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by German Lopez 08.21.2013
Posted In: News, City Council, 2013 Election at 10:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pg sittenfeld

Sittenfeld to Appear on Ballot

Councilman collects more than 1,500 signatures

Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld has resolved his petition problems and will appear on the ballot for reelection this November.

“The (Hamilton County Board of Elections) confirmed last night we have more than enough signatures to be placed on the ballot,” Sittenfeld wrote in an email.

Sally Krisel, deputy director of the Board of Elections, says the board has so far verified more than 900 signatures out of the 1,500 Sittenfeld turned in. Council candidates need 500 to get on the ballot.

Sittenfeld was one of two candidates who faced petition problems last week. In his case, petitions were found to have crossed-out dates with corrections written on the back, which election officials said might disqualify hundreds of signatures. In response, Sittenfeld renewed his petition drive.

In a Facebook post this morning, Sittenfeld thanked a 93-year-old family friend, a former teacher, City Council candidates and other volunteers for helping with the effort.

Mike Moroski, who was told his original batch of petitions fell 46 signatures short, wrote on Twitter that he turned in more than 1,100 signatures this morning. In a statement, Moroski thanked his team and participants for helping him collect the signatures, which the Board of Elections will now need to verify.

The deadline for turning in City Council petitions is Aug. 22. Once the Board of Elections finishes verifying the numbers, it will release the full slate of candidates.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.11.2013
Posted In: News, 2013 Election, Mayor at 03:29 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Charter Committee Endorses Mayoral Election Reform

Group cites low voter turnout, calls current system “absurd”

Following the Sept. 10 mayoral primary’s historically low voter turnout, the Charter Committee, Cincinnati’s unofficial third political party, is supporting efforts to reform how the city elects its mayors.

“It is absurd that taxpayers paid $400,000 for a primary yesterday that few people voted in, and that decided very little,” said Mike Goldman, convener of the Charter Committee, in a statement.

Voter turnout for the Sept. 10 mayoral primary was a dismal 5.68 percent. In comparison, turnout was at 15 percent for the primary held on Sept. 11, 2001 — the day of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon — and 21 percent for the 2005 primary.

The primary’s results also went exactly as most election watchers expected: Ex-Councilman John Cranley and Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls overwhelmingly won, allowing them to move on to a direct face-off in the general election.

Prior to the Charter Committees announcement, WVXU reported on a proposal from City Council candidate David Mann, who was endorsed by the Charter Committee and Democratic Party, that would place all eligible mayoral candidates on the ballot in the general election and give the job to whoever gets more than 50 percent of the vote. If no one received majority support, a runoff would ensue between the top two finishers two weeks later.

But the Charter Committee is unsure if Mann’s proposal would work. Charter Committee spokesperson Sean Comer says it would have to study the issue and make a final proposal after hearing opinions from a much larger group of experts. Until then, the Charter Committee isn’t giving specifics.

Under the current system, voters select from all eligible mayoral candidates during a September primary. The two winners then move on to the November ballot for a one-on-one election.

Comer says the Charter Committee is working on broad reforms for Cincinnati’s charter, and the mayoral primary system will be part of the final suggestions.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.09.2013
Posted In: News, Privacy, 2013 Election, Energy at 09:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mikedewine

Morning News and Stuff

Facial recognition program insecure, mayoral primary tomorrow, startup innovates cooking

Attorney General Mike DeWine’s office is taking steps to secure Ohio’s facial recognition program against hackers after potential problems were found. The program allows law enforcement and other public officials to use a simple photo to search driver’s license and mugshot databases to get contact information. In the past, officials needed a name or address to search such databases. But the program apparently wasn’t following proper security protocols and lacked typical requirements for passwords, including a mix of upper- and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters, according to The Cincinnati Enquirer. Previously, Gov. John Kasich compared the program’s potential for abuse to breaches of privacy made through federal surveillance programs such as the National Security Agency and Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act.

Tomorrow is the day of the mayoral primary, in which voters will decide between Democrat Roxanne Qualls, Democrat John Cranley, Libertarian Jim Berns and Independent Sandra “Queen” Noble. The two winners will move on to a head-to-head face-off on Nov. 5. Currently, Qualls and Cranley are widely seen as the frontrunners. It’s difficult to predict how many people will turn out to vote, but only 21 percent of Cincinnati voters participated in the mayoral primary in 2005.

