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The Morning After
 
by Staff 07.17.2015
 
 
todo_lil-bub_photo-jesse-fox

Your Weekend To Do List (7/17-7/19)

Street parties, cats, plays, Ant-Man, Star Trek + Pops and more

FRIDAY

EVENT/ARTS/CATS!: LIL' BUB'S BIG ART SHOW

“Perma-kitten” Lil Bub — the Internet, TV, movie and book sensation — uses her looks to help others. The Bloomington, Ind., feline with the perpetually visible tongue and bulging eyes has raised more than $300,000 for animals in need. Now she’s headed to Leapin’ Lizard Gallery in Covington for an art show to benefit Ohio Alleycat Resource. The Madisonville spay/neuter clinic and no-kill shelter has an especially soft spot for cats like Bub, a former feral with dwarfism and other physical oddities. Help support homeless kitties not as lucky to have their own “dude” and 2 million Facebook likes. The 7-9 p.m. meet-and-greet with Bub is sold-out with a wait list, but you can still attend the silent auction, shop for works by local artists and soak up the bubbly Bub spirit. Music by Dublin Defense, hors d’oeuvres, cash bar. 7 p.m.-midnight Friday. $20. Leapin’ Lizard, 726 Main St., Covington, Ky., ohioalleycat.org.

COMEDY: AN EVENING WITH JEN KIRKMAN
Comedian, best-selling author, screenwriter and actress Jen Kirkman is the voice for what the world is actually thinking, and her stand-up act is an honest and humorous way of saying exactly what’s on her own mind. Not only is Kirkman well-known for her frequent appearances on Comedy Central’s Drunk History and @midnight, her Netflix Original debut I’m Gonna Die Alone (And I Feel Fine) began streaming this summer. Join Kirkman alongside comic, actress, writer and television host Brooke Van Poppelen as they take over the stage at the Taft Theatre. 8:30 p.m. Friday. $15. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org

ONSTAGE: THE 25TH ANNUAL PUTNUM COUNTY SPELLING BEE
Back in February 2005 I was in New York City to see some shows, and at the last moment (on a Saturday afternoon) I was offered the chance to see a new off-Broadway show I hadn’t heard of, The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. I was totally charmed by the tale of adolescents (played by young adult actors) competing in a spelling contest, and I told acquaintances afterwards that it would surely become a staple of universities and community theaters. The production currently offered by the Commonwealth Theatre Company at Northern Kentucky University’s Stauss Theatre, where Spelling Bee is being presented as the second of two summer dinner theater shows. Directed by Roderick Justice, Spelling Bee works because Rachel Sheinkin’s script has created a half-dozen youngsters who are quirky and intense, some nervous and others cocky. Presented by Commonwealth Theatre Company at Northern Kentucky University. Continues through July 26. artscience.nku.edu.

Rodger Pille as John Adams in '1776' at Incline Theatre
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: 1776
The musical 1776 requires a cast of about two dozen strong male singers and actors to portray our founding fathers. They were a querulous bunch with opinions from all points on the political spectrum, not too different from today’s politicians, in fact. This production at the new Incline Theater has rounded up fine cast of performers, led by Rodger Pille as feisty Boston attorney John Adams, the flash point in the back-and-forth argument about whether the colonies should declare their independence from England. The show’s opening number, “Sit Down, John” announces immediately that we will meet a crowd of very human characters. Through July 26. $26 adults; $23 students. Warsaw Federal Incline Public Theater, 801 Matson Place, Price Hill, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

Paul Rudd in 'Ant-Man'
Photo: Disney/Marvel
FILM: ANT-MAN
Writer-director Edgar Wright (Shaun of the Dead and Scott Pilgrim vs. the World) and his creative partner Joe Cornish (director of Attack the Block) had a dream — long before such things were practical — to bring one of their favorite comic book superheroes to life. They wanted to bring Ant-Man to the big screen, so they set about the task of penning a screenplay for Wright to helm. The pair imagined Paul Rudd as their heroic little Ant-Man, a burglar named Scott Lang seeking a shot at redemption and to provide for his young daughter. What Ant-Man proves to be is a capable independent heist movie — think Mission: Impossible meets Fast Five with weird and wacky dollops of The Usual Suspects and To Catch a Thief thrown in for good measure — that also happens to be a wonderful Scott Pilgrim twist on what a Marvel superhero should look like. Every detail, both big (Michael Douglas) and small (Peña), works to alter our perceptions of we mean when we talk about this genre and those crazy expectations. 

SATURDAY
EVENT: DANGER WHEEL
Pendleton transforms into a sort of Fast & Furious franchise with the inaugural Danger Wheel, a downhill big-wheel race fundraiser where adults get to climb onto over-sized big-wheels and race down 12th Street to win the title of Danger Champion. This outdoor event features not only an epic crash-course, but also booths by local breweries including Madtree, Rhinegeist, Christian Moerlein and more, as well as food from food trucks, streetpops and Nation Kitchen+Bar. Guest and fans, BYOS (bring your own seat) and get a great view. Big-wheels will be provided for racers. 4-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. 378 E. 12th St., Pendleton, dangerwheel.com.

'Star Trek'
Photo: Paramount Pictures

FILM: STAR TREK LIVE IN CONCERT
Live long and prosper with an in-sync live performance of the score to the 2009 blockbuster Star Trek (PG-13). Held at the Taft Theatre, the Hollywood extravaganza will be thrillingly soundtracked by the Cincinnati Pops Orchestra with Constantine Kitsopoulos as conductor. Watch the film, the first in the latest Star Trek franchise reboot, and listen to Oscar-winning composer Michael Giacchino’s score whether you’re reuniting with Captain Kirk and Spock or a newbie aboard the starship Enterprise. You should probably wear a costume to this galactic journey through time, space and music. “Beam me up, Scotty.” 7:30 p.m., Saturday. $10-$60. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.

Cincy Summer Streets
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCY SUMMER STREETS
Cincy Summer Streets — a program that converts streets from dangerously busy thoroughfares for motorized traffic to idyllic urban playgrounds for pedestrians and cyclists, at least for a few hours — kicks off its 2015 season on Saturday in Walnut Hills. East McMillan Street will be reserved for such activities as cycling (rental bikes are available), jump-roping, lawn bowling, mini-golf, hula-hooping, yoga, crosswalk-painting and more. Two more Summer Streets events, sponsored by Interact for Health and the Haile Foundation, are planned in Northside on Aug. 23 and Over-the-Rhine on Sept. 26. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. East McMillan Street, between Victory Parkway and Chatham Street, Walnut Hills, cincysummerstreets.org.

Blessid Union of Souls
Photo: Provided
EVENT: BASTILLE DAY CELEBRATION IN MONTGOMERY
Bastille Day is fun because it’s a holiday based entirely on the fact that a bunch of French peasants went and guillotined a bunch of French aristocrats — a bit like our Fourth of July Independence Day celebration, but bloodier. To fête the beginning of the French Revolution, the city of Montgomery will be holding a Bastille Day celebration, with Cincinnati favorite Blessid Union of Souls (they of “Hey Leonardo (She Likes Me for Me)” fame) headlining an evening of entertainment. There will also be street café vendors, a kids’ area, an animal show and 60-minute historic walking tours of old Montgomery. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. Downtown Montgomery, between Cooper and Remington roads, montgomeryohio.com.

Thing-stead installation
Photo: Aaron Walker
ART: THING-STEAD ARTIST BOOKS
Two veterans of Cincinnati’s co-op gallery scene, now students at the University of Illinois at Chicago, will present their strange and fascinating new project, Thing-stead artist-books, Saturday night at Camp Washington’s Wave Pool gallery. And given that Chris Reeves’ and Aaron Walker’s work is deeply inspired by Fluxus, the mixed-media (or “intermedia”) movement of the 1950s and 1960s in which avant-garde art was made with a spirit of fun, the 7-10 p.m. Wave Pool event will be a happening. It will include readings and performances. Read the full story here. 7-10 p.m. Saturday. Wave Pool, 2940 Colerain Ave., wavepoolgallery.org.

