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by Nick Swartsell 12.21.2015 47 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
greg hartmann

Morning News and Stuff

Hartmann to step down early 2016; Sittenfeld slams Strickland on gun control; prez debates on a Saturday?

Good morning all. Let’s talk about news.

The announcement last week that a number of cycling advocacy groups and bike trail initiatives are going all-in on a 42-mile loop around the city was exciting for the city’s cyclists, to be sure. But how feasible is that plan, and what’s the time frame for it? As the Business Courier reports, that’s still somewhat up in the air. Boosters of the project say it will take money from the city, state and federal governments, as well as private giving, to fund the multi-million dollar loop. The proposal would link four independent proposals — the Wasson Way, Ohio River West, Mill Creek Greenway and Oasis trail — in a bid to maximize impact and extend bike trails into 32 Cincinnati neighborhoods. Boosters of the plan say 18 miles of the loop, including stretches along the Mill Creek, are already complete. Another 10 miles could be done by 2020, they say, stressing the proposal is a long-term effort.

• Here’s some big news that could change the dynamic of next year’s Hamilton County Commissioners race. The current head of that commission, Greg Hartmann, is expected to resign early in 2016, and Republicans intend to name Colerain Township Trustee Dennis Deters as his temporary replacement. Hartmann’s term ends next year, and he recently announced he would not seek reelection. That seemed to leave the door wide open for Democrat Denise Driehaus, who recently filed to run for the seat. But now the race will be a more heated contest as Driehaus runs against Deters, who will have the advantages of nearly a year in office by election time. The Republican’s brother is Joe Deters, current Hamilton County prosecutor, which will further boost his prospects come November. Driehaus also has strong name recognition, however, thanks to her stints in the State House and her brother, Steve Driehaus, who represented the Cincinnati area in Congress. It’s not uncommon for outgoing commissioners to bow out early, and as long as they do so 40 days before the election, state law dictates that their party gets to choose a temporary successor. Partisan control of the three-member county commission hangs in the balance. Currently, Republicans control the county’s governing body 2-1.

• Tomorrow, residents of Grant County in Kentucky will go to the polls to decide whether or not to formally end its status as a dry county where alcohol sales are prohibited. Supporters of the change say it’s about economic development and allowing establishments like hotels to offer services visitors want. Opponents, however, worry about increases in drunk drivers, alcoholism and whether the measure will change the general character of the community there. Grant County is a generally pretty conservative place — it’s home to the upcoming Ark Encounter Noah’s Ark theme park, for example. Currently, because of the laws in the county, only five establishments there serve alcohol. They’re all restaurants that seat more than 100 people and get 70 percent or more of their revenue from food. Supporters of the ballot initiative would like to extend alcohol sales to the county’s five cities while allowing the rest of the area to stay dry — making Grant a so-called “moist” county. Currently, 31 counties in Kentucky are dry, and another 53 are “moist.” 36, including Boone, Kenton and Campbell Counties making up Northern Kentucky, allow full alcohol sales.

• The upcoming 2016 Senate race is getting tough in Ohio, with Democrat candidate and former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland getting slammed for his past opposition to gun control legislation. Primary challenger and current Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld’s campaign is hitting Strickland on ads the elder Democrat made while he was running for governor in 2010 touting his record on gun rights. That ad had Strickland holding a hunting rifle and slamming Kasich for voting for gun control legislation that Strickland opposed. In subsequent years, however, Strickland changed his tune and now says he supports gun control, especially in the wake of mass shootings like the 2012 Sandy Hook massacre. But Sittenfeld, a staunch supporter of gun control efforts, says that his primary opponent’s record against gun control is long and clear.

As we’ve told you before, the 2016 race looks to be a pivotal one for both Democrats and Republicans. Democrats are scratching to regain control of that chamber after they lost it last year. Meanwhile, Republicans are looking to shore up their gains in what will likely be a challenging presidential election year when more Democratic voters turn out. Whoever wins between Sittenfeld and Strickland will go on to face incumbent Republican Sen. Rob Portman, who has raised millions for his reelection bid but remains vulnerable, according to some polls.

• Finally, I guess we should talk about Saturday night’s Democratic presidential primary debate, eh? First, a bit of commentary: It seems supremely unwise to hold said debate on a Saturday night right before the holidays, as people are scrambling to get to various pubs and restaurants to catch up with out-of-town friends and relatives home for the holidays. It’d be super-interesting to read more about why the Democratic National Committee made that decision, but I digress.

The debate seems to have merely solidified the three candidates’ statuses, as there were neither major flubs nor breakthrough moments for any of them. Former secretary of state Hillary Clinton came across as the moderate and competent expert politician. U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders continued to sound the notes of the populist rabble-rouser with a skeptical outlook on financial institutions and foreign wars. And former Maryland governor Martin O’Malley once again made a few good points and then promptly disappeared back into the woodwork. In that way, the debate sort of functioned the way these things are supposed to on paper: It gave interested voters a chance to see what the candidates say they’re all about, how they handle themselves under pressure, and which one most aligns with any particular person’s views on the issues. What it didn’t do was drum up much excitement or hype for the party’s candidates, something that seems to be the main point of these things in our rabid, vapid 24-hour-news-cycle world these days. That, coupled with recent Democratic Party infighting about campaign data, could well hobble Dems come election time. Though, admittedly, that’s still a fairly long way away.

