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by Danny Cross 04.16.2009
Posted In: baseball at 01:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (6)
 
 

Re: Nachos

Dear Cincinnati Reds:

I recently attended a baseball game between the Reds and the Pittsburgh Pirates at Great American Ballpark. I don’t usually go to your stadium to watch the games live because walking across Fort Washington Way and looking at the Pepsi Smokestacks in the outfield kind of make me hate being there. I don’t mind the Mountain Dew bottles racing each other on the scoreboard or how Mr. Red always loses the Skyline Chili race because he is too tempted by a 3-Way to finish the competition. That guy’s lack of dedication kills me every time.

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by Danny Cross 03.02.2012
Posted In: Basketball at 01:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
martinarms_500x500

Twelve Year Anniversary: Kenyon Martin Goes Off

The year 2000 seems like only yesterday — everyone all hunched up in our bomb shelters assuming the bank was going to turn our life savings into some kind of repeating decimal instead of the hundreds of dollars we had in there, all because a computer doesn't know how to count above 1999.

Once we made it to the Millennium, many Cincinnatians' concerns shifted from ultimate survival to how awesome it was going to be when Kenyon Martin and the UC Bearcats won the National Title. We're not here to recap how much it sucked to witness Kenyon's broken ankle in the stupid Conference USA tournament or to apologize to the girlfriend at the time who walked in the room during the injury and expected some semblance of reason to be demonstrated despite the fatal blow to the 'Cats' chances. (She says she forgave me, but her recent marriage to a hockey player in California speaks otherwise...)

Before the conference tournament there was the Bearcats' second-to-last regular season game, a contest against future pro Quintin Richardson and the DePaul Blue Demons on March 2, 2000. UC had four of its own players who would be drafted following the 1999-00 season: Martin (1st overall pick in 2000), DerMarr Johnson (6th pick in 2000), Kenny Satterfield (53rd in 2001) and Steve Logan (30th in 2002).

Witness, via the beauty of the Internet, the final 3:46 of gametime, the No. 2 Bearcats trailing 60-50 and Dick Vitale in the house to go off about how awesome Kenyon was.

 
 
by Danny Cross 02.16.2012
at 10:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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UC vs. Providence Live Blog! (Recap)

It was a late night at Fifth Third arena for our esteemed live bloggers, but the Bearcats came away with a much-needed Big East win. The 'Cats moved to 18-8 overall and 8-5 in the Big East. They're currently tied with No. 18 Louisville for sixth place in the conference.

UC will host Seton Hall, winners of three straight, at 4 p.m. Saturday, followed by a visit from Louisville next Thursday. With only five remaining regular season games, the Bearskins have some work to do to ensure that Selection Sunday doesn't become "Where the hell do they play the NIT Monday."




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by Jeff Huisman 02.20.2009
Posted In: Air Hockey at 04:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 

Air Hockey Blog — The Injury

Well, this is it. The aspiring Air Hockey World Champion's blog. Seriously. Air hockey.

Why air hockey? As Jason points out in the Air Hockey Blog intro, he kicked my ass at Pop-A-Shot on a regular basis and I got tired of it. I challenged him to a game of air hockey ... and let me tell you, our lives changed. Air Hockey is an incredible game of strategy, skill, power and geometry? Yes ... geometry. Knowing the angles helps win games. Hitting your angles ... that's a little harder.

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by Danny Cross 11.10.2008
Posted In: football at 04:09 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 

Brian Kelly Tried To Ruin My Night

I spent part of Saturday night lying in my front yard, refusing to come inside the apartment until I found a cat to chase. I was supposed to spend the evening celebrating a big important Bearcat football win, but because of ill-advised strategy and an impressive comeback by West Virginia, my celebratory evening turned into a terrified binge.

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by Jason Gargano 07.18.2011
Posted In: baseball at 06:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Drew Stubbs: Strikeout King

I opened my New York Times Sports Sunday section yesterday to find an informational graphic on the bottom of page 3 called “Close-Up: Strikeout Kings.” (I was going to link to it, but The Times isn’t providing a version of it online — thus the crappy photo at right, which gets bigger if you click on it.)

