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by Staff 02.09.2015 106 days ago
 
 
quan hapa congee

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Dried pork congee from Quan Hapa, Eli's BBQ, Cancun, plantains and LaRosa's

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food.  

Ilene Ross: It wasn't exactly cold this weekend, but most frigid winter days find me jonesing for a body-warming bowl of congee, a type of rice porridge popular in many Asian countries. On Saturday, I enjoyed a tasty bowl of dried pork congee at Quan Hapa in OTR. It's filled with chicken, and there's a poached egg hiding in there. On top is yummy fried pork, five-spice oil and green onions. Deeply satisfying, no matter what the thermometer says. 

Rebecca Sylvester: LaRosa's! Did you know LaRosa's garlic butter dipping sauce contains no actual dairy, so it's vegan/lactose-intolerant friendly? If you think about it too much it's super creepy, but if you just don't think about it then it is a delicious option to dunk your cheese-less veggie pizza. #thestruggleisreal 

Jac Kern: Yesterday I had fajitas and margs at Cancun, my home away from home. The Western Bowl-adjacent cantina is a great brunch alternative for lazy/antisocial people: fast service, standard but consistent Mexican grub, dim lights and crack-like frozen margaritas. Come hungry; leave stuffed, tipsy and with a frost-bitten tongue. That's basically how all of my (frequent) Cancun adventures go.  

Samantha Gellin: I ate at Eli's BBQ for the first time. The inside was packed so we ate at a picnic table inside one of their big white outdoor tents. It was like 30 degrees outside, so thankfully I was able to nab a spot right by a working heater, but it was still pretty chilly. But now I know what all the fuss over Eli's has been about: It's freakin' delicious. And seriously cheap. A meat-stuffed sandwich and two generous sides will run you eight bucks. That's it. There's not many other restaurants in Cincy (at least not that I know of) that are so generous with their portion size and yet so easy on your wallet. And it's BYOB. I mean, what else could you ask for?!

I got a pulled pork sandwich with a side of baked beans and macaroni and cheese. The deliciousness of everything made me forget I was cold. The macaroni is to die for; it's everything you want a side of macaroni to be with a barbecue dinner — super rich, creamy and calorie-laden. The baked beans were also delicious: savory, with hints of bacon and brown sugar and something more complex that I can't put my finger on. And the pulled pork was pretty much everything you've heard Eli's pulled pork to be: savory, tender and with just the right amount of sweet. Will I go again? Most definitely, but I'll wait until it's warm out. 

Jesse Fox: On Saturday I did a freelance photo job for Ena's Jerkmania and fell in love with their fried plantains. I had never even had a regular plantain before so I wasn't sure what to expect. The texture reminded me kind of of like a thinner version of French toast, a little crunchy on the outside but soft in the middle. They were great on their own but would have been really good with some agave nectar on, too — but that's probably the sugar addict in me talking. 

Garin Pirnia: I’ve been nursing a cold, so I decided to stay in this weekend and make a few things. First up was homemade chai tea. You just throw a lot of spices — crushed cardamom, pepper, vanilla bean, star anise, ginger, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves — into boiling water and then add black tea and brown sugar. When I bought the spices at Findlay Market a couple of weeks ago, the guy was like, “Do you work at a restaurant or something?” I don't.

Next, inspired by The Comet’s housemade ginger ale, I took it upon myself to make my own. A caveat: If you hate ginger you will not like this; it’s super strong. You chop up a few ounces of fresh ginger and let it simmer in water for 45 minutes, and then dissolve sugar into it, which makes a simple syrup. Just add carbonated water and you have ginger ale that tastes better than Vernors and anything else on the market.