A Cincinnati entrepreneur is aiming to innovate solar energy through his GoSun solar cooker, which will use solar collectors traditionally seen on solar panels to cook food. Patrick Sherwin launched a Kickstarter campaign for the project on Sept. 5. He says his original interest in solar energy came from a desire to move away from harmful fossil fuels that are warming the planet, and this project gives him a chance to inspire a small cultural shift.

Councilman Chris Seelbach will today introduce new legislation that will help crack down on cellphone theft by making it more difficult to sell stolen devices. The initiative will require the hundreds of dealers who currently buy cellphones second-hand to get licensed with the city and keep full records of the transaction, including a serial number of the device, a photocopy of the seller’s ID and other contact information. Seelbach has likened the requirements to existing regulations for pawn shops. The hope is that cracking down on dealers will make stolen cellphones more difficult to sell and less lucrative to potential thieves.

Four finalists remain in the search for Cincinnati’s new police chief: acting Chief Paul Humphries; Jeffrey Blackwell, deputy chief of the Columbus, Ohio, Police Department; Michael Dvorak, deputy chief of the Mesa, Ariz., Police Department; and Jerry Speziale, deputy superintendent of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police.

Butler County turns away more veterans seeking aid than any county in Ohio. In 2012, veterans asked for help 432 times; they were turned away nearly 40 percent of the time.

Although tax receipts are up, they’re coming in below estimate for the first two months of the new fiscal year. The lower-than-expected revenue could cause deficits in the state budget.

Ohio gas prices are rising toward the national average.

Human babies are apparently hardwired to pay attention to lemurs.

If you’re job searching, remember that a job interview can almost always go much worse:

 
 
by German Lopez 06.28.2013
Posted In: News, Abortion, Budget, 2013 Election at 09:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ohio statehouse

Morning News and Stuff

State tax plan favors wealthy, state budget limits abortion, mayoral primary incoming

The Republican-controlled Ohio General Assembly yesterday passed its state budget for the next two years, and Gov. John Kasich is expected to sign the bill this weekend. Part of the budget is a tax plan that would cut income taxes but raise sales and property taxes in a way that Policy Matters Ohio, a left-leaning public policy think tank, says would ultimately favor the state’s wealthiest. On average, individuals in the top 1 percent would see their taxes fall by $6,083, or 0.7 percent, under the plan, while those in the bottom 20 percent would pay about $12, or 0.1 percent, more in taxes, according to Policy Matters’ analysis.

The state budget also includes several anti-abortion measures: less funding for Planned Parenthood, more funding for anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers, regulations that could be used by the state health director to shut down abortion clinics and a requirement for doctors to do an external ultrasound on a woman seeking an abortion and inform her whether a heartbeat is detected. Republicans claim they’re protecting the sanctity of human life, while abortion rights advocates are labeling the measures an attack on women’s rights.

Cincinnati will have a mayoral primary on Sept. 10. Five candidates vying for the highest elected position in the city: Democrats Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley, Libertarian Jim Berns, self-identified Republican Stacy Smith and Sandra Queen Noble. Qualls and Cranley are widely seen as the favorites, with each candidate splitting on issues like the parking lease and streetcar. Qualls supports the policies, while Cranley opposes both. A recent poll from the Cranley campaign found the race deadlocked, with Cranley and Qualls both getting 40 percent of the vote and the rest of polled voters claiming they’re undecided.

Former U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords will appear at the Northside Fourth of July parade. Giffords will be in Cincinnati as part of a nationwide tour on gun violence.

Elmwood Place’s speed cameras are being confiscated by the Hamilton County Sheriff Department. Judge Robert Ruehlman originally told operating company Optotraffic to turn the cameras off, but when the company didn’t listen, the judge ruled the cameras should be confiscated.

The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments released its new bike map for southwest Ohio.

President Barack Obama signaled on Thursday that the federal government will extend marriage benefits to gay and lesbian couples in all states, even those states that don’t allow same-sex marriage. That may mean a gay couple in Ohio could get married in New York and Massachusetts and still have their marriage counted at the federal level, but state limitations would still remain. The administration’s plans follow a U.S. Supreme Court ruling on Wednesday that struck down a federal ban on same-sex marriage.

