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by Rick Pender 03.03.2014 44 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 07:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onstage_blake robison - photo sarah bradley

Playhouse in the Park Announces 2014-15 Season

Season ahead includes homegrown works, award-winning shows and a couple of musicals

The Cincinnati Playhouse announced its 2014-15 season on Monday. 

I’m especially looking forward to Peter and the Starcatcher, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike and Circle Mirror Transformation, as well as the premiere production, Safe House

Here’s what’s coming our way, in chronological order:
  • Jeffrey Hatcher’s new whodunit featuring the world’s favorite detective, Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club. (Marx Theatre, Sept. 6-Oct. 4, 2014)
  • I Loved, I Lost, I Made Spaghetti, adapted from foodie Giulia Melucci’s hilarious memoir. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Sept. 27-Oct. 26, 2014)
  • A world premiere by up-and-coming playwright and Cincinnati native Keith Josef Adkins, Safe House, inspired by his Kentucky ancestors. (Marx Theatre, Oct. 18-Nov. 15, 2014)
  • Tenderly: The Rosemary Clooney Musical, which traces America’s favorite girl singer from her Cincinnati childhood and Hollywood stardom to triumphant comeback. It’s by the local team of composer Janet Yates Vogt and writer Mark Friedman. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Nov. 15-Dec. 28)
  • The season also includes Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, back for its 24th year. (Marx Theatre, Nov. 26-Dec. 28, 2014)
  • A new version of the recent Broadway show, Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash, directed by and featuring the star of the Broadway production, Jason Edwards. (Marx Theatre, Jan. 17-Feb. 15, 2015)
  • The second U.S. production of an offbeat love story, Chapatti, a tasty new comedy of misadventures involving love and pets. (Shelterhouse Theatre, Feb. 7-March 8, 2015)
  • Peter and the Starcatcher, the magical, family-friendly Peter Pan prequel that hooked five Tony Awards. (Marx Theatre, March 7-April 4, 2015)
  • A compelling, darkly funny new play by Tracey Scott Wilson, Buzzer, getting its world premiere at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre this month. (Shelterhouse Theatre, March 21-April 19, 2015)
  • The 2013 Tony Award-winning best play, Christopher Durang’s hit comedy Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, full of echoes of Anton Chekhov. (Marx Theatre, April 25-May 23, 2015)
  • The comic off-Broadway hit Circle Mirror Transformation, winner of the 2009 Obie Award for best new American play. (Shelterhouse Theatre, May 9-June 7, 2015)

In a recent conversation, Artistic Director Blake Robison described his program priorities and told me the Playhouse takes them seriously. “Variety is one of our hallmarks. We’re always going to make sure there are new works and culturally diverse works and that there are family-friendly or multigenerational things. We will find ways to continue to support and entertain the traditional audience while reaching out in various directions to new audiences. It’s our responsibility to bring the best theatrical material both old and new to our community.” 

I’d say Robison’s third season sticks to his priorities.

 
 
by Ilene Ross 03.03.2014 44 days ago
Posted In: Food art, Openings, Events at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the art of food _mad hatter_photo jens g rosenkrantz, jr.

The Art of Food

A recap of last week's exhibition opening and what's still on view

It’s not often enough that the worlds of food and art collide. And why not, I ask? We first eat with our eyes, and after spending hours traipsing through museums and galleries gazing at masterpieces, we get really, really hungry. This is just one of the many reasons I always eagerly anticipate the opening of the exhibition known as The Art of Food at Covington, Ky.’s The Carnegie. This show never disappoints the palate or the eyes.

Last Friday night, hundreds crammed into The Carnegie to witness local artist Pam Kravetz and a band of merry revelers open the show with a fanciful recreation of “The Mad Hatter's Tea Party.” While the artists entertained on a center stage/table surrounded by diners supping on handcrafted china, the rest of us enjoyed creatively crafted bites fashioned by local chefs. Especially tasty were the diminutive Belgian waffles topped with caramelized apples, shallots, goat cheese mousse and Sirop de Liège by chef David Kelsey of Taste of Belgium; a salad of spinach, pistachio relish, fig purée and goat cheese, topped with a tart cherry vinaigrette and wrapped in a cone of sopressata by chef Andrew Mersmann of La Poste Eatery; and The Rookwood’s chef Jackson Rouse’s offering of head cheese with frisée, pickled mustard seeds, crispy pig ear and blood orange.

La Poste's Sopressata salad
Photo: Jens G. Rosenkrantz, Jr.

And then there is of course the art. Art made of food. Art made to look like food. Look, but most definitely do not eat. And, without giving away any spoiler alerts, I will tell you two things: One, think twice before standing under the work of local artist Eric Brass — it could quite possibly put fear into the hearts of even the bravest of souls. And two, I was exceedingly tempted to lick the installation by Eye Candy Creative. It brought back one of my fondest childhood memories.

Art by Eye Candy Creative
Photo: Jens G Rosenkrantz, Jr.

The Art of Food exhibition runs through March 15. More at thecarnegie.com.

 
 
by German Lopez 03.03.2014 44 days ago
Posted In: News, Taxes, Budget, Development at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Tax abatements benefit wealthy, group to market Cincinnati, winter raises city’s costs

About 1 in 20 Cincinnatians, many of them in the wealthiest neighborhoods, pay less in taxes because their home renovations and constructions are subsidized by a local tax program. While the program benefits the wealthy, it also hits Cincinnati Public Schools and other local services through lost revenue. The tax abatement program aims to keep and attract residents and businesses by lowering the costs of moving and living in Cincinnati. Anastasia Mileham, spokeswoman for 3CDC, says the tax abatements helped revitalize Over-the-Rhine, for example. Others say the government is picking winners and losers and the abatement qualifications should be narrowed.

With hotel room bookings back to pre-recession levels, Source Cincinnati aims to sell Cincinnati’s offerings in arts, health care, entrepreneurism and anything else to attract new businesses and residents. The Cincinnati USA Convention and Visitors Bureau established the organization to reach out to national journalists and continue the local economic momentum built up in the past few years. “Successful cities are those that have good reputations,” Julie Calvert, interim executive director at Source Cincinnati, told The Cincinnati Enquirer. “Without reputation it’s difficult to get businesses to expand or relocate or get more conventions or draw young diverse talent to work for companies based here.”