Finally, I made bagels. Yes, bagels. It’s so easy! You mix bread flour, yeast, a pinch of sugar and salt and malt syrup (I use honey) in a mixer or food processor. Form the dough into a ball and wait for it to rise. Then you shape the dough into the semblance of bagels and flash boil them. The hardest part is forming the dough, but the most fun part is sticking toppings like sesame seeds and poppy seeds onto the bagels. You can get a little crazy and creative — anything goes. Bake 'em in the oven for about 20 minutes and, voila, bagels without weird stuff like yoga mat component/flour whitening agent azodicarbonamide. You can freeze the bagels to make them last longer. Damn, I should open a café.

Anne Mitchell: I ate a fancy dinner at Covington's 200th birthday celebration gala. For giant catered-meal food, it was great — especially the bundles of green beans tied up with red and yellow peppers. Bean bondage! Seriously, there was real bacon on the salad and bourbon in the chicken sauce, so bravo COV200. I hope the next 200 years are just as tasty.

Kristen Franke: This weekend, I had a lot of things. 1. Dollar oysters at Anchor OTR. Thursday nights are the best. We were seated by the window and ordered a dozen delicious little numbers. Their granita topping — basically caramelized red onions that have been frozen into slushy-like goodness — and the fluffy fresh horseradish are dynamite. Our kickass server also brought Sriracha, which is a game changer when it comes to oysters. 


2. The volcano roll at Ichiban (half-price sushi, hell yeah!) on Friday night. The roll features a tower of crab meat on top of a deep-fried eel roll. That and a standard spicy tuna roll and I was set. No, it's nothing stellar, but when your bill comes back with $10.57 printed on the bottom, it's hard to resist doing your happy dance.


3. Homemade meatloaf, whipped potatoes and crisp green beans at my dad's house. His meatloaf is essentially a giant, baked meatball made with soaked french bread, fresh garlic, Parmesan and parsley. Dip it in those buttery potatoes and you can just feel your soul relax.


4. Late-night spoonbread at The Eagle OTR. Eagle is fantastic late night. We arrived at 10:41 p.m. and waited 30 seconds for a table for four. Their maple syrup-soaked spoonbread goes GREAT with a Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale, an on-tap staple at this place.


 
 
by Staff 02.02.2015 113 days ago
 
 
eats_kreugerstavern_700x615

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

A lot of stuff from Walgreens, Packhouse, Krueger's Tavern, Amol and more

Each week CityBeat staffers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food. 

Danny Cross: A couple of my friends' girlfriends had a birthday death wish on Saturday night, taking a party of more than 15 to Krueger's Tavern. My girlfriend and I showed up late, kind of assuming everyone would be standing on the Vine Street sidewalk like a bunch of tourists. Apparently, Krueger's will seat your giant party as long as half have arrived, though, and no one was mad when the final two of us showed up like 40 minutes after the reservation time. Krueger's is owned by the same people who run Bakersfield and The Eagle OTR, and its concept is similar: loud, hip atmosphere; really good, relatively inexpensive food; and pretty great service considering how crowded and busy the place is. We split the Cuban sandwich, fries and a kale salad someone told us was going to be awesome (true). It's nice to have an OTR option aside from Taste of Belgium where you can sit down with more than four people without forcing the restaurant to rearrange the entire room. CityBeat food writer Kristen Franke had good things to say about Krueger's last week, so you should probably take her word for it. 

Jac Kern
: I’ll tell you where I did not eat: Bridalrama. Cupcakes and macaroons and cakes at every corner, and I didn't touch any of it. I was proud of my self-control until the next day when Jeff insisted on ordering Pizza Hut during the Super Bowl. And we're not talking some regular fattening pizza. No, we had to order the Triple Cheese Covered Stuffed Crust Pizza. So, needless to say, any pride I had left was gone at this point. I wanted to be disgusted by it but I reluctantly found it really tasty. 

Rebecca Sylvester: Best Friday night: ordered too much Indian food and went to sleep. Since it was obviously too cold to leave the house, my boo and I took advantage of the fact that Amol delivers and made someone else deal with the frigid 2.5-mile trek between their kitchen and my couch. The food was great, but the best part of the meal was the fact that their delivery minimum is $25, meaning it is just a dollar or two out of reach of ordering only two entrees, so we were (I was) justified in ordering A THIRD ENTREE for additional feasting. 