SUNDAY
Lux Alptraum
Photo: Provided
COMEDY: THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF BONING 
“It’s just taking a loving and humorous look at how terribly we tackle such an important topic,” says sex educator and comedian Lux Alptraum of her show The Wonderful World of Boning: Sex Ed with a Sense of Humor, a new outcropping of the popular Found Footage Festival series. “I had these movies in my house and I thought I should really show them to the world,” she says. “I decided to do a sort of Mystery Science Theater 3000 treatment.” So she enlisted some comedian friends to say funny things about the vintage sex-ed films. Joining Alptraum to poke fun at the films, as it were, will be Joe Gordon, a former writer for The Onion. 8 p.m. Sunday. $10. Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., Newport, Ky., thompsonhousenewport.com.


'Clybourne Park'
Photo: Provided
ONSTAGE: CLYBOURNE PARK

Community theaters often produce tried-and-true shows that keep people laughing and happy. But Sunset Players isn’t afraid to make its audiences think, and that’s what will be happening over the next two weeks with a production of Bruce Norris’ Pulitzer Prize-winning script, set in a Chicago neighborhood in 1959 and 2009. In the first act, white community leaders try to prevent the sale of a home to a black family. In Act II, the same house is the focus as the African-American neighborhood struggles to hold its own against redevelopment. It’s an ambitious show that’s important in today’s world. Through July 25. $12-$14. The Arts at Dunham Center, 1945 Dunham Way, Western Hills, 513-588-4988, sunsetplayers.org.


Vent Haven Museum
Photo: Cameron Knight
EVENT: DOUBLE TALK

Little-known fact: Northern Kentucky is home to the Vent Haven Museum, the world’s only museum dedicated to the art of ventriloquism. And Sunday marks their annual fundraiser show, Double Talk, a fun and raucous afternoon of comedy, audience participation and ventriloquist dolls (don’t call them puppets). Featuring performances from around the country, including the No. 1 female ventriloquist in the U.S., Lynn Trefzger; young up-and-comer Peter Dzubay from Connecticut; and Tristate favorite Denny Baker. 3 p.m. Sunday. $20 advance; $25 door. Notre Dame Academy Performing Arts Center, 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, Ky. ventshow.com.


An image of the Nez Perce's Chief Joseph on display in 'Enduring Spirit'
Photo: Edward Curtis
ART: ENDURING SPIRIT: EDWARD CURTIS & THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS
Edward Curtis was an early 20th-century American ethnologist and photographer who captured the disappearing world of the American Indian. In the Taft Museum’s Enduring Spirit exhibit, Curtis chronicles the living culture of Native Americans from 1900-1930 through gelatin silver photographs, cyanotypes and platinum prints, among others. Profoundly moving, the images depict everything from powerful portraits of men, women and children to Navajo riders, painted lodges and teepees, and a famous and striking image of the Nez Perce’s Chief Joseph, a crusader who led his people against the U.S. government when they were forcibly removed from their ancestral lands in the Pacific Northwest. In addition to the exhibit, check out Saturday Sounds (noon-2 p.m.) on the terrace, with live music from Full Moon Ranch. Through Sept. 20. $10 adults; $8 seniors/students; $4 youth. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., Downtown, taftmuseum.org.



 
 
by Jac Kern 07.15.2015
at 03:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

The All-Star Game brought thousands of people to Cincinnati this past week — most importantly, celebz! Snoop Dogg, Josh Hutcherson, Ciara and tons more famous types stopped by the city, so it only made sense that hometown Indie Pop crew Walk the Moon joined in on the fun. Watch them love on Cincy:


Walk the Moon has far surpassed local band status, so much so that their tunes are being co-opted for something more sinister than an MLB All-Star Game — pregnancy announcements. This is the year 2015 and people are horrible about shoving every life event down the collective throat of everyone on the Internet, but this really might be the worst one yet. #birthcontrol 

True Detective’s second season has reached its midpoint (yes, already) and that shit can still be hard to follow. At a certain point, all the disheveled men and highway shots and rail project talks just start to blur together. We Get the World We Deserve (a reference to Season One) is a handy little blog with graphic depictions of TD characters and plot points. If that doesn’t help, at least there’s a lot less people to keep track of after last week’s episode…

Big ups to A.V. Club for pointing out that Velcoro’s partner/sloppy detective Teague Dixon is also Warren from There’s Something About Mary. Show off that range, W. Earl Brown!

Amy Schumer’s first major film opens this week, in case you haven’t noticed the comedian's takeover of all media over the past few months. Let’s be clear: Amy Schumer is bae. She’s smart, funny and talented. I love her Comedy Central show and just her in general as a human (in my mind). But if we don’ back off on some of the Amymania, girl is gonna get thrown out to the curb like Lena Dunham. Attention, world: it’s OK to like more than one funny, outspoken non-stick figure at one time!

Anyway, here’s an interview with Schumer with Jon Hamm stepping in as her Trainwreck co-star Bill Hader.


The Comic-Con to end all comic-cons returned to San Diego for the 45th year last weekend, and with it came a treasure trove of celebrity panels, exclusive trailers and epic costumes. What used to be a fest devoted to comic books and sci-fi/fantasy movies has expanded into an overall celebration of all pop culture (Last Man on Earth, Food Network and Gumby all had a presence at this year’s event.)

Peep some of the best cosplay here and here, and find trailers for Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, Suicide Squad, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2, The Walking Dead and new companion series Fear the Walking Dead and more here.

Fans of zombie media and those of boy bands have to be some of the most enthusiastic in all of fandom. So, naturally, a zombie movie starring former boy banders would be a huge success, right? That’s what Syfy is banking on with its upcoming flick, Dead 7. The Backstreet Boys’ Nick Carter wrote, directed and will star (!!!) in the movie alongside bandmate A.J. McLean and *NSYNC’s Joey Fatone. What more could you ever possibly want?

Japp’s, Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar, Wiseguy Lounge and Newberry Bros Coffee all made The Bourbon Review’s list of the country’s top 75 bourbon bars. Cheers!

Lachey’s Bar, the A&E reality series about…Lachey’s Bar in Over-the-Rhine, premieres tonight. Tune in at 10:30 p.m. after Wahlburgers and Donnie Loves Jenny, as part of what is apparently A&E’s Last Grasp at Fame time block. Read more about what's on TV this week here.

As if Comic-Con trailers weren’t enough, two more just dropped that look great. And by great, I mean Amy Poehler + Tina Fey; Jennifer Lawrence — 'nough said.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 07.10.2015
Posted In: Culture, Dating, Fun at 10:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_cincysportsfest

Your Weekend To Do List (7/10-7/12)

Well, there's a lot of baseball stuff.

FRIDAY

CINCY SPORTS FEST 2015
The best thing after making memories might just be, well, buying them. And that’s something you can do at the Cincy Sports Fest, an autographs and collectibles event that will bring in more than 100 exhibitors selling baseball memorabilia, sure to help you cherish the memories you make during the All-Star Game. The four-day event is also a way for hardcore fans to meet the living legends of America’s favorite pastime. For All-Star Gamers, Northern Kentucky’s Southbank Shuttle (tankbus.org) has a new route, which includes pick-up and drop-off in front of the fest at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center. Friday (VIP)-Tuesday. $5 one-day; $20 four-day. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, Ky., cincy2015.com.

ALL-STAR FANFEST
This fan-friendly and family-friendly convention includes more than 100 appearances from baseball legends and Hall of Famers. Fans can check out players’ official All-Star Game uniforms, run around and take batting practice and hang out in mini dugouts. There will be daily player appearances and autograph sessions, plus artifacts from the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Friday-Tuesday. $35 adult; $30 children/seniors. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, 513-419-7300, allstargame.com.

Volksfest
Photo: Provided
VOLKSFEST
Meaning “people’s festival” in German, Volksfest brings all of Cincinnati’s favorite local beers together in one place for a two-day celebration of the Queen City’s craft brewing culture. Featuring more than 20 different area breweries, some of which have created special beers just for Volksfest, the idea is to focus on lighter, lower ABV and session beers for hot summer days. There will be music and food, and both families and dogs are welcome. 5 p.m.-midnight Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. Listermann Brewing Company, 1621 Dana Ave., Evanston, listermannbrewing.com.