The harsh winter weather this year pushed Cincinnati’s budget $5 million over, with nearly $3 million spent on salt, sand and chemicals alone. . The rest of the costs come through increased snow plowing shifts and other expenses to try to keep the roads clean. The extra costs just compound the city’s structurally imbalanced budget problems. The need for more road salt also comes despite Councilman Charlie Winburn’s attempts to undermine the city’s plans to stockpile and buy salt when it’s cheap.

Mayor John Cranley says the success of The Incline Public House in East Price Hill, which he helped develop, speaks to the pent-up demand for similar local businesses in neglected Cincinnati neighborhoods.

Less than a month remains to sign up for health insurance plans on HealthCare.gov.

The estimated 24,000 students who drop out of Ohio schools each year might cost themselves and the public hundreds of millions a year, according to the Alliance for Excellent Education.

Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says meth abuse has reached “epidemic” levels in the state.

Ohio gas prices continued to rise this week.

Developers say they have funding for the first phase of a Noah’s Ark replica coming to Williamstown, Ky.

There’s a Netflix hack that pauses a movie or TV show when the viewer falls asleep.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
• Main: @CityBeatCincy
• News: @CityBeat_News
• Music: @CityBeatMusic
• German Lopez: @germanrlopez

Got any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 
by Mike Breen 02.28.2014 47 days ago
Posted In: Music News, Live Music, Local Music at 01:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
super_shakeit

Shake It Records Celebrates 15 Years with Free Shows

Northside record haven presents a string of in-store performances in honor of its 15th anniversary

In March of 1999, after running the Cincinnati-based Shake It Records label for several years, brothers Jim and Darren Blase opened a new record store in the Northside neighborhood. The store, also called Shake It Records, was an instant hit with local record-buyers, offering a huge chunk of vinyl alongside their CD stock, as well as books, magazines and various musical merchandise (among many other items). 

Since then, word of Shake It’s awesomeness has spread far and wide — the well-stocked and unique shop has often earned nods in the national press as one of the best record stores in the country, and music heads from across the region always make trips to Shake It when in Cincinnati (or they make trips just to go Shake It). Indie Rock star/hardcore record lover Bob Pollard, for example, comes down from Dayton often and frequently leaves with a big stack of LPs for his (surely gargantuan) collection. 


The beloved shop has also regularly featured in-store performances from both local artists and national touring acts (a Tegan and Sara in-store a few years ago drew the attention of local TV news stations because of the huge turnout to meet the Pop duo). To celebrate its 15th anniversary — a remarkable milestone considering Shake It’s rise coincided with the rise of digital music and the alleged death march of brick-and-mortar record stores — Shake it will be presenting a string of performances throughout March. 


The free, intimate shows kick off tomorrow (Saturday, March 1) with a 7 p.m. performance from Cincinnati Pop/Rock guitar/songwriting legend Rob Fetters. Fetters, who kicked off the 2014 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards in January with a surprise performance, will be supporting his latest solo release, Saint Ain’t, and you’re bound to hear a few songs from his expansive songwriting legacy with the bands The Raisins, psychodots and The Bears. 


Shake It recently released the schedule of in-store performances for the rest of the month, with more to be added. Not that an excuse is needed for a Shake It visit, but the following events are great chances to stop in and wish the store a happy birthday. 


March 15: Cincy Honky Tonk ensemble Jeremy Pinnell & The 55's (7 p.m.)

March 19: Luther Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars, supporting his third solo release, Rock ’n’ Roll Blues, which comes out March 18. (time TBA)

March 21: Northern Kentucky singer/songwriter Daniel Martin Moore, who’s released acclaimed material through the Sub Pop label, and “Friends.” (8 p.m.) 

March 22: The Shake It label’s biggest success story, Cincy rockers Wussy, who will preview their new album, Attica, which releases nationally on May 6. (7 p.m.)

March 29: Covington Indie Rock crew Frontier Folk Nebraska, whose releases are distributed through the Shake It label. (7 p.m.)

Keep an eye on shakeitrecords.com — and sign up for Shake It’s e-mailing list — for the latest in-store additions and more. 



 
 
by Amber Hemmerle 02.28.2014 47 days ago
Posted In: Culture at 12:13 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
twitter-whale-css-illustration copy

Trending Topics

Cincinnati's most buzzworthy tweets of the week

Each week our intern Amber will be exploring what Cincinnatians are interested in by scouring the local Twitter trends and reporting on what she’s found. From serious tweets to goofy hashtags, she’ll highlight what Cincy’s been buzzing about. So get to tweeting, folks. 

#SK2K

Sean Kilpatrick became the second player to score 2,000 career points at UC during the Bearcats’ game against Louisville on Feb. 22. The only other Bearcat who tops his record is Oscar Robertson, "The Big O," whose career points totaled 2,973 by 1960. Fans from Cincinnati and beyond were showing their love for Kilpatrick all over Twitter on Sunday.

#DaleJr

As in Dale Earnhardt Jr., the superstar of NASCAR. Earnhardt won the Daytona 500 for the second year in a row and as part of his celebration, he finally decided to create a Twitter. In 10 hours, the racecar driver accumulated over 450,000 followers — 515,000 by Wednesday and 526,000 by Friday. I’ve had my Twitter for years and I’m barely pushing 200 followers. Anyway, who says NASCAR is only for the Southern folk? 

Texas 

A judge in Texas voided the ban on gay marriage in the state this week. An outpour of support for the judge’s decision was evident throughout the nation. Following suit in equality, an Arizona judge vetoed a bill that would allow businesses to refuse service to the LGBT community due to their “religious rights” being violated. Of course, Cincinnati also made moves toward a more equal community when announcements of a domestic partner registry for same-sex couples were made. 

#Reds

Thursday was the start of spring training for the Reds. The boys took the win, 8-3 over the Indians, in the Cactus League Opener. It doesn't matter if you think Homer Bailey's extension is a total waste or that Joey Votto should have won the Face of MLB competition, one thing we can all enjoy is the sweet sound of Marty Brennaman’s voice and the memories of warm weather it has brought with it for the past 50 years. 

#NewOscarCategories

You know I had to do at least one funny trend. People just made up categories that should be in the Oscars:

@Weinheimerandy: Tyler Perry presents the Tyler Perry Oscar for best performance by Tyler Perry.
@startpuking: Movies so bad you yell, Sharkeisha! No!
@MnightShelton: Best Seth Rogan film in a non-Apatow production

Also trending: Stiles, #WatchingTop13, Taco Bell, #Scandal, Penn State, Son of God and #BBN.

