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by 07.29.2010
 
 

Love Canal Activist in Town

The Pleasant Ridge Community Council wil get words of advice and inspiration tonight from environmental activist Lois Gibbs, who was instrumental in the fight to clean up Love Canal in New York during the 1970s.

Gibbs will speak to the group at 7 p.m. at the Pleasant Ridge Presbyterian Church.

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by 10.08.2008
Posted In: Social Justice at 03:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

JustNews

The Cincinnati Interfaith Workers Center (www.cworkers.org) is putting out a newsletter with all kinds of peace and justice events in the Queen City. To sign up, send an e-mail to calendar@cworkers.org.

In the meantime, here’s a sample of what’s coming up this week:

Saturday, Oct.11:

Amnesty International - Group 86

Location: Sitwell’s Coffee House 324 Ludlow Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45220

Please confirm that this meeting is happening as scheduled by contacting Laura Osborn Coffey at 513-734-6043 or lozcoffey@cs.com

9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.: Quarterly Peace Brunch

Topic: Environmental Sustainability and Justice

Presenters: Dan Korman, Park and Vine; Jim Embry, Sustainable Communities Network Facilitator: Susan Dirr, from Miami University and Peaslee Center Children’s Garden Location: Peaslee Neighborhood Center, 215 E. 14th St., Cincinnati, Contact: saad.ghosn@uc.edu

10 a.m. Workers & Immigrant Rights Meeting

Open discussion among workers and their families about solutions to problems in their workplaces and communities.

Location: The Cincinnati Interfaith Workers Center, 40 E McMicken St.

513-621-5991 or e-mail: cworkers@cinci.rr.com

Sunday, Oct. 12:

3-5 p.m.: Students Together Against Racism Town Hall Think Tank

Organize to undo racism and to build consciousness in our communities!

Location: Essex Place 7610 Reading Road

Contact Akosua Favors & Ben Sea via e-mail at star@nku.edu or revol-radio@hotmail.com

Monday, Oct. 13:

12 p.m.: City Council debate & vote on Environmental Justice Ordinance

Council members David Crowley, Roxanne Qualls, John Cranley, Cecil Thomas and Laketa Cole have cosponsored an ordinance for "smart and clean development." Speakers are invited to address the Health, Education and Environment Committee.

Location: Council Chambers at City Hall

Contact: David Crowley 513-352-2453

4:30-5:30 p.m.: Women in Black Vigils

Join us on the grassy island at the corner of Vine Street and Central Parkway for a vigil held every Monday protesting the Iraq war. Wear black or dark clothes. All are welcome!

Contact: For more information, call 513-579-8547

6:30-8:30 p.m.: Talk, Act, Listen, "Konnect"

A weekly program that aims to bring women of diverse backgrounds together to talk about the challenges and issues that are common to women everywhere regardless of race, socio-economic status and age.

Location: The Women's Connection's Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave.

Contact: Alisa Franks at 513-471-4673 ext 17 or e-mail her at afranks@thewomensconnection.org

Tuesday, Oct. 14:

6:30 a.m.: Vigil Outside Lucasville Prison for Richard Cooey

Carpool will leave from Peaslee to travel to the state prison in Lucasville for the execution of Richard Wade Cooey.

Prayer vigil will begin at 9 a.m. and last until the execution is over.  We will return to Peaslee around 1:30pm.

8:30 a.m.: Rally to Make CINTAS Safe This October

More than one and a half years since a Cintas Worker was killed on the job, the Cincinnati-based company still hasn't done enough to make its laundries safe. Join hundreds of injured Cintas workers, union members and community allies at the company's annual shareholders meeting.

Location: 6800 Cintas Blvd., Mason OH.

Contact: UNITEHERE: uniformjustice@unitehere.org or 800-872-8646

7 p.m.: Cincinnati Chapter of Ohioans to Stop Execution

Cincinnati Chapter of Ohioans to Stop Execution Meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month.

Location: Peaslee Neighborhood Center, 215 E. 14th St.

Contact: 513-579-8547

— Margo Pierce

 
 
by 06.26.2009
Posted In: Social Justice, Protests at 12:56 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Iranian Solidarity Rally Planned

A group of local people with connections to Iran will hold a rally Saturday at Fountain Square to show support for the dissidents protesting the recent Iranian presidential election.

The rally is scheduled from 4-5:30 p.m.

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by 04.09.2009
 
 

NAACP Speaks/Sings To City Council [Photos]

The NAACP turned out to the City Council meeting Wednesday to start the conversation about a disproportionate amount of city contracts awarded to non-minority contractors. Many of the speakers said that of the $1 billion worth of contracts awarded by the city, less than 1 percent were given to minorities.