The Summer Draft at Taft's Ale House
Photo: Provided
THE SUMMER DRAFT AT TAFT’S ALE HOUSE
All your favorite local breweries and eats come together at Taft’s Ale House for the all-outdoors Summer Draft All-Star Weekend party. Featuring beers from MadTree, Rhinegeist, Christian Moerlein and Taft’s Ale’s summer selections, paired with Eckerlin Meats from Findlay Market, the draft party also features live music from locals Yo Mama’s Big Fat Booty Band, The Almighty Get Down, Jake Speed and more. Noon-11 p.m. Friday-Sunday. Free. 1429 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, taftsalehouse.com

 
COV200 SUMMER CELEBRATION & ROEBLINGFEST

Founded in 1815, this summer marks the city of Covington’s 200th birthday, and they’re going to be fêting their bicentennial the same way you would if you had been alive for 200 years — with a huge six-day celebration. Focused along Covington’s riverfront, there will be a 50-foot Ferris wheel at Covington Landing, a “Bark Centennial” dog parade in MainStrasse, historical tours of the Licking Riverside’s beautiful homes, kids’ activities, food, drink, music, performances from Circus Mojo and much more. Also includes the 11th-annual RoeblingFest on Saturday, with tours of the Roebling Suspension Bridge. 6-10 p.m. Thursday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday-Tuesday. Covington Landing, Covington, Ky., cov200.com/summercelebration

ST. RITA FEST
The turtle soup-steeped 100-year-old tradition continues. St. Rita Fest is a three-day annual summer festival that gives participants the chance to win $25,000 in a grand raffle. When you’re not trying to get rich quick, you can celebrate the community with more than 100 booths featuring food, rides, games and the aforementioned renowned turtle soup. All proceeds benefit students of the St. Rita School for the Deaf. 7 p.m.-midnight Friday; 4 p.m.-midnight Saturday; 1-10 p.m. Sunday. $2. 1720 Glendale Milford Road, Evendale, srsdeaf.org/StRitaFest.aspx.


SATURDAY

CITY FLEA ALL STAR MARKET

A special edition of the City Flea, in honor of All-Star Weekend. The event will feature the normal curated urban flea market selections, plus some baseball-themed fun. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, thecityflea.com.



Pete Rose
4192 - AN EVENING WITH PETE ROSE
A live theatrical event during which Pete Rose discusses his childhood on the West Side, his baseball career and the Big Red Machine on a set that looks like a baseball field. Sing the National Anthem, see a surprise guest throw out the first pitch and relive the moment Rose broke Ty Cobb’s hit record on Sept. 11, 1985. 8 p.m. Saturday. $32.50-$125. Taft Theatre, 317 E. Fifth St., Downtown, tafttheatre.org.

Know Theatre
Photo: Eric Vosmeier
ONE-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL
Got a minute? How about an hour? That’s enough time to see some quick plays this weekend at Know Theatre. Local writers were invited to consider the world around them, locally and beyond, and write about moments that could only happen here and now. The result is a festival described as “a series of 60 pulses of storytelling, 60 heartbeats saying something about who we are, where we are and where we might be going as a community.” Two days only with proceeds benefiting new play development at Know. 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 and 8 p.m. Sunday. $10-$20. 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, knowtheatre.com.

GEOFF TATE
After splitting time between Los Angeles and Cincinnati, Geoff Tate is back in the Tristate full time. Since returning to Cincinnati, Tate has never been busier as he has been able to parlay his multiple appearances on Doug Benson’s Doug Loves Movies podcast into a string of East Coast and Midwest dates. Cincinnati audiences will be treated to six shows as Tate does new material attempting to reconcile his religious upbringing with his life today. Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go
Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com. 

The Color Run MLB All-Star 5K
Photo: thecolorrun.com 
THE COLOR RUN
MLB hosts an official All-Star Weekend Color Run 5K, starting at Sawyer Point. The un-timed race will wind through an All-Star-themed course downtown and into Northern Kentucky, dousing runners head-to-toe with colored powder at every kilometer. The start-line window opens at 9 a.m., with music, dancing, stretching and giveaways; waves of runners will continue to start the race every few minutes until 10 a.m. After crossing the Purple People Bridge from Northern Kentucky back into downtown, the free Finish Festival at Sawyer Point will include family-friendly entertainment, music and more color throws. Start time at 9 a.m. with waves every few minutes until 10 a.m. $45 team member; $49.50 individual. Register at allstargame.com/run.

'Don Pasquale'
Photo: Provided
DON PASQUALE
Don Pasquale offers a break from unrequited love, tragedy and death. Nobody dies in Donizetti’s comedy, which is his most-performed opera during his lifetime. The tale of an old bachelor tricked into a fake marriage with his nephew’s sweetheart is by turns hilarious and heartbreaking, and its music is like limoncello on a sweltering summer day. The physical production is a new one for Cincinnati Opera. In this iteration, Don Pasquale is a silent film star who wants a young starlet to help revive his career. Director Chuck Hudson studied with the great mime Marcel Marceau and, according to Mirageas, many of Marceau’s famed characters and routines will turn up. Read more here. 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. Music Hall, Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatiopera.org.

SUNDAY
Norwood Highlanders Vintage Baseball Team
HEART OF VINTAGE BASEBALL
The annual Heart of Vintage Baseball Tournament pits the area’s 1860’s-style baseball clubs against each other in a series of games using Civil War-era sporting rules. 10 a.m. Sunday. Coney Island, 6201 Kellogg Ave., California, norwoodhighlanders.com.

Rhinegeist
Photo: Molly Berrens
CITYBEAT AND RHINEGEIST WIFFLE BALL HOME RUN DERBY
Rhinegeist and CityBeat have partnered to play Wiffle Ball for a cause, with a home run derby inside the OTR brewery. Anyone can play — a $5 entry fee gets you 10 swings and your $5 goes directly to help the Bow Tie Cause and the Jason Motte Foundation. Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. $5. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, rhinegeist.com.

DIVERSITY IN BASEBALL
Referred to as America’s Pastime, baseball also mirrors America’s social progress — as barriers were removed in society, so too were those in baseball. The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center’s Diversity in Baseball exhibit celebrates the players who have broken racial and other social barriers. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. $15 adults; $13 seniors; $10.50 children. 50 E. Freedom Way, The Banks, Downtown, freedomcenter.org.





 
 
by Jac Kern 07.08.2015
at 02:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-3

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

American Girl dolls can teach us a lot: what it might be like to be a girl growing up during the American Revolution, Civil War or World War II; how to care for a special collectable; the things white people will blow hundreds of dollars on. But now they’re teaching us how to kick ass.  

Fast-food kids meal toys are serious business. From the controversy of pandering junk food and crap prizes to kids and the idea of “boy” and “girl” toys to the chaos of collectible items (remember the mini McBeanie Babies?), that inedible side dish served alongside nuggets is kind of a big deal. I even remember flipping out in a drive-through line over a Catwoman toy at a weak moment in my 8-year-old life. So it only made sense that a (fake) story about a McDonald’s employee dropping his mix tapes into Happy Meals went viral recently. Few took the time to notice the original source was Huzlers, a parody site. What is true is that the mugshot of a Micky D’s employee they used was real — only he was selling drugs, which is arguably not as funny.

On the topic of kid stuff, Maria from Sesame Street (aka Sonia Manzano) is leaving the block after 44 years. Fourty-four years.

Lots of rumors have surrounded the upcoming season of HBO’s The Leftovers — few actors would be returning, there’d be a totally new setting, etc. Well fans of the show, which debuted last summer, can calm the hell down now because nearly all the characters will be back and the new setting looks fascinating.

This is how a graffiti artist and city cleanup play a yearlong game of tag.

Fucking wedding-moons are a thing now. File this with mason jars and “greige” in my GO AWAY NOW folder.

Here’s a map of the most popular fictional character from every U.S. state. Ohio’s is kind of a bummer — Freddy Krueger. I didn’t even realize A Nightmare on Elm Street was set in Ohio (in the go-to fictional town of Springfield), let alone that director Wes Craven was from Cleveland. Kentucky’s character is a bit more contemporary and less creepy: Rick Grimes from The Walking Dead.

Stephen Colbert stepped in to host Only in Monroe, a Michigan public access show. Colbert reported on various Monroe happenings and history tidbits, interviewed the regular hosts of the program and welcomed Michigan native Marshall Mathers to the show.