 
 
by Mike Breen 12.18.2015 50 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, CEAs, Music News, Local Music, Music Video at 02:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cea16 logo

Cincinnati Entertainment Award Nominees Announced (Updated)

Voting opens Monday for CityBeat’s 19th annual program honoring Greater Cincinnati musicians

On Jan. 31, 2016, the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards winners will be announced at the 19th-annual ceremony/show/party at Covington’s Madison Theater. Today we are happy to announce the nominees for the CEAs, which are presented by CityBeat and honor Greater Cincinnati’s rich and eclectic music scene. 

Again this year, the public was invited to submit nominee suggestions via an online ballot; a list of the top vote-getters in each category was given to members of the CEA nominating committee for consideration. The committee, which features local music writers, club owners, radio DJs and others, helped decide the final slate of nominees in the genre categories, as well as categories for Best Live Act, Singer/Songwriter and Best Music Vide  (which are open to all genres). Public vote decides the winner of a majority of the categories; the nominating committee determines the winner of the Critical Achievement categories (Album of the Year, New Artist of the Year and Artist of the Year). 


This year’s nominees include several artists who have previously been nominated (or won) CEAs, as well as numerous first-time nominees. Walk the Moon have scored two Artist of the Year CEAs in past years and return to the category after exploding internationally with its ubiquitous, Platinum-selling hit “Shut Up and Dance” and Talking is Hard album (both released towards the end of 2014). Singer/songwriter Jess Lamb, who kicked off 2015 by appearing as a contestant on American Idol (and is a previous CEA performer and nominee), earned five nominations, including her first Artist of the Year nod. Artist of the Year nominee Wonky Tonk (the Indie/Country guise of Jasmine Poole) also earned nominations in the Singer/Songwriter, Best Music Video and Country categories, following a 2015 that saw her Stuff We Leave Behind album earn widespread national acclaim. Perennial Hip Hop nominee Buggs tha Rocka, who has been working with indie Hip Hop legend Talib Kweli’s Javotti Media label and played the 2015 A3C Hip Hop fest in Atlanta and Cincinnati’s own Ubahn fest, earned his first Artist of the Year nomination. 


First-time CEA nominees this year include Country artist Taylor Shannon, Jazz player/composer Brad Myers, Metal newcomers Casino Warrior and jazzy Soul/Pop ensemble Krystal Peterson & the Queen City Band.


The New Artist of the Year category (as well as other promising new performers) will again be spotlighted at CityBeat’s Best New Bands showcase at Bogart’s on Jan. 16. This year’s New Artist of the Year nominees are Dawg Yawp, Coconut Milk, The Skulx, Go Go Buffalo, JSPH and Mutlimagic. New Artist nominees from the 18th-annual awards program returning to the CEA ballot this year in a big way include Leggy, Honeyspiders and Noah Smith. 


Public voting opens at noon on Monday, Dec. 21 here.


Bluegrass

Mamadrones

Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers 

The Missy Werner Band 

Rumpke Mountain Boys 

Comet Bluegrass All-Stars 

My Brother’s Keeper 


Country

Jeremy Pinnell 

Bulletville 

Dallas Moore

Wonky Tonk  

Noah Smith 

Taylor Shannon


Folk/Americana

Arlo Mckinley & The Lonesome Sound 

Willow Tree Carolers  

Buffalo Wabs and the Price Hill Hustle 

Young Heirlooms 

Honey & Houston 

Wilder


World Music/Reggae

Elementree Livity Project 

Baoku 

The Cliftones 

Queen City Silver Stars 

Mayan Ruins 

Know Prisoners 


Rock

Mad Anthony 

Wussy 

Alone at 3AM 

Lovecrush 88 

Honeyspiders

Zebras in Public 


Hard Rock/Metal

Electric Citizen 

Ethicist 

Moonbow

Lift The Medium 

Casino Warrior

LiViD 


Singer/Songwriter

Wonky Tonk (Jasmine Poole)

Jess Lamb 

Kate Wakefield  

Royal Holland (Matt Mooney) 

Dallas Moore 

Daniel Van Vechten 


Indie/Alternative

Motherfolk 

Us, Today 

Daniel in Stereo 

Jess Lamb 

The Yugos 

DAAP Girls 


Punk/Post Punk

Leggy 

The Slippery Lips 

Tweens 

Tiger Sex 

The Z.G.s 

Vacation 


Blues

Noah Wotherspoon Band 

Silver Pockets Trio 

Kelly Richey 

Sonny Moorman 

Johnny Fink and The Intrusion 

The Whiskey Shambles 


R&B/Funk/Soul

The Almighty Get Down 

Krystal Peterson and the Queen City Band 

The Perfect Children 

The Cincy Brass 

Freekbass & the Bump Assembly 

JSPH  


Jazz

Brad Myers 

Dan Karlsberg and the ’Nati Six 

The Faux Frenchmen 

Cincinnati Contemporary Jazz Orchestra 

Blue Wisp Big Band 

The Hot Magnolias 


Hip Hop

Napoleon Maddox 

Ilyas Nashid 

Sleep 

Buggs Tha Rocka 

Abiyah 

Mix Fox 


Electronic

Moonbeau 

Ethosine 

Black Signal  

Skeleton Hands 

Playfully Yours 

Umin 


Best Live Act

Tiger Sex 

The Whiskey Shambles 

The Yugos 

The Slippery Lips 

Buffalo Wabs and the Price Hill Hustle  

The Cliftones 

Honeyspiders 

Noah Smith  


Best Music Video

Molly Sullivan - "Before”

 


Jess Lamb - "Memories" 


Automagik – “Pop Kiss” 


Playfully Yours – “Colorvision”  


Puck – “Ruined”


Electric Citizen – “Light Years Beyond”


Wonky Tonk – “Denmark” 

"Denmark" by Wonky Tonk from Mopics on Vimeo.

