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by 09.22.2009
Posted In: Public Policy, Public Transit at 09:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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First Streetcar Open House Tonight

The city of Cincinnati starts hosting a series of 10 open houses tonight to provide information on the proposed streetcar line connecting the downtown riverfront, Over-the-Rhine and the Uptown area around UC. City staff will be on hand to answer questions about the line’s economic benefits, costs and route. There is no formal presentation.

Tonight's meeting is 5-7 p.m. in the lobby of the Aronoff Center for the Arts downtown, 650 Walnut St.

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by Danny Cross 10.28.2011
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar proponents have spent considerably more on their campaign than the anti-streetcar people, probably because Issue 48 is so wide-reaching it has brought out people concerned with things way more important than the streetcar such as regional planning, commuter rail and making Cincinnati not look like it totally sucks.

Also being outspent are the SB 5 supporters, who have seen support decline dramatically in recent weeks as people look around their neighborhoods and see a bunch of regular people whose rights would be taken away. And Building a Better Ohio does unethical things like this, which makes people think they are meanies.

Here's a blog about City Council candidate Chris Smitherman arguing against all the legal experts who say Issue 48 will block all rail construction through 2020.

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by Danny Cross 09.21.2011
 
 
london_tower_bridge

Morning News and Stuff

President Obama's Cincinnati bridge visit is an attempt to literally and figuratively connect Mitch McConnell and John Boehner. No word on whether the top two Republicans in Congress will show up, but Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is reportedly going to pop in.

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by Danny Cross 10.17.2011
 
 
480px-mount_rumpke

Morning News and Stuff

Here's how The Enquirer describes an Ohio Supreme Court decision allowing Democrats to challenge a ridiculous Republican attempt to unfairly redraw Congressional districts: “Court ruling throws 2012 elections into chaos.” Here's the same report by WLWT, minus the drama: “Ohio Supreme Court Allows Redistricting Challenge.”

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by Rachel Podnar 05.29.2014 124 days ago
Posted In: LGBT Issues, Public Transit, City Council, Mayor at 12:02 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Metro to Offer Domestic Partner Benefits

Organization could become first to utilize city’s proposed domestic partner registry

Kim Lahman was doing cartwheels in her mind for Metro this morning.

The organization’s Ridership and Development Director celebrated Metro’s announcement on Thursday that it will provide health and dental benefits to domestic partners of its employees.

Lahman said she has used same-sex partner benefits in the past, when she went back to school.

“[My partner and I] know first-hand what it means to have the flexibility and equality as others do in the workplace,” Lahman said at a press conference at Metro’s office. “This is just a fantastic day and I’m so proud that Metro is able to do the right thing.”

Metro is the first employer to say it will use Cincinnati’s domestic partner registry if the initiative passes next week in City Council. Should it pass, Cincinnati will be the 10th city in Ohio to have a domestic partner registry.

Mayor John Cranley and City Councilman Chris Seelbach attended the press conference and spoke in support of the move.

Cranley called it “symbolically and substantively right” and during   the announcement shared a memory in honor of Maya Angelou, her poem “On the Pulse of Morning” at former President Bill Clinton’s inauguration in 1993.

“She ended it with ‘Good morning,’” Cranley said. “I think this is a good morning for Cincinnati, a new day.”

Many of Cincinnati’s major employers, including Procter & Gamble, Kroger and Macy’s offer same-sex and domestic partner benefits.

Seelbach said while those companies already have systems to evaluate domestic partnerships, the registry will give other companies like Metro an easy way to provide those benefits.

“We are now leaders in the nation and the region to make sure everyone is welcome in our city, regardless of who they love,” Seelbach said. “Everyone should bring their full self to their workplace and be able to do that with health benefits for their partners.”

Seelbach said while Metro is the first to say it will use the registry, other companies like Cincinnati Bell have expressed interest.

Metro is a nonprofit tax-funded public service of the Southwestern Ohio Regional Transit Authority (SORTA) with around 850 employees.

One of SORTA’s executive statements says the organization is committed to a work environment that “promotes dignity and respect for all.”

Board Chair Jason Dunn said SORTA’s commitment to inclusion is a great business decision.

“It shows that we value our employees,” Dunn said. “It shows that not only is Metro on the cutting edge of transportation but also making sure we are open to talent and we are open to retaining great talent in our system.”

Same-sex partners with a valid marriage license, same-sex partners registered by a government entity and same-sex partners with a sworn affidavit will be recognized by Metro for domestic partner benefits, which will take effect January 1, 2015.

 

 

 

 
 
by Hannah McCartney 10.30.2013
Posted In: Public Transit, News, Development at 02:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
metro plus bus

Cincinnati Metro Expands Transfer Time

Looser transfer time restrictions start Friday

If you're a Metro rider and often feel like making your bus transfer on time a little too closely resembles the hell that was your high school gym class, you're in luck: The folks at Cincinnati Metro have answered riders' requests to relax the time limit an issued transfer ticket is valid.

Beginning Friday, Nov. 1, it will extend its transfer time allowance from 90 minutes to two hours without increasing the cost.

Cincinnati Metro Public Relations Manager Jill Dunne says extending transfer times was one of the most-requested changes from readers and drivers in a survey issued earlier this month. The results of that survey, the Metro Report Card, should be issued in a week or so, says Dunn.

Transfers currently cost 50 cents in addition to the cost of fare; they're used on top of regular fares when riders must switch buses and combine bus routes to reach their destination.


 
 

 

 

 
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