 
 
by Brian Baker 02.28.2014 47 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, New Releases, Reviews at 09:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: Saturn Batteries’ ‘Real Far East’

An EP can serve several purposes — a stopgap release between full-length releases; fresh merch to offer at shows; a teaser for more material down the road; or an exploratory release to test the waters for a response to a new band or an existing band's new direction (among others). 

In any event, whatever a band's reason might be for offering up a small dose of their material for reduced consumption, the inviolable rule of the EP is simple — always leave the listener wanting more. If you elicit even a modicum of boredom or disinterest in a spare handful of tracks, you're not likely to entice listeners to take a chance on a full-length or get them out to a show, which is, as stated, sort of the point.


Luckily, no such lapse is even remotely evident on Real Far East, Saturn Batteries' second EP in just over a year. Since the Cincinnati bands formation in 2010, guitarist/vocalist/lyricist Brad Gibson — who's put in bass time with the likes of Charlie Hustle, Young Heirlooms and Walk the Moon — has presented his brainchild as a trio, quartet and quintet along the way, all in the service of Beatlesque Pop filtered through the New Wave aesthetic of the Police and XTC and adrenalized with a heart needle full of the Pixies' jittery satellite Rock. 


On last year's Ever Been in Love? Gibson and the Batteries du jour hewed a little closer to the John Lennon/Frank Black strands of their DNA, but Real Far East finds the freshly minted foursome (Gibson, guitarist Brad Rutledge, drummer Justin Sheldon, bassist Archie Niebuhr) drifting more toward the Paul McCartney/Andy Partridge end of their gene pool. And while the Batteries soften the edges ever so subtly and polish their surface to a slightly more reflective shine on Real Far East, these refinements don't diminish the band's energetic charm in the least.


One of the reasons for that is the Batteries have never forsaken one direction for another, preferring to incorporate differing elements into their foundational sound in an effective display of their diversity. The soulful "It's Not About the Money" and propulsive "Overtime" are both Pop gems that swing and swagger in a groove that isn't far removed from the benchmarks established by Walk the Moon in their march toward global domination. "You Really Live Twice" features previous members Rob Barnes and Rich Shivener, naturally hearkening back to the moody energy of Ever Been in Love? "Every Last Time" updates '60s/'70s AM Pop to the 21st century, while "Cherry Times" is a solid hybrid of the sweet and dissonant Pop that has characterized everything that Saturn Batteries has done well to this point in their history. 


Real Far East shows that Saturn Batteries can have fun within their core Pop/Rock sound and clearly points the way toward a bright future for the quartet going forward. 


Saturn Batteries celebrates the release of Real Far East tonight (Friday) at The Drinkery in Over-the-Rhine (click here for details). Below is the EP track “Every Last Time”; click the player or here to sample/download the entire release. 



 
 
by Rick Pender 02.28.2014 47 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door for 2-28 - lesmiz @ ccm - blaine alden krauss as valjean & kimber sprawl as fantine - photo mark lyons

Stage Door: Hapless Heroes at Cincy Shakes

There's a magnificent production of the legendary musical Les Misérables at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music. I attended the opening performance at Patricia Corbett on Thursday evening, and a show that I've seen umpteen times has been given new life with fresh direction, impassioned staging and innovative design — even if you've seen the legendary original with its turntable and massive barricades, you'll find CCM's rendition, directed by Aubrey Berg, an eye-opener. It's simpler and more dramatic (that's quite a claim for a show designed to pluck your heart-strings), and it's especially noteworthy for the leads' strong vocal performances — Jean Valjean and Inspector Javert are double-cast, a demonstration of the depth of talent in this nationally renowned program — as well as each and every every performer in an ensemble of more than 40.

The 16-musician orchestra, conducted energetically by Steve Goers, sounds larger whole lot more, since several players handle three to five instruments. Berg's staging gives the show a clarity and power that makes it feel fresh and new. It has vivid feature characters and storytelling with momentum and emotional impact. This one is a must-see, so it's great that the production runs longer than many at CCM, where it's usually one-weekend and done: There are nine more performances through Sunday, March 9, which means that more tickets ($31-$35; $18-$24 for students) are available. Nonetheless, they'll be snatched up quickly, so you should call right away to get yours. 513-556-4183.

I saw Cincinnati Shakespeare's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead a week ago, and gave it a Critic's Pick in my CityBeat review here. It's a one-off from Hamlet, which Cincy Shakes just staged, using the same cast — but Tom Stoppard's 1966 script puts two throwaway characters in the limelight. Just like the Prince of Denmark, his college chums are perplexed and bedeviled by questions of existence and the meaning of life. They're caught in the swirl of the court — the characters of Hamlet dart in and out around them and add to their confusion — which adds to their confusion about their own roles, the expectations they need to fulfill and their ultimate fate. Billy Chace and Justin McCombs have a firm grasp on their hapless characters: Their sure-handed comic portraits of loquacious Guildenstern and bewildered Rosencrantz might remind you of the movie comedy team of Laurel and Hardy. This classic modern work of absurdity drawn from perhaps the greatest Elizabethan tragedy makes for a fine evening for lovers of great drama. Tickets ($22-$31): 513-381-2273, x1

Andrew Lloyd Webber’s classic musical Evita is at the Aronoff Center through Sunday. It looks great with some epic scenery and excellent choreography. Josh Young as Che is charismatic and strong-voiced in his role as the show’s commentator. But Caroline Bowman’s Eva Perón is shrill, and Sean MacLaughlin's Juan Perón lacks the sinister gravitas that the role requires. So there's not nearly enough of the complex passion and manipulation that bonded them as a political machine. The tale of the ambitious woman who rose to the highest levels of power in Argentina then crashed and burned at age 32 is a memorable modern tragedy, and Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rock-opera tunes by will stick in your head. Tickets: 513-621-2787.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.27.2014 48 days ago
Posted In: Food news at 11:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Taft's Ale House

Taft's Ale House Groundbreaking

3CDC begins construction on new OTR brewpub next Friday

Head to the old St. Paul's Evangelical Church (1429 Race St., OTR) at 11 a.m. on Friday, March 7 to check out the groundbreaking for the new 3CDC project, Taft's Ale House, as well as interior renderings of the project.