Zebras in Public – “John Doe”


Critical Achievement Awards

Album Of The Year

Honeyspiders – Honeyspiders 

Us, Today - T E N E N E M I E S 

Dawg Yawp - Two Hearted 

Honey & Houston – Barcelona 

Jess Lamb - Circles 

Noah Wotherspoon Band – Mystic Mud 

Dan Karlsberg - The ’Nati 6

The Sundresses – This Machine Kills


New Artist Of the Year

Dawg Yawp

Coconut Milk

The Skulx

Go Go Buffalo

JSPH 

Mutlimagic


Artist Of The Year

Leggy 

Walk the Moon 

Jess Lamb

Noah Smith 

Wonky Tonk

Buggs tha Rocka 


UPDATE: The CEA ballot is now live. Start voting here.
 
 
by Natalie Krebs 12.18.2015 50 days ago
at 11:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pride_seelbach_jf

Morning News and Stuff

CCV to fight conversion therapy ban; Kroger executive joins fight against child poverty; GOP targets growing Hispanic vote

Hello Cincy! Here are your morning headlines.

• Controversial Sharonville conservative organization Citizens for Community Values is figuring out ways around council member Chris Seelbach's recently passed ordinance that bans conversion therapy in Cincinnati. The group has teamed up with the Washington D.C. area-based group Equality and Justice for all to figure out ways for local parents and clergy members to still provide the counseling. Its leaders announced at a press conference yesterday that they will continue to help those "struggling with same-sex attractions." On Dec. 9, Cincinnati became the first U.S. city to ban conversion therapy when City Council approved the ordinance 7-2. The states of California, Oregon, Illinois and the nation's capital, Washington D.C., have also previously banned the controversial practice. Council member Charlie Winburn, who voted against the ordinance, recently wrote an editorial in the Enquirer arguing the ban would do more harm than good.

CCV is famous locally for helping pass notoriously anti-gay legislation in 1993 called Article XII, which prohibited the city from passing laws protecting LGBT people from discrimination. Article XII was repealed in 2004. CityBeat had its own dustup with a CCV-organized coalition in 2008, which you can read about here.

• Kroger executive Lynn Marmer is joining the city's fight on child poverty. The vice president of corporate affairs at the largest grocery store chain in America has been appointed the executive director of the Child Poverty Collaborative that has the ambitious goal of reducing child poverty by at least 25 percent. Cincinnati's child poverty rate is very high — Census estimates from last year put that figure at 44.3 percent. The group's goals include bringing 10,000 Cincinnati children out of poverty and helping 5,000 adults find employment within the next three to five years. Marmer has a long history of involvement in community affairs. She has served on the board for Cincinnati Public schools and most recently helped the city secure funding for HUD's Empowerment Zone program. Marmer is set to retire from Kroger's on Feb. 1.

• Ohio Governor John Kasich, who's still hanging on to that shred of hope for the GOP presidential nomination, is working on a proposal to redo Social Security. Kasich's plan would cut back benefits for high-income seniors, but also lower the starting level for benefits. Kasich sat down the Des Moines Register to outline his plan in the hopes that maybe, just maybe, he could snag their endorsement. Kasich also once again dodged the newspaper's question of his feelings on gay marriage. The governor claimed it's a non-issue since the Supreme Court's June ruling that legalized the practice across the country. 

• There's lots of talk about how the rising Hispanic population in the U.S., which leans Democrat, are going to re-shape Republican stronghold states like Texas, which is predicted to be majority Hispanic by 2042. Following the whirlwind of voter ID regulations put in place at the beginning of this decade by the right, The New York Times has published the second part of an ongoing series looking at some of the ways some GOP lawmakers are working to suppress the Hispanic vote as the U.S.'s white Republican-leaning population starts to dwindle.

• Finally, this adorable photo from last March of a Northside kid named Quincy who got so excited he cried when he had a chance to meet his heroes, the local garbage men, is circulating back around the Internet once again. Viral content generator website Buzzfeed placed the photo at the top of its list titled "28 pictures that prove 2015 wasn't such a terrible year." I mean, I didn't realize that 2015 had been such a terrible year, but, sure, if you say so Buzzfeed. But honestly with recent attacks around the world and in the U.S., it has been sort of a rocky end to the year, and I'm glad this Cincinnati photo has resurfaced just in time for the holiday season.

Email any ideas, story tips or amazing Christmas cookie recipes to nkrebs@citybeat.com.
 
 
by Rick Pender 12.18.2015 50 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 10:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the cast of every christmas story ever told @ cincy shakes performs its take on the year the grinch stole christmas - photo rich sofranko

Stage Door: Last Chances — and Some Big Laughs

This weekend is your final chance to see several December productions, including Low Down Dirty Blues (Cincinnati Playhouse), All Childish Things (Know Theatre) and Rent (Incline Theater). A few shows stick around after Dec. 25 — A Christmas Carol (Playhouse) continues through Dec. 30 and Ensemble Theatre’s staging of its jaunty rendition of Cinderella remains onstage until Jan. 3. I would find it odd to watch Ebenezer Scrooge getting scared into a “Merry Christmas” a few days after the holiday, but ETC’s contemporary rendition of a beloved fairytale might be just the thing to entertain bored kids after they’ve tried out all the new toys. Tickets for the latter: 513-421-3555.