An architecture firm in Australia announced its plans for a Beyoncé-inspired skyscraper in Melbourne. They design is apparently based on the artsy fabric dancing in her “Ghost” video. Looks like The Beygency has new headquarters!

7 Days in Hell premieres this Saturday — read more in this week's TV column.

Nick and Drew Lachey’s A&E reality show premieres next Wednesday. We all know Lachey’s Bar in OTR and now we can watch it on TV. Let’s not forget the last time A&E cameras were in town, though — with Rowhouse Showdown, shit got weird.

 
 
by Jac Kern 07.01.2015
at 12:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-1

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

It’s always weird when a celebrity agrees to do a local morning news show, especially when the local channel’s city has nothing to do with the star or whatever they’re promoting (a TV show, movie or product). Morning Show All-Star Tracy Morgan knows how to do the that local live TV circuit right, but most others just leave us wondering, “Why did your manager make you do this?”. Such is the case for Workaholics and Dope star Blake Anderson.

Doesn’t everybody know never to wake Blake up before noon and expect him to conduct a family-friendly interview and not just completely fuck shit up on in live TV? (It's like feeding a Gremlin after midnight!) Fox 19’s Frank Marzullo didn’t. He recently interviewed Blake via satellite, and between having a bagel v. donut debate, Blake dozing off and barely skirting around F-bombs, the segment was cut before they even really got to talk about the movie (which, it bears repeating, has nothing to do with Cincinnati or a Fox morning audience). Blame it on the Golden State Warriors!

Note to NPR: If you’ve got a Kardashian on the program (in this case Kim on Wait Wait…Don’t Tell Me!) snobby nerds will revolt!

Did you hear about the young Florida boys who identified a house fire, called 911 and entered the burning home to rescue two babies? Amazing. Brave. Heroic. But they’re just not as fearless as Tyra Banks, who changed millions of lives recently when she posted a makeup-free, non-filtered photo of herself on Instagram. You so strong, Ty Ty Baby!

Ever want to look up a movie or show by name and find which streaming services have it? Problem solved. Can I Stream.It? lets you search for films and TV shows and tells you if it's available for streaming, digital rental, purchase, etc. and where to find it. The future is now!

Wet Hot American Summer’s Netflix series prequel debuts later this month, and we finally have a trailer!


Sessy math: Chris Pratt + Chris Evans = Chris Hemsworth

Fake documentaries are all the rage right now. OK, there’s like two premiering on TV this summer but it’s definitely worth noticing. First up: Andy Samberg and Kit Harington (dream threeway, right?) star as professional tennis players in the hilarious looking sport mockumentary 7 Days in Hell. Harrington is presumably pretty stoked to star in an HBO feature that’s light and funny not so murdery and full of spoilers (#thenightismurderyandfullofspoilers). Let’s not even speak of that other show he’s on…

Coming up later this summer on IFC is Documentary Now!, a faux music documentary starring Bill Hader and Fred Armisen. Keep it coming, funny dudez.

Thanks to Facebook, you know some of your embarrassing homophobic extended family and former classmates may equate gay pride parades with terrorism, but CNN actually thought they spotted an ISIS flag during New York Pride. But it wasn’t ISIS ... It was dildos. 

It was an epic Pride Week as the Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states last Friday! Cheers to love, equality and Saturday Night Live for pulling this skit from the archives. Because, face it, we all really might need some Xanax for gay summer weddings.

xanax for Gay summer weddings from MisterB on Vimeo.

 
 
by Staff 06.26.2015
at 10:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pride pub crawl

Your Weekend To Do List (6/26-6/28)

A really huge celebration of PRIDE! Plus Panegyri, a beer festival, lots of live music and more.

FRIDAY

PRIDE!!!! Kick off the weekend with the PRIDE PUB CRAWL

Friday the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges, a set of cases challenging same-sex marriage bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. The court ruled in a 5-4 opinion that the equal protection clause of the constitution requires all states to grant marriage rights to same-sex couples. "The Fourteenth Amendment requires a State to license a marriage between two people of the same sex and to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out of state," the decision, penned by Justice Anthony Kennedy reads. ""It is now clear that the challenged laws burden the liberty of same-sex couples, and it must be further acknowledged that they abridge central precepts of equality," the decision later states.

Celebrate with a Pride Pub Crawl: Tour 16 LGBTQ+ bars across Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Shuttles will run with stops in downtown, Over-the-Rhine, Clifton, Northside, Newport and Covington. Wristbands required. No cover. 9 p.m.-3 a.m. $10 wristbands. cincinnatipride.org.


Celebrate love and Hip Hop with the OFFICIAL RAINBOW FEST
Love & Hip Hop Atlanta star Rasheeda performs with a special celebrity guest, featuring DJ Trubb and hosted by Bo$$ Britt of Cincy LGBT and M.A. of Sauce Gang. 10:30 p.m. $10 with any other Friday night event ticket. Bogart's 2621 Vine St., Corryville, 614-999-3905.

Panegyri Greek Festival
Photo: Provided
Gorge on baklava sundaes at PANEGYRI GREEK FESTIVAL
If you’re a fan of cult-classic My Big Fat Greek Wedding (and who isn’t?), then get yourself to Holy Trinity-St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church for their annual Panegyri Greek Festival. This Queen City favorite features bouzouki music, traditional Greek dancers (where visitors are encouraged to join in on group dances!), rides, a Greek culture exhibit, cooking demonstrations, and, most importantly, a plethora of delicious Greek foodstuffs. There will be souvlaki, spanakopita, Greek pizza, moussaka, gyros, and much, much more — you can even pick up handmade Greek pastries to take home. 5-11 p.m. Friday; 3-11 p.m. Saturday; 1-8 p.m. Sunday. $2; free ages 12 and younger. 7000 Winton Road, Finneytown, 513-591-0030, panegyri.com.

Celebrate Radiohead with RADIOHEAD: THE BENDS TRIBUTE SHOW
Radiohead’s 1997 album, OK Computer, is considered a classic by critics and fans alike, while post-OK albums like Hail to the Thief and In Rainbows are hailed for their progressive experimentalism. But in 1995, after garnering attention with the hit “Creep” and before breaking wide with OK Computer, Radiohead released one of the more underappreciated LPs of its discography, the melodic, guitar-driven The Bends, which contained classics like “Fake Plastic Trees” and “Just.” In honor of the album’s 20th anniversary, local musicians Kyle Knapp, Todd Patton, Dennis DeZarn, Christopher Robinson and Josh Purnell perform the album in its entirety. Saturn Batteries opens. 9:30 p.m. Friday $5. Southgate House Revival (Sanctuary Room), 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky., southgatehouse.com.

Despite her battle with cancer, Sharon Jones has continued to bring her unbridled energy to stages across the country while on tour with her powerhouse Soul band, The Dap-Kings.
Photo: Jake Chessum
Head to Riverbend for the TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND and SHARON JONES AND THE DAP-KINGS
Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks, both individually and as a unit, are musicians about whom words can barely do justice. Something of a power duo, Tedeschi and Trucks have been slaying it onstage separately for decades. With every member bringing strong, varied influences and serious commitment, the band is as hot as ever and only getting better with every show. See Tedeschi Trucks Band with Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings and Doyle Bramhall II Friday at PNC Pavilion at Riverbend. More info/tickets: riverbend.org. Read an interview with Jones here.

Heartless Bastards
Photo: Courtney Chavanell
Catch the second night of the HEARTLESS BASTARDS at Woodward Theater
From the very start, Heartless Bastards made it clear they weren’t interested in reinventing the Blues/Classic Rock wheel, just riding it as far and as fast as humanly possible without ever forgetting how they got where they were going and where they came from in the first place, musically and geographically. Wennerstrom was never aiming to become Rock’s poet laureate; she just wanted to play her guitar to the very limits of its tolerances and project her wildly distinctive voice into the atmosphere with no greater purpose than to dust a few rafters, open a few clogged ears, make a few new fans and entertain the ones smart enough to have been around from the beginning. Restless? Absolutely. Heartless? Not by a long shot. Heartless Bastards with Craig Finn perform Thursday and Friday at Woodward Theater. More info/tickets: woodwardtheater.com.