Mike Breen: I largely had a depressed, shut-in kind of weekend, for which I loaded up on supplies from that gourmet food haven Walgreens and barely left my apartment. The cashier told me we might get eight inches of snow over the weekend as I checked out; even though I knew that wasn’t true, I hoped my sad purchases were seen as “stocking up” for the impending Snowmageddon (or at least as treats I was taking to a Super Bowl party). I should have grabbed a bag of rock salt to make it look less pathetic.

Along with the wasabi-flavored almonds, the best thing I grabbed on my junk food spree was a pint of Ben & Jerry’s Truffle Trifecta, which I first discovered last year. It’s only available at Walgreens (which seems weird; B&J’s also has “exclusive” flavors at Target, which is somewhat understandable, but Walgreens seems to be a weird place to have to go to score ice cream). It’s Ben & Jerry’s, so of course it’s really good. And pretty simple — chocolate ice cream with marshmallow, fudge and caramel-filled truffle candy. It’s become one of my favorite Ben & Jerry’s flavors.

I was proud of myself for not devouring all of the crap food I bought. Seemed like a good purchase at the time, but I just couldn’t stomach eating the small bag of Ruffles’ Deep Ridged Bacon & Cheddar Loaded Potato Skins flavored chips I bought. But there’s always next weekend. Grammys viewing party at my place, y’all! 

Jesse FoxI wanted to get some film that I shot developed on Saturday and apparently the Walgreens in Highland Heights is the only place around here that still does that. I didn't want to drive down, go home and drive right back, so I went with my freelancer Catie so we could talk or something while we waited. The guys working said it would take two hours so we did what any respectable humans would do — we went and bought mini vodka bottles from the liquor store nearby and ate at Taco Bell. Despite ordering different things, the total of both of our meals was $6.66. The next day I woke up with strep throat, so thank you Taco Bell satan.

Maija Zummo: I finally went to Packhouse in Newport to eat some vegetarian meatballs. (My computer keeps auto-correcting that to "packhorse," which is an altogether different type of meatball.) I had been to the meatball restaurant in Corryville, Meatball Kitchen, which has a different vibe (you order at a cash register there). I had been warned that the Packhouse menu was a little bit confusing — there's a ton of choices and you fill boxes in on your menu with a marker to order — but it wasn't so bad. The waitresses help you navigate.

You pick a type of meatball — I got quinoa and veggie and the rest of my party got one of each other type of meatball on the menu: fried chicken, turkey and sage, something with sundried tomatoes and blue cheese, a normal meatball and then a lasagna meatball (lasagna shaped into a ball and fried). Then you choose a sauce (marinara, parmesan cream, some type of stew sauce, and a couple others) and how you want it served. You can get it on a sandwich, on a slider, on pasta, with Brussels sprouts etc., etc. There are like a million possible combinations. I got three quinoa meatballs on some boursin mashed potatoes with parmesan cream on top and a quinoa slider with cheese and marina sauce because, as a vegetarian, I never get to eat sliders.

Portion sizes were big and the quinoa meatballs tasted like little arancini; they were little fried tasty nuggets. I loved them a lot more than I expected because I hate quinoa. The rest of my party, however, didn't love their meatballs. There was some confusion as to which was which, like they couldn't tell the difference between the turkey and sage an the sundried tomato one. But I was happy, which is the most important part. They also have bottles of wine for $19, and the service staff is paid a fair wage so you don't tip, which is a cool novelty. I'd go back for more sliders and cheap wine, and my one friend wants to go back to tackle their eating contest, where you need to eat like 25 of the same meatballs in an hour or something. 

