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by Amy Harris 07.11.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Q&A with Bunbury Performers Everest

Neil Young cohorts perform at second annual Bunbury Music Fest this Friday

Everest is an Indie Rock band unique in a cluttered genre. The group has been able to work with many major players — most notable is the band's relationship with Neil Young, whose recording studio produced their first studio album. Young has had the band to open for him many times over the last several years. Last year, Everest released its third studio album, Ownerless, which came out on Dave Matthews' ATO label.

CityBeat spoke with bassist Elijah Thomson about the group's unique vision and feel and also where he feels the band is going in their evolution. Everest will be playing the Bunbury Music Festival at Cincinnati's Sawyer Point/Yeatman's Cove on Friday alongside fun., Walk the Moon, Devotchka, Tegan and Sara and many others. Everest plays the Bud Light Stage at 5 p.m. Friday.

CityBeat: What have you guys been up to since I saw you last summer at Forecastle in Louisville?

Elijah Thomson: We took a little break. We were touring with Neil Young at the end of the year, which was really fun. We were a little beat down from a year of touring. We took probably about six months off. We did a little tour in April with Minus the Bear, so we sort of violated our own hiatus to go out with those guys, but that was better. We just did a couple weeks' run from L.A. to Chicago, so we went out there to do a couple dates.

CB: I know Neil Young personally picked you guys to go on tour with him and open his shows. What was the highlight of playing with him?

ET: It has been pretty sweet over the years getting to tour with Neil and obviously a total honor to be able to play with an artist of that caliber and a living legend, as far as I am concerned. 

On a certain level, it is still a gig — you know, driving and loading in and out and all that kind of stuff. I think for me personally, watching a guy like Neil night in and night out, it sort of proves that sort of mystical thing in music, what is compelling about somebody that can sustain them for so long. 

People are coming out in droves to see Neil and for me it is a personal study on art and what it is that enamors people with art. With Neil, I think it is primarily an honesty with his art. He will put it out there. The first song on his new record is like 27 minutes long. That’s the kind of bravery that comes from having nothing to prove and I think for them, like us, we have to understand why that is important and to find a formula that works, but also (be) true to ourselves and true to our own desires musically. That is a process. It has not been instantaneous, but I think we are sort of on the verge of realizing that ourselves.

CB: Did Neil give you any advice?

ET: I think if there ever was, it was just (to) absolutely do whatever you want and don’t make any apologies and don’t play it safe. It was the kind of real world wisdom that is important. It is not about playing some game. We should not be concerned where we will be classified in a musical genre. It is more about making what you feel and letting other people classify it. 

CB: You guys toured pretty consistently the past few years. Do you have any crazy tour stories on the road?

ET: One of the main things we talked about from last year, we seemed to be pretty slippery when it came to crossing paths with law enforcement. We were slippery, we had no issues. I don’t know how we did it. We had a couple close calls, but were able to talk our way out of it every time.

CB: Are you working on any new music right now?

ET: Yeah, the biggest change in Everest is a slight personnel change. Jason Soda, a founding member of the band, decided to resign. I don’t know if I should say why, but ultimately he needed more normalcies in his life. 

His replacement — I hate to put it that way — his name is Aaron Tasjan, an amazing guitar player who we met while we were on the road with Alberta Cross. He was kind of filling in for guitar and when it came up that J was going to resign, Joel and I were talking about it. 

I think it was a sensitive thing — who were we going to collaborate with and how were we going to take this opportunity to improve the internal chemistry? We had a really great rapport with Aaron and when we were on the road he watched our set every night. He would open the shows doing solo stuff and we would jump on stage with him and jam with him. His spirit has been really amazing since he has been playing with us, bringing a freshness and newness that we have really desired and I think interpersonally it has been good and natural. 

Also, the drummer chair has been in rotation the last year and a half or so since Davey, our original drummer, stopped playing with us. Our drummer now is a guy named Dan Bailey, a guy I have known for years. I really respected his drumming. He is an absolutely astounding drummer. It was very easy to ask him to join. Bass players and drummers generally want to choose who they are going to play with. He has known this band for a while, since I have been in it, and he has been chomping at the bit to jam with us, so we are on this new plane that we have never really experienced. It is really sort of a beautiful and fun creative discovery. 