The U.S. Senate on Thursday approved a bill to overhaul the nation’s immigration laws. Ohio’s two senators were split on the bill: Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown voted for it, while Republican Sen. Rob Portman voted against it. A Congressional Budget Office report previously found the bill would reduce the nation’s deficit and boost the economy over the next decade.

Scientists cloned a mouse with a mere blood sample.

CityBeat won a bunch of awards at Wednesday’s Society of Professional Journalists Cincinnati chapter awards banquet and hall of fame induction ceremony. Read about them here.

 
 
by German Lopez 02.15.2013
 
 
kasich_2

Morning News and Stuff

GOP questions Medicaid expansion, Qualls' streetcar concerns, council backs efficiency

State legislators, particularly Republicans, have a lot of questions regarding Gov. John Kasich’s Medicaid expansion. Legislators are worried the state won’t be able to opt out of the expansion if the federal government reneges its funding promise, raising potential financial hurdles. As part of Obamacare, the federal government pays for 100 percent of the Medicaid expansion for the first three years, and the share phases down to 90 percent after that. Kasich’s budget includes a trigger — called a “circuit breaker” — in case the federal government ever funds less than currently promised. A study from the Health Policy Institute of Ohio found the Medicaid expansion could insure nearly 500,000 people and generate $1.4 billion by raising revenue and shifting funding burdens from the state to federal government.

Vice Mayor Roxanne Qualls, a longtime supporter of the streetcar, is getting concerned about some of the problems surrounding the project. In a memo to the city manager, Qualls suggested putting the streetcar project through “intensive value engineering” to bring the project’s budget and timetable back in line — preferably in time for the 2015 Major League Baseball All-Star Game. The memo was in response to streetcar construction bids coming in $26 million to $43 million over budget — a setback that could cause further delays or more funding problems.

With Councilman Chris Seelbach’s strong support, City Council passed a resolution urging the state government to maintain its energy efficiency standards. State Sen. Bill Seitz, a Cincinnati Republican who chairs the Public Utilities Committee, sent out a memo Feb. 1 that pledged to review the state’s standards, causing much concern among environmental groups.

Tolls for the Brent Spence Bridge could be as low as $2, according to financial consultants involved with the project. The tolls will help pay for the massive rehabilitation project, which gained national attention when President Barack Obama visited Cincinnati to support rebuilding the bridge.

State Democrats and Republicans have some questions about the governor’s Ohio Turnpike plan. Some Democrats are concerned the state government won’t actually freeze toll hikes at the rate of inflation for EZPass users. Others are worried about language in the bill. The plan leverages the Ohio Turnpike to fund a statewide construction program.

The man accused of dumping fracking waste into the Mahoning River in Youngstown was arrested and charged with violating the Clean Water Act.

Dayton wants to help illegal immigrants who are victims of crime. The Dayton City Commission approved a $30,000 contract with a law firm to help potential victims. CityBeat previously covered the recent struggles of children of illegal immigrants in Ohio.

A Dayton Daily News report found Ohio overpays unemployment compensation claims by millions of dollars.

The University of Cincinnati is launching a technology incubator for mobile apps.

In his State of the County address yesterday, Commission President Chris Monzel said Hamilton County is “on the move and getting stronger.”

Attorney General Mike DeWine and officials from other states announced a $29 million settlement with Toyota over the unintended acceleration debacle. Ohio will get $1.7 million from the settlement.

A meteor flew over Russian skies and exploded with the strength of an atomic bomb Friday, causing a sonic blast that shattered windows and injured nearly 1,000 people.

Scientists engineered mice that can’t feel the cold. Certain people on CityBeat’s staff would probably do anything for this superpower, but scientists are probably going to use it to make better pain medication.

 
 
by German Lopez 10.11.2013
Posted In: News, 2013 Election, Pensions, Drugs at 09:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
tea party pensions

Morning News and Stuff

Pension language mostly upheld, Cranley rejects COAST, Ky. group criticizes housing facility

The Ohio Supreme Court upheld most of the controversial ballot language for Issue 4 — the tea party-backed city charter amendment that would semi-privatize Cincinnati’s pension system — but the court also concluded that the Hamilton County Board of Elections must add language about how much the city can contribute to the new retirement accounts. The amendment would require future city employees to contribute to and manage individual 401k-style retirement accounts, instead of placing them under the current pension system in which the city pools pension funds and manages the investments through an independent board. Voters will make the final decision on the amendment on Nov. 5, although some already voted early on ballots that included the full controversial language. CityBeat analyzed the amendment — and how it could reduce benefits for city employees and raise costs for the city — in further detail here.