Samantha GellinI had brunch at BrewRiver Gastropub. It's a New Orleans-style place. The food was delicious but the prices ... not. The entrees were all in the $12 to $16 dollar range, so I opted for two "sides": two sunny-side up eggs and a small bowl cheese grits. The eggs were delicious; the grits, while tasty, weren't life-changing. My husband got poutine and eggs, and the beef short-rib gravy was really rich and delicious. It had strips of really tender meat in it. For anyone who doesn't have to watch their cholesterol, it's a solid choice. The server was a bit pushy and anxious to get our party of eight out the door by the afternoon closing time, though. I'm not sure I'd go back, partly because of the prices and partly because I'm over brunch dates. Maybe I'm just getting too old to be drinking three mimosas at noon.
 
 
by David Watkins 02.02.2015 113 days ago
Posted In: Events, fundraising, News at 10:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dining out for life

Dining Out for Life Cincinnati Returns

Eat dinner somewhere that isn't your house, fight AIDS

Significant progress has been made since the 1980s HIV/AIDS epidemic, but there is still research and work to be done in finding a cure. Spearheading the movement in Ohio is Caracole, an organization that provides affordable housing and supportive services for individuals and families living with HIV/AIDS. 

You can help, too. 

The annual Dining Out For Life event encourages you to dine out at participating local restaurants, which will be donating a portion of your meal’s proceeds to Caracole. Participating in Dining Out For Life is easy: Choose a participating restaurant. Gather a group of friends and call ahead to make a reservation. Be sure to mention you're with Dining Out For Life and a predetermined percentage of your meal will go directly to Caracole.

Participating restaurants include: 
  • Arnold's Bar & Grill; 513-421-6234; Donating 25%; Lunch, Dinner
  • Bella Luna; 513-871-5862; Donating 20%; Dinner
  • Below Zero Lounge; 513-421-9376; Donating 100%; Dinner, Late Night
  • Blue Jay Restaurant; 513-541-0847; Donating 25%; Breakfast, Lunch
  • The Brew House; 513-961-9058; Donating 20%; Dinner
  • Buz; 513-533-2899; Donating 25%; Dinner
  • Green Dog Cafe; 513-321-8777; Donating 25%; Dinner
  • Kitchen 452; 513-559-0452; Donating 25%; Lunch
  • The Littlefield; 513-386-7570; Donating 20%; Dinner
  • Macaron Bar; 513-813-8181; Donating 100%; Dessert
  • Main Bite; 859-261-2483; Donating 25%; Dinner
  • McAlister's Deli Blue Ash, Crestview Hills, Kenwood, West Chester and Mason; Donating 20%; Lunch, Dinner
  • Park + Vine; 513-721-7275; Donating 100%; Dinner
  • T.G.I. Friday's Anderson, Colerain, Crestview Hills, Fields Ertel, Kenwood, Tri-County, West Chester and Western Hills; Donating 20%; Lunch, Dinner
  • Unwind Wine Bar; 513-321-9463; Donating 25%; Dinner
  • Washington Platform Saloon & Restaurant; 513-421-0110; Donating 25%; Lunch, Dinner
Note that Park + Vine, Macaron Bar and Below Zero are all donating 100% of their proceeds from your meal.

All day Tuesday, Feb. 3. For more information, visit diningoutforlife.com/cincinnati/.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.20.2015 126 days ago
Posted In: Alcohol, Food news, Openings at 10:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
julia petiprin and stuart king

Apothecary-Themed Cocktail Bar to Open in OTR

Yet unnamed, but historically outfitted

If there's one thing we like in Over-the-Rhine, it's enjoying a bit of updated history while we dine and drink. And that's what proprietors Stuart King and Julia Petiprin aim to bring to the corner of 13th and Republic streets with their new apothecary-themed cocktail bar. 

While the name has yet to be revealed, the theme is sound. The bar will be nestled in a historic storefront, replete with turn-of-the-century antique medicines, jars, bottles and sundries, along with dark wood, leather booths and vintage lighting; more moody and romantic and less American Horror Story

King and Petiprin, cofounders of the Circle Hospital Group, are striving to create a warm, comfortable bar with a design aligned to the ethos of OTR. Petiprin, the designer of the space, will also oversee the cocktail program. It's slated to feature spirits, syrups and other homemade concoctions in a strategy developed with assistance from former Los Angeles bar manager Brandyn Tepper (Hinoki and the Bird) and Matt Landes of Cocktail Academy of Downtown Los Angeles. 