I am excited to bring this to Cincinnati. There is a great spirit going on. The plan right now is to finish out this summer touring, a couple weeks in July and a couple weeks in August on the West Coast. Then we are going to go back in the studio. The sound checks for our shows have gone into much more depth with the music; I don’t like the word "jamming," so we will say "spontaneous musical landscapes." It is something we have been wanting to do for a long time and it is really amazing to go on stage and just not have it all pre-programmed, even calling out set lists on the stage, stretching songs out, kind of taking our time with things, letting things be different night after night and really encourage our creative flow together. We are really excited about getting in the studio and experimenting with this.

CB: What is your favorite bass to play?

ET: I play a Gibson Les Paul Recording bass (from) 1973. I have been playing it exclusively for about 12 years. I do own several basses. The first bass I ever had was a Gibson Les Paul Recording bass. My Dad was a bass player and he gave it to me. It was kind of his junker bass and I didn’t even like it but it was something.

It sounds really stupid and mystical, because it was the bass I learned on and I kind of wore it out and it was an awkward bass, but I was always coming back to it because it was familiar. 

I was playing with a guy named Richard Swift (producer, singer/songwriter and current member of The Shins), still do, a really dear friend. Right around when we first started playing together, he said, “That is the raddest bass I have ever heard. You should only use that bass when you are playing with me.” I was like, “OK no problem.” I basically decided that was my thing and I was going to stick with it. 

I haven’t played any other bass for years and years except in a studio, and even then it is only one song, maybe. 

CB: Did you always want to be a musician?

ET: Like I said, my dad was a musician and so I grew up on the road and around music. My uncle owned a studio, still does, and we still work out of there a lot. I have been recording bands since I was 17 years old and have been playing music since I was 12 years old, always had guitars around. When I was a little kid I thought I was the talentless one in the family because I didn’t pick it up before the age of 10. I eventually found my way. This was always what I was meant to do, in a way.

CB: Somebody the other day said that the best way to become a successful musician is to not have a backup plan. 

ET: I’d say so, and I’d say most true artists would rather downgrade and live in a shack and still be doing what they are passionate about. It really plays into the artist mentality. I am no spring chicken, so I certainly decided I was in for life. I don’t have a retirement plan. I don’t ever want to stop. This is what I do. I get into other things outside of music so it is not a total obsession. I found a way to make it this far. I don’t know why that would change in the future. If it does, it does, and I will figure it out. This is what works for me; there is no backup plan.

CB: Where did the band name come from?

ET: The story … I wasn’t in the band when they named it and maybe I wouldn’t have picked that name, but that is for another conversation. 

From what I gather, Russ and Jason had named their studio Everest Recordings because of a pack of cigarettes that Geoff Emerick had. He was an engineer on a lot of the Beatles stuff and supposedly Abbey Road was originally going to be named Everest and they were going to do a photo shoot in Nepal. It became a logistical nightmare and, as the legend goes, Paul or somebody said, "Let’s shoot a picture out front and be done with it." So the name Everest has significance to them, however it is sort of a common thing for something to be named. 

It is hard to Google something like that. That is something you have to think about nowadays and maybe it gets lost in the shuffle a little bit. 

CB: What can the fans look forward to at Bunbury seeing you guys for the first time?

ET: As a band we are really relaxed and comfortable. Every new show is an adventure. Every show we have had with this lineup has been over the top amazing. 

I guess what fans can expect is the unexpected. They can expect to see some sort of fine but not some self-congratulatory musicianship, people making themselves vulnerable in front of people and making up stuff on the spot and really trying to live in that spirit of Jimi Hendrix and Zeppelin and the kind of feelings those shows had when it was a beautiful thing of stream of consciousness. I think that is something rarer these days in music. I am happy and proud to be in a band that values that part of live performance.

Everest performed at Lousiville's Forecastle fest last summer. Check out the "A Day in the Life" Forecastle photo series with the group here.

Everest – Let Go from Everest Channel on Vimeo.

 
 
by Mike Breen 07.11.2013
Posted In: Festivals, Live Stream, Local Music at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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LISTEN: Cincy Trio Public Debuts New Single

Local indie rockers unveil "Honeybee" single from forthcoming EP just in time for Bunbury

Impressive Cincinnati AltRock trio Public is all set to performing at Cincinnati's huge Bunbury Music Festival this weekend, essentially opening the fest Friday at 2 p.m. with a performance on the Bud Light Stage.