Taft's Ale House will be a new OTR brewery and pub, christened after Cincinnati's greatest political export, William Howard Taft — the 27th president of the United States, the 10th Chief Justice of the United States and the first person to hold both positions in their lifetime. He's also probably our greatest mustachioed export as well (and reportedly the last sitting president with facial hair). Taft's will be a full-service restaurant serving local beer as well as a variety of in-house brews.

The ale house will reside on all three floors of the former St. Paul's location. The historic Greek Revival church was built in 1850 and then abandoned in the 1980s, falling into disrepair. 3CDC started stabilization efforts several years ago. 

Read more about the history of the building and its preservation in this Enquirer article or this fantastic piece from Digging Cincinnati History. And keep up with the progress of Taft's Ale House on Facebook.

 
 
by Brian Baker 02.27.2014 48 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Reviews at 10:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
denimroadband

REVIEW: Denim Road Band’s ‘Blame It On the Stars’

The combined musical experience of the members of the Denim Road Band easily eclipses the century-and-a-half mark and encompasses every conceivable type of band and genre of music; local show/dance/cover outfits to nationally recognized entities playing Classic Rock, Blues, R&B, Jazz, Fusion, Top 40 Country, Funk and everything between and beyond. 

DRB's sense of history and classicism invests their original material with the same soulful expanse and crisp Pop approach of the defining bands (The Doobie Brothers, Hall & Oates, Santana, Steely Dan) that have provided DRB with inspiration and a template for success.


There is certainly a formula to what the Denim Road Band does live and in the studio, but there's a huge difference between having a formula and being formulaic. On their third album, the silky smooth Blame It On the Stars, DRB hits the same markers as its previous discs (DRB's eponymous 2009 debut, 2010's Back to Mexico), utilizing George Harp's crystalline-yet-earthy vocal range, Craig Ballard's sinewy percussion and the almost impossibly adaptable journeymen rhythm section of bassist Robbie Lewis and drummer Kevin Ross to maximum groove effect. 


Woven within that tightly knit fabric is the impeccable guitar work of Jim Zuzow, who channels everyone from Tom Johnston to Walter Becker to Steve Miller to the guitar legacies of the Eagles and Santana, creating a sound that is reminiscent of past Classic Rock glories

but delights in advancing the flag a little farther up the hill. Denim Road Band sets up shop at the corner of passion and professionalism and delivers the sophisticated goods with a showman's flair and a fan's devotion.


For more on Denim Road Band, click here

 
 
by German Lopez 02.27.2014 48 days ago
Posted In: News, Parking, History, Mayor, City Council, city manager at 09:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news parking

Morning News and Stuff

Council backs parking plan, strong mayor gains support, museum keeps Dr. Seuss cartoons

City Council yesterday expressed support for a barebones parking plan that would upgrade all meters to accept credit card payments and increase enforcement around the city, which should boost annual revenues. The plan does not increase rates or hours at meters, as Mayor John Cranley originally called for. It also doesn’t allow people to pay for parking meters through smartphones. The plan ultimately means death for the parking privatization plan, which faced widespread criticism after the previous city administration and council passed it as a means to jumpstart new investments and help fix the city’s operating budget and pension system.

Councilman Christopher Smitherman plans to pursue changes to the city’s political structure to give more power to the mayor and less to the city manager. Smitherman says the current system is broken because it doesn’t clearly define the role of the mayor. Under Smitherman’s system, the mayor would run the city and hire department heads; the city manager, who currently runs the city and handles hiring, would primarily preside over budget issues; and City Council would pass legislation and act as a check to the mayor. Smitherman aims to put the plan to voters this November.

Commentary: “WCPO’s Sloppy Streetcar Reporting Misses Real Concerns.”

The Cincinnati Art Museum maintains five political cartoons from the famed Dr. Seuss (Theodore Seuss Geisel), but none are currently on public display. The cartoons call back to the history before World War II, when most of the world played ignorant to the horrors of the Holocaust and Americans had yet to enter the war. Dr. Seuss loathed the villains on the world stage, and his cartoons promoted a message of interventionism that would eventually lead him to join the Army to help in the fight against the Axis powers. When he returned home, he would write the famous stories and books he’s now so well known for.

Mayor Cranley and some council members appear reluctant to accept a routine grant application that would allow the Cincinnati Health Department to open two more clinics because of the potential effect the clinics could have on the city’s budget. Cranley and other council members also seem concerned that the Health Department played a role in the recent closing of Neighborhood Health Care, which shut down four clinics and three school-based programs after it lost federal funding.

Ohio legislators approved a bill that forces absentee voters to submit more information and reduces the amount of time provisional voters have to confirm their identities from 10 days to one week. For Democrats, the bill adds to previous concerns that Republicans are attempting to suppress voters. The bill now goes to Gov. John Kasich, a Republican who’s expected to sign the measure into law.

The Ohio legislature continues wrangling over how to give schools more snow days.

More than 175,000 claims have been filed over winter damage, potentially making this winter one of the costliest in decades.

Robot suits could make mixed martial arts blood-free.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
• Main: @CityBeatCincy
• News: @CityBeat_News
• Music: @CityBeatMusic
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Got any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 

 

 

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by Rick Pender 04.16.2014 3 hours ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:46 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
2014-fringe-festival-image - designed by alex kesman copy

Know Theatre Announces 2014 Fringe Festival Lineup

This evening at its Jackson Street headquarters in Over-the-Rhine, Know Theatre of Cincinnati revealed the lineup for the 11th annual Cincinnati Fringe Festival to a crowd of nearly 100 enthusiastic supporters and performers. The two-week festival begins Tuesday, May 27, with the CityBeat Fringe Kick-Off Party; it winds up 12 days later on Saturday, June 7, having presented 32 productions — 17 plays, two musicals, seven solo performers, and six dance presentations. In addition, there will be four FringeNext productions (selected from 11 applicants — a record number), featuring original material produced and performed by local students from the School for Creative and Performing Arts, Newport Central Catholic High School, St. Xavier High School and Highlands High School.

Performance Gallery is kind of the alpha and omega of the Cincinnati Fringe: They’ve been in all 11 festivals, including the 2008 hit show fricative. Producer Eric Vosmeier calls them the inspiration for much of what the Fringe is about: They were doing “fringe-like” work before the festival began, and they’ve returned annually with work that pushes the envelope. This time they’ll offer Heist, about three crooks of questionable ability. Vosmeier also cited Pones Inc., the dance-based company that returns for the seventh time with Traffick, a piece of audience engagement that explores issues of human trafficking. Vosmeier says, “This is the kind of work the Fringe was built to exhibit.”