I checked out opening night of the tenth anniversary presentation of Every Christmas Story Ever Told (and then some) at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, and it’s as silly and funny as ever — especially with some clever pokes at people and events from 2015. The annual gags about fruitcakes take on a whole new dimension this time around by having some fun with Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis and her intransigence about issuing marriage licenses to gay couples. Every Christmas Story trots out just about every “BHC” (Beloved Holiday Classic) you might recall and puts it through a humorous filter. It’s fun from start to finish, but there is a moment — after recreating A Charlie Brown Christmas, complete with a woebegone tree — when Justin McCombs steps into a pool of light as Linus with his security blanket and recites the New Testament passage from the Gospel of Luke about an angel speaking to the shepherds. It’s a somber and wholly lovely scene, so far removed from very tongue-in-cheek, sometimes off-color humor typical of the show that it sticks with audience members. The antic McCombs also plays a true believer who refuses to be be convinced that Santa’s existence is impossible: His enthusiasm for all the miraculous things the Jolly Old Elf can accomplish is so childlike that you’ll wish you could return to that innocent age yourself. Even if you’ve seen Every Christmas Story before, it’s a blast to go back. In fact, I’d say it’s become a BHC in its own right. Onstage through Dec. 27. Tickets (if they’re still available): 513-381-2273.

There’s also some great holiday laughs to be had compliments of OTRImprov, presenting its annual show The Naughty List in the Courtyard at Arnold’s Bar & Grill in Downtown Cincinnati. The 90-minute show — unscripted and building off suggestions from the audience — happens Sunday-Tuesday, Dec. 20-22 and Dec. 27-29. It’s a laugh-a-minute way to have fun right before or after Christmas. To make an evening of it, show up at Arnolds (201 East 8th St.) between 6 and 6:30 p.m., get seated and place your dinner order. The performance will begin at 7:30 p.m. The rotating cast includes OTRImprov’s quick-witted regulars Mike Hall, Kirk Keevert, Sean Mette, Dave Powell, Charlie Roetting, Dylan Shelton and Kat Smith. Tickets (order before 4:30 on the day of the show): 513-300-5669.


Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.17.2015 51 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_cincinnatibeerweek

Morning News and Stuff

Busy day as council approves OTR liquor districts, other measures; Cincy developments win big Ohio tax credits; the crowded race for Boehner's seat

Hey all! Time for your news run down. A lot of stuff happened in Cincinnati City Council yesterday, so we’ll focus on that.

First, let’s go to one of the bigger topics around town lately, a proposal Council passed yesterday that will split Over-the-Rhine’s current entertainment district into two separate districts and extend them north. Council’s go-ahead for that plan means the neighborhood will get twice as many liquor licenses as it had before. There were concerns about the plan, including some from community members worried that it would cause the neighborhood to become too rowdy or stoke the neighborhood's ongoing gentrification. Entrepreneurs on the other hand cheered the decision, saying it will allow new businesses to open and new jobs to be created, especially in the northern part of the neighborhood. Anyway, I made you a rough map of those districts so you can know if a new craft beer cocktail/artisanal tatertot place is headed your way. Blue is the original district and red and orange are the new districts. You're welcome.


• Council also wrangled, again, over the application of Community Development Block Grants from the federal government. Those grants diminish every year, and this year about $700,000 less is available for programs funded by those grants. Councilwoman Yvette Simpson objected to plans to cut funds to youth employment programs paid for with those grants, but eventually moved forward with the cuts on the condition that the city would try to plug the holes with money from its $19 million surplus.

• At the same meeting, Council approved a less-controversial measure designed to save nine historic mosaics that once occupied the now-demolished concourse at Union Terminal. Those mosaics, made in 1933 by Winold Reiss, are once again in a space that will soon no longer exist — a soon-to-be torn down terminal at CVG. The city and the airport board will split the cost of moving the murals, which will be relocated to the Duke Energy Convention Center.

• Finally, Council also approved adjustments to its downtown and OTR tax abatement plans, allowing developers in those neighborhoods to keep their tax abatements on the improvements to their property up to twice as long. The catch: those property owners have to double their contributions to a fund that will provide money for the coming streetcar.

• Outside of Council chambers, a couple local development projects got a big up yesterday when Ohio announced the recipients of the next round of state historic tax credits. Among the 18 (yep, 18) projects awarded the credits in the Cincinnati area: more than $700,000 in credits for a $7.4 million renovation project that will bring a 20-room boutique hotel to a historic building in OTR being developed by 3CDC, and $2 million in credits for a $20 million project called Paramount Square in Walnut Hill seeking to redevelop six historic buildings at the intersections of Gilbert Avenue and McMillan Street. Among those buildings is the iconic Paramount Building. That project is being undertaken by Model Group and the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation and will create 44 market-rate apartments as well as commercial space.

• Finally, if you thought the GOP presidential primary race was crowded, check this out. Seventeen GOP candidates are lined up for former U.S. Rep. John Boehner’s congressional seat, along with a Democrat, a Libertarian and a Green Party candidate. The special election for Boehner’s seat, which he abruptly vacated last month after his tenure as House Speaker got pretty brutal, represents a unique opportunity for otherwise little-known candidates to take a step up in the political world. But candidates will have to vie for that opportunity on an accelerated basis: The Republican primary for that election is March 15.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 12.16.2015 52 days ago
Posted In: News at 03:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
blogpost3

Cincinnati women hold mixed-faith prayer vigil in response to Islamaphobia

Fountain Square vigil drew more than 200

At least 200 people gathered downtown on Fountain Square during their lunch hour today to take part in a multi-faith, women-led prayer service for peace in response to recent outbursts of Islamaphobia.

