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by Rachel Podnar 07.02.2014
Posted In: Life at 12:51 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From The Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the July 2 issue of CityBeat

All right guys, you know the drill. I found nine words this week to choose from, the most I’ve noticed so far. Maybe the writers are doing it on purpose?

Be sure to check out the issue (and subsequently this blog) before the Fourth of July food coma and drunken stupor sets in. That doesn't give you much time so you'd better get started ...


Autodidactic: like a self-taught person, adj.

I could have figured this out without wordreference.com if I would have just thought about it a little bit — auto, meaning self and dictact, meaning teaching. It makes sense; it’s just that people use this word even less than they learn things for themselves.


In the paper: “I just wanted to write because, autodidactic as I am, I had the sense to know that writers write,” in Kathy Y. Wilson’s “No. 104.” Can I make a joke about Kathy’s autodidactic deduction? Yes, writers write, but as opposed to what, exactly? 

 

Cogent: appealing to the mind or reason, adj.

I can’t think of a cogent reason why I like this word, but I do. FYI, it’s pronounced COjent.


In the paper: Looks like Kathy Y. Wilson pulled a double-vocab-hitter this week, “He [Danny Cross] said cogent things to me about my voice, my skill set and my value to this city” in “No. 104,” describing how our editor got her to start writing this column two years ago. I can’t really imagine Danny saying anything cogent (jokes, jokes) but whatever he said must have worked if she’s been back for 104 weeks of columns (much more impressive than my short tenure as copy editor/blogger).

 

Epocha: the beginning of a distinctive period in the history of anything, n.

Please turn to Epoch in your dictionary, because even the 1913 Webster’s Dictionary said so. Epocha is the Latin version of epoch because John Adams just had to be that formal.


In the paper: Although it appeared in Isaac Thorn’s “The Fourth of July and Me” sidebar, the credit for this one goes to John Adams. Apparently he screwed up pretty big time when he thought what we celebrate as the Fourth of July was supposed to the Second of July. “The Second Day of July 1776 will be the most memorable Epocha in the History of American,” Adams said.

 

Je ne sais quoi: French phrase, meaning a quality that cannot be described or expressed, n.

Expressions borrowed from other languages that we are supposed to understand when used in an English sentence are hard. I know what déjà vu and pièce de résistance mean, but come on, isn't this the Fourth of July issue?


In the paper: Shout out to “Beygency Officer” Jac Kern aka Arts and Culture Editor for mixing in some French with her English this week. Also for changing the masthead to say “Beygency Officer,” I’m guessing because she had the privilege of attending Beyoncé and Jay Z’s On the Run show this past weekend. I personally have never seen the ‘90s lifetime movie The Face on the Milk Carton so I can’t give you a hint as to what Jac meant when she wrote "[The new MTV series Finding Carter] could be watchable, but will surely lack that '90's lifetime movie je ne sais quoi," in her TV roundup. I did, however, try and read the eponymous book when I was in fifth grade, but I was 11 years old and I distinctly remember being uncomfortable with the teenage sexual tension between the main character and her neighbor.


I give Jac *Pick of the Week* this week because the Beygency Officer thing was so funny and I haven’t thought about The Face on the Milk Carton since 2005 and she taught us all some French.

 

Pilsner: a tall slender footed glass for beer, n.

When I read this in the paper, I thought "Wow I wonder what a pilsner is," and I was extremely disappointed when Google Images just showed what I would describe as a “beer glass but not a stein.” Maybe you all knew what a pilsner was (it is also a type of beer) and I’m just showing my age (20) or lack of class. 


In the paper: “These boys know how to have fun and get a laugh, whether it’s drinking wine out of a pilsner glass…” in Nick Grever’s “Kings of Power” about the comically named Martin Luther and the Kings band. Now that I now what a pilsner glass is, I can appreciate the quantities of wine they drink during rehearsal.

 

Bonus round: This is more grammar than vocab, but which is correct, upward or upwards? It’s always upward, regardless of what you may say in conversation. Upward as in “The car cost upward of $30,000,” according to my handy dandy 2012 Associated Press Stylebook.

 

Also, if you’re studying for a spelling bee and dying to know what words didn’t make the cut, you can click for caliphate, contrived and histrionics yourself.

 
 
by Jac Kern 07.02.2014
Posted In: Movies, Music, TV/Celebrity, Humor at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-2

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Here at IJCGE, we’re in the business of talking trash and making jokes, not patting ourselves on the back. That being said, some readers might be interested to know that this blog was recognized last week at the Cincinnati Society for Professional Journalists’ Excellence in Journalism awards, which we assure you sounds incredibly fancier that it actually is. I Just Can’t Get Enough nabbed first place for Lifestyle Reporting — just one of several awards CityBeat received. So rest assured, when you come here for the latest Beyoncé scoop or completely biased awards show commentary, you’re utilizing an award-winning source.

