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by Jac Kern 11.13.2013
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
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UPDATE: Cork 'N Bottle Removes London Police Mural

Decision made one day after BLDG's Mike Amann passed away

UPDATE: Cork ‘N Bottle has reached out to BLDG and the public to apologize for the removal of The London Police mural made possible by BLDG and Mike Amann, who passed away Sunday.

Cork ‘N Bottle’s Tim Hue met with BLDG owners to apologize for the unfortunate timing of the mural removal. The company says it will donate $1,000 to the American Cancer Society in Mike Amann’s name and work to bring The London Police back to Covington to create a new mural. Both the gallery and Cork ‘N Bottle shared the news on social media.

From BLDG’s Facebook page:

“Excellent update on the Cork-N-Bottle and The London Police - Official mural situation:
We just had an excellent meeting with Tim Hue from Cork N Bottle issuing a formal apology along with a gracious $1,000 donation to the American Cancer Society on behalf of Mike Amann.
We fully accept this apology along with Tim's eagerness to correct the situation. We will be working with Tim and Cork N Bottle on replacing the mural in a timely fashion.
Also, we would like to state that the unfortunate timing of the event was in no way intended to be malicious or insensitive in any way.
Thank you Cork N Bottle for doing the right thing for the City of Covington and our community.”

Cork ‘N Bottle also reached out to fans on their page:

“We understand and sincerely regret the hurt that the removal of the art mural has caused our community. We acted out of a concern of a Maker’s Mark copyright violation – which we feared might affect our relationship with a key supplier. We certainly had no intention of offending The London Police - Official, BLDG or the community who had come to appreciate and enjoy the mural. We have been a part of this community for 50 years and as always, wish to work in the best interest for our community's development and growth. We regret the loss of this piece of art, and thank you for your comments and your enthusiasm for Covington. We too share your passion for our neighborhood and love being a part of this community. In furtherance of our sincere apologies, Cork 'N Bottle has made a donation in the name and memory of Michael T. Amann to The American Cancer Society. We invite others to join us.”

ORIGINAL POST: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12

The London Police mural on the side of Covington’s Cork ‘N Bottle has been removed by the liquor store.

British street artists TLP came to Greater Cincinnati this August as part of a collaboration with Covington’s BLDG. The London Police created one large mural and several smaller graffiti works across Covington during their two-week stay. Cork ‘N Bottle owners, according to BLDG, agreed to keep one of the works on the side of their building for at least one year. The mural was removed Monday.

From BLDG’s Facebook Page:

Huge loss in Covington today. Cork 'N Bottle decided to paint over their The London Police - Official mural today. Let us state that the agreement of the mural being painted on the building was that the painting would be up for at least a year after completion. From this point forward, we will surely only shop at The Party Source for all our spirits!”

This decision comes just a day after BLDG owner Mike Amann passed away Sunday after a battle with stage four neuroendocrine cancer.

Friends of Amann and fans of the artwork reached out to Cork ‘N Bottle on Facebook for an explanation. The liquor store posted the following statement this morning.

The London Police mural was removed from our building at 501 Crescent Ave. yesterday. The reasons for this are that the contract to have it painted was unauthorized and the image was an infringement on the Maker’s Mark trademarked bottle image. Please look for new art coming this spring as a new mural is being properly contracted.”

This blog will be updated when more information becomes available.

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.08.2013
Posted In: Arts community, Theater, Visual Art at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door blog 11-8 - drew pulver as tevye human race - photo scott j. kimmins

Stage Door: Choices Galore

I had occasion to be in downtown Dayton on business earlier this week and thought I'd stay for the evening to catch the Human Race Theatre Company's production of Fiddler on the Roof at the Loft Theatre. It's not a space you'd immediately think of for this often large-scale show, but director Kevin Moore has put of lot of action and choreography (by Chris Crowthers) on the stage, centering on Drew Pulver as the philosophical Jewish milkman, Tevye. He's the show's charismatic core, but he's surrounded by a strong cast who really embody their roles. Wandering on and off the stage, a four-musician band, including George Abud as the expressive fiddler, ably accompanies the cast, several of whom play multiple roles. The intimacy of the Loft amplifies the heartfelt nature of the show, and the actors pour heart and soul into the joyous storytelling. This production runs through Nov. 30, so you have time to plan a trip to Dayton yourself. If you're a fan of musicals, you won't be disappointed. Tickets: 937-228-3630

If you're looking for a good musical closer to home, I can certainly recommend the Cincinnati Playhouse production of Cabaret, which gets my Critic's Pick in the current issue (see review here). Director Marcia Milgrom Dodge has taken it back to 1929 with costumes and choreography very true to the period in a seedy, sexy Berlin nightclub. The Playhouse doesn't often do musicals, but this one is done right. Tickets: 513-421-3888