The band — nominated at the most recent Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for "Best New Artist" — released its four-track EP, Red, last summer and is now offering fans a brand-new recording, just in time to learn all the words and sing along at tomorrow's fest appearance.

The new track is "Honeybee," a spacious, groove-driven Indie Pop gem which is slated for Public's forthcoming second EP. 

If you're download phobic, you can also grab a physical copy of the single. Fifty are being pressed, featuring hand-drawn artwork and a bonus acoustic B-side, "I Need You," and made available at Bunbury.

Both songs will be available for download on July 16. The stream and eventual download will be available at publictheband.com.

 
 
by Mike Breen 07.10.2013
 
 
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MidPoint Music Festival 2013: New Additions!

Have you picked up your new CityBeat today yet? In the music section's column Spill It, you'll find Round 3 of this year's MidPoint Music Festival lineup announcements. Click here to read it in column form or check out some audio/visual samples from the just-confirmed acts below (click the artists' names for their website homes).

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club 


Damien Jurado

Nicholas David


Young Empires


Johnathan Rice


The Technicolors

The Technicolors - Sweet Time from YELLOW BOX on Vimeo.

Bear’s Den


Snowmine


Pure X


American Royalty


Gauntlet Hair


The Grahams


Helado Negro


Cory Chisel and the Wandering Sons


Vandaveer


Ha Ha Tonka

Ha Ha Tonka, "Usual Suspects" from Bloodshot Records on Vimeo.

The Delta Saints


These artists will join previously announced MPMF.13 performers like The Breeders, The Head and The Heart, Warpaint, Shuggie Otis, Youth Lagoon, Cody ChesnuTT and many others. Visit MPMF.com and follow MPMF’s social media accounts for the latest artist additions and other MPMF news.

Tickets for 2013’s MidPoint Music Festival are available now at mpmf.cincyticket.com, where you can purchase three-day passes for only $69, the music fest bargain of the year.

 
 
by mbreen 07.08.2013
Posted In: Festivals, Live Music, Local Music at 09:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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ArtSong Music Series Takes It Indoors

EdenSong becomes "ArtSong" with move to Cincinnati Art Museum

EdenSong, the long-running summer concert series presented by the Queen City Balladeers, kicks off this Friday in Eden Park, but not in its usual outdoor spot at the Seasongood Pavilion.

For the 2013 series, EdenSong is moving just up the hill and indoors — inside the Cincinnati Art Museum, to be exact. The series — now dubbed ArtSong — runs every Friday through Aug. 2 and, as usual, features an excellent collection of primarily local Americana/Roots music performers.

The concerts will take place in the museum’s Fath Auditorium. Seating is more limited, so organizers advise arriving earlier than the 8 p.m. start time. Attendees are asked to enter the museum’s Dewitt entrance on the side of the building, in lieu of using the front doors.

The EdenSong concerts remain free (donations are, of course, welcome) and there is free parking on the museum grounds. This Friday's opening concert features the impressive lineup of Shiny & the Spoon, Ma Crow & the Lady Slippers, Lisa Biales, Anachrorhythms and Bob Kotz.

For the July 19 show, you can catch Ricky Nye, Wild Carrot & the Roots Band, Jim’s Red Pants, Steve Bonafel & One Iota and Ellie Fabe. The lineup for July 26 features Anna & Milovan, Red Cedars, Silver Arm, Greg Schaber and Calamity Rain. And for the Aug. 2 closer, you'll be able to see/hear The Rattlesnakin' Daddies, Bromwell-Diehl Band, the Hertz Brothers, Ann & Phil Case and John Ford.

For more info, visit queencityballadeers.org.

 
 
by RIC HICKEY 06.15.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Live Blog, Festivals at 04:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bonnaroo 2013: The Knight Slays

It goes without saying that Paul McCartney flat out slayed 'em on Bonnaroo's What Stage last night. Snagging Sir Paul as a main stage headliner is possibly the biggest coup in Bonnaroo's 12-year history. To no one's great surprise, McCartney dished out sheer unfettered joy to the thousands via a masterful marathon performance that featured onw heart-warming soul-sending classic after another. You can be sure that his eyes have beheld many wonders over the course of a 50+ year career that is unrivaled and unparalleled in every way imaginable. But even McCartney himself could not disguise his expression of awe and disbelief at the size and deafening enthusiasm of the Bonnaroo crowd.