SATURDAY
Erika Ervin
Have the best time at the PRIDE PARADE

The annual Cincinnati Pride Parade steps off at Central Avenue and Seventh Street downtown at 11 a.m., continues down Seventh to Vine, past Fountain Square and The Banks, ending at Sawyer Point/Yeatman’s Cove. Model/actress Erika Ervin (American Horror Story: Freak Show’s Amazon Eve) serves as Grand Marshal. 11 a.m. Free. Downtown, cincinnatipride.org.


Then go to the PRIDE FESTIVAL 

Following the parade, the fun continues at Sawyer Point with food, drinks, vendors, a family-fun zone and live music from headliners Betty Who and Steve Grand. Noon-9 p.m. Free. Sawyer Point/Yeatman’s Cove, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown, cincinnatipride.org.


Karina Rice bakes artisan donuts for her traveling pop-up, Gadabout Doughnuts.
Photo: Jesse Fox

Get a rare GADABOUT DOUGHNUT at the O.F.F. Market

Cincinnati is filled with artisan bakers, so what’s one more? At Oakley Fancy Flea Market (O.F.F. Market) on May 30, Karina Rice debuted her handcrafted donuts under the moniker Gadabout Doughnuts, a term meaning “a person who flits about in social activity.” The market was a success, and it marked the beginning of Gadabout making life in the city a little bit sweeter.  Last November, Rice was working at a Starbucks in Madeira, but she wasn’t satisfied.  “I was really tired of doing that, and I wasn’t finding what I was looking for,” she says. “I was like, ‘I’m going to start something on my own. I’m not sure what.’ We (she and husband Chaz) looked at the pop-up shop model, and then donuts had really gotten popular. I saw that modeled together and was like, ‘That could work.’ ” Gadabout Doughnuts will be at Oakley’s O.F.F. Market Saturday. For more info, visit gadaboutdoughnuts.com or follow @gadaboutdonuts on Instagram.


Party at the inaugural OTR BEERFEST: CANIVAL

Washington Park hosts the inaugural Over-the-Rhine brew festival dedicated solely to cans — OTR Beerfest: CANival. It’s a celebration of canned craft beer (no glass bottles here) and features more than 100 different varieties from breweries all over the country, including locals. There will entertainment on stage all day, food trucks lining 14th Street, and the event producers promise there are many more surprises up their sleeves. Buy three beer tokens for $5, each good for a 4-ounce pour of beer, or use all three for a 12-ounce can. 1-11 p.m. Saturday. 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.


SUNDAY

Pop Up Drag Brunch
Photo: Provided 
Get a hangover recovery brunch at Metropole's POP UP DRAG BRUNCH

Help turn the Queen City into Drag Queen City while getting your brunch game on. You can celebrate Cincinnati Pride and your appetite at 21c Museum Hotel’s Metropole restaurant during Pop Up Drag Brunch, an event that includes cocktails from mixologist Catherine Manabat, a brunch prepared by chef Jared Bennett and, of course, live performances from local drag queens. The brunch is part of the city’s much larger Pride Week Festival, Parade and other associated events, which celebrate Cincinnati’s LGBTQ+ community. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Sunday. Call for reservations. 609 Walnut St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-578-6660, 21ccincinnati.com.

Brooklyn Steele-Tate
Photo: Provided
Hit a surprise party with the CINCINNATI MEN'S CHORUS TEA DANCE
Celebrate the Cincinnati Men’s Chorus’ 25th-anniversary season with a pool party at a surprise location — buy a ticket to find out where. Includes adult beverages, light bites and pool fun with music by Brooklyn Steele-Tate. 2-5 p.m. Sunday. $50. cincinnatipride.org.

Head to Cheviot for WESTFEST
Harrison Avenue transforms into the West Side’s biggest street party for the 14th year in a row. An estimated 30,000 people will fill the block, featuring two separate stages for live local music, as well as beer booths, snow cone stands and grub from local eateries such as N.Y.P.D. Pizza, Maury’s Tiny Cove, Big Dog BBQ and many more. This event also offers a Kid Zone with rides, games and contests. 1 p.m.-midnight Saturday; 1-10 p.m. Sunday. $2. Harrison Avenue, Cheviot, cheviotwestfest.com.

Greensleeves Garlic Festival
Photo: Provided
Bring the gum to GREENSLEEVES GARLIC FESTIVAL
Garlic: It’s not just for scaring away vampires. This bulb, a cousin to the onion, has been in both culinary and medicinal use for thousands of years, and is a staple in Asian and Mediterranean diets. The annual Greensleeves Garlic Festival lets you sample 20 varieties of garlic during a day-long event with live music, farm tours and more, including a Garden Scamper cooking competition. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Sunday. $5. Greensleeves Farm, 10851 Pleasant Ridge Road, Alexandria, Ky., greensleevesfarm.com.

Find vintage and art treasures at the MAINSTRASSE VILLAGE BAZAAR
This outdoor marketplace is an antique- and art-lover’s dream, filled with vintage treasures and repurposed items such as furniture, home goods and décor, architectural elements, jewelry, clothing, collectibles, etc. Spend the afternoon browsing Sixth Street and check out every unique item vendors have to offer. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. Free. Sixth Street, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org.

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros
Photo: Laure Vincent Bouleau
Have a fun-loving hippie evening at Horseshoe Casino with EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS
The fun-loving hippies that make up Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros are coming to The Shoe. If you like good music and are great at ignoring band politics, you should definitely check ’em out. Just do yourself a favor and don’t land at the barricade.From the moment the group burst onto the scene in 2009, the band’s “Home” began soundtracking first dances everywhere. The sweetest sentiment from the song — “Home is wherever I’m with you” — can be found cross-stitched, painted or decaled onto seemingly half the items for sale on Etsy. With songs like “Home” and “40 Day Dream,” the band’s frontman, Alex Ebert (no, there isn’t an actual “Edward Sharpe” in the band), his female counterpart, Jade Castrinos, and their rotating cast of backing musicians quickly found adoration among a strange mix of Psychedelic music lovers and folksters alike. Read more here.  See Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros with The Bright Light Social Hour and Letts Sunday at The Shoe at The Horseshoe Casino. More info/tickets: caesars.com/horseshoe-cincinnati.

Future Science
Photo: Provided
Be super cool and go to sketch comedy show FUTURE SCIENCE at MOTR Pub
What happens when you put science and cooking together? Well, Breaking Bad, but also Future Science’s upcoming show, “Food.” A group of “scientists,” who also happen to be local comedians Andy Gasper, Karl Spaeth, Chris Weir and Logan Lautzenheiser, will discuss the present and future of food in their variously themed monthly live comedy show held at MOTR Pub. 10:30 p.m. Sunday. Free. 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/futurescienceshow.
 
 
by David Watkins 06.24.2015
Posted In: LGBT at 09:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Queer City Spotlight: Safe and Supported

Local LGBTQ+ news and views

Almost a year and a half ago, the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) invited Cincinnati’s Hamilton County and Houston, Texas’ Harris County to participate in a pilot initiative to end LGBTQ youth homelessness. Lighthouse Youth Services and Strategies to End Homelessness accepted the invitation here in Cincy and created Safe and Supported, a program that has partnered with local and national organizations like GLSEN and the Human Rights Campaign to facilitate greater local collaboration, to improve the quality of inventions and to provide new resources to homeless youth. Currently spearheading the initiative is Lighthouse Youth Services Director Meredith Hicks. CityBeat caught up with Hicks to learn more about the organization, queer homelessness in Cincinnati and how far they have come since 2014.

CityBeat: What has Safe and Supported accomplished so far?

Meredith Hicks: A couple things I am really proud of. So, first, this is a pilot initiative. We didn’t know how the community was going to respond. One of the events we held with Cincinnati Public Schools had over 100 people attend to learn more, to contribute, to sign up for our subcommittees to participate. We had young people there, we had providers, we had educators. It really was this incredible group of community members coming together. That, to me — seeing the standing room only, seeing the parents, seeing the young people — really showed me we could do this as a community and there was the interest, there was the passion, there was the drive, and people recognized the incredible need of our LGBT youth — to be able to support them an have them not experience homelessness.

