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by Steven Rosen 08.30.2010
Posted In: Visual Art at 09:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Dennis Harrington Honored

Sunday afternoon, some 100 people (perhaps many more — it was really crowded!) gathered at the downtown studio of artist Tom Bacher for a surprise party celebrating Dennis Harrington's 30-plus years of work in Cincinnati's visual arts community. Harrington currently is director of the non-profit Weston Art Gallery in the Aronoff Center for the Arts. He was hired there in 1995, when it was new, by Sally LoveLarkin and became director upon her retirement in 1998.

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by Steven Rosen 05.20.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 10:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

CAM Announces 2009-2010 Exhibition Season

The Cincinnati Art Museum's 2009-2010 season will include several photography shows, all in 2010: Starburst: Color Photography in America 1970-1980 (Feb. 13-May 9); local photographer Thomas Schiff's Las Vegas 360 (April 3-July 18): and Walker Evans: Decade by Decade (June 12-Sept. 5).

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by Steven Rosen 10.22.2008
Posted In: Visual Art, Visual Art at 09:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Scribble Jam Inspires Exhibitions

Cincinnati Art Museum’s China Design Now and Contemporary Arts Center’s Maria Lassnig and Carlos Amorales shows have been at the top of the list for contemporary art followers for quite some time. But now that they're both open and (hopefully) seen, it's a good chance to turn to some smaller but interesting gallery shows around town.

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by Steven Rosen 10.16.2012
Posted In: Visual Art, COMMUNITY at 09:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Finding the FotoFocus Art that Transcends Categories

After the second full week of FotoFocus, I’ve begun to realize that there are way more shows and events out there than one person can get to. (Or, if you do get to them all, to remember what you’ve seen.) It’s also clear that you can begin to roughly pair into categories the kinds of shows that are out there — art photography and photojournalism, still photography and video, portraiture and everything else, contemporary work and vintage (or historic).

And then there are those that touch numerous bases — either because that’s what the artists intended or because time has changed the meaning or our appreciation of the work. In the former category, and so far the work that towers over everything else I’ve seen, is Doug and Mike Starn’s Gravity of Light in the decommissioned Holy Cross Church at Mount Adams Monastery. This installation prominently uses photographs without letting them define what its purpose or meaning is about. I’ve written about it previously and may do so again, so powerful is it. It’s up through year’s end, and I hope everyone realizes how important an artwork it is and goes to see it. Go here for details.

But two other very different exhibits deserve mention in this regard, too. On the second floor of the Emery Theatre, through the end of the month, is an exhibit of estate-authorized prints — from the original glass-plate negatives — of the mysterious Mike Disfarmer’s Depression-era portraits of residents of the small Arkansas town of Heber Springs. Here is work that, whatever its original intention, contemporary thought has turned into art photography.

It can be discussed and debated whether Disfarmer, who died in 1959) was engaged in what he thought was a commercial venture or whether he was after something else… his own quest for an artful statement. But the work today is important as something other than straight photo-documentation, though it is that. The photographs are haunting missives from the place Greil Marcus called “the old, weird America” — a spiritual zone, a cosmic baptismal font, from where much of our contemporary culture can trace its origins.

Disfarmer was born Mike Meyers, but seems to have chosen “disfarmer” as a statement that he didn’t want to fit into the agricultural lifestyle of his hometown. He taught himself photography and built a studio, first on his mother’s back porch and then in the heart of town. According to the Disfarmer website, he obsessed over getting the right light — one wonders what his subjects, for whom time was money, thought as the minutes ticked on.

But they came, sometimes dressed in their best and sometimes dressed in the best they had. What resulted — and we are fortunate his work has been preserved, which itself was a struggle — is a different take on Depression Era poverty than the federal Farm Security Administration photos. Taken by outsiders, those placed — with warmth and humanity — their subjects in their surrounding hardscrabble environment. They have a sociological dimension.

But these remove their subjects from their environment and seem psychological. In a photograph like “First Born,” you have to wonder if Disfarmer ever told his subjects to say “cheese.” The young father, dressed up nicely and wearing a hat, has a proud but slightly furtive gaze that renders his emotions somewhat inscrutable. He sits, holding a child whose face is almost pouting and whose staring eyes are disturbing. The two look apprehensive, either about the photograph or about what life has in store for them. If Disfarmer was after that effect, maybe he was some kind of prophet.

By the way, I’m not sure how many people know this exhibit is here. FotoFocus literature didn’t list it as an ongoing show, but rather a part of a one-day event – last week’s Emery concert by guitarist Bill Frisell/858 Quartet of his composition Musical Portraits from Heber Springs. But the Emery is keeping it up through the month. To see it, e-mail info@emerytheatre.com with your phone number and times you’re available, or call 513-262-8242.

Another show that crosses boundaries in interesting ways is Santeri Tuori’s The Forest project at University of Cincinnati’s Phillip M. Meyers Jr. Memorial Gallery (for hours, go here). Tuori is from Finland — a welcome international addition to FotoFocus — and this show was curated by Judith Turner-Yamamoto, a FotoFocus staffer, with assistance from the Finnish consulate.

The artist spent five years observing — in film and still photographs — the effect of light, seasonal change and weather on a remote, pristine, Finnish island. In “Forest (Tree and Pond),” his work is condensed via editing into a relatively tight time span and projected onto a gray-painted section of a gallery wall. While it looks like we are a watching a specific spot on the island change over the seasons, I’m told it’s a composite. (I find that remarkable.) Tuori has created this slightly wavering mirage of an image to show how art can turn what we think of as mundane into something momentous. He has photographed elusive “change.”