Mayoral candidate John Cranley says he would reject and doesn’t want an endorsement from the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST), a conservative group formed in 1999 with a history of anti-LGBT causes. The response came just two days after COAST on Oct. 8 tweeted that it supported — but not endorsed — Cranley and council candidates Amy Murray, Chris Smitherman and Charlie Winburn for a “change of direction.” In response, Councilman Chris Seelbach, Cincinnati’s first openly gay council member, called on all candidates to reject COAST’s support because the conservative group’s most public members previously opposed LGBT rights and backed efforts to make it illegal for the city to deem gays and lesbians a protected class in anti-discrimination statutes.

A historic preservation society in Ludlow, Ky., is attempting to block a transitional housing facility that provides low-cost housing for recovering addicts as they get their lives back in order. Even though the facility’s two buildings aren’t designated as “historic,” the Ludlow Historic Society wrote in an email that it’s “concerned because we are striving to maintain and improve our housing stock in Ludlow, and especially make the city a desirable place for young people to own their homes and raise their families.” There’s not much information on the ripple effect transitional housing has on communities, but a 2010 study found residents of transitional housing were achieving significant improvement or total abstinence.

Ohio officials are considering rules that would allow oil and gas drillers to store fracking wastewater in lagoons the size of football fields then recycle the wastewater for further use. Fracking is a drilling technique in which millions of gallons of water, chemicals and sand are pumped underground to unlock oil and gas reserves, but the technique produces potentially toxic wastewater that has to be deposited or recycled somewhere. CityBeat covered fracking and the environmental controversy surrounding it in further detail here.

A state senator proposed a bill that attempts to keep the monthly per-member growth of Medicaid costs at 3 percent or lower, down from the current projections of 4.6 percent. But the bill doesn’t specify how it would reach the savings required and instead calls on the legislature and state administration to find a solution. The bill also doesn’t take up the federally funded Medicaid expansion, which the Health Policy Institute of Ohio previously found would generate $1.8 billion for the state and insure nearly half a million Ohioans in the next decade.

A national reporting project will track the accessibility of Plan B, or the “morning-after pill,” now that emergency contraception is a court-upheld right for all women of childbearing age.

The death of Ariel Castro, the Cleveland man convicted of holding three women captive and raping them for a decade, may have been caused by autoerotic asphyxiation, not suicide.

Angelina Jolie’s announcement that she got a double mastectomy may have inspired more Cincinnati women to seek a cancer screening.

Scientists discovered an exoplanet whose mass is 26 percent water. In comparison, Earth is only 0.023 percent water, by mass, according to Popular Science.

Early voting for the 2013 City Council and mayoral elections is now underway. Find your voting location here. Normal voting hours will be 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., although some days will be extended.

 
 
by Danny Cross 11.27.2013
 
 
streetcar

Morning News & Stuff

The Cincinnati Enquirer abruptly changed its tone about the streetcar project yesterday, writing in an editorial that the city should continue the project and leaving the newspaper on the opposite side of Mayor-elect John Cranley on the two main issues of the campaign it endorsed just weeks ago.

Fourteen months after publishing an editorial against the streetcar project, the three-member Enquirer editorial board yesterday spelled out why it now supports completing the project, suggesting that a main part of its opposition — and to Roxanne Qualls as mayor — was the current administration’s inability to “argue effectively for the project” that Cranley and other conservatives used to take office during an election that saw extremely low voter turnout.

CityBeat’s German Lopez noted on Twitter the irony of The Enquirer now supporting both the streetcar and parking plan while the candidate it endorsed attempts to unravel both — Cranley already stopped the parking plan. The comment drew a response from Enquirer Editor Carolyn Washburn, who is on the newspaper’s editorial board along with Publisher Margaret Buchanan and Editorial Page Editor David Holthaus.