CB: I bet that was a great feeling. What other accomplishments are you proud of?

MH: After the planning phase, there’s really two that stick out to me. The first one is that one of our strategies was supporting foster youth. We were able to bring in the All Children - All Families training

to our communities. Lighthouse Foster Care and Adoption completed these 10 benchmarks of improving our practices with LGBT foster youth and LGBT foster families. We also went through three days of intensive staff training and invited community partners to attend. We even had allies across the river in Kentucky that came over because they were interested in improving their work with LGBT youth as well. And actually, Lighthouse just earned the seal of recognition from the Human Rights Campaign for completing the All Children - All Families program within our foster care.

This invitation from HUD was completely unfunded, so it didn’t come with any money to do this work or actually to implement our strategies, so we really are relying on the generosity of our community, individual donors and foundations to help us with the capacity and funds to do our strategies. We held a funders briefing and we are excited that we have committed funds to support and hire a full-time director to really take this collaboration to the next level. That is what it’s going to take because we are working across multiple systems. We’re looking at education, child welfare, homelessness, juvenile justice. All of these systems have things that they can do to support LGBT youth. The director is going to be really invested in all these areas.

CB: You mentioned staff training. What kind of curriculum is involved to properly train staff members?

MH: We have six different subcommittees that also involve different community members that are also participating with their organizations or volunteering. One of those subcommittees is the cultural competency committee. They are identifying different curriculum, different resources, a structure for how organizations can improve their cultural competency. We’re looking to be able to offer that to the community in the fall, but coming up with a standardized way of doing that and then being able to offer support to organizations, or systems, or churches or whatever that want to develop a higher level of competency service LGBT youth and families.

CB: How would you describe cultural competency and why is it important in this process?

MH: Cultural competency is developing the knowledge and the skills to be able to understand somebody’s lived experience and identities and be able to respond in a supportive way. Cultural competency is a learning process you never reach or say, “OK, I’m completely competent.” It’s about developing a way of listening, understanding, learning and then an appropriate way of responding, and that’s a skill.

CB: A homelessness initiative that caught a lot of national attention was Miley Cyrus’ Happy Hippie Foundation, which is for homeless youth with an emphasis on queer youth. Can you weigh in on the foundation and celebrity-driven organizations?

MH: Yeah! So I think that any national attention, positive celebrity attention is a good thing. With Miley Cyrus, I think part of her mission is purchasing food and supplies for homeless shelters in California. I think that her actions demonstrate the need we have on a local level. Every year, Lighthouse serves over 500 youth in our street outreach team and in our homeless shelter, [ages] 18-24, that are facing homelessness. We know that up to 40 percent of them self-identify as LGBT. We have the same needs from folks that contribute food, that contribute hygiene products or socks and underwear, clothing. I hope that people look at [Cyrus’ Happy Hippie Foundation] and say, “What can I contribute in my community?” I want people to know that it’s just not just happening in New York or L.A. This is a problem in our community. It’s happening in Cincinnati, and we have committed community members that are dedicated to solving them.

CB: What are your plans for the future? What do you hope to accomplish or where do you hope to be in maybe five, 10 years with Safe and Supported?

MH: Our goal is to end youth homelessness in Cincinnati by the year 2020. I hope in five years we’ve been successful in ending youth homelessness. My vision is that this is a community collaboration between all these agencies. I hope it flourishes, we gain new partners and the structure develops and communication develops across sectors. We also have some great things coming down the pipe related to developing resource guides to help LGBT youth and providers. We’re still looking at what that format will look like — it could be a mobile application, a paper guide, a website — but one of our short-term goals is having the resources available for young people in a guide format.

For more information on queer youth homelessness and Safe and Supported, visit the following resources: True Color Fund, Strategies to End Homelessness.

 
 
by Staff 06.22.2015
Posted In: Winning at 10:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mrt

CityBeat Wins Mad Awards 2015

Reporters, editors and designers recognized for work published in 2014

CityBeat writers and designers were recognized last week with seven first-place awards and eight runners up by the Cincinnati chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. The awards ceremony recognized work completed during the 2014 calendar year, and it followed announcements of two other journalism contests — the Cleveland Press Club statewide contest and the Association of Alternative Newsmedia national awards.

The Cleveland Press Club recognized nine pieces of work, including two first-place winners, while three CityBeat staffers are finalists in the AAN contest (including Art Director Rebecca Sylvester, for her cover art for "Pileup at the Morgue," "Stranger than Fiction" and "The Love List"). AAN winners will be announced July 18.

This year’s most recognized piece of writing and reporting was “Stranger Than Fiction,” by Arts & Culture Editor Jac Kern and Staff Writer Nick Swartsell. The story won two first place awards in the Cincinnati SPJ contest — Arts/Entertainment Reporting and Investigative/Enterprise/Database Reporting — placed second in the Cleveland Press Club contest and is a finalist for the AAN’s national Arts Writing award. The Cincinnati SPJ describes it as such: “Extraordinarily thorough examination of the real impact of a staged reality TV show on an impoverished Cincinnati neighborhood. Homes were trashed to make for better TV. Story also presents a global look at how neighborhood revitalization really works.”

Other Cincinnati SPJ first-place winners were CityBeat columnist Kathy Y. Wilson for a collection of her columns; Nick Swartsell for Business Reporting (“Whose Gonna Drive You Home?”); John Lasker for Government Reporting (“Legal Limit?”); Rebecca Sylvester for Newspaper/Magazine Design/Graphic (“RAW Numbers”); and the CityBeat staff for Special Section (“Best of Cincinnati 2014”).

CityBeat photographer Jesse Fox won first place in Cleveland Press Club’s “Spot News Photography” category for her image titled, “Hands Up for Justice.” Danny Cross and Maria Seda-Reeder won first place in Arts & Entertainment Reporting for “Your Name Here.”  

In addition to Kern’s and Swartsell’s “Stranger Than Fiction,” the Association of Alternative Newsmedia named Rebecca Sylvester a finalist for Cover Design and Jesse Fox’s “Faces of Pride” project a finalist for Innovation/Format Buster.

A complete list of winners and finalists for all three contests is below:

Cincinnati Society of Professional Journalists

INVESTIGATIVE/ENTERPRISE/DATABASE REPORTING

WINNER: Jac Kern & Nick Swartsell, "Stranger Than Fiction"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Extraordinarily thorough examination of the real impact of a staged reality TV show on an impoverished Cincinnati neighborhood. Homes were trashed to make for better TV. Story also presents a global look at how neighborhood revitalization really works.

NEWS COLUMN

WINNER: Kathy Wilson

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Most of the entries were strong and focused. Wilson's were straight and to the point. She exercised the kind of passion in her opinions that left no doubt about her feelings, regardless of what you thought of them. Some entries in this category were so polite it was hard to remember it was a column for analysis and opinion. Wilson hit both on the head.

BUSINESS NEWS

WINNER: Nick Swarstell, "Who's Gonna Drive You Home"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: An engagingly written piece that ably considers the local reverberations from new, disruptive business models.

GOVERNMENT ISSUES

WINNER: John Lasker, "Legal Limit"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: This detailed and lengthy expose about the use of flawed breathalyzers in Ohio suggests possible story ideas for other states. Well-reported and well-balanced.

ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT

WINNER: Jac Kern & Nick Swartzell, "Stranger than Fiction"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: This story skillfully combines good reporting about two issues – the questionable integrity of a “reality” TV show and its impact on property in an at-risk neighborhood. A long read, but worth it.

SPECIAL SECTION

WINNER: Staff, CityBeat, “Best of Cincinnati 2014"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Fun, funky look at the best of what the city has to offer, as well as some well-written features of general interest to city and suburban dwellers. Visually exciting and fun, and let's face it, who doesn't like to know all there is about beer?

NEWSPAPER/MAGAZINE DESIGN/GRAPHIC

WINNER: Rebecca Sylvester, "RAW Numbers"

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: I think Rebecca did a great job presenting this idea. The stylized graphic treatment showing the money flow from events around the world to the "wheelbarrow-of-revenue" was a nice touch. There’s a good balance between all the elements on page. I also thought the red money backdrop in the pointer box was a nice graphic touch that emphasized the information being presented. Nice work!