“We had a great mix of new producers and returning favorites in the applicant pool,” Vosmeier says. “The word continues to spread about our Cincinnati Fringe Festival, which has a national reputation for being the most artist-friendly festival. We’ve worked very hard on this over the years, and I believe that we’ve created something special for our artists and for our region.”

The Cincinnati Fringe differs from festivals elsewhere in that productions are screened and handpicked by a committee of local theater artists. Drawing from a large pool of applicants, comparable to last year’s record-breaking number, this yielded a balanced mix of local vs. out-of-town producers: 15 from Greater Cincinnati and 18 from beyond. The latter number includes three international shows, the most ever for the festival: Around Dark Matter, a Holocaust memory piece by Mica Dvir, is from Tel Aviv, Israel; A Brief History of Beer by Wish Experience from London, a company that has performed at festivals from Edinburgh to Adelaide; and Prefer Not to Say, an interactive piece by blueDragonfly Productions, another U.K. group, the presenter of And All the Rest is Junk Mail a year ago.

For Wednesday evening’s announcement event, members of the Fringe staff mentioned the shows they were most looking forward to. They named:

·     An Unauthorized Autobiography of Benny Hill by Four Humors Theater (Minneapolis), the creative minds behind such past Festival favorites as Lolita: A Three Man Show, Bombus and Berylline and Harold. This will be their sixth consecutive Cincinnati Fringe appearance.

·     Blogging Behind Bars by Unity Productions, creators of two past Fringe hits, The Wave and Nothing. This time it’s a true story about a young, nonviolent criminal who wrote a blog while incarcerated in a maximum-security prison.

·     Papa Squat’s Store of Sorts by solo artist Paul Strickland from Indianapolis, whose Ain’t True and Uncle False was a “Pick of the Fringe” last year. His new show is a music-filled memorial for a guy who “once filled the emptiness in Big-Fib Cul-de-sac with his insightful songs.”

·     Something Something New Vagina by Rebecca Kling, a transgender artist and educator from Chicago with a follow-up show to her 2012 production, Beneath Her Skin.

·     The Ultimate Stimulus by Felipe Ossa, a Brooklyn-based playwright and a new artist to the Cincy Fringe, is presented in the form of a TED Talk that argues for concubinage as a way to address the problem of income inequality.

The festival is also a chance for Cincinnati’s local theater companies to show off. Clifton Performance Theatre will present Sarge, a piece by Kevin Crowley about the wife of discredited Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky. Untethered Theatre has prepared Where Edward Went, a new play by Ben Dudley and Adam Sievering about a screenwriter’s effort to make a documentary about Edward, the late fiancé of Elyse, a painter. They don’t quite agree about the portrait. New Edgecliff Theatre will offer TRAGEDY: a tragedy, described as “one of the funniest apocalypses of our time.” And Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s intern company always offers a fine showcase of young talent. This year it’s two one-act plays: Sheila Callaghan’s Crumble (Lay Me Down, Justin Timberlake) and Itamar Moses’s Authorial Intent.

In addition to the productions offered nightly, artists, audience members, staff and volunteers flock nightly at Know Theatre’s Underground and headquarters for the Fringe Bar Series, with a reasonably priced bar, some free food inside and offerings for purchase from food wagons on Jackson Street. Each evening after the Channel Fringe Hard Hitting Action News Update, everyone has a chance to be a performer with activities such as the Fringe Olympics, Fringe-A-Oke, Fringe Prom, Segway Night and the Night Without Technology. This year the Bar Series night adds Fringetoberfest, an evening of German-inspired food and brews from local craft beer creators.

Vosmeier expects the festival to attract more than 8,000 visitors this year. If you’re someone who tries to see as much as possible, your best bet is a “Full Frontal” Fringe pass ($200) providing access to every event in the festival. Know also offers “Voyeur” passes ($60) good for six shows of your choice. If you can only make it once, a “One Night Stand” pass ($25) is available — admission to any two performances in an evening plus one drink at Know’s Underground bar. Single tickets to Fringe shows continue to be priced at $12; they’ll go on sale in mid-May.

There will be lots more — and the lineup can change. Hey, it’s the Fringe, so be ready for anything. You’ll find details on all these shows and more at cincyfringe.com.

 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 04.16.2014 8 hours ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 03:19 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cac

Contemporary Arts Center Launches Redesigned Website

The CAC celebrates its 75th anniversary this year

The Contemporary Arts Center marks its 75th anniversary with the launch of its newly redesigned website, contemporaryartscenter.org.

By adding a timeline and a list of exhibits dating back to 1939, the updated site highlights some of the museum’s most notable attractions through videos and interactive learning. The historical timeline depicts an honest look at what Cincinnati was like in 1939 and displays the iconic artists that put the CAC on the map. In 1940, Picasso’s Guernica toured the Midwest for its first and only time and made a pit stop in Cincinnati. In 1963, the Pop art show An American Viewpoint was one of the first exhibitions of its kind. And in 1990, nearly 81,000 people visited the Robert Mapplethorpe exhibition.

Along with the illustrated timeline and videos, the CAC site also offers lesson plans, exhibit brochures, audio files and slideshows about past exhibits. New features like online ticket admission and family visitor information have been added. After 75 years and hundreds of amazing artists, the Contemporary Arts Center has proven it’s still the coolest place in Cincinnati to spark your creativity and become inspired.

FORM, a Cleveland-based creative services firm, designed the visual layout of the site.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.16.2014 9 hours ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 02:24 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dining out for life

Dining Out for Life 2014

Fight AIDS by dining out at your favorite restaurants on April 24

Dining Out For Life is an annual event to raise funds for licensed AIDS service agencies in 60 cities across the nation. Started in 1991 by ActionAIDS in Philadelphia, today more than 3,000 restaurants donate a portion of their proceeds from one day to the aforementioned service agencies; more than $4 million is raised each year which goes directly to the agencies (except for a $1,150 licensing fee). 


Cincinnati's Dining Out For Life event benefits Caracole, a nonprofit that provides housing and supportive services to individuals and families living with HIV/AIDS in eight counties across Southwest Ohio. Caracole currently serves more than 1,400 clients and their families.