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by Danny Cross 03.12.2012
 
 
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Occupy Settlement Grants 24-Hour Public Space, Keeps Rules

Encampments, tents still banned during 1-year 'Open Period'

The city of Cincinnati and Occupy protesters have reached a legal settlement that will erase criminal charges against protesters and designate part of Piatt Park a 24-hour public space for one year. The open space will still be subject to park rules, which include the “prohibition or restriction on noise, encampments, open flames, tents, and common law nuisance principles.”

The Enquirer reported today that the settlement was expected to be filed in court this morning. The settlement will end protesters’ federal lawsuit against the city, which was based on the First Amendment right to peaceably assemble. The far eastern section of the park, which is where Occupy Cincinnati set up its encampment starting in October and where many of the arrests occurred, will reportedly be designated a 12-hour public space for one year beginning 10 p.m. March 19.

Should the city refuse to extend the Open Period, Occupy protesters are allowed to institute a new lawsuit challenging the park rules.

The city has agreed to install new signage at the park noting its modified closing time and will install signage or placards at least 14 days prior to the open time’s scheduled expiration at 11:59 p.m. March 18, 2013.

The city retains the right to terminate the Open Period should park rules not be followed. According to the lawsuit:

Consistent and persistent violations of Park Board Rules and/or generally applicable laws which constitute a public nuisance under Chapter 3767 of the Ohio Revised Code, including without limitation any conduct in violation of prohibitions or restrictions on noise, encampments, open flames, or tents, shall constitute a breach of this Agreement. As a remedy for such breach, the City may terminate the Open Period prior to the expiration date set forth in Section 3 above by obtaining an order from a court of competent jurisdiction enjoining any such nuisance and finding that termination of the Open Period is necessary to abate any such nuisance.

City Hall will appoint an individual to function as the liaison of the Park Board and schedule a public meeting within 60 days and another within 180 days to accept public input.

 
 
by Stephen Carter-Novotni 06.24.2009
Posted In: Social Justice, Media at 02:19 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Appalling News of the Day

The UK furniture store Habitat capitalized on the Iranian political crisis on their Web site using Twitter keywords to lure potential customers who, instead of shopping, were looking for news on more mundane matters — human rights violations, political unrest, that sort of junk.

Has it really come to this?

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by 04.07.2009
Posted In: Social Justice, LGBT Issues, NAACP at 05:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Odd Musings About 'the Odd Couple'

Maybe Christopher Smitherman, the Cincinnati NAACP’s president, is cagier than most people think.

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by Danny Cross 05.16.2012
 
 
james craig

Morning News and Stuff

The ongoing saga involving Cincinnati Police Chief James Craig and his nonexistent policing powers will continue into July, as a hearing scheduled for Thursday has been continued. Craig's attorneys will argue in front of the Ohio Peace Officer Training Commission that his prior experience, and certification in three other states, should exempt him from a state rule requiring all officers pass a certification exam before earning police powers. Craig believes he was hired to do things other than study for an entry-level policing test, and some states would already have certified him.

A statewide ban on texting while driving moved through the Ohio House of Representatives yesterday and is expected to be signed into law by Gov. John Kasich. The law makes the writing, sending or reading of a text message while driving a secondary offense, meaning officers may not pull over an adult driver for the act. Teens, however, under House Bill 99 will be prohibited from using any electronic device other than GPS and may be pulled over for it.

Kasich on Tuesday followed through with the GOP plan to overturn its own controversial election law that was to go before voters in November. State Republicans and election officials now say there's no reason for the law to go in front of voters thanks to the 300,000 signatures gathered by President Obama's re-election campaign and other opponents, but opponents of the election law point out that the repeal still reaffirms an election law change that would end early voting the weekend before an election. Democrats plan to keep the issue on the ballot.

But people on both sides of the issue say there's no precedent for a legislative repeal of a bill that also is the subject of a referendum, so it's unclear how a court might rule if a legal challenge is filed.

Jennifer Brunner, a former Democratic secretary of state and a leader in the Fair Elections Ohio campaign that brought the referendum, said Tuesday that the action taken by Gov. John Kasich and Legislature doesn't force the removal of the question from November ballots.

"Since this issue is a case of first impression for any court, we do not see the statement of the Secretary of State to be determinative on this issue," Brunner said in an email. "The issue remains on the ballot."

More drama from Columbus: Republicans are moving forward with a test program requiring some welfare recipients to submit to drug testing in order to continue receiving benefits. Opponents say the process stigmatizes the poor, while the GOP says it's just a simple process involving poor people paying the upfront costs for drug tests, being reimbursed if they pass and living on the streets for six months if they fail.

Northern Kentucky leaders plan to use the revitalization of Over-the-Rhine as a model for reinvesting in their urban core. A nonprofit organization has raised $10 million during the past five years to get started spurring commercial and residential investment.