The graphic featured a photo of Reds centerfielder Drew Stubbs sitting on the ground, a grimace overtaking his face after apparently being thrown out while trying to steal second base; a table of stats that included the offensive numbers of strikeout-prone hitters Stubbs, former Red Adam Dunn, Mark Reynolds, Ryan Howard and Jack Cust; and a paragraph across the bottom of the graphic entitled “One of These Players Is Not Like the Others.”

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by Isaac Thorn 01.12.2009
Posted In: baseball at 03:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (6)
 
 

Reconsidering Dunn

Thinking it over, Manny probably wouldn't be too stoked on coming to Cincinnati once he realized that the number of decent sushi places can be counted on the fingers of one hand. His casual, laid back demeanor may or may not encourage the core of the Reds team to approach the game with the true sense of urgency that is necessary to win consistently at the Major League level. Maybe Manny and the Dodgers smooth things out, and their Hollywood relationship splashes across the front page of newspapers out there for the next few years.

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by Zachary McAuliffe 10.07.2013
Posted In: football at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
league of denial book cover

Hidden History of Concussions and the NFL

New book reveals connection between football and brain injuries

A new book set for release Tuesday called League of Denial: The NFL, Concussions and the Battle for Truth is set to challenge the NFL and their denial of a connection between concussions and football. 

Written by Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, investigative reporters for ESPN, the book claims the NFL has not only known about the connection between concussions in the NFL and long-term brain injuries for about 20 years, but the league has been actively trying to cover up these facts.

The suicides of Junior Seau as well as former NFL players such as the Bears’ David Duerson and the Eagles’ Andre Waters have brought this issue to the forefront of players’ and fans’ minds. All three players are thought to have suffered severe brain damage from injuries while playing football, all of which lead to their unfortunate suicides.

The NFL has claimed for years they had no knowledge of any relation between the brain injuries sustained from concussions and the deaths of professional players. Even in the face of a recent lawsuit from players, the league held firm to their stance.

The league did settle the recent lawsuit out of court for $765 million, and many questions were raised asking if the league has been honest with how much they know about the possible link between concussions and football. 

For a long time, concussions in the professional level of football were not seen as a big issue because no one knew of the long-term effects. Former New York Jets defensive lineman Marty Lyons talked with Rich Cimini of ESPNNewYork.com where he described his own sideline concussion experience. 

Lyons said whenever a player would come off the field, the physician would hold up some fingers, ask how many and, despite the player’s answer, the physician said, “Close enough.” A couple plays later, or even the next play, the player would find themselves on the field once again. 

“That wasn’t the doctors or trainers saying, ‘You’re OK,’” Lyons said in the interview. “I’m not saying the league didn’t know, I’m not saying the players didn’t know. It was part of the game.” 

According to the authors of League of Denial, the cover-up of how much the NFL knew about the connection started when the former NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue created a concussion committee in 1994 to better understand the effects of concussions on players. A few members of the committee came forward in 1995 saying concussions were not “minor injuries” as previously thought. These claims were quickly hushed by the NFL. 

Another claim the book makes is that around 2000, some of the country’s top neuroscientists told the NFL the big hits in football, especially those considered head-to-head, led to not only concussions, but also what is known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

Some of the symptoms of CTE are higher rates of depression, dementia, memory loss and brain damage.

The NFL, rather than publishing these findings and telling players of the potential harm, made no such effort and tried to ignore the facts.

Then in 2005, the authors report the NFL tried to persuade a medical journal to retract articles and findings on concussions and their effects on individuals. The journal in question refused and the findings continued to circulate without interference. 

The authors spoke with Dr. Ann McKee, a former assistant professor of neuropathology at Harvard Medical School and one of the leading professionals on the link between football and brain damage, who said of the 54 harvested brains of deceased NFL players, only two did not have CTE.

However, all of these findings are not just exclusive to professional football. Youth, high school and college football players are also at a high risk for concussions. 

A report from 2007 titled “Concussions Among United States High School and Collegiate Athletes,” found that about 300,000 people aged 15 to 24 suffered traumatic brain injuries every year from contact sports. This number is only second to brain injuries sustained from motor vehicle accidents. 