FINALISTS

NEWS STORY

Finalist: Nick Swartsell, "Dreaming Big"

INVESTIGATIVE/ENTERPRISE/DATABASE

Finalist: Danny Cross & Maria Seda-Reeder, "Your Name Here"

SPORTS FEATURE/ANALYSIS/COLUMN

Finalist: Jason Gargano, "The Rebuilder"

Finalist: Josh Katzowitz, "Homegrown Heroes"

GOVERNMENT ISSUES

Finalist: Nick Swartsell, "Change of Heart

HEALTH/MEDICAL NEWS

Finalist: Nick Swartsell, "Last Clinic Standing"

COMMUNITY ISSUES

Finalist; Nick Swartsell, "Historic Crossroads"

ARTS/ENTERTAINMENT CRITIQUE

Finalist: Mike Breen, "Spill It"


Cleveland Press Club Excellence in Journalism Awards

Complete list here.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

FIRST PLACE: Danny Cross, Maria Seda-Reeder, “Your Name Here

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Investigative journalism in an arts & entertainment piece — an unusual and refreshing combination. This was a longer piece, but it was well-written and compelling to read.

SPOT NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY

FIRST PLACE: Jesse Fox, “Hands Up for Justice”

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

SECOND PLACE: Jac Kern & Nick Swartsell, “Stranger Than Fiction

FEATURES/PERSONALITY PROFILE

THIRD PLACE: Jason Gargano, “The Rebuilder

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Really liked how this story started out, what he was saying and what he really felt. The commitment to team, fans and the community. No sportizms. Clearly a man who knows himself. If there’s a sports features category, this should be in it too. Packed paragraphs with great descriptions. Nice!

PUBLIC SERVICE

SECOND PLACE: Nick Swartsell, “Pileup at the Morgue

SPORTS

SECOND PLACE: Josh Katzowitz, “Homegrown Heroes

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: Interesting local-interest piece with a national reach.

COMMUNITY/LOCAL COVERAGE

SECOND PLACE: Nick Swartsell, "Battling Barriers

JUDGE'S COMMENTS: In-depth, comprehensive look at issue of sex-trafficking. Good use of description.

GENERAL FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY

SECOND PLACE: Jesse Fox, “Zip Dip”

Association of Alternative Newsmedia

Complete list here.

FINALISTS:

ARTS WRITING

Jac Kern & Nick Swartsell, “Stranger Than Fiction

COVER DESIGN

Rebecca Sylvester


INNOVATION/FORMAT BUSTER

Jesse Fox, “Faces of Pride

 
 
by Staff 06.19.2015
 
 
rain_cloud

Your Weekend To Do List (6/19-6/21)

A ton of stuff is canceled, thanks to Tropical Depression Bill

Tropical Depression Bill is slated to make his way through the Tristate on Saturday (WCPO weather report here) with heavy rains and the possibility of flooding. Many of this weekend's events have been postponed due to weather, including Paddlefest — with the exception of Friday night's River Music & Outdoor Festival at Coney Island — and CityBeat's Porkopolis Pig & Whiskey festival, which has now moved to Saturday, Aug. 1. The rest of the outdoor events listed below have not yet been postponed, but please call or check social media before you head out — we'd hate for you to be left out in the rain.






FRIDAY
Gorge on goetta at MainStrasse's GOETTAFEST

Cincinnati has a lot of regional culinary specialties that non-Cincinnatians find weird (like, you know, Skyline), but goetta might take the cake. Made of ground pork, pinhead oats and spices, Cincinnati’s signature breakfast food has been ingrained into our city’s cultural DNA since it was first invented by German immigrants in the late 19th-century as a way to stretch a serving of meat into several meals. Cincinnati has a lot of regional culinary specialties that non-Cincinnatians find weird (like, you know, Skyline), but goetta might take the cake. Made of ground pork, pinhead oats and spices, Cincinnati’s signature breakfast food has been ingrained into our city’s cultural DNA since it was first invented by German immigrants in the late 19th-century as a way to stretch a serving of meat into several meals. 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Mainstrasse Village, Sixth Street, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org.

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion
Photo: Micha Warren

Rock with THE JON SPENCER BLUES EXPLOSION at Woodward Theater

Musical provocateur Jon Spencer chose the perfect handle for his new project when it was formed back in 1991 — Blues Explosion — and it continues to accurately reflect the visceral sound and fury emanating from his incendiary trio almost a quarter century later. The Blues Explosion’s numerous releases have been among the most scorchingly inventive and influential releases of the modern Rock age. Next year will be The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion’s 25th anniversary. And its recently released new studio album, Freedom Tower - No Wave Dance Party 2015, may well be the proof that the threesome is just getting warmed up. Read more here. The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion performs Friday at Woodward Theater. More info/tickets: woodwardtheater.com.

Jungle Jim's International Beer Festival
Photo: Provided

Cure what ales you at Jungle Jim's INTERNATIONAL BEER FESTIVAL

Cure what ales you this weekend as Jungle Jim’s brings more than 400 beers to the table for its 10th-annual International Beer Festival. You can taste (and buy) brewskis from more than 100 breweries around the world while enjoying picnic-style food.  Beer buffs and experts will be in attendance to talk shop about the sudsy art form, and you can taste special brews and rarities. The fest kicks off with a firkin tapping, “a keg of beer that’s been fermented inside of the barrel it’s fermented in,” according to Jungle Jim. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $50 daily; $20 non-drinker. Oscar Event Center, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.


By This River at the Weston Art Gallery
Stop by the opening of BY THIS RIVER at the Weston Art Gallery

The Weston Art Gallery hosts an opening reception for a group exhibition curated by Michael Solway, director of the Carl Solway Gallery, featuring six American artists “exploring the sensorial, geographical, historical and ephemeral dispersal of water from rivers to oceans.” The show began as part of an ongoing conversation between Solway and Fluxus pioneer Ben Patterson regarding their long-held mutual instinct to live near major bodies of water, and will bring together recent works by artists working in photography, painting, sculpture, paper, video and sound, as well as a series of interactive constructions. Opening reception: 6-9 p.m. Friday. Through Aug. 30. Free. 650 Walnut St., Downtown, westonartgallery.com.

Vince Morris
Photo: provided 
Laugh with VINCE MORRIS at Funny Bone on the Levee
Columbus native Vince Morris has never felt more comfortable on stage. “I have enough material that I let the crowd take me where they want to go,” he says. “I’ll talk about fatherhood or social issues, but I don’t have a strict set list. I don’t like to be too organized.” Raised by a single dad, his material about fatherhood also comes from his own experiences helping to raise his 6-year-old daughter. Wednesday-Sunday. $12-$15. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., funnyboneonthelevee.com.


SATURDAY 
Kevin Hart
Photo: Provided
See the hardest working man in show business, KEVIN HART

Kevin Hart, everyone’s favorite little comedian and most likely literally the hardest working man in show business (in the past two years he’s been in seven movies, including Ride Along, The Wedding Ringer, Get Hard and on and on), brings his “What Now?” stand-up tour to U.S. Bank Arena. According to Billboard, “What Now?” is on its way to becoming the highest-grossing comedy tour of all time. 7 p.m. Saturday. $49.50-$150. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway, Downtown, usbankarena.com.

Summer Solstice Lavendar Festival
Photo: Provided
Get calm at the Peaceful Acres SUMMER SOLSTICE LAVENDER FESTIVAL
From medicine to aromatherapy or as a fragrant ingredient in everything from cookies to tea, the Summer Solstice Lavender Festival allows attendees to stroll through blooming fields of lavender to pick a bundle and learn about its uses, as well as purchase lavender-infused body and food products. Going hand-in-hand with the herb’s calming properties, three-minute gong meditation sessions will be held all day, along with several workshops like lavender painting and wreath making. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Free. Peaceful Acres Lavender Farm, 2387 Martinsville Road, Martinsville, peacefulacreslavenderfarm.com.