Two Kentucky high school students who were turned away from their senior prom for arriving as a same-sex couple have argued that if their Catholic high school wants to ban students based on upholding the church's teachings, such a ban should include couples who have had premarital sex and kids who plan to get wasted after the prom.

Apparently viewers of Harry's Law, which was set in Cincinnati and used a stage-version of Arnold's as the lawyer gang's regular hangout, are too old to attract advertising dollars despite their relatively high numbers.

The show ranked very low among viewers ages 18 to 49, the demographic most advertisers care about. In fact, its young-adult numbers were beneath those for "Prime Suspect," a cop show that NBC canceled earlier this season, and roughly on par with those of "Off Their Rockers," the Betty White show about senior citizens pulling pranks on younger people.

"It was a difficult decision," an NBC executive said Sunday, quoted by the site Deadline.com. "Everyone here respects 'Harry's Law' a lot but we were finding it hard to grow the audience for it. Its audience skewed very old and it is hard to monetize that."

President Obama raised $44 million during April for his and other Democratic campaigns.

John Boehner says that when the federal government raises the debt limit again America can expect another prolonged fight about cuts.

George W. Bush has found “freedom” wherever he ended up after having little to offer the GOP after his tumultuous two terms as president. From ABC News:

We don't see much of Bush these days. He's the president that a lot of people would like to forget, still so toxic that he's widely considered more likely to hurt than help the Republican Party by participating in the 2012 campaign.

Bush's speech Tuesday morning was a rare exception. He spoke in a small, nondescript room to about 200 people about democracy activists, promoting a human rights campaign that's part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

His presence on the national stage is perhaps best seen in his presence on the small stage at 1777 F Street. At the end of the affair, Bush and his wife were called back up to be presented with writings by Czech human rights icon Vaclav Havel. They posed for pictures as the audience clapped, and when they were done, Bush glanced around as if unsure what to do next.

He walked back to his seat, but then quickly walked back onto the stage and behind the lectern. He leaned forward into the microphone, paused, and said slyly, "Thanks for coming."

Bush waited a second or two. Then he said, "See ya later."

He waved, and then he left.

Is U.S. energy independence a pipe dream? This article says no.

Apple might soon give you a larger iPhone screen.

A private rocket launch this week could be the start of commercial space travel.

Here are some important tips about sunscreen as summer approaches and the circle in the sky threatens to burn off our skin.

 
 
by 03.17.2009
Posted In: News, Social Justice, Public Policy, Community at 08:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 

Murder Sucks

Murder sucks. Rape sucks. In fact, all violent crime sucks. Eradicating it sure would make the world a nicer place to live. I don’t know anyone who would argue with any of that. But after all that agreement, unity breaks down. Emotional outrage and grief take hold and rational thought evaporates. What then?

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by Kevin Osborne 04.12.2012
 
 
joe

Another State Ends the Death Penalty

Connecticut is 17th to abolish capital punishment

Connecticut will soon join the list of states that have ended the use of capital punishment.

 

In an 86-63 vote, legislators in Connecticut’s House of Representatives passed the bill Wednesday night. The state Senate approved the measure April 5, in a 20-16 vote.

 

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy, a Democrat, has indicated he will sign the bill when it reaches his desk, probably sometime this week. A similar bill was vetoed by then-Gov. Jodi Rell, a Republican, in 2009.

 

Connecticut’s law is prospective in nature, and won’t affect the sentences of the 11 people currently on the state’s death row.

 

In the last five years, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York and Illinois have repealed the death penalty, according to CNN. California voters will decide the issue in November.

 

Other states that have abolished capital punishment are Alaska, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia and Wisconsin.

 

Meanwhile, a man who spent 21 years on Ohio’s death row until he was exonerated in 2010 will speak tonight at a forum in Clifton.

 

Joe D’Ambrosio will discuss his experience and why he believes the death penalty should be scrapped at 6:30 p.m. at the St. Monica-St. George Parish Newman Center, located at 328 W. McMillan St. D’Ambrosio will be joined by the Rev. Neil Kookoothe, a Roman Catholic priest who worked to get him released.

 

D’Ambrosio was wrongfully convicted of the 1988 murder of Anthony Klann in Cleveland. Cuyahoga County prosecutors withheld 10 pieces of evidence that would have exonerated D’Ambrosio at his trial and implicated another suspect in the crime, a judge ruled in March 2010.

 

D’Ambrosio is the 140th Death Row exoneration in the United States since 1973 and the sixth in Ohio.

 

This week’s Porkopolis column looks at a report from Amnesty International about the use of capital punishment throughout the world, and how the United States is one of the only industrialized nations that still condones the practice.

 

 
 

 

 

 
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