The editorial includes the following paragraph: “In endorsing Cranley, we said he would ‘have to rein in his dictatorial tendencies and discipline himself to be diplomatic, respectful and collaborative.’ What we’ve seen so far is a matter for concern. Hurling insults at professionals like streetcar project manager John Deatrick isn’t what we need. Deatrick enjoys a good reputation as someone who has managed The Banks project and the rebuild of Fort Washington Way. He needs to stay on the streetcar project.”

The editorial was published the same day City Council put completing the project into law and Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld announced his decision to support the project’s completion, which Lopez pointed out leaves Council short of the six votes required for an emergency clause that would immediately halt the project without leaving it open to referendum. Without the emergency clause, streetcar supporters could gather the required signatures to put a 5-4 cancellation vote to referendum, which would force the city to continue working on the project until voters decide on it in November.

Mayor-elect Cranley will hold a vote to stop the project on Monday. With Sittenfeld set to vote against halting the project, Cranley will need either newly elected David Mann or Kevin Flynn to vote in favor of stopping it. Both are on the record as being against the project but have left room to consider the financial realities before making their final decisions. 

Cranley announced this morning that he will name the new city manager at 2 p.m. today. Cranley removed former city manager Milton Dohoney last week.

A story by The Enquirer’s Mark Curnutte yesterday detailed life expectancy disparities among Cincinnati’s poor neighborhoods, finding a 20 year difference at times between citizens of predominantly black or urban Appalachian neighborhoods and people of wealthy white neighborhoods like Mount Lookout, Columbia Tusculum and Hyde Park. The Cincinnati Health Department will release more statistics Tuesday and a community discussion on the issue is set for Jan. 10. 

Pope Francis yesterday criticized the world’s growing wealth disparity, mentioning things like “idolatry of money” and “a new tyranny” in a 50,000-word statement that sharply criticized trickle-down economics.

The Pope via The Washington Post:

"Some people continue to defend trickle-down theories which assume that economic growth, encouraged by a free market, will inevitably succeed in bringing about greater justice and inclusiveness in the world. This opinion, which has never been confirmed by the facts, expresses a crude and naive trust in the goodness of those wielding economic power and in the sacra­lized workings of the prevailing economic system. … Meanwhile, the excluded are still waiting."

OTR restaurant Kaze will begin offering lunch hours starting on Black Friday.

Away from home and tired of “Friends-giving” gatherings? Here’s a bunch of restaurants serving good stuff on Thanksgiving day. 

Skip Black Friday craziness and use CityBeat’s Gift Guide to shop local this holiday season. There are also plenty of local retailers you can hit up online if you don't wait until the last minute!

If you’re traveling to some stuck-up East Coast city for Thanksgiving, charge the iPad or whatever because there are going to be some storms.

And high winds might cause the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to take all the air out of the Snoopy balloons so no one flies up into the air like in movies.

The NSA reportedly considered revealing the “porn-browsing history” of certain people considered to have ties to terrorist activity in order to discredit them.   

Great, now America’s durable goods orders are down. Thanks a lot, government shutdown!

At least the country’s jobless claims are back to pre-recession levels. Thanks, Obama?

The University of Cincinnati Bearcats beat UMass Lowell in basketball last night and senior forward Justin Jackson jammed one in the hoop hard.

 
 
by German Lopez 08.01.2013
Posted In: News, 2013 Election, Human services, Death Penalty at 09:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
poor priorities

Morning News and Stuff

Human services funding falls short, state to kill murderer, longshot mayoral candidates rage

Although this year’s cuts are being undone, City Hall has been cutting resources to the homeless, long-term unemployed, crime victims and casualties of domestic abuse since 2004. Aid to those groups is part of human services funding, which is supposed to receive 1.5 percent of the operating budget but currently gets a quarter of that at 0.4 percent. To explain the decade of cuts, the city administration typically points to citizen surveys and meetings conducted as part of the priority-driven budgeting process. But a CityBeat analysis of the demographics of the process found they were skewed in favor of the wealthiest Cincinnatians and against low-income people, who benefit the most from human services. For the agencies that receive funding, the history of cuts is even more worrying as Cincinnati prepares for more budget gaps in the next few years.