Juneteenth Festival
Photo: Provided
Celebrate the end of legal slavery in America at the JUNETEENTH FESTIVAL
Juneteenth, a national celebration of Emancipation Day and the legal end of slavery in America, will hold its 28th-annual festival at Daniel Drake Park. The nonprofit festival will include historical reenactments (including visits from Abe Lincoln and Harriet Tubman), exhibits, craft demonstrations, live music and a wide variety of food. An amalgamation of June and “nineteenth,” the name reflects the date in 1865 when General Gordon Granger reissued the Emancipation Proclamation. The event, whose popularity has skyrocketed, aims to bring Cincinnati’s diverse community together to celebrate freedom. A special Father’s Day concert caps the weekend on Sunday. Noon-9 p.m. Saturday; 2:30-6 p.m. Sunday. Free. Daniel Drake Park, 5800 Red Bank Road, Kennedy Heights, juneteenthcincinnati.org.

'Il Trovatore'
Photo: Provided
See Cincinnati Opera's first summer production, IL TROVATORE
Leading off the Cincinnati Opera's 95th season is Il Trovatore, Giuseppe Verdi’s melodrama based on that old staple of Italian opera known as “la vendetta,” or vengeance. Don’t focus on the plot, which was considered overblown even in Verdi’s day, though it does propel some of Verdi’s most familiar music, including the “Anvil Chorus.” And what a cast: bass Morris Robinson, tenor Russell Thomas and the highly anticipated debut of mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton in the role of the vengeful gypsy Azucena. Read more here. 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Saturday. More info/tickets: cincinnatiopera.org.

SUNDAY
Colin Farrell in 'True Detective'
Photo: Lacy Terrell
Watch the season premiere of TRUE DETECTIVE
After a wildly successful debut season, the second iteration of crime-drama anthology True Detective is under a microscope. How can — or perhaps just can — the first season be topped? While a cop drama featuring Surfer, Dude stars Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson seemed forgettable on paper, True Detective rose to become one of the best programs of 2014. Season Two brings us a new setting, crime and cast: the disappearance of a California city manager leads to an investigation involving a dirty cop (Colin Farrell), a career criminal trying to go legit (Vince Vaughn), an uncompromising sheriff (Rachel McAdams), a damaged war-veteran officer (Taylor Kitsch) and the U.S. transportation system. Expect a more linear narrative set in the present day around various California locales, with more complicated characters to delve into. Writer/creator Nic Pizzolatto returns with rotating directors. While it’s counter-productive to harp on comparisons to Season One, it’s hard not to speculate if this season will be as strong or if it could be the Midas touch for the diverse cast — particularly Vaughn and FarrellSeason Premiere, 9 p.m. Sunday, HBO.

OR…
Bar Rescue (9 p.m., Spike) – Jon visits a bar that’s been a backdrop for a porn video.

Halt and Catch Fire (10 p.m., AMC) – Stress at Mutiny mounts as Cameron and Donna deal with the fallout from Sonaris in addition to money troubles. Elsewhere, Joe calls in Gordon’s help to get West Group’s computer systems running during off-hours.

Ballers (Series Premiere, 10 p.m., HBO) – Entourage: Sportz (alternate title) stars Dwayne Johnson as a retired football-star-turned-athlete-manager in Miami.

The Brink (Series Premiere, 10:30 p.m., HBO) – Three disconnected, unlikely men in U.S. government/military (Jack Black, Tim Robbins and Pablo Schreiber) are tasked with preventing World War III when a geopolitical crisis arises.

'Dope'
Photo: via IMDb 
See DOPE from director Rick Famuyiwa
Director Rick Famuyiwa (The Wood) has been rather quiet since Brown Sugar back in 2002, with only one other feature as a writer-director (2010’s Our Family Wedding) and a screenplay credit for Talk to Me in 2007. But he’s riding a strong wave of attention following the reception of his latest coming-of-age dramedy Dope at the Sundance Film Festival, which is not necessarily known as a hotbed for embracing stories about geeks in Inglewood, Calif. While there will certainly be gangsters, drug dealers and tough choices facing the film’s young college hopeful (Shameik Moore), Famuyiwa won’t forget to highlight the pop culture referencing teen dreams that will not be deferred nor deterred.






 
 
by Staff 06.17.2015
at 08:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
larry gross

Remembering Larry Gross

Longtime staffer and columnist Larry Gross passed away June 15, 2015. He was 61.

CityBeat is sad to announce the passing of longtime staffer and columnist Larry Gross, a great friend, an innovative and thoughtful author and a longtime supporter of independent media. He was 61. 

To honor his memory, we're re-publishing his November 2014 column, "Should I Die Tomorrow," in which Larry reflects: "I have a feeling if my life really does pass before my eyes, I’m gonna die knowing I had a pretty good one. For that, I’m feeling thankful and blessed."

His family asks that in lieu of flowers or donations to consider supporting a locally owned business, alternative newspaper or artist whose work speaks to you.


"Should I Die Tomorrow"
By Larry Gross

Just so you know, I’m writing this in mid-afternoon in late October. I know this column will run in CityBeat in early November and will be my last one before Thanksgiving. I’m assuming I’m going to live long enough to get these words to my editor. Of course, you know what happens when you assume. 

Actually, I seldom assume anything. There’s no guarantee I will live to see another day. Death isn’t something I think about all that much, but when I do, it doesn’t scare me like it did when I was a kid. Hell, I’m 60 years old now and feel lucky to have lived this long. I think the older you get, the more you put things in proper prospective, and today, in late October, I’m thinking about my life and also the people I love who have been in it. 

Should I die tomorrow, I know my daughter is going to be just fine. She has a management job at Kroger — started out as a bagger there when she was a teenager. I like to think she gets her strong work ethic from me. If that’s not the case, just let me think it anyway. She got married in September of 2013 to a great guy who also works for Kroger. I guess I’m not supposed to like my son-in-law, you know, taking my little girl away from me and all that, but I do like him and know he loves my daughter and will protect her when I’m gone. 

Should I die tomorrow, I know my son is going to be OK, too. He just got engaged to a wonderful girl, owns his own home and has a great job at General Electric. When he was a little boy, it concerned me that, for whatever reason, I didn’t feel close enough to him. That changed after he came to live with me a few years after my wife and I divorced in 1994. The trials and tribulations and the give and take between us during his teenage years brought us closer together. I look back on those days and cherish them. He knows this, as I’ve told him many times. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll be grateful to my ex-wife who I have remained friends with since our divorce in 1994. I still see her about once a month. I think we get along better as friends instead of husband and wife. We’ve always got plenty to talk about — especially when it comes to our two wonderful kids. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll be thankful to my parents who did the best they could for their children. They made mistakes — hell, all parents do — and some of those mistakes affected me later in life. I’ve worked through the issues. You know, you do what you have to do to make life work. 

Should I die tomorrow, and this is something I never thought I would say, I’ll be glad my mother pushed my brothers and I into being country music entertainers when we were little. We never became “stars,” but we met a lot of real stars that most kids would never get a chance to meet. I mean, how many kids can say Loretta Lynn kissed them? Because of my mother, I can. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll be thinking of my twin brother who has passed before me and my younger brother, who is still alive. Some brothers drift apart in adult life, but not us “Gross kids.” Despite our sometimes differences, we always stayed close. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll look back on those 30-plus years of being an accountant with gratitude. I’m glad I had the mindset for that kind of work. Sometimes it was interesting, but seldom, if ever, exciting. Having said that, it paid the bills, bought the houses, purchased the cars and put my kids through school. I can’t ask for anything more than that. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll be thankful for October 17, 1997. That’s the day I got fired from an accounting job and decided to start pursuing my life-long dream of wanting to be a writer. It took plenty of practice and a lot of rejection, but now, over 17 years later, I think I can say I’m a writer without feeling strange saying it. I think I made it. My audience may be relatively small, but I’ve gotten the kind of readers I wanted to get and I’m grateful for the people who have read me throughout the years. I try to never take any of them for granted. 

Should I die tomorrow, I’ll be anxious to see if my life really will pass before my eyes. I’m kind of hoping it does. I have great memories of grandparents, aunts, uncles and old friends. I want to relive those memories before I take my last breath. 

I have a feeling if my life really does pass before my eyes, I’m gonna die knowing I had a pretty good one. For that, I’m feeling thankful and blessed. 

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone.

Read thoughts from Larry's son on Larry's blog here.
 
 

 

 

 
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