Area restaurants participating include Arnold's Bar & Grill (donating 25 percent); Below Zero Lounge (donating 100 percent); Blue Jay Restaurant (donating 25 percent); Green Dog Cafe (donating 25 percent); Kitchen 452 (donating 25 percent); Tom+Chee (donating 25 percent); and more. Find a full list of participating restaurants and how much they're donating here.


Dining Out For Life is easy. Just follow three steps:

  1. Choose a participating restaurant.
  2. Gather a group of friends and call ahead to make a reservation. Be sure to mention you're with Dining Out For Life®.
  3. Dine out on Thursday, April 24th and enter for a chance to win fabulous prizes. Restaurants will list what time of day they're participating in fundraising.

If you would like to participate or would like more information, please contact Megan Green, Caracole Community Investment Coordinator, at 513-619-1483 or at mgreen@caracole.org.

 
 
by Jac Kern 04.16.2014 11 hours ago
at 12:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-2

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Senior prom is a special milestone for many American teens, but even traditions as old as school dances change over time. Intimate one-on-one dates have given way to group dates and attending as friends. Flip-flops and cutout cocktail dresses replaced the overdone evening look for many girls. And now a southern-fried specialty is getting in the prom game. Kentucky Fried Chicken — What? Yes. — partnered with Louisville florists to create the chicken corsage. For $20, Louisville residents can purchase a corsage from Nanz and Kraft Florists that includes a $5 gift card to KFC, where folks can then go buy the perfect piece of chicken. It can only be assumed that after prom, girls will press the greasy chicken bone between their yearbook pages, just like their moms did with their corsages when they were young.




It’s confirmed: Stephen Colbert will take over the Late Show desk once David Letterman retires sometime in 2015. That’ll mean no more Colbert Report and, likely, the end of the host’s faux-servative character. Start the countdown to the announcement of a new reality show following Letterman, Leno (and, let’s just be honest — Craig Ferguson and Conan O’Brien) around Ex-Host Island. Move over, old people! Slightly younger people are takin' yer jerbs!

In the contemporary classic Mean Girls, Lindsay Lohan’s Cady describes Halloween as, “the one night a year when a girl can dress like a total slut and no other girls can say anything about it.” Well, Coachella must be kind of like Halloween for celebrities, except instead of wearing lingerie and some form of animal ears, they throw on the most jumbled assortment of terrible fashion fads. Not sure about the new cream-colored designer jumpsuit you purchased? Try it out in the middle of the desert! Want to channel Woodstock without ever having been to, read about or seen a photo of Woodstock? Grab a Native American headdress and wear that shit to Coachella. The fest is HQ for floral head wreaths, jorts and combat boots (often all worn at once), and for some reason I cannot pull myself away from the celeb photos of this mess. It’s like someone made a slot machine with various teenagers’ style blogs on Tumblr and everyone going to Coachella must take a spin to determine their outfit.

“Ooh, I got a bindi, a latex bra, a crocheted duster and gladiator sandals!” Just look at these famous attendees, capped off with Koachella Kweenz Kylie and Kendall Jenner.

 

But seriously, you need to see this video that’s (probably) of Leonardo DiCaprio Coachin’ it up (people say that, right?) at an MGMT performance, which makes me feel weird and old.

And since I brought up Lindsay, the supposedly sober starlet was supposedly washing down all that Coachella dust and glitter with vodka this weekend. The reports come days after the latest episode of her Oprah docu-series, in which she admits to drinking alcohol after her latest stint in rehab. Also, there were a lot of emo scenes of Lindsay filming herself crying. Get it together, girl. OPRAH WILL CUSS AT YOU AGAIN. And everyone knows if Oprah has to cuss at you twice, you will spontaneously burst into flames.

Celebrispawn in the media is quite the hot topic as of late, particularly thanks to Dax Sheppard and Kristen Bell vs. Papz (this will definitely be a court case our children will study in history class). But what about fake famous babies — fair game? OK! Leslie Knope is pregnant! Pawnee's upcoming addition will be the Prince George of fictional TV comedy births. Which is to say, a very big deal. Parks and Rec's Leslie and Ben will be the best parents ever. I think I speak for fans everywhere by saying we can't wait for his or her first playdate with the world’s most attractive child, Ann and Chris’ little Oliver.

Sunday was an epic night for television with the final Mad Men premiere (sort of) and a crazy-ass episode of Game of Thrones. These two are great popular, critically-acclaimed dramas, but they’re on complete opposite ends of the style spectrum. Mad Men’s seventh season debut was gradual and calculated (as always), giving viewers a chance to fill in the blanks between Season Six and now, speculate on what’s to come and read into every little detail. And by detail, I mean Pete’s California Ken Doll look, which was #flawless. Ratings were way down Sunday — the lowest-rated premiere since the second season's in 2008. Some attribute the drop to a lackluster episode, but the truth is probably that everyone was too busy losing their shit over this week’s Game of Thrones to get into the cool Mad Men mood.

Without giving too much away (and because I spoiled “the incident” for myself since I can’t stay off the damn Internet — so I know it sucks), Thrones fans who hadn’t already read the books were treated to a truly righteous, bubbly, bloody scene this week that totally flips the script for many of our favorite characters. Can’t these people get through one wedding without having to immediately plan a funeral?

New movie trailers to hit the Interwebz: bestseller-turned-likely blockbuster Gone Girl; two red band previews for 22 Jump Street (The College Years); Sex Tape, starring Cameron Diaz and a manorexic Jason Segel, a comedy that’s exactly what you think it’s about; and Jon Favreau’s take on the foodie world, Chef.

Aaand it looks like Jay-Z and Beyoncé may tour together for a string of shows this summer, so I need to go quit my job and fulfill my dreams of being a roadie. Byé!
 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.16.2014 12 hours ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
corv local food guide cover

CORV Local Food Guide Release Party Tonight

5-7:30 p.m. at Om Eco Café on Ludlow in Clifton

The annual Central Ohio River Valley (CORV) Local Food Guide celebrates its release (find one inside this week’s CityBeat) and upcoming Earth Day with a party at Om Eco Café on Ludlow in Clifton. The CORV guide is a very complete directory of area food resources that connects residents of Greater Cincinnati, Southwest Ohio, Southeast Indiana and Northern Kentucky with local farmers, markets, producers, restaurants, wineries and fresh, local, healthy food. 

