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by Rick Pender 11.06.2009
Posted In: Theater at 02:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Stage Door: "Rhinoceros," "Orpheus Descending" Ending

There’s some very interesting theater onstage this weekend, from Cincinnati Shakespeare to the Cincinnati Playhouse, but I’m going to point you at productions on two local university stages, in part because they have short runs and will be over in the next few days.

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by Jac Kern 03.21.2012
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 11:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Shepard Fairey Returns to Cincinnati

Famous street artist makes a one-night stop at CAC March 29

Street artist Shepard Fairey, whose murals from his 2010 visit can still be found plastered on walls across the city, will return to Cincinnati and the Contemporary Arts Center for one night only, March 29.

Fairey's return is made possible by ArtsWave, the local organization that works with entities in all facets of the arts community to foster a creative environment in Cincinnati. ArtsWave has awarded Fairey with the 80-year-old Rosa F. and Samuel B. Sachs Fund Prize, created to celebrate outstanding achievements in the arts.

In a press release, ArtsWave President and CEO Mary McCullough-Hudson said, "The committee members felt strongly that Fairey's exhibition and public murals increased the vibrancy of our city and engaged citizens in a dynamic conversation about art and society."

While he won't be covertly pasting images around town this time, Fairey has been invited to return to DJ at the CAC and mingle with fans at 8 p.m. that Friday. Limited edition prints by Fairey will be raffled off at this members-only event. That's right – the party will not be open to the public, so it's a pretty good excuse to buy a CAC membership. Go here to renew or register (student memberships are only $25).

His exhibition Supply and Demand opened at the CAC in February 2010, offering a mix of screen prints, illustrations and mixed media works throughout the space. Being a street artist, a public art supplement was to be expected. Those concerned about graffiti in the city were soon stunned to see beautiful posters glued to previously naked walls.

Fairey gained notoriety for his Andre the Gaint/OBEY stickers, which really drew attention to the idea of street art. After creating the iconic HOPE poster in support of Barack Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, Fairey became a household name. While not officially endorsed by the president, the image has become nationally recognizable. Most recently, he appeared on the March 4 episode of The Simpsons.

 
 
by Julie Mullins 08.23.2011
Posted In: Dance at 08:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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A Stellar Gala of International Dance Stars

You know it’s going to be a good Gala when you get chills down your spine within the first five minutes — the first act, no less. Marshall Davis, Jr.’s “Summertime in Cincinnati” kicked off a stellar show with his knock-em-dead tap dancing to the sounds of Lonia Lyle’s lovely vocals and Christopher Lyle’s electric bass. Gershwin’s “Summertime” has seldom sounded so good.

And the thrills kept coming. Aim cincinnati — aim stands for arts innovation movement, the organization formerly known as ballet tech Cincinnati — presented its 10th annual Gala of International Dance Stars at the Aronoff Center Aug. 13.

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by Jason Gargano 07.13.2011
Posted In: Literary at 05:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Donald Ray Pollock: Badass Writer, Nice Guy

Donald Ray Pollock's debut short-story collection, 2008's Knockemstiff, was something of an unexpected sensation —unexpected in that Pollock was a first-time author at age 53; a sensation in that the stories were driven by a visceral, sharp-edged prose style and a narrative thrust as sensitive as it was savage.

Knockemstiffwas rightly praised by everyone from The New York Times to Chuck Palahniuk (“more engaging than any new fiction in years”) to literary savant Michael Silverblatt, whose incisive KCRW radio show Bookwormfeatured an interview with the author.

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by Rick Pender 10.09.2009
Posted In: Theater, COMMUNITY at 08:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Stage Door: Laramie Project Revisited

There’s a lot of good theater available this weekend — Equus at New Edgecliff, Victoria Musica at the Cincinnati Playhouse, Dead Man’s Cell Phone at ETC and The Lion in Winter at Cincinnati Shakespeare (in its final weekend) are all productions worth seeing — but I want to draw your attention to one day beyond the weekend for a rare Monday evening theater event marking the sad anniversary of the death of Matthew Shepard. 

If you care about the issues surrounding his brutal murder in Laramie, Wyo., in 1998, you should make a reservation at Ensemble Theatre of Cincinnati (ETC) for a one-evening of The Laramie Project: Ten Years Later.

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by Rick Pender 05.19.2009
Posted In: Theater at 11:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Broadway Across America Announces Season

Broadway Across American announced its Cincinnati presentations of six touring broadway shows for 2009-2010 today.

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by Rick Pender 03.20.2011
Posted In: Theater at 11:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Playhouse Announces Stern's Final Season

Ed Stern, Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s producing artistic director, today announced the shows that will make up his 20th and final season for the city’s Tony Award-winning regional theater. It consists of several shows that have proven track records with audiences as well as a smattering of new works. The season is precisely the kind of mix that audiences have come to expect from Stern during his two decades at the Playhouse — that is, unpredictable selections with enough of the tried-and-true and the wait-til-you-see-this-one that will keep everyone eager to see what’s next.