The 1,200-square-foot space will hold 55 people and is slated to open in March.
 
 
by Amanda Gratsch 01.12.2015 134 days ago
Posted In: Alcohol, Food news, Openings at 02:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
horse & barrel 1 (1)

Horse & Barrel Bourbon House Opens Downtown

More bourbon for everyone!

After a long history with bourbon, the Tavern Restaurant Group (The Pub, Nicholson's, deSha's) recently opened their latest bar concept in the former Bootsy's/Walnut Street Grill space across from the Aronoff downtown: The Horse & Barrel Bourbon House.

Inspired — and named after — the former award-winning bourbon bar (named one of the world's three best bourbon bars in 2008 by Whisky Magazine) attached to deSha’s now-shuttered Lexington, Ky., location, the Kentucky-style Horse & Barrel Bourbon House is the latest in the area's ever-growing collection of bourbon-focused drinkeries, joining MainStrasse's/Molly Wellmann's Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar and Northside's The Littlefield

The bar, which is on the ground floor and seats about 40 (the upstairs will function as an events space, with space for 100-150 people and various complete event packages) offers 80 different bourbons, several flights and bourbon cocktails, plus a small menu of shareable plates with a Southern theme. The savory snacks and desserts run $6.50-$12, and include items like chicken tenderloin flash-fried and tossed in Maker's Mark barbecue sauce; gouda mac and cheese smothered in pulled pork with a Maker's Mark barbecue sauce; and a Queen City Pie, with bourbon, pecan, chocolate and banana served with salted caramel ice cream. 

Their $9 bourbon cocktails range from a fruity Old Fashioned Woodford Reserve Personal Selection — orange, cherry, simple syrup, Angostura Bitters — to the refreshing Mint Julep Maker’s Mark. The premium bourbon selection also includes Old Forester Birthday 2014 Edition, Elmer T. Lee Single Barrel, George T. Stagg and Woodford Reserve Personal Selection (this bourbon is only available at Tavern Restaurant Group locations, which has personally curated bourbons from both Woodford and Buffalo Trace).

Horse & Barrel also does happy hour, available from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. The “Old” One & A Cold One special includes your choice of any draft beer and one shot of the “Olds” for $5. The “Olds” include: Old Crow, Old Forester Classic, Old Grand-Dad 80 and Old Overholt Rye. 

The Horse & Barrel Bourbon House
Go:
631 Walnut St., Downtown;
Hours: 4-11 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday; 4 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday.


 


 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.06.2015 140 days ago
Posted In: History, Food news at 02:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
zips cafe

Zip's Cafe Under New Ownership

No worries; the Cincinnati institution is staying true to its roots

Classic Mount Lookout burger joint Zip's Cafe is under new ownership — but don't freak out. Longtime general manager Mike Burke recently purchased the 88-year-old burger institution from Brian Murrie, who had owned the restaurant since 1996. 

"Over 18 years later, it's now time to pass the torch," Murrie said in a recent press release. "We've been side by side and had each other's backs for years. It's Mike's turn now."

Burke has been working at Zip's off and on since he was 15, and has been running day to day operations for the past six years. The restaurant is famous for its burgers, from its Zip Burger to its more adventurous and meaty Girthburger (a Zip Burger with a split mettwurst) and Train Wreck (a Zip Burger with shaved ham, a grilled mettwurst and three types of cheese). But they also have excellent onion rings — super crispy and the onions don't fall out of the breading like they do at other places. Also, if you're a vegetarian, they have both a garden burger and a black bean burger, which you can dress like a real burger-joint burger — American cheese, mayo, onion, pickle, tomato. 

We caught up with Burke to ask him a couple of questions about the transition and assuage any fears from longstanding Zip's fans about potential menu changes.