The event, co-sponsored by the American Jewish Committee, the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati and Christ Church Cathedral, is a response by faith community in Cincinnati to the recent uptick in anti-Muslim sentiments across the country in the wake of the recent deadly attacks in San Bernardino, California and Paris. 

The event featured an all-female lineup of 13 faith leaders representing Baptist, Buddhist, Catholic, Espiscopalian, Hindu, Jewish, Morman, Sikh and Unitarian communities.

"For us to stand together on basically our town square, makes an incredible statement," says Shakila Ahmad, president of the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati in Westchester. "And I hope it makes a statement to cities across the country where mothers and sisters and daughters need to stand up for their children because this is impacting our kids in unbelievably horrible ways." 

Ahmad said she teamed up with Michelle Young of the American Jewish Community and several other faith leaders at another prayer service and decided they needed to do something about the recent rise in intolerance against the Muslim-American Community.  

Ahmad said once the prayer service was decided, they had Fountain Square booked within 15 minutes. 

For Young, the current backlash against Muslim-Americans was reminiscent of the way the Jewish community was treated at the beginning of Nazis rule of Germany.

Natalie Krebs

 

"I thought, this is how it must of felt in the beginning as a Jew in Germany in Berlin. Hate talk is not even responded to with love. We're just quiet, wondering if it's true," she says. 

The message of love and tolerance of diversity was reiterated by most speakers to a crowd of many races and religions. Some woman wore hijabs while other carried signs with Bible passages on them.  

"What I like about you is that I see the United States right here. Because I see a diverse crowd gathered together in peace and in harmony and love. This is the country I know. This is the country I was born into," said Reverend Sharon Dittmar of the First Unitarian Church in Cincinnati at the prayer service. 

Some also spoke of messages of unity among women and communities of faith. 

"For alone we may be only a small flame, but uniting together may we create a great light diminishing the blackness of despair, of bigotry and hatred bringing forth reconciliation, hope and understanding," said Rabbi Margaret Meyer, president of the Metropolitan Area Religious Coalition of Cincinnati to the crowd.

Natalie Krebs

 

Ahmad of the Islamic Center of Greater Cincinnati says they focused on woman for the prayer service because women typically are loving and look out for each other and their children, but also to slash through another common stereotype held against the Islamic community. 

"In my own faith of Islam, women, contrary to what people think, have incredible respect and power," she says.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.16.2015 52 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
bike and dine

Morning News and Stuff

Bike groups to unveil 42-mile loop proposal today; DOJ considering federal investigation into Tamir Rice shooting; no breakout for Kasich in GOP debate

Hello all! Let’s talk about news today. There’s a lot of it, so I’ll refrain from my normal verbosity (you probably got enough long-windedness from the GOP presidential debate last night anyway) and just give you the facts.

• As a bike commuter, I’m intrigued. As a reporter who follows the trials and travails of building bike infrastructure in this city, I’m skeptical. But intrigued. A coalition of bike groups is unveiling Cincinnati Connects today, a plan that would link up various proposed or in-progress bike trails to create a 42-mile loop around the city. The groups involved include boosters of major bike trail proposals like Wasson Way and the Millcreek Greenway, along with Queen City Bike and others. Those trails, along with connectors, would need to be completed for the plan to come to fruition. But boosters say they have a much better chance at things like federal TIGER grants — which Wasson Way was recently passed over for — with this larger project. The group says 242,000 of the city’s 300,000 people would live within a mile of a bike trail should the project take off. But will it help me avoid getting flattened by that one guy who drives his SUV, like, 60 miles an hour down Highland Avenue as I bike to work in the mornings? Here’s hoping.

• Hamilton County has yet to set a trial date for Ray Tensing, the former University of Cincinnati police officer who shot and killed unarmed black motorist Sam DuBose in Mount Auburn over the summer. At a pretrial hearing yesterday, prosecutors said they’re still in the evidence-gathering phase of their investigation, a statement that frustrated
DuBose’s mother, Audrey DuBose. The court did set another pretrial hearing for Feb. 11 next year. In the meantime, a settlement to a wrongful death civil suit brought by DuBose’s estate against UC could be near. That settlement could be worth millions. Tensing pulled over DuBose because he didn’t have a front license plate on his car. Though Tensing claimed DuBose tried to drive off and dragged the officer, footage from Tensing’s body camera appears to show that story is false.

• It’s baaaack. Thanks to a change of heart by a Cincinnati City Council member, the much-discussed Over-the-Rhine parking plan has new life after a mayoral veto sunk it earlier this year. At that time, Council had five votes in favor of the plan, which would block off 450 parking spots for residential permit holders. Those permits would cost $108 a year or $18 for low-income residents. Another 151 spots would be set aside for service workers in the neighborhood. Cranley didn’t like the idea, however, saying that people all over the city pay for the streets and thus have a right to park on them. Now, however, Councilman Charlie Winburn has been persuaded to switch sides and vote for the measure, giving Council a veto-proof majority. Winburn says he asked OTR community members about their biggest problems and that parking came up over and over again in those discussions.

