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by Nick Swartsell 02.23.2015 5 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
wwe-cranley

Morning News and Stuff

Donors make it rain for Cranley; feds pledge cash for new Cincinnati labs; this man has been in jail for a quarter-century. Is he innocent?

Good morning y’all. I’m fresh off my epic, hour-long alpine adventure, also known as my walk to work. Did you wonder what happened to all the snow that had been on the roadways as you were driving leisurely to work this morning? It's now piled in mountains on the sidewalk by city snowplows. Thanks guys. I do have to say a city worker in a Bobcat drove by yesterday while I was digging my lady friend’s car out of the snow. He looped back around and with three or four quick maneuvers did what would have taken me 20 minutes with a shovel. Driving one of those things is an art, and I have met its Picasso.

Enough grumbling. It’s news time. Mayor John Cranley is, as the kids say, stacking cash (note: kids these days don’t actually say that). Cranley collected more than $250,000 at a Feb. 17 fundraiser for his re-election campaign. That may be the biggest haul ever for a city candidate, according to Cranley’s campaign, which is all the more impressive because Cranley doesn’t face reelection for almost two years. A ton of big names were in attendance at the event, and it seems like the city’s movers and shakers are backing the mayor.

Reds owner Bob Castellini was a host. So were Western and Southern CEO John Barrett, two members of the Lindner family and PACs from Kroger and Procter & Gamble. Cranley’s already got his eye on the election, having hired his campaign manager and setting a fundraising goal of $2 million. That’s a huge sum of money, some of which could go to help out allies in their City Council campaigns, though Cranley has said he won’t be doing that, focusing the cash on his own bid. Another possibility: Is Cranley setting such ambitious goals as a demonstration of his fundraising abilities so he can set up a bid for a higher office down the road?

• The federal government has said it will give $110 million to build a new facility in Cincinnati for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown has been instrumental in securing the funding for the building, which will replace two aging facilities in the city, the Robert A. Taft Laboratory in the East End and the Alice Hamilton Laboratory in Pleasant Ridge. The new facility will consolidate them, making work easier for the federal employees there.

The Center for Disease Control oversees NIOSH. The agency researches ways to prevent injury and illness caused by occupational hazards, making recommendations to other federal agencies. The Cincinnati labs employ about 550 people. It’s not clear where the new labs will be located, but the Uptown Consortium, which represents major businesses and institutions in the Clifton, CUF, Corryville and Avondale neighborhoods including UC and several hospitals, is making a big pull to get the 14-acre site in that area. Other neighborhoods looking to get the facility include Bond Hill.

• Cincinnati anti-abortion activist Dr. John Wilke has died. He was 89. Wilke founded Greater Cincinnati Right to Life and Ohio Right to Life in the 1970s with his wife Barbara as debate swirled about a woman’s right to choose. The two groups have been incredibly active in the decades since as the issue has continued to be one of the country’s most intense and divisive. Wilke also served as head of national and international pro-life groups. Among Wilke’s more controversial assertions: that the stress caused by rape made it very unlikely a woman being raped would become pregnant. Other doctors and experts have since challenged that assertion, calling it bunk science and a cruel perspective on a terrible experience. Last month, Wilke released an autobiography about his time as a pro-life activist.

• A lawsuit over decades-old corpse abuse at the Hamilton County Morgue is in court today. The case involves the behavior of former morgue employee Kenneth Douglass, who was convicted six years ago of sexually abusing three bodies while he worked at the morgue. The families of the women whose corpses were abused have sued the county, charging that it should have known Douglass was engaging in illegal behavior at the facility and fired him. County officials and the estates of the former county coroner and supervisor, who the family also named in the suit and who have both since died, say they couldn’t have known Douglass would engage in behavior so abnormal and unpredictable.