I appreciate the thoughtfulness and hard work of this effort — which is accompanied by a soundscape by Mikko Hynninen — but did find the slight blurriness of the piece distracting. I preferred the three smaller-scale pieces in the gallery’s other room. Here, video images of trees are projected onto, and over, black-and-white photographs of similar trees, providing a three-dimensional effect — a ghostly sense of movement. That happens even though, unlike “Tree and Pond,” these works are not out to simulate an evolving time span.

Photography, like all art, isn’t meant to stand still. Tuori is at the forefront of finding new ways to show that.


Watch for Contributing Visual Art Editor Steven Rosen’s FotoFocus blog postings all month. Contact him at srosen@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 11.20.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 03:33 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

A Walk (and Talk) Down the Aisle

Aisle Gallery, 424 Findlay St., 3rd Floor in the West End, is presenting a gallery talk with artist, curator and Citybeat contributor Matt Morris this Saturday from 1-3 p.m.

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by Steven Rosen 04.22.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 09:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Shepard Fairey Hits the CAC?

As the Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) prepares for next Tuesday's announcement of its 2009-10 season, there is indication it will be bringing the big, nationally reviewed Shepard Fairey: Supply and Demand show here from Boston's Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA). The first museum retrospective for the popular and controversial street artist, Supply and Demand looks at his career up to his creation of the iconic Obama silk-screen posters, depicting the then-presidential candidate, head slightly and nobly uplifted, above the words "Progress" and "Hope."

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by Steven Rosen 09.25.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 03:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Cincinnati Art Museum: Genius Factory

Cincinnati Art Museum did well at this week's announcement of MacArthur Foundation $500,000 "genius grants" — one of the most prestigious in the world. Among the 24 recipients were artist Los Angeles artist Mark Bradford (pictured), who creates large-scale map-like collages out of everyday material and whose show Maps & Manifests was featured at Cincinnati Art Museum in 2008.

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by Steven Rosen 10.24.2012
Posted In: Visual Art at 02:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Art Museum's Rifle Firing Set for Monday

The firing of a high-powered rifle inside the Cincinnati Art Museum, sending a bullet past masterpieces through the first-floor Schmidlapp Gallery and into a block of bronze in the middle of the Great Hall, will occur on Monday, museum officials said.

Todd Pavlisko, the New York-based, locally born artist who proposed the project, will be at the museum Friday for final planning and discussions. (CityBeat will interview him for a story in next week’s Big Picture column.)

The museum has refused to allow press — or the public — to witness the actual event, for security concerns, according to Director Aaron Betsky. It also won’t say what time it will occur. The male sharpshooter who will fire the high-powered rifle from a mounted stand also doesn’t want to be identified. The museum normally is closed to the public on Monday.

A spokeswoman said the museum will be on “lockdown” for the event. Those who will attend the actual shooting include the artist and the sharpshooter, Betsky and Chief Curator James Crump and several others. A Cincinnati police officer also will be present, a requirement of the City Council ordinance permitting the event. 

According to an earlier press release, which did not set a specific date for the actual rifle shot, Pavlisko’s project is an outgrowth of his work with photography and video. This will reference the work of Harold Edgerton, whose photographs capturing bullets passing through fruit and droplets of milk have become masterpieces for making visible that which the naked eye could not see. Pavlisko’s idea is to contrast the flight of the bullet with the timeless nature of the masterpieces on display in the Schmidlapp Gallery. (The bullet will be 12 feet from any actual artwork.)

High-speed cameras and video equipment will document the shot, and the resultant work will be on display May 25-Sept. 22 in a show called Crown. So, too, will the 36-inch cast brass cube, or what remains of it, as the bullet strikes it.

 
 
by Jac Kern 10.02.2013
Posted In: Street Art, Visual Art at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Street Art Featured on BuzzFeed's Community Blog

Queen City again recognized on popular list-icle site

BuzzFeed — a popular source for news bits, pop culture stories and “list-icles” such as “19 Relics From The ’90s Hologram Epidemic — has published many stories about Cincinnati this year alone. There's “15 Gorgeous Photos Of The Old Cincinnati Library,” which compiles swoon-worthy photographs of our Main Library’s past, as well as “11 Cincinnati Foods That Are Better Than Yours” and “31 Ways To Tell You’re From Cincinnati,” both of which have been shared on social media by countless locals — and mocked/criticized for being outdated and overly-generalizing (some of us actually subsist on a diet of foods that are not covered with runny chili and cheese!).

Chris Breeden, promotions director at Arnold's Bar and Grill, recently added another local list-icle to the site (on BuzzFeed’s Community page), highlighting the city’s bevy of public art created by globally recognized street artists.

Breeden's “9 World Famous Street Artists (You Never Would Have Guessed Are) Up In Cincinnati, OH” features photos of work by Shepard Fairey, Vhils, The London Police and other street artists that have adorned Cincinnati surfaces. Also on the list is French artist JR, who was recently in town for his exhibit at the Contemporary Arts Center (on view through Feb. 2, 2014).

Street art featured in the list can be seen everywhere from Arnold's downtown and Amerasia in Covington, Ky. The story details each artist’s background and home base as well as how to find each mural/painting/poster/graffiti site.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 11.02.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 03:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Clifton Cultural Arts Center Lights Up

Starting at 5 p.m. this Friday, the Clifton Cultural Arts Center will hold a ceremony for the lighting of its historic 1906 Clifton School Building. The actual lighting is slated for 6 p.m. The new exterior lighting has been provided by funds raised by the CCAC, with and installation donated by Architectural Landscape Lighting & Design of Miamitown.

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