• Speaking of Mr. Winburn, it looks like his road to running as the Republican candidate for the county commission seat vacated by outgoing chair Greg Hartmann just got easier. Winburn’s fellow council member, Christopher Smitherman, an independent, announced yesterday that he won’t seek the Republican nomination in that race. Smitherman cites more work he'd like to do on City Council as his reason for foregoing the race. That leaves Winburn the most likely choice to face Democrat Denise Driehaus, who formally filed paperwork for her candidacy earlier this week. Winburn has yet to do the same, but has expressed serious interest in the race.

• The U.S. Department of Justice will review a request by the family of Tamir Rice to remove grand jury deliberations from the jurisdiction of Cuyahoga County Prosecutor Timothy McGinty and conduct a federal investigation into the police shooting of Rice. That request came in the form of a letter to the DOJ in which attorneys for the family outlined what they say is misconduct by McGinty, including remarks made by McGinty to the press that the family had economic interests at heart in pursuing the case, the alleged disparaging of a defense expert witness and an alleged incident where a prosecutor stuck a toy gun in a defense expert witness’ face while he was testifying. Rice, 12, was playing with a toy gun on a playground when he was shot by Cleveland police officer Timothy Loehmann. Dispatchers did not relay information to Loehmann from a 911 caller who stipulated that Rice was a child and that the gun he was holding was probably fake.

• The organizations that sponsor Ohio charter schools will get a new rating system after data rigging at the Ohio Department of Education earlier this year left low-performing online charters out of a statewide charter school performance evaluation. That scandal resulted in the dismissal of ODE’s School Choice Director David Hansen, who admitted to leaving the school data out of evaluations on charter school sponsors. Now, ODE is expecting to put in place a more rigorous 12-point scale that is weighted depending on school size. So if a charter sponsor has a small school that is failing but larger ones that are doing well, it won’t be penalized as much as it would be otherwise. Some have questioned this scale, however, saying students and parents at failing schools suffer no matter the school’s size. The new rating system is expected to be implemented early next year.

• So, the question on everyone’s mind. Did Ohio Gov. John Kasich break through in last night’s presidential debates? Not really. We did see a kinder, softer Kasich, however, as opposed to the sharp-elbowed interrupter who graced the stage at the last debate. Instead, he called out other candidates for fighting in what was perhaps the most contentious GOP debate yet. The tussling often centered around foreign policy and national security, and while Kasich wasn’t as abrasive as his last performance, he seemed to have a hard time getting a word in edgewise against frontrunners like Donald Trump and the recently emergent Sen. Ted Cruz. His campaign says Kasich has a busy schedule of appearances in early primary states that will bolster his profile among voters, but it’s clear time is running out to make the big splash Kasich will need to boost his flagging poll numbers and rise above the crowded GOP field.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 12.15.2015 53 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:37 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mikedewine

Morning News and Stuff

Report says streetcar might run at a deficit; federal judge issues restraining order against Mike DeWine's Planned Parenthood lawsuit; Pete Rose won't be reinstated by MLB

Good morning! Here are your morning headlines. 

• The streetcars are arriving one by one in Cincinnati, slowly parading around the city to get ready for their debut in the second half of 2016, but a new report released by the project's financial advisor says the cars might also be dragging in some money problems behind them. The report by Davenport and Co. says the city could be more than $1 million short during its first year. The company ran four different scenarios weighing all of the streetcars funding sources — fares, advertising, reduced tax incentives for developers, parking meters and a back-up of nearly $1 million from the Carol Ann and Ralph V. Haile Jr./U.S. Bank Foundation — and estimated deficits ranging from $830,000 to $1.4 million by 2017. They estimated a deficit between $495,000 and $2.4 million in 2021. Vice Mayor David Mann, a streetcar supporter, wasn't phased by the report, saying the city could handle the deficits the streetcar brings. 

• The city has released a plan to help end some of the city's food deserts. Right now certain parts of Avondale, Bond Hill, Evanston, Northside and Fairmount are among the neighborhoods that struggle the most to offer access to fresh foods. The city is launching the Grocery Attraction Pilot Program to try to fill in some of those grocery store holes in the city by offering incentives such as tax abatements and waiving the city's annual food permit fee for up to give year for new and future grocers operating in those areas. The Clifton Market in Clifton, the proposed Apple Street Market in Northside and grocery stores in Avondale would qualify for the program. Council's Neighborhoods Committee passed it on Monday, and it could go in front of Council for a full vote on Wednesday. In order to quality, the stores would have to hit certain benchmarks designated by the feds: at least 6,000 square feet, operate in an area where at least one-third of residents live more than a mile from a grocery store and where the census track shows a poverty rate of at least 20 percent or a family median income that is 80 percent or less of Cincinnati's average. 

• Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine won't get his hands on Planned Parenthood for at least 28 days now, at least according to U.S. District Court Judge Edmund Sargus, who issued a temporary restraining order for the health clinic Monday. DeWine has asserted that Planned Parenthood clinics in Cincinnati and Columbus have improperly disposed of fetal parts and says the requirement that fetuses are disposed in a "humane" way might be "vague." DeWine hoped to sue to stop the clinics from disposing of fetal parts, but Planned Parenthood filed a lawsuit against his office and the Ohio Department of Health on Sunday. Planned Parenthood's Cincinnati-based attorney, Al Gerhardstein, said that the organization has been properly disposing of fetal parts for more than 40 years and that DeWine is now changing the rules on them. 