Download the 2014 guide here. It has a full list of farmers markets, a story about local artisan/cottage businesses, a harvest guide, a list of local CSAs and farms and more.

5-7:30 p.m. $10 donation requested. Om Eco Café, 329 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, eatlocalcorv.org. 

 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 04.16.2014 12 hours ago
Posted In: Alcohol, News, Events at 11:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
arnolds2_jilliantellep

Arnold's Taps Great Lakes Cherry Vanilla Edmund Fitzgerald for Autism

Great Lakes Brewing Company and #BeerAutismHope partner for an autism fundraiser

Arnold’s has partnered with Great Lakes Brewing Company and Neltner Small Batch to host a fundraiser for autism, #BeerAutismHope. Great Lakes will be tapping a cask-conditioned firkin of their fabled, impossible-to-find and extremely delicious Cherry Vanilla Edmund Fitzgerald Porter. For each pint sold, a dollar will be donated to Lance’s Room, a charity to fund scholarships for people with autism. In addition to the beer, local artist Keith Neltner will be designing a limited edition, multi-layer Great Lakes Brewing Company art print, released exclusively for the event. A portion of those proceeds will also be donated to Lances’s Room. The Hot Magnolias will perform. 

9 p.m. Friday. Free. 210 E. Eighth St., Downtown, 513-421-6234, arnoldsbarandgrill.com.

 
 
by mbreen 04.16.2014 14 hours ago
Posted In: Live Music, Music News at 08:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (20)
 
 
manman_04_0136f

MidPoint Indie Summer Concerts Announced

Free summertime Fountain Square shows feature national headliners and lots of local talent

The first good sign that consistent warmth is on its way is the announcement of the lineup for this year’s MidPoint Indie Summer series at downtown’s Fountain Square. The concerts are part of the Square’s free PNC Summer Music Series, which showcases different types of music (played mostly by local acts) five days a week. (The lineups for the every-Thursday Salsa on the Square shows have also been announced; visit myfountainsquare.com for details.)

The eclectic, free Indie Summer shows take place every Friday throughout the summer. This year’s lineup is perhaps the series’ strongest yet, with some higher profile national touring acts and the usual array of top-notch local talent. 

Here’s the full rundown of Indie Summer shows so far (a few slots are still to be announced): 


• May 30: WHY?Yip DeceiverBad BoxesDark Colour 


• June 6: WussyThe TigerliliesHoney & HoustonMason School of Rock


• June 13: Betty WhoVito EmmanuelCaptain KiddPluto Revolts


• June 20: Those DarlinsThe HarlequinsThose Crosstown RivalsThe Frankl Project 


• June 27: Moon TaxiPeridoniNeveleAcarya 


• July 4: Local HNew StrangeMad AnthonyOne Day Steady 


• July 11: Soledad BrothersElectric CitizenPop Goes the EvilGrotesque Brooms 


• July 18: Wesley Bright & the Hi-LitesDAAP GirlsMardou 


• July 25: Clap Your Hands Say YeahPublicDanny & His Fantasy


• August 1: The Spiders (tribute to David Bowie); Honeyspiders


• August 8: Man ManInjecting StrangersOhio KnifeSkeleton Hands


• August 15: The Nightbeast (a co-headliner will be announced in July)


• August 22: psychodotsLemon SkyTonefarmerHeavy Hinges 


• August 29: IslandsThe PassThe YugosJoey Cook & The Keepers of the Secret


The Indie Summer series is sponsored by the MidPoint Music Festival, CityBeat’s popular annual music extravaganza, which returns to the clubs and venues of Downtown and Over-the-Rhine Sept. 25-27. (Though all MPMF-worthy, the acts are booked through Fountain Square, not by MidPoint.) There will be a MidPoint booth on Fountain Square every Friday where music fans can find the latest MPMF info and purchase tickets to the three-day festival. 


A limited amount of discounted early-bird passes for this year’s MPMF are available now at mpmf.cincyticket.com. Nail down your three-day tickets (or VIP Experience tickets) before the prices increase. And be sure to stay tuned to mpmf.com and the fest's various social media accounts for the latest updates. 

 
 
by Rick Pender 04.16.2014 15 hours ago
Posted In: Theater at 07:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
heist 2

Know to Announce 2014 Fringe Lineup Tonight

Eleventh-annual fest kicks off May 27

This evening at its Jackson Street headquarters in Over-the-Rhine, Know Theatre of Cincinnati will announce the lineup for the 11th annual Cincinnati Fringe Festival. The two-week festival begins on Tuesday, May 27, with the CityBeat Fringe Kick-Off Party, and continues through Saturday, June 7, presenting 33 productions — 17 plays, two musicals, seven solo performers, six dance presentations and one defined as “variety/other.” In addition, there will be four FringeNext productions, featuring area high school students, and an array of special events.

“We had a great mix of new producers and returning favorites in the applicant pool,” says Producing Artistic Director Eric Vosmeier. “The word continues to spread about our Cincinnati Fringe Festival, which has a national reputation for being the most artist-friendly festival. We’ve worked very hard on this over the years, and I believe that we’ve created something special for our artists and for our region.”

The pool of applicants, comparable to last year’s record-breaking number, has yielded a mix of local vs. out-of-town producers: 15 from Greater Cincinnati, including the return of Performance Gallery for the 11th consecutive year (it’s the only group that’s been in every Fringe) with a new piece, Heist, about three crooks of questionable ability. There will be 18 productions from beyond Cincinnati, including three international shows.

Vosmeier expects the festival to attract more than 8,000 visitors for 2014. If you’re one of those people who tries to see as much as possible, your best bet is a “Full Frontal” Fringe pass ($200) that gives you access to every event in the festival. Know also offers “Voyeur” passes ($60) good for six shows of your choice. If you can be there for one evening, a “One Night Stand” pass ($25) is available, offering access to any two performances in an evening and one drink at Know Theatre’s Underground bar. Individual tickets to Fringe Festival shows continue to be priced at $12; they’ll go on sale in mid-May.

Look for more information at CityBeat.com after the 7 p.m. announcement tonight. More info: cincyfringe.com.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.15.2014 32 hours ago
Posted In: Food news, Openings at 02:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
a tavola madeira

A Tavola Madeira Now Open

Innovative OTR pizzeria expands to the suburbs

Favorite OTR eatery (and this year's Best of Cincinnati winner for Best Pizza, non-chain) A Tavola opens its new Madeira location today at 4 p.m. 