And speaking of Queen Bey — who just topped Forbes’ Most Powerful list (Bow down, Oprah) — locals got the rare opportunity to breathe the same air as Mrs. Carter last weekend (just kidding, of course — we all know Bey is an alien robot goddess that does not require oxygen like us plebs). Jay Z and Beyoncé’s On the Run tour made its second stop at Great American Ballpark Saturday; read our review here. Spoiler Alert: It was the best thing that has ever happened.

Part of the joy of being a kid is the adventure. It’s all about having fun, throwing caution to the wind! Ten-year-olds don’t worry much about safety or the fact that death is lurking behind every corner. Some people believe we, as a society, are too overprotective of our children — we shelter them. But across generations we can all probably agree we did some pretty fucked up shit in our youth we’d never dream to attempt now. For kids around the northern New Jersey area between 1978 and 1996, Action Park in Vernon, N.J., played a role in those haunting memories of destructive youth decisions. Check out this short, highly entertaining doc on “the world’s most dangerous theme park.”


The Most Insane Amusement Park Ever (Full Length) by insane-amusement-park

So we’ve all had a good laugh about this defunct attraction (except all those people who died or got hurt). Well, surprise, bitch! Action Park has reopened, and everyone’s freaking out about it.

Tim & Eric fans: Check out the Steve Brule Name Generator, for your health! (I got Jranice Kringus, which is what I will answer to exclusively from this point on.)

In other news, apparently we’re still talking about Grumpy Cat. The Internet-famous feline was recently united with her doppelganger, Peter Dinklage, and is also in a new Honey Nut Cheerios commercial. Nelly, you’re in good company! #beegotswag #whyisthishappening

Remember “First Kiss,” that hot black-and-white viral vid with strangers making out (that was actually somehow a clothing ad)? Well, now there’s “The Slap,” a hands-on response to Wren’s kissing project. It features Haley Joel Osment so it is obviously amazing.

Between recording what’s become known as a rape anthem, pissing off Marvin Gaye’s family and probably cheating on/breaking up with/desperately trying to win back wife Paula Patton, Robin Thicke is generally disliked by most humans at this point. So VH1 thought this was a good opportunity to open up Twitter to questions for the singer. Apparently they never heard about #AskRKelly. It went about as well as you’d expect.

New movie trailers to hit the Interwebz: Fury, a World War II action drama from David Ayer (End of Watch, Training Day) starring Brad Pitt, Charlie from Perks of Being a Wallflower and a way-too-method Shia LaBeouf; odd-couple comedy St. Vincent that has nothing to do with Annie Clark starring Bill Murray, Chris O'Dowd, Naomi Watts and Melissa McCarthy in a role that doesn't appear to be that same sloppy, stupid fat lady caricature; and dark comedy The Skeleton Twins, in which Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig play recently reunited troubled twins.

 
 
by Rachel Podnar 06.25.2014
Posted In: Life at 12:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the June 25 issue of CityBeat

Welcome to week two of the vocab blog. I got a teaser on page 7 of the issue this week so you could say things are getting pretty serious. In case you weren’t here last week, this is where I showcase the wackiest words from this week's issue of CityBeat. I’m paying close attention while I copy edit (I guess that’s what copy editing is, paying close attention) to find the most interesting words so you can add some snazz to your vocabulary.

Aegis: used in the idiom “under the aegis of,” meaning sponsored or supported by, n.

I’m sure we’ve all read this word, using context clues for the correct definition, but I wonder how often it gets thrown around in conversation. Does anyone know how to pronounce aegis? I’m thinking AGEis, aGIS. After hitting up Merriam-Webster for a robot audio pronunciation, it’s Egis. Your next challenge is finding a way to casually incorporate it in conversation, pronouncing it correctly. 

In the paper: “under LCT’s aegis” in Rick Pender’s "Curtain Call" column for the week on the League of Cincinnati Theatres Award.

Ephemera: a class of collectable items not originally intended to last more than a short time, n.

*Pick of the Week* I like this because it’s a niche word. It can only be used to describe stuff like trading cards and tickets, which is awesome. I wonder which was used first, the adjective ephemeral, which can be used to describe anything fleeting, or the more selective noun?

In the paper: “there is little fortune in ephemera like the card,” shout-out to Maria Seda-Reeder for using ephemera correctly, describing the 1940s business card of a creepy, self-appointed “dealer of love” in “Another Man’s Treasure.” Also, if I may say, I smiled at the title because I thought "No, not one man’s trash — that’s another man’s come-up." Come-up, if you don’t know, means something like “cool stuff found in a thrift store” and Macklemore's “Thrift Shop” brought it into colloquial use.

Irascible: irritable, adj.