CityBeat: Since Zip's is a classic Cincinnati institution, people will want to know if the menu be staying the same under your control. Will there be any changes or updates?
Mike Burke: Zip's is so consistent, I don't foresee many changes to the menu. There may be some small additions here or there but I don't think the customers will notice a big difference around the restaurant … and I think that's a good thing!

CB: Since the restaurant has been part of your life off and on since you were a teenager, what does it mean for you to own Zip's?
MB: Zip's has been a big part of over half my life and at this point it is going to be even bigger for the second half. It is definitely a wild dream come true. It's owning an iconic part of Cincinnati history. To keep Zip's history of a neighborhood/city favorite and its quality and consistency the same is my biggest job moving forward.

CBWhat's your favorite menu item?
MB: Hands down my favorite menu item is the Girthburger. It's our regular burger topped with a signature mettwurst made for us at our butcher (Avril-Blehs on Court). It was named by former Bengal Pat McInally. I think it holds its own against any "designer" burger or sandwich in town. You can't skip our world famous chili either.

CBCan you relate one of your favorite memories of Zip's?
MB: Biggest memory: The former owner, Brian, hired me when he was the manager. About a month later he was the new owner. The two of us worked a busy Saturday lunch together and afterward were catching our breaths. I remember asking him, "B, do you ever just look around and think how fucking cool it is that you own this place?" His response, with a smile and a nod, was a very simple and proud, "Yes." Ever since then, it was a crazy dream. Back then, I never thought [owning Zip's] to be a possibility.  

Other than that, I will also never forget my jaw hitting the floor when my friend Patrick walked in with Jack White. One of the few times I have ever been star struck, for sure the only time while at work. He was a super nice guy and seemed to enjoy himself.


Go: 1036 Delta Ave., Mount Lookout;
Call: 513-871-9876;
Internet: zipscafe.com;
Hours: 10:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 10:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Sunday.
 
 
by Sean M. Peters 01.06.2015 140 days ago
Posted In: Coffee, Food news, Openings at 01:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
collective espresso northside interior

Collective Espresso Northside Now Open for Business

Collective Espresso now offers two of the city’s finest coffee shops found off the beaten path. 

Owned and operated by Dave Hart and Dustin Miller, Collective Espresso’s original alleyway location off Main Street in Over-the-Rhine quickly established itself as a worthwhile destination for caffeine-cionados. They’ve branched out with a second location between Happy Chicks Bakery and Fabricate on Hamilton Avenue in Northside. And their new spot has inevitably found itself on a similar easy-to-miss-but-hard-to-forget alleyway — enter through the swinging wrought-iron gate in front of Cluxton Alley, home to Cluxton Alley Roasters, which is renting them the space. 

The imposed sense of secrecy only adds to Collective Espresso’s allure. Staff and owners, who are usually steaming milk or doing pour-overs alongside each other, are extremely inviting, talented and knowledgeable in all things espresso. And though the new location boasts a fully functional coffee roaster (owned by Cluxton Alley Roasters), it’s not in the duo’s business trajectory to roast and sell their own coffee beans yet. 

The shop has already enjoyed a soft opening and is currently open the same hours as the OTR location (7 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday; 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday). The Northside shop also serves Collective’s same critically acclaimed coffee drinks, which recently received accolades from Food Network star Alton Brown, who grabbed a “spot-on” cortado when he was in town for his show at the Aronoff.

Go: 4037 Hamilton Ave., Northside;
Hours: 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Monday; 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday; 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.

 
 
by Garin Pirnia 12.22.2014
Posted In: Alcohol, Events, Food news, Openings at 03:42 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
lacheys-bar

Lachey's Bar to Open Jan. 1

We went to the sneak preview — there were fewer shirtless 98 degrees photos than we had hoped

The Lachey brothers are officially in the bar business. Cincinnati natives and boy band superstars Nick and Drew Lachey held a preview night for their bar, Lachey’s Bar, Dec. 19. It opens to the public on Jan. 1. 2015. Mayor John Cranley, 3CDC and 4EG/Lachey’s Bar partner Bob Deck were on hand to help the brothers cut the red ribbon. 