Today and tomorrow, I'll focus on the smaller stages to catch up close and personal performances by JEFF The Brotherhood, The Revivalists, and Alex Ebert of Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. Already today I've seen the Futurebirds destroy the Sonic Stage with their peculiar powerhouse hybrid of Indie Country.

Sir Paul's son James McCartney drew a respectful and curious crowd to the On Tap Lounge for his early afternoon solo acoustic performance. Sadly, the booming bass reverberating from the larger stages all but drowned out his gentle folk pop purr. If you could huddle up close enough to the stage, he sounded pretty good. But the son of a Beatle deserves better accommodations.

 
 
by RIC HICKEY 06.15.2013
Posted In: Festivals, Live Music, Live Blog at 02:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bonnaroo 2013: Meet the Press

We are barely halfway into this thing and Bonnaroo's memorable performances and highlights already seem too good to be true. In addition to 12 stages featuring live music for 18 hours a day for four days straight, the assembled press are privy to gut busting scenes of spontaneous hilarity in Bonnaroo press conferences twice daily.

Without fail, these press conferences will feature provocative observations from the panelists about their respective Bonnaroo experiences. But more often than not they will degrade into an impromptu exchange of silly quips, wacky tales from the road, and dirty jokes. Friday was no exception.

After setting the bar obscenely low for the 1pm press conference with multiple references to sex acts taking place on and off stage, it was the affable Matt + Kim who stuck around for nearly 45 minutes afterwards, smiling broadly, Happily answering more questions and posing for photographs.

The press conference itself was a chaotic and ramshackle riot that teetered on the brink of peep-show perversion for the duration. Perhaps this was no surprise as its schizophrenic panel included TV star Ed Helms and classic rocker John Oates alongside the eager upstarts Matt + Kim, Nicki Bluhm and Michael Angelakos from Passion Pit. Aside from a brief description of Oates' charity work, the discussion was a lighthearted group improvisation on the pros and cons of playing big festivals.

Helms is doing double duty at this year's Bonnaroo, presenting a comedy revue in the festival's comedy tent and hosting a Bluegrass jam on one of its main stages. Asked why he loves the banjo, Helms sighed, "I believe that banjos are very irritating and that's why banjos and comedians get along."

"Hey Ed," a smirking Oates chimed in, "Do you know why there's no banjos on Star Trek?"

"No John. Why is that?"

"Because it's the future."

Later in the day there was a 4 p.m. press conference that featured some very insightful exchanges between country rocker Jason Isbell and Jazz Fusion guitar legend John McLaughlin (pictured). The Bonnaroo crowd warmly embraced McLaughlin's evening performance in That Tent, causing the master musician to grin from ear to ear from the first notes of his set to the very last.

Though they started 30 minutes late, Rock icons ZZ Top performed a smoking midnight set in This Tent to a capacity crowd who sang along to nearly every song in the bands hit-laden set.

 
 
by RIC HICKEY 06.15.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Live Blog, Festivals at 09:33 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bonnaroo 2013: Friday Fun and Funnies

Friday's Bonnaroo festivities started with great promise, as we were treated to a surprise performance by Jack Johnson in the press tent. Johnson is a last-minute fill-in for headliners Mumford and Sons, who had to cancel because their bass player had a medical procedure to fix a blood clot in his brain earlier this week. Warmth and humility emanated from Johnson as he debuted two brand new songs accompanied by ALO's Zach Gill on accordion.

An hour later Trixie Whitley slithered on to the Which Stage in a long black gown and proceeded to mesmerize the mid-day crowd with her hypnotic and soulful swamp Rock. There were moments during her set when she sang with such power and pathos it literally knocked the wind out of me. The crowd was so awed by Whitley's performance they stood in a stunned silence so quiet that at times you could hear shutters clicking in the photo pit.

I don't think Chuck and I stopped laughing once during a spontaneous and hilarious 15 minutes we spent chatting with Daniel, Thomas and new drummer Johnny Colorado of the Futurebirds. We barely had time to catch our breath and regain our composure before a 4 p.m. press conference that featured comedians Michael Che and Mike Birbiglia, as well as Jason Isbell and Jazz Fusion guitar legend John McLaughlin.