• Along the same lines, several other Ohio Republican lawmakers have argued that aborted fetuses should be cremated and buried instead of disposed in a landfill. In a proposal that was started a month before DeWine's allegations, Sen. Joe Uecker (R-Miami Township), Reps. Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) and Kyle Koehler (R-Springfield) want to change the way the clinics dispose of fetal tissue and are proposing that a woman who has an abortion can choose on a form whether or not she prefers cremation or burial. The disposal method would be an alternative to the use of medical waste companies, which heat and sanitize the remains before dumping them in a landfill. The proposal comes after Indiana and Arkansas passed similar laws earlier this year.  

• It was a sad day for hometown hero Pete Rose yesterday. Major League Commissioner Rob Manfred informed the former Cincinnati Reds player verbally and in writing that he would not lift the permanent ban Major League Baseball placed on him 25 years ago. Rose has been banned since 1989 for betting on games while he was the Reds' manager.  

• It's been nearly a year since President Barack Obama made the big announcement that the U.S. and Cuba would begin repairing their broken relationship. The Dec. 17, 2014 announcement led to the opening of the doors of an American embassy in Havana and inspired new dreams of beach vacations for Americans, who were previously banned from going there for tourism. So how much has the country really changed in the last year? Well, U.S. businesses have only secured a few deals and Cuba remains a one-party state, but while business has been slow to take off, U.S. tourism has increased 40 percent. But the change has also led more Cubans to flee the country than in previous years. Since the big announcement last December, more than 43,000 Cuban migrants to the U.S, up from less than 25,000 in 2014.

Email any story tips to nkrebs@citybeat.com!
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.14.2015 54 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:33 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cincinnati-paul-brown-stadium

Morning News and Stuff

Planned Parenthood, Ohio AG fight over fetal tissue disposal; could city cut community development corp funding?; Bengals ask for study on possible stadium upgrades

Good morning all. Hope your weekend was grand and not too spoiled by the disastrous Bengals loss/Andy Dalton injury Sunday, or, if you’re a UC basketball fan, their loss yet again to XU in the Crosstown Shootout. Luckily, I’m only vaguely aware of sports so I was just dandy. Anyway, news time.

Planned Parenthood of Ohio is firing back against Attorney General Mike DeWine’s allegations that the women’s health organization has been using a company that disposes of fetal remains in landfills. DeWine announced that Ohio will pursue civil penalties against
Planned Parenthood over the allegations, which the AG says were discovered during an investigation into alleged sale of fetal remains for research. Donation of remains for research purposes is legal in other states, but illegal in Ohio, and the AG’s investigation found no evidence clinics in the state are engaged in the practice. However, DeWine announced that investigation did find three Planned Parenthood clinics, including one in Cincinnati, had contracted with a medical waste company that disposed of abortion remains in landfills, which he says violates a state law requiring such remains to be disposed of in a humane way. Planned Parenthood has called the allegations false and says the announcement is politically motivated. They’ve filed a federal lawsuit against the state for making the claims.

• A group of about 50 gun law reform advocates gathered in Northside Sunday to protest gun violence. National group Moms Demand Action organized the rally, which was one of many around the country aimed at highlighting the damage gun violence does to communities as well as pressuring politicians to pass tighter restrictions on the availability of firearms. One of the laws the group is protesting is House Bill 48, which would allow concealed carry permit holders to bring their guns into daycare centers, college campuses, churches and some government buildings. That bill passed the Ohio House and is now being considered by the state Senate.

• City of Cincinnati administration has proposed a 36-percent cut in funds to neighborhood community development corporations, and the heads of those organizations are crying foul. In an editorial that ran yesterday in the Cincinnati Enquirer, CDC Association of Greater Cincinnati head Patricia Garry said the proposed cuts would “cripple” CDCs. The non-profit groups work to create economic development and shore up housing and commercial space in the city’s neighborhoods. They include the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Corporation, the Avondale Comprehensive Development Corporation and a number of others, many of which signed the editorial by Gerry.

The groups rely on federal money from Community Development Block Grants and HOME programs that the city administers. Other programs receiving those funds from the city face much smaller cuts, Garry writes. Council’s Budget and Finance Committee will vote today on whether to slash funding to the CDCs. If it passes there, full council could vote on the cuts later this week. It's not the first time the city administration and Mayor John Cranley have sought to cut funds to CDCs, a move critics say is contradictory to his campaign promises to serve the city's neighborhoods first and foremost.

• Oh, yeah, back to the Bengals for a minute. The team is asking the county to commission a study from independent experts comparing Paul Brown Stadium to other NFL stadiums across the country and recommend possible upgrades. The county will most likely end up footing the bill for a good portion of any recommended improvements, much the way it paid $7.5 million of the $10 million it cost to put in a new scoreboard last year and $3 million for stadium-wide WiFi. Bengals officials say the upgrades could be necessary to keep the stadium competitive with other NFL facilities. The request for a study on upgrades is stipulated in the Bengals’ contract with the county, a deal that has been very controversial. Outside observers have called it one of the worst deals for taxpayers in sports stadium history. The $450 million stadium, approved by voters in 1996, has left the county struggling with debt and forced to shift funds from other revenue sources to cover the overall stadium deal.

• West Chester-based AK Steel has announced big layoffs at a Kentucky production facility, where as many as 620 workers will be out of work for an indefinite period of time. The move won’t affect all of the 900 employees at the company’s Ashland, Kentucky plant, but the news is still a big blow for the community, where AK is a major employer. The company says market conditions and low steel prices will force reductions in production, causing the layoffs. AK’s administrative offices are in West Chester Township, and the company also runs a large production facility in Middletown. That location has been hiring as recently as this summer.