“We’re literally cutting the red tape,” Drew Lachey joked to the crowd. Cranley gave the brothers keys to the city and declared December 19 98 Degrees Day, er, Lachey Day in Cincinnati. As the event unfurled, A&E was also there rolling cameras for the upcoming reality show surrounding the opening of the bar, which will start airing in March 2015. 

“Nick has been talking about this, I swear, it has to be at least a decade,” Justin Jeffre, a childhood pal of the Lacheys, fellow 98 Degrees member and editor for newspaper Streetvibes, says. “They’ve been more serious about it for the past couple of years. After hearing so many conversations, it’s nice to see it finally come to fruition.”  

The sports bar, located on the corner of Walnut and 12th Street in OTR, is huge and bright, so there’s no way you’ll miss it. Because of its large windows, you can easily stand on the street and gaze inside at Drew and Nick, and read the LED sports ticker crawling underneath the 10 or so TVs hovering above the long bar. 

“We felt like we wanted it be a sports lounge,” Nick says. “Sports bar, you kind of think of peanut shells on the floor, more Buffalo Wild Wings vibe, which I love, but we wanted to create something that was a little bit more upscale from that but still approachable to everybody.”

The plethora of TVs, the sports ticker and glowing rectangular colored lights wired into panels underneath the bar countertop creates almost a sensory overload. There’s already a sports bar (Rhinehaus) and a craft beer emporium/taco joint (Half Cut, Gomez Salsa) across the street, but keep in mind Lachey’s is more commodious, with 100 seats and a 150-person occupancy. Chefs Jonathan Price and Brian Duffy (of Bar Rescue fame) are building a menu of high-quality, non-frozen pub grub, including tater tots, pork sandwiches, bison burgers and salads, so you can stuff your face while you watch golf. 

The big draw here is not only the bros, but also the booze. Three tap stations serve an array of craft beer and Miller Lite (Nick’s fave), but there’s also Nobilo wine on draft (it’s fancy and it’s good), cocktails on tap, a beer cocktail called Una Noche and non-alcoholic sodas for the teetotalers. Sports and non-sports fans will be able to imbibe their Miller Lite and Mad Tree Thundersnows sitting on barstools at the bar, sitting at one of the high top tables or lounging in the back of the bar on a comfy couch. Or, the ladies can take their business into the bathroom and lounge on couches in there. Note: The ladies room is nicer than most sports bars’ bathrooms. 

But what’s the appeal of a sports bar to those who aren’t into sports? Nick assures, “It’s really about the people. I think I go to places because I want to be around good people and great atmosphere, and this is going to have that, for sure.” 

Like many bars in OTR, Lachey’s will have happy hour, which will be yet another reason to hang out at the bar in hopes of catching a glimpse of the bros. And if you’re into the Pedal Wagon, the bar has a garage that enables the wagon to pedal right into the bar. 

Currently, the only framed photos hanging on the red-hued walls are of The Bengals and Reds, and when asked if he’ll hang photos of 98 Degrees, Nick says, “We’re still decorating.” So here’s hoping some of those ‘90s-era shirtless pictures of the guys will make it onto the wall of shame.

Lachey’s Bar is located at 56 E. 12th St., Over-the-Rhine. For more info, go to lacheys.com.


 
 
by Richard Lovell 12.19.2014
Posted In: Food news, fundraising at 03:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ryan talking at table

Chef Ryan Santos and Please Looking for a Permanent Home

Their new kickstarter campaign is helping raise funds for a brick-and-mortar location

After four successful years as a pop-up dining experience in the downtown area and beyond, Please is looking for a permanent home. And chef and founder Ryan Santos has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund the next step: a brick-and-mortar restaurant.   