Know Theatre is staging another work by Mike Bartlett. Last spring it was Cock; this time it's Bull (review here). It's a story of two people bullying a third as they compete for jobs. A nasty tale, not for the faint-hearted, but some fine writing and acting. You'll feel ashamed of yourself for enjoying it, I suspect. Tickets: 513-300-5669

A fine production of John Steinbeck's Depression era tale of migrant workers and a guy who just doesn't fit in, Of Mice and Men (review here), finishes its run this weekend at Cincinnati Shakespeare. Jeremy Dubin's performance as cranky George and Jim Hopkins as simpleminded Lenny are examples of the kind of fine acting that's a regular commodity at Cincy Shakes. Tickets: 513-381-2273

Finally, if you're in the mood for a hilarious farce, your destination should be the Carnegie in Covington. CCM Drama has transported some of its actors from the UC Campus to Covington, Ky., for a production of a deliriously funny tale of one man in Paris juggling three fiancees, Boeing Boeing. They're all flight attendants, but advances in aviation screw up his neat schedule to keep them discreet from one another. Comedy ensues. Tickets: 859-957-1940

 
 
by Maija Zummo 10.03.2013
Posted In: Visual Art at 02:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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CityBeat Photographer Exhibits Original Photography

Northside's NVISION hosts "Define Sex Appeal" by photographer Jesse Fox

CityBeat photographer Jesse Fox is exhibiting some of her recent non-editorial work at NVISION in Northside with a free opening reception this Saturday night. 

The show, titled Define Sex Appeal, is a collection of her conceptual art and fashion images that showcase sex and sexuality in a way that's a bit darker and more colorful than your average nudie mags. 

Fox likes to incorporate narrative and emotional element in her works, which explore the feelings, secrets, fears and fantasies of her subjects and humanity at large.    

She has won multiple awards and scholarships for her work behind the lens, and been exhibited in galleries throughout the United States. You can find her work in publications like Alternative Press, Coco Magazine, Meets Obsession, Filigree and others, including CityBeat and the now-defunct A-Line Magazine

See more of her photography at jessefox.net

Opening reception: 6-10 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5. On view 2-9 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday and noon-9 p.m Sunday through Nov. 3. NVISION, 4577 Hamilton Ave., Northside, nvisionshop.com.


 
 
by Jac Kern 10.02.2013
Posted In: Street Art, Visual Art at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Street Art Featured on BuzzFeed's Community Blog

Queen City again recognized on popular list-icle site

BuzzFeed — a popular source for news bits, pop culture stories and “list-icles” such as “19 Relics From The ’90s Hologram Epidemic — has published many stories about Cincinnati this year alone. There's “15 Gorgeous Photos Of The Old Cincinnati Library,” which compiles swoon-worthy photographs of our Main Library’s past, as well as “11 Cincinnati Foods That Are Better Than Yours” and “31 Ways To Tell You’re From Cincinnati,” both of which have been shared on social media by countless locals — and mocked/criticized for being outdated and overly-generalizing (some of us actually subsist on a diet of foods that are not covered with runny chili and cheese!).

Chris Breeden, promotions director at Arnold's Bar and Grill, recently added another local list-icle to the site (on BuzzFeed’s Community page), highlighting the city’s bevy of public art created by globally recognized street artists.

Breeden's “9 World Famous Street Artists (You Never Would Have Guessed Are) Up In Cincinnati, OH” features photos of work by Shepard Fairey, Vhils, The London Police and other street artists that have adorned Cincinnati surfaces. Also on the list is French artist JR, who was recently in town for his exhibit at the Contemporary Arts Center (on view through Feb. 2, 2014).

Street art featured in the list can be seen everywhere from Arnold's downtown and Amerasia in Covington, Ky. The story details each artist’s background and home base as well as how to find each mural/painting/poster/graffiti site.

 
 
by Rick Pender 06.21.2013
Posted In: Arts community, COMMUNITY, Theater, Visual Art at 09:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door image for human races avenue q - katie pees & andrew ian adams - photo scott j. kimmins

Stage Door: The Droll Days of Summer

Most of our local theaters are cooling their jets for the summer months, but you still have two more weekends to catch the hilarious, three-actor Sherlock Holmes spoof of Hound of the Baskervilles at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. This one is definitely fine-tuned, featuring a trio of Cincy Shakes best actors — Jeremy Dubin, Nick Rose and Brent Vimtrup — directed by Michael Evan Haney from the Cincinnati Playhouse. It's a revival of a hit from last summer, so they have the comic timing of quick costume changes and fast-paced tomfoolery down pat. I understand that this weekend is almost sold out, but don't let that keep you from trying. Final performance is June 30. I hope you've deduced that you need to get for it this time around, even if you saw it before. (If you did, you know how funny it is.) It's elementary! Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1