 Around the festival grounds today we've heard remarkable performances by Jason Isbell and 400 Unit, Nashville's Alanna Royale and Trombone Shorty.

Coming up later tonight: Wilco, Paul McCartney, ZZ Top and many more.

 
 
by Mike Breen 06.14.2013
 
 
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MidPoint Music Festival 2013 Playlist Update

The unofficially official Spotify playlist featuring the artists booked so far for Cincinnati's 2013 MidPoint Music Festival has been updated with all of the artists announced for this September's festival so far. Dig around and explore, find your favorite new artists (you may even find an artist or two not mentioned in the first two lineup announcements) and start planning for what is looking to be the best MidPoint Music Fest yet, Sept.. 26-28 in the venues of beautiful Over-the-Rhine and Downtown Cincinnati.

Click here to grab your MPMF.13 tickets now.


 
 
by RIC HICKEY 06.14.2013
Posted In: Live Music, Festivals, Live Blog at 01:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bonnaroo 2013: Walk The Moon Thrills

As Thursday began, we heard the tragic news of two people from the Tristate who were killed in an automobile accident on their way to the festival. (Five others were injured in the same crash.)

All told, Bonnaroo attendees and staff number close to 90,000 souls during peak hours. For this long weekend in June Manchester becomes the seventh largest city in Tennessee, with births and deaths on-site like one would expect in a small city over the course of any 96-hour span.

On a brighter note, this year's festival kicked off with a young couple tying the knot under the multi colored arch at Bonnaroo entrance.

In the late afternoon I wandered through Centeroo, perusing the various vendors' booths. Corporate sponsors abound, but non-profits and independent artisans dominate the Bonnaroo bazaar.

In the shadow of a Ferris wheel and psychedelic light tower a giant throng gathered in and around the area surrounding the Other Tent to greet Cincinnati's pure Pop pride and joy Walk The Moon


Technical glitches delayed the start of their set but they had the crowd bouncing, clapping, singing along and eating out of their hands from the minute they took the stage. 


WTM singer Nicholas Petricca shouted, "We're called Walk The Moon! We're from Ohio!" and the crowd roared as the band launched into their single "Tightrope." This writer has never seen a larger crowd assembled for a performance in the Other Tent and Petricca's buoyant charm and boundless energy kept the crowd pumped and jumping throughout the bands' entire performance.


Later in That Tent, Father John Misty brought the weird and the beard via his sardonic Folk Rock parables. I half-expected the depth and humor of FJM's material to sail over the heads of most Bonnaroovians but I was pleasantly surprised to hear many people singing along. A huge fan of his new Fear Fun album, I think I would have driven all the way to Tennessee just to hear Misty sing "Only Son Of The Ladiesman". He didn't make me wait long, playing it in the No. 2 slot.

(Walk the Moon hotos by Chuck Madden)

 
 
by Mike Breen 06.14.2013
Posted In: Festivals, Live Music, Music Video at 11:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Go to the Movies with The Hiders

Local band performs a special show with artist Anthony Luensman tonight at The Esquire

Transcendent, rootsy local band The Hiders are going to the movies tonight — and you are more than welcome to join them. The group will be performing at Clifton’s Esquire Theatre for a special concert that will feature visual accompaniment by acclaimed Cincinnati artist Anthony Luensman (or, as he's being dubbed this evening, "Visual Structuralist"). Check out some of Anthony's stunning work here.

There should be an interesting "midnight movie" kinda vibe, with the show beginning at 11 p.m. and being promoted as "a surreal night of live music and imagery."

Admission to "Art at the Art House: The Hiders at The Esquire" is just $3 and a cash bar will be available for drinkers. Visit thehiders.com for more on the group and click here for more on tonight's performance. The Hiders are scheduled to appear at the Bunbury Music Festival next month; if you're already making your itinerary, be sure to catch the group on the fest's final day (July 14) at 5:45 p.m.

Here's a great music video (directed by
Anthony Francis Moorman) for the song "Under Shooting Stars," which can be found on The Hiders' latest, greatest LP, Temenos.



 
 

 

 

 
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