Santos has been honing his culinary skills for nearly 10 years, having worked at his craft throughout the U.S. and in Europe with renowned chefs like Kevin Sousa and John Shields. Finding a spot to call home is only a natural progression for Please, known for using quality, locally grown produce and products to create new takes on classics and dream up inventive dishes like wild ohio venison with juniper branch or toasted milk ice cream. CityBeat sat down with Santos to discuss the Kickstarter campaign and what the future holds for Please. 

CityBeat: Why do you want to transition from a pop-up to a permanent location? 
Ryan Santos: Doing the pop-up has been great. It’s given me the freedom to find my voice and vision as a cook and a chef, to make mistakes, and learn greatly from them. But there comes a point when as a pop-up you can only take things to a certain level. We feel like we’ve plateaued at that point and are ready to keep pushing, improving and refining … We want something we can make and call our own, from the furniture to the food to the atmosphere. 

CB: You've been a pop-up restaurant for around four years now. Why is now the appropriate time for the transition? 
RS: I think the food scene here in town is really hitting its stride and I’ve grown to a point as a chef where I think what we do can contribute something meaningful to it. As well as our excitement to just be a part of it. 

CBWhat are your plans for a new restaurant? 
RS: We plan on continuing to do what we do. We want to open a restaurant where we continue to strive to be an honest, delicious, value-driven restaurant that continues to focus on creativity, quality and sourcing locally from the Ohio River Valley, Tristate and beyond. 

CB: What's going to be different about Please if it finds a permanent home? 
RS: The food will continue to grow, evolve and definitely we’ll be able to refine things. Right now with the pop-up it’s a lot of raw ideas, but in the format, it’s difficult to have the budget and time to refine dishes, so we are definitely looking forward to that. We’ll also have a bar with a fun beverage program. It’ll include our unique take on cocktails, a focus on local and European beers, and a wine program that focuses on natural, biodynamic and small producers. 

CB: If the Kickstar [campaign] succeeds, what's your timeline for finding a spot and opening? 
RS: The Kickstarter is also being supplemented by some private fundraising we’re still doing as well, so when all those things come together, we can get moving. We’re hoping to have a space and fundraising locked up and ready to start building out by this spring. 

You can help support their Kickstarter campaign here, or check out their website at pleasecincinnati.com. (A CityBeat 2013 cover story on Santos and Please is available here.)
 
 
by Maija Zummo 12.05.2014
at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
comet-hopnosis-7-2014

The Comet to Host Hopnosis 7 Craft Beer Festival this Weekend

Thirty kegs of rarities, debuts and fine brews Friday and Saturday

If you're a fan of craft beer, you might want to set up camp outside the Comet in Northside this weekend. The bar is hosting its seventh annual Hopnosis beer event, featuring 30 kegs of small batch beer, tapped hourly over Friday and Saturday.

The bar, which is already known for its wide beer selection, will be tapping rarities, debut releases and other fine brews from the likes of Great Lakes, Deschutes, Rhinegeist, MadTree and more. They list 19 of the included brews on their site:
  • Great Lakes Blackout Stout 
  • Deschutes Pine Drops 
  • Green Flash Jibe 
  • Victory Hop Harvest 
  • Lagunitas Extra Double Dry Hopped Pale 
  • Epic Element 29 
  • Brother’s Drake Apple Pie Mead 
  • Brew Kettle EL Lupulo Libre
  • Brooklyn Quadraceratops 
  • Affligem Noel 
  • Southern Tier Gemini 
  • Troegs Blizzard of Hops 
  • Smuttynose Smutlabs White IPA 
  • Bell’s Kal-Haven 
  • Christian Moerlein Tart Cherry Honey Almond Ale 
  • Rhinegeist Asterix 
  • Rhinegeist Ink 
  • MadTree Axis Mundi 
  • MadTree Funke Blue 
  • and more
4 p.m.-1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Free entry; beer costs money. 4579 Hamilton Ave., Northside, cometbar.com.
 
 

 

 

 
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