The Showboat Majestic is a venue that floats along every summer with solid entertainment. Right now you can come on board for a classic piece of comedy by Neil Simon, The Odd Couple. It's a hit from 1965 in a production featuring a couple of great local actors: Joshua Steele as the prissy Felix and Mike Hall as the messy Oscar. They're a pair who know their way around a funny script, so it's a fine show for a summer's laugh. Tickets: 513-241-6550

Maybe you thought Sesame Street was funny when you were a kid. How'd you like to see some raunchy puppet behavior? Avenue Q is onstage in Dayton at the Human Race Theatre. The 2004 Tony Award-winning musical offers laugh-out-loud musical mayhem. But leave the kids at home: This one is aimed at those who are twentysomething and up, offering answers to a simple question: What happens to the kids who were raised on Sesame Street when they grow up? You'll find the answers — in songs like "It Sucks to Be Me" and "The Internet Is for Porn" — at the Loft Theatre, 126 North Main St. in downtown Dayton. Tickets: 937-228-3630

 
 
by Rick Pender 06.13.2013
Posted In: Theater, Dance, Visual Art at 08:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cirque du Soleil's Quidam Is a Flight of Imagination

Onstage at Dayton's Nutter Center through June 16

Cirque du Soleil's classic show, Quidam, opens with Zoé (Alessandra Gonzalez), a bored little girl whose parents ignore her. We enter the world of her imagination when Quidam, a headless wanderer under an umbrella, hands Zoé his blue bowler hat. (This imagery will resonate with those who know the surrealist paintings of René Magritte, a 20th century artist whose paintings challenged traditional perceptions of reality.) Zoé's self-absorbed parents float away and we are transported to the magical reality of Cirque's physically astonishing performers.

The "world" presently inhabited by Quidam is Dayton's Nutter Center, on the campus of Wright State University, through Sunday, June 16. The show, which originated as a big top production (it spent several weeks in Cincinnati in August and September 2006 in a "grand chapiteau" on the Ohio River bank near the Suspension Bridge) is now an arena show, and it works beautifully in the Nutter. Five giant metal arches are used to suspend performers in mid-air, but you quickly lose sight of the mechanics thanks to the artistry, visual and musical, of Cirque.

To me, the greatest wonder — beyond the physical precision and discipline of Cirque's athletic artists — is the universality of shows like Quidam, which tour the world. (In a few months, this company will be performing in Europe, playing to audiences in cities including Vienna, Munich and London, where it has a month-long engagement at Royal Albert Hall.) The performers are ethnically diverse and the storytelling spans cultural boundaries: Wordless clowning (Quidam features a segment about making a silent movie that recruits a few audience members as "actors") is laugh-out-loud funny, and the ringmaster John (Mark Ward) borders on intentional incompetence in a way that endears him to the crowd even as he moves us from act to act without saying a word.

And what acts we see: German Wheel (a pair of man-sized double hoops containing a guy who rolls around the stage); Diabolo (spinning Chinese yo-yo's tossed high into the air from a string and caught); Aerial Contortion (Tanya Burka is an amazing silk contortionist, many feet above the stage); Skipping Ropes (using 20 acrobats); Aerial Hoops (three women spinning and pivoting through the air); Hand Balancing (incredible strength and flexibility by a woman on yard-high canes); Spanish Webs (five fellows on high, hanging and twisting on ropes); Statue (a mesmerizing performance by Yves Décoste and Valentyna Sidenko who slowly and powerfully balance in various positions); and finally Banquine (acrobatics). The latter section, Quidam's finale, uses 15 artists, launching tumblers high into the air and catching them. At one point they build a tower of four humans atop each others' shoulders. Each assemblage or toss seems more daring than the previous.

Quidam might be the product of Zoé's boredom, but the show expands imaginative horizons. It's definitely worth a one-hour drive from Cincinnati.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 06.12.2013
Posted In: Visual Art at 10:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
vent haven diane keaton, matthew rolston

Vent Haven Museum Book Gets Star-Studded L.A. Party

Release features large-format prints, documentary, celebs

The publicist for photographer Matthew Rolston's book, Talking Heads, The Vent Haven Portraits (featured in this 2012 CityBeat article), recently sent photos from Rolston's book-publication party in L.A. Here's an excerpt from the accompanying release:

"On Friday, May 10th, actress and author Diane Keaton, renowned art collector Kay Saatchi and Joel Chen, owner of Los Angeles' top resource for antiques and vintage furniture JF Chen, celebrated influential American celebrity photographer and director Matthew Rolston’s new book at JF Chen. Featuring 100 ‘headshots’ of a rare collection of ventriloquist dummies unearthed from the intimate and obscure Vent Haven Museum in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky (the world’s only museum dedicated to the art of ventriloquism), the book is a departure from the celebrity portraiture for which Rolston is known and marks his first foray into the world of fine art."

A documentary about Rolston's project also was shown. Other guests included actor John C. Reilly and songwriter Diane Warren. Vent Haven, incidentally, is planning an exhibit of the photos, though not the large-format prints shown at Chen's store.