• Finally, did Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s recent attacks on Donald Trump help Ohio’s big queso in his quest for the GOP prez nomination? Probably not. As the mainstream of the Republican Party begins to repudiate Trump over his statements about halting all Muslims from entering the U.S., among other inflammatory remarks, Kasich wants some credit. He’s been saying these things for weeks, by gosh, and people should recognize that he was early among GOP presidential primary contenders to call out the Donald. But it’s not really playing out that way, which leaves Kasich looking like he’s just crying out for attention.

“People are now beginning to wake up and say that this dividing is not acceptable, but I’ve been saying it for weeks, before anybody else even thought to pay attention to it,” Kasich said to reporters in South Carolina last week. “I’m glad I started it.”

Hm. Sometimes, though, being an early adopter doesn’t necessarily make you more popular. Kasich’s poll numbers haven’t really budged since his tangles with Trump, and more recent criticisms of the real estate magnate seem to skip over any mention of Kasich altogether. The Ohio guv’s attacks on Trump come as he works frantically to woo GOP voters, who so far have relegated him to single-digit returns at the polls.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.11.2015 57 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

BOE report: 84 percent of polling locations experienced problems on election day; city officials look to end food deserts; prosecutors push back on calls for grand jury reform

Good morning all. It’s Friday. I’m ready for the weekend. You’re ready for the weekend. Let’s keep this news rundown brief today, k? Here's what I've seen floating around in the news and what I have written in my own reporter's notebook.

• The Hamilton County Board of Elections has released its report on last month’s rather rocky election day. The results, as you might expect, weren’t great. The report found that a crazy 84 percent of polling locations experienced difficulties that day. Those problems ranged from trouble with new electronic voting systems to poll worker errors and poll locations that closed earlier than the extended time ordered by a judge. The report is headed today to Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted, who, let us remember, originally pinned voting difficulties solely on poll workers here in Hamilton County. Getting our polling situation worked out is a big deal, as Hamilton County was piloting a new voting system that will be extended to the rest of the state next year and because the county looks to be a pivotal battleground in perhaps the most important swing-state in the country for the next year’s presidential election. The BOE report recommends opening polls earlier and fixing bugs in voting software ahead of next year's elections.

• City of Cincinnati officials Wednesday unveiled a new plan to fight the city’s food deserts. The Grocery Attraction Pilot Program will provide financial incentives for the establishment of new grocery stores in neglected parts of the city and provide support for existing grocery stores in areas at risk of becoming food deserts. The federal government defines a food desert as an area where at least 20 percent of residents are below the federal poverty line and live more than a mile from a grocery store. Cincinnati has several such areas, including Avondale and tucked-away places like Millvale. Those incentives and support include tax abatements for stores that come into under-served communities and a waiver on the cost of food supply permits for five years. The city will front the cost of the permit inspection and provide faster, more flexible scheduling of those inspections for grocery stores in such areas. A proposed cooperative grocery in Northside, Apple Street Market, could be one of the stores eligible for that assistance. You can find out more about that project in our cover story about food co-ops and more about the city’s food access problem here.

• City Manager Harry Black confirmed yesterday that the city did not list the job posting seeking a replacement for ousted former Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, nor did the city interview outside of CPD for the job. Black defended that decision yesterday at a press conference announcing the hiring of interim chief Eliot Isaac as Blackwell’s permanent replacement, saying that Eliot, a 25-year veteran of CPD, is the best candidate for the job. Though many called for a national search for a replacement, Cincinnati City Council members said they supported Isaac in his new role. Council Wednesday voted to boost the pay range for the chief position from $136,000 to $163,000, though the original proposal by city administration would have put the top-level salary at $180,000. Some members of Council balked at that raise. Supporters on Council and in the city administration said that the pay bump was needed to secure Isaac as the new chief. Opponents of the raise said the city should focus on providing better wages to the city’s hourly workers. Isaac faces one more hurdle before he’s good to go as chief — he’ll need to relocate into the city limits from his home in Forest Park. He’s indicated he’s willing to do so.

• The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority today held its State of Metro presentation and issued its report on the future of its bus service. Big changes for the coming year include a new transit center in Oakley, smaller buses running more routes in the city’s under-served areas and smartphone-enabled ticket buying options. The announcement that Metro will run smaller buses comes after a near-strike by the Amalgamated Transit Union, which initially balked at the suggestion because Metro wanted to use drivers who do not have commercial driver’s licenses and pay them less money than current Metro drivers. ATU and Metro reached an agreement the day before a strike vote earlier this month, and now Metro will use its regular drivers to drive the smaller buses. Officials with the bus service announced at the presentation that Metro has balanced its budget for 2016 without raising fares or reducing service.

• Finally, some county prosecutors in Ohio are resisting widespread calls to reform the state’s grand jury process, including Butler County Prosecutor Michael Gmoser. The push for reform comes after several high-profile police shootings of unarmed black men across the state, including the death of Tamir Rice in Cleveland, John Crawford III in Beavercreek and Samuel Dubose in Cincinnati. Earlier this year, Ohio Gov. John Kasich convened a task force on community-police relations made up of state lawmakers, community leaders and law enforcement professionals to study the issue. Reforms increasing transparency in the often-secretive grand jury process was among the recommendations that task force suggested. Gmoser told a state committee charged with deciding upon reforms to the grand jury process that the current process works well, and that changes will only compromise the sensitive nature of grand jury proceedings, which are secretive in order to keep from leaking information and biasing a potential trial jury. 

 
 

 

 

 
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