This is one of those words where I can feel what it’s supposed to bring to the sentence just by the way it looks and is pronounced, but I couldn’t come up with a single synonym because I really have no idea and the “feel” of a word is something I just made up.

In the paper: “a portrait of irascible President Lyndon Johnson.” Rick Pender pulled a double vocab hitter in “Curtain Call,” as you know he also gave us this week’s “aegis.” Should he get “Vocab Master” of the week? Fun fact, I learned from Ben L. Kaufman’s “On Second Thought” that theater-writer Pender is a former CityBeat arts editor. Maybe you already were aware. Perhaps some of the current editors will follow Pender’s lead and include some more daring vocabulary in their issue contributions.

Incursion: hostile invasion of territory, n.

This is basically just a fancy version of “invasion,” which I’m guessing is more widely understood. I’d like to note incursion is the opposite of excursion, which we all know is an outing.

In the paper: “The Avengers repelled an alien incursion of planet Earth,” in tt stern-enzi’s cover story on summer movies. He used “incursion” because “invasion” was just too mundane.

Relegate: to send something to a lower ranking, v.

Relegate is extremely obvious from context clues and this probably isn’t a new vocab word for anyone. But as a copy editor, I had to ask ‘Why didn’t she just use “delegate” instead? Technically, delegate would work because it also means to elect something to represent something else, but Kathy Y. Wilson was trying to convey a demotion of sort, hence relegate was the precise verb for the job. Bravo.

In the paper: “pitbulls have been relegated to outcast status,” in Kathy Y. Wilson’s “Wagging the Dog.”


Rachel Podnar writes "From the Copy Desk" weekly from her desk as CityBeat's intern copy editor. Her job is to find and correct everybody else's mistakes, occasionally referencing a dictionary to check one of our more pretentious educated writers' choices of words. She rounds up and recaps the best ones here.


 
 
by Jac Kern 06.24.2014
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Movies, Humor at 03:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-3

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

A role on a Law and Order episode is a rite of passage for actors — it won’t necessarily guarantee success, but nearly every major TV actor has done time in the Law and Order franchise. I mean honestly, if you haven’t portrayed a bludgeoned child prostitute, an over-affectionate music teacher or an undercover crack dealer, I’m really not interested in the rest of your body of work.

Who doesn’t love recognizing actors before they made it in old SVU reruns, or seeing more established actors guest-star on new episodes? One minute it’s, “Hey, isn’t that bailiff the neighbor from Shameless?” Next thing you know, it’s 3 a.m. on a Tuesday and you’re in an IMDB black hole. We’ve all been there. Thankfully for fans of Orange Is the New Black that are obsessive TV watchers, someone has cross-referenced the L&O archives to create this list of every Orange character’s appearances on everyone’s favorite gavel-thumping series.

Fun Fact: OITNB star Taylor Schilling has never appeared on L&O — and her IMDB page starts in 2007. Newbie!

Fun Fact No. 2: Taylor Swift recently got a cat and named it Olivia Benson, so. It’s been a very Dick Wolf week.

Since TV and food go together like Benson and Stabler (never forget), Ben & Jerry’s is releasing a line of Saturday Night Live-inspired ice cream flavors. Lazy Sunday — named after the Andy Samberg/Chris Parnell rap video that put the SNL Digital Shorts on the map in 2005 — is not flavored with Mr. Pibb and Red Vines (missed opportunity), but rather yellow and chocolate cupcake pieces in vanilla cake batter ice cream with a chocolate frosting swirl (I seriously gained four pounds typing that). Gilly’s Catastrophic Crunch, a chocolate and sweet cream ice cream swirled with marshmallow, fudge-covered almonds and caramel clusters for no apparent reason, pays tribute to Kristen Wiig’s prankster schoolgirl character. Two additional SNL flavors will roll out later this year.

Double Dare was a gem of a game show from Nickelodeon’s heyday. But stacked up against today’s sophisticated offerings like American Ninja Warrior, the family-friendly DD probably wouldn’t work in the new millennium. At least we’ll always have Marc Summers and these faaaabulous pri-zes!

History will be divided into two times: before there were selfies and when everyone just gave up on life. If this is true, Susan Sarandon and Geena Davis will find themselves on both sides of history, as they recently recreated their famous selfie Polaroid self-portrait photograph from Thelma and Louise.

 

Athletes are no strangers to hecklers. Take a pastime that’s revered on a religious level for many fans, then add alcohol — it’s not always going to be classy. During last week’s rain-delayed Reds game against the Pirates in Pittsburgh, one spirited Pirates fan took to heckling Joey Votto and Brandon Phillips. His taunts echoed in the near-empty stadium, ringing loud and clear for an amused Phillips. The second baseman responded by signing a ball for the heckler, thanking him for the support and asking him to kindly “shut the phuck up,” and posing for a picture.