This same study also found of the total number of concussions from other collegiate sports, including boys’ and girls’ soccer and basketball, football was responsible for more than 40 percent of the concussions.

Concussions in high school sports have even led to the death of young athletes. Jaquan Waller and Matthew Gfeller are two football players who died in North Carolina after head injuries sustained during high school games this season.

A study from the University of Pittsburgh found that over the past decade, 30-40 high school football players have died from concussions, and the likelihood of contact sport athletes to receive a concussion is 19 percent. 

Changes are coming to the NFL, however, most notably in the minds of players. Bengals’ cornerback Brandon Ghee received two concussions in back-to-back preseason games against the Falcons and Titans. Ghee was forced to take a five-week break from contact because of these injuries. 

In an interview with The Enquirer, Ghee said if it weren’t for the recent deaths and lawsuit, he would have wanted to go back to play immediately. Now though, he’s not so sure. “After the second one you have to think about your kids and family,” Ghee said in the interview. “You don’t want any long-lasting issues.”

 
 
by Isaac Thorn 12.30.2008
Posted In: baseball at 11:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 

Manny Would Be Super Sweet

How much sense would it make? How stupid does it sound, my loyal readers?

To give in to Manny Ramirez's not-so-secret desire to get a four-year deal and bring the best hair in baseball (along with a lethal bat) to town would buck conventional thinking and the status quo of a team focused on cultivating talent and watching it develop. It would also be a lot of fun and would turn GABP into a way more lively environment than it has been of late.

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by Armond Prude 05.07.2010
at 03:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

5 Reasons To Experience a Commandos Game

I attended my first Cincinnati Commandos game at the Cincinnati Gardens Arena on April 24. The Commandos were host to the Miami Valley Silverbacks. To say the least, my first professional indoor football game was a very satisfying one. The nail-biting 58-50 win gave the undefeated Commandos their fifth straight win, leaving them in first place. Afterwards, I took a look back at my overall experience and made a brief list of the five main reasons to make it down to the Cincinnati Gardens and root on the Commandos.

1. Intense sideline action

You definitely won't find yourself anywhere near this close at your local Bengals or UC Bearcats football game. While at a Commandos game you will experience the excitement and up-close action of indoor football like you would never imagine. Fans can enjoy the action as close to the sidelines as they please, high fiving with the home team after every big play. Just make sure you keep your head on a swivel because the action can come your way at anytime. Hold those nachos tight!

2. $1 hot dogs and beers

Tell me where else you can not only receive two classics for this extremely low price but enjoy a game of hard-nosed football as well? Believe it or not this deal runs during all Commandos home games. What better way to enjoy a man’s game than to wash down your $1 hot dog with an equally cheap $1 brew.

3. Commando Cuties

If the game wasn't enough, the Commando Cuties are one addition that will bring any fan back to the Cincinnati Gardens. One of the better half-time shows you will see in quite sometime, this is one dance team that will keep you on the edge of your seat all four quarters. Their halftime show will definitely be the first subject mentioned during the essential car-ride home chatter. Did I mention that they come into the stands from time to time? Speechless.

4. Check out your UC favorites

What better way for a true Bearcats fan to watch his or her favorite players create havoc on the field once more. The Commandos roster includes several former UC stars that have moved on from Nippert Stadium to the indoor gridiron for Cincinnati's indoor home team. The starting lineup consists of recent UC stars quarterback Ben Mauk, receiver Dominick Goodman and defensive end Terrill Byrd. The three are now heading towards their second undefeated season in a row, yet with a new hometown team.

5. Player and fan camaraderie

During no other sporting event in Cincinnati will you find a team that holds such a close relationship with its fans. Commandos Players toss balls to young fans, high five into the crowd and even come out and sign autographs after the game. The overall emotion and level of excitement from the hometown faithful is felt for an entire four quarters of Commandos football. From the moment you walk into the Cincinnati Gardens, you can sense right away that these fans love their team. The Commandos and their fans truly have a unique bond within the walls of the Cincinnati Gardens.

The Commandos next home game is Saturday, April 15. For more information go to www.cincinnaticommandos.com or click here.


 
 

 

 

 
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