Located in a former bank that once housed a sushi restaurant, A Tavola has given the building a facelift with new flooring, lighting from Switch Lighting & Design, custom banquettes from Landeck Woodworking, a brand new patio and they've also installed a pizza oven from Naples, Italy, a solid-wood bar, a La Marzocco espresso machine and an Italforni Bull oven (which their Facebook says created the "First pizza made in A Tavola, Madeira, and first pizza made on an Italforni Bull in the U.S.!")

They don't take reservations and they're currently BYOB (with a corkage fee).

7022 Miami Ave., Madeira, 513-272-0192, atavolapizza.com.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.15.2014 35 hours ago
at 12:29 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
wwe_cincinnati_skyline_jdc

Cincinnati Takes Over New York City

Cincy in NYC Week features Queen City art, music and food in the Big Apple

Cincinnati's arts groups and chefs are road tripping it to New York City for a seven-day showcase highlighting the eats, arts and culture of the Queen City for Cincy in NYC.

The showcase, which runs May 6 through May 12, features events and performances from the Cincinnati Ballet, CCM alumni, the May Festival Chorus and the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, the Playhouse in the Park, the Cincinnati Art Museum, the Taft Museum of Art, Queen City chefs (Jean-Robert de Cavel, Julie Francis of Nectar, David Cook of Daveed's NEXT, David Falk of Boca, Jose Salazar of Salazar, chocolatier Jean-Philippe Solnom and Stephen Williams of Bouquet) and more.

According to an article in Cincy Magainze, the original idea was that just the Cincinnati Ballet would return to New York City for the first time in 30 years. But it turns out the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and the May Festival Chorus were also scheduled to be in NYC, performing around the same time as the ballet's performance week at the Joyce. So, long story short, other Cincinnati-based art groups were recruited to head East and now there's a ton of Cincinnatians trekking to New York to show the city what the Midwest has to offer.

Events kick off on May 6 with a performance from the Cincinnati Ballet at the Joyce and round out with a performance by CCM's quartet-in-residence, the Ariel Quartet, at the 92nd Street Y. 

MAY 6
The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 7:30 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

CCM Jazz Alumni at Jazz at Lincoln Center — Past and present CCM big band alumni perform at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $30-$45. Broadway at 60th Street, New York, jalc.org/dizzys.

MAY 7
Music and Words with Ricky Ian Gordon — The composer will discuss his work with moderator Evans Mirageas, the Harry T. Wilks Artistic Director of the Cincinnati Opera. 7 p.m. Free for members; $20 for non. The National Opera Center, 330 Seventh Ave., New York, operaamerica.org

The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 7:30 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

MAY 8
May Festival/Symphony Party — The May Festival and Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra host a cocktail soiree. 6-8 p.m. $275 (patron); $200 (guest). New York Yacht Club, 37 W. 44th St., New York, cincyinnyc.com.

The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 8 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

MAY 9
Playhouse Staged Reading in Afternoon — Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park presents a reading of Fool, by Cincinnati native Theresa Rebeck, creator of TV's Smash. The reading features an all-star cast of Cincinnati stars. 2 p.m. Free but tickets required. Pearl Studios, 519 Eighth Ave., 12th Floor, Studio D, 513-421-3888.

Cincinnati Night at Carnegie Hall — The May Festival Chorus and the CSO take the Carnegie Hall stage as part of the prestigious Spring for Music Festival with a program including John Adams' iconic "Harmonium" and the New York premiere of R. Nathanial Dett's "The Ordering of Moses." 7:30 p.m. $25. Carnegie Hall, 881 Seventh Ave., New York, mayfestival.com.

The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 8 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

Cincinnati Party for Young Professionals — Cincinnati-native YPs are invited to an evening of live music, mingling and an open bar. Dhani Jones will MC. 9-11 p.m. Free. Arlene's Grocery, 95 Stanton St., New York, cincyinnyc.com.

MAY 10
Queen City Chefs Take a Bite Out of the Big Apple — Jean-Robert de Cavel, Julie Francis of Nectar, David Cook of Daveed's NEXT, David Falk of Boca, Jose Salazar of Salazar, chocolatier Jean-Philippe Solnom and Stephen Williams of Bouquet head to the James Beard House in NYC to cook a seven-course dinner. While they planned the menu together, they're each responsible for a different course. 7 p.m. $170; $130 for James Beard members. James Beard House, 167 W. 12th St., New York, jamesbeard.org.

Cincinnati Art Museum's Eyes on the Street Panel — A panel discussion of street photography in the 21st century. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $5. Aperture Gallery, 547 W. 27th St., Fourth Floor, New York, cincyinnyc.com.

The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 2 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Tour — Enjoy a special docent-led tour of the Met's Rembrandt galleries, including Portrait of a Man Rising from His Chair, on loan from the Taft Museum of Art. 2 p.m. $29. The Met, 1000 Fifht Ave., New York, taftmuseum.cincyregister.com/rembrandtatmet.

MAY 11
World Piano Competition Gold Medalists at the Carnegie — Performance by gold medalist Alexander Yakovlev, 2012 World Piano Competition winner. 2 p.m. $15. The Carnegie, 881 Seventh Avenue and 57th Street, New York,  carnegiehall.org/events.

The Cincinnati Ballet at The Joyce Theater — The ballet celebrates it's 50th anniversary with a week-long tour at the Joyce, where they'll be performing three New York City premieres: Hummingbird in a Box, featuring seven new compositions by Grammy-winner Peter Frampton; Chasing Squirrel, an eccentric work by Trey McIntyre; and Caprice, a new ballet choreographed by Val Caniparoli that features live musicians performing Paganini's Violin Caprices. 2 p.m. $19-$49. Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue at 19th Street, New York, cballet.org/newyorktour.

MAY 12
CCM's Ariel Quartet — The internationally acclaimed Ariel Quartet and CCM's quartet-in-residence perform Haydn's String Quartet in G Major, Op. 76, No. 1; Beethoven's String Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 130 and more. 7:30 p.m. $30. 92nd Street Y, SubCulture, 45 Bleecker St., New York, 92y.org.

For more information on all the events and Cincy in NYC in general, head to cincyinnyc.com.
 
 
 
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