The state of Ohio will execute Billy Slagle on Aug. 7, even though the prosecutor’s office behind the charges asked the Ohio Parole Board to grant him clemency. The parole board denied the request, and Gov. John Kasich last week declined to commute the sentence to life in prison. Slagle was convicted in 1988 of murdering a 40-year-old woman in a gruesome stabbing. His family says he was in an alcohol- and drug-fueled haze at the time and has a history of problems at home, including domestic abuse, that presents extenuating circumstances.

Two longshot mayoral candidates are really upset about Cincinnati’s primary system: Independent Sandra “Queen” Noble sent an F-bomb-laden email to debate organizers, and Libertarian Jim Berns quit the race. Under the current primary system, multiple mayoral candidates are allowed to run. But come Sept. 10, voters will select the top two contenders in a primary. Those frontrunners will then face off in a final election on Nov. 5 to pick who will take over City Hall on Dec. 1. Noble and Berns claim the current system favors the two frontrunners — Democrats Roxanne Qualls and John Cranley — by helping them get the most exposure through televised debates after the primary election.

Commentaries:
• “GOP Continues Playing Politics with Ohioans’ Health
Is Ohio’s New License Plate the Worst or Just Bad?

Cranley has raised more money than Qualls in the mayoral race, according to campaign finance reports filed yesterday. Cranley has raised about $472,000, compared to $348,000 for Qualls. Cranley also has about $264,000 in the bank, while the Qualls campaign has about $192,000 in hand.

Undocumented immigrants who were brought into the country as children will be eligible for in-state tuition at Ohio public colleges, following a decision from the Ohio Board of Regents. The change will save the students thousands of dollars at the state’s public schools, which were charging exorbitant out-of-state and international rates before. The undocumented immigrants qualify for legal benefits because of an executive order signed by President Barack Obama earlier in the year that prevents the federal government from prosecuting them. The order falls short of actual legalization on the books, but it grants many benefits under state and federal law.

In quite possibly the worst news ever, Rob Lowe and Rashida Jones announced they’re leaving “Parks and Recreation” after the 13th episode of the upcoming season.

German scientists have proposed a new strategy for combating climate change: turn coastal deserts into forests.

By science, ostriches can now fly:

 
 
by German Lopez 11.04.2013
Posted In: News, 2013 Election, LGBT, Streetcar at 10:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
election_streetcaressay_juliehill

Morning News and Stuff

Last chance to vote early today, gay marriage case proceeds, streetcar workshops this month

With Election Day tomorrow, today is the last chance to vote early. Find your voting location here. Normal voting hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., although some days are extended. If you don’t vote early, you can still vote on Election Day (Nov. 5). Check out CityBeat’s coverage and endorsements for the 2013 election here.

Judge Timothy Black ruled to continue with a lawsuit that will decide whether same-sex marriages conducted in other states should be acknowledged on Ohio’s death certificates. The lawsuit originally appeared to matter only to a Cincinnati gay couple, but it’s been expanded to potentially reflect on the rights of all gay couples in the state. Black is expected to give his final ruling on the lawsuit in December. If Black rules in favor of same-sex couples, it could be the latest step forward in an ongoing line of progress for LGBT rights. Although same-sex marriage remains illegal in Ohio, gay couples can now jointly file for federal taxes.

Local officials plan to host two workshops to show business owners how the streetcar could benefit them. The workshops are set for Nov. 14 at 10 a.m. and Nov. 18 at 6 p.m. Both will be held on the third floor of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County at 800 Vine Street, downtown Cincinnati. Anyone interested can sign up here.

Attorney General Mike DeWine announced the Bureau of Criminal Investigation tested 2,093 sexual assault kits through October, resulting in 688 DNA matches. Each kit represents a sexual assault case in which DNA was taken but not previously submitted for testing. The initiative is meant to speed up the process through which sexual assault kits from around the state are tested.

A teacher with close ties to Gov. John Kasich was promoted to senior policy adviser, a top position, at the Ohio Department of Education.

With financial incentives from the state attached, the film industry is working more and creating jobs in Cincinnati and around Ohio.

A new study, conducted in part by Cincinnati researchers, found obesity contributes to early puberty in girls.

Ohio gas prices slightly increased from one week ago.

Eating too much Halloween candy might make someone really sick, but it usually won’t kill.

Watch kids discuss gay marriage:

And here’s one lady who really loves sponges:

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