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by Rick Pender 02.26.2009
Posted In: Theater, Theater at 11:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Mile-High Plays

I’ve often written in CityBeat about the Humana Festival of New American Plays that happens annually at Actors Theatre of Louisville. I look forward to this annual collection of new works, regarded by many as the premier opportunity in the to see fully staged works by contemporary playwrights. (This year is the Humana Festival’s 33rd iteration, and it opens March 1.)

But Actors Theatre isn't the only place for new work in the United States. I recently spent time at the Colorado New Play Summit, presented in its fourth year by the Denver Center Theatre Company (DCTC), which takes a different approach.

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by Rick Pender 07.14.2012
Posted In: World Choir Games at 12:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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World Choir Games: Awards Ceremony

On Friday evening, I hiked down to U.S. Bank Arena for the World Choir Games awards ceremony. It was bustling at The Banks, since the Reds are back in town and playing the Cardinals. It was fun to see the WCG participants, many dressed in colorful team T-shirts, mingling with the crowds around Great American Ball Park in their Reds gear. Lots of folks from other nations had a chance to peer into the stadium and see American fans revving up.

But there was no lack of revving — or revelry — inside the arena for the program. This was not a musical event, but a ceremony in which choirs in eight categories were recognized for their performances and champions crowned. For 20 minutes before the event began, there was a ton of merriment going on as teams did the "wave" around the arena and cheered whenever their own choir showed up on the big video monitors.

Lots of awards are handed out at WCG, some simply for participating. Choirs can choose to compete in an open category, in which they are evaluated but not competing for medals (although they are ranked and can receive gold, silver or brionze "diplomas") or in the head-to-head competitions. By scoring within certain point ranges, singing groups are awarded bronze, silver or gold medals. The ultimate designation, "Champion," is bestowed on the choir that scores the highest point total among the gold medalists in each category. Other medalists send forward their director and one singer to receive the medal and a certificate. When the champions are named, the entire choir races jubilantly to the stage, hugging, screaming and celebrating. Once assembled there and the medal bestowed, the choir's national flag is raised and its national anthem sung, often with tear-streamed faces on the video screens.

Champions were named eight categories. Three were from the United States, including in two largely American categories included in the games for the first time, Barbershop and Show Choirs. Gospel was also broken out from Music of Religions. The most wildly celebrated champion was surely the Choraliers, from Fairfield, Ohio, just north of Cincinnati, which was named the champion Show Choir (amid choirs from other nations and several from universities). Also from Ohio, the Jeremy Winston Choir from Wilberforce University was named the champion Gospel group. The other American champion was a barbershop chorus from Pennsylvania, the Greater Harrisburg Chapter of Sweet Adelines.

The remaining five champions were: Female Chamber Choir: Latvian Voices from Riga, Latvia (where the 2014 World Choir Games will be held); Male Chamber Choir: Newman Sound (Canada); Music of Religions: Stellenberg Girls Choir (South Africa); and Young Children's Choir's: Wenzhou Children Art School Boys Choir (China). The latter category's winners of gold medals were all youth choirs from China, where it's clear such ensembles are prized and emphasized.

More champions are being announced on Saturday morning, and a selection of champions will perform in a concert at Music Hall on Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. That concert, as well as the Closing Ceremony at U.S. Bank Arena on Saturday at 7 p.m., are both sold out.

 
 
by Rick Pender 09.23.2012
Posted In: Theater at 11:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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'Mormons' Are Coming to the Aronoff

Broadway Across America to produce Trey Parker and Matt Stone musical

The Mormons are coming! The Mormons are coming! No, not the one running for president (although he's showing up pretty often). It's the award-winning irreverent musical The Book of Mormon, which Broadway Across America announced this morning will be part of its 2013-2014 season at the Aronoff Center. The winner of nine Tony Awards (including the best musical of 2011) is a satirical look at two naive and idealistic Mormon missionaries who are sent to a remote Ugandan location where a nasty warlord is oppressing the villagers. Their clueless devotion, good-hearted but misguided — with a lot of very off-color humor — has made The Book of Mormon an unusual hit.

It will come as no surprise to CityBeat readers that the guys behind this are Trey Parker and Matt Stone, the creators of animated South Park, another outrageously irreverent look at contemporary life. Also involved was composer Robert Lopez, whose Avenue Q was another Broadway hit, this one featuring Sesame Street-styled puppets in very adult situations.

The Book of Mormon has been a big Broadway hit. It will be interesting to see how it plays at the Aronoff Center for audiences that tend to be very mainstream, if not downright conservative in what they'll line up to see. I'm eager to see this one! Broadway Across America has not announced specific dates for the engagement yet.
 
 

 

 

 
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