• Has Kentucky held the wrong man in prison for 27 years? Some evidence suggests that might be the case. The Kentucky Innocence Project has been working on the case of William Virgil, who was convicted for the 1987 killing of psychiatric nurse Retha Welch in Newport. Virgil was convicted based on witness testimony, though some of those witnesses have since been discredited. Meanwhile, DNA evidence tested since the trial suggests Virgil may not have committed the crime. His DNA wasn’t found at the crime scene, Virgil’s advocates point out, and hers was not found on his clothing. The state is waiting for more tests to be done, but the Kentucky Innocence Project holds that there isn’t enough evidence against Virgil to hold him in prison.

 
 
by Staff 02.23.2015 5 days ago
 
 
o pie o_ilene ross

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Pie. The Art of Food. Potatoes. Pizza. Secrets.

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food.

Jac Kern: I stocked up on groceries Friday night in preparation for a weekend full of snow, pajamas and movies. Pizza-making is a perfect snow day activity, so that's what I made for dinner on Saturday. My two go-tos are classic pepperoni and a fig and prosciutto inspired by A Tavola. The local eatery's version includes fontina, parmigiano and balsamic arugula; I used the fresh mozzarella and spinach I had on hand, plus fig jam and prosciutto. It's no A Tavola — my oven pales in comparison to their Italian wood-burning beauty — but it was tasty and easily consumed in the aforementioned pajamas. Also: Plenty of popcorn during the Oscars!

Ilene Ross:
I feel as if I did nothing but eat out this weekend, but given what I do for a living, this should come as no surprise. On Friday night I attended the ninth annual Art of Food at The Carnegie in Covington. This event, a combination of art and food, never disappoints; it’s a feast for the eyes as well as the taste buds. Local artist Pam Kravetz put on quite a spectacular show — the theme was Candy Land — with even chef Jean-Robert de Cavel getting into the act with a starring role as Lord Licorice. Some of the more outstanding dishes were The Littlefield’s house-cured and smoked bacon with house pickles; Wunderbar’s bacon, spinach, brie and fig jam finger sandwiches; The Rookwood’s Porchetta, with Marksbury Farm pork belly, Beeler's Farm pork cheek rillettes, rosemary-cured lardo, carrot mostardo, shaved celery and red cress; The Sleepy Bee’s flatbread stalactites with Moroccan chicken and date herb chutney; Bouquet Restaurant and Wine Bar’s whipped goat cheese with popcorn, pickled fennel and pear gastrique; and Django Western Taco’s beer-braised pork belly with corn relish, guacamole and corn chips.   

On Saturday my son and I got to try one of O Pie Os latest creations, a honey vinegar pie. Now, that might sound a tad bit strange, but believe me, it’s not. Picture a rich, slightly tangy, not-too-sweet custard filling in a perfectly flaky crust. A little packet of crisp sea salt comes along with the pie so you can sprinkle a bit on top to taste, therefore achieving a nice salty balance. We also dug into an apple pie with rosemary caramel. I have to say that O Pie O’s apple pie is so good, I didn’t care one bit that I forgot to buy ice cream.   

Saturday night I got to be a guinea pig of sorts during a trial run for the staff at chef Jean-Robert de Cavel’s latest restaurant, the soon-to-be-opened Le Bar a Boeuf in The Edgecliff. The restaurant will be opening quite soon and I was overjoyed to be able to participate. While I can’t divulge too many details, I can say that the space is beautiful, the staff — under the watchful eye of hospitality expert Richard Brown — is charming and diligent, and as far as the food, well, you’re in for a real treat.   

I have a good friend who lives in Indianapolis, and her daughter is a Girl Scout. This year was the second time I’ve bought cookies from her and the two have driven in and delivered them to me on a Sunday. It’s also the second time that we’ve met at Maribelle’s eat + drink for brunch to make the cookie drop off. My son and I took them to Maribelle’s for the first time last year and they loved it so much that they specifically requested it again. I don’t blame them. Brunch at Maribelle’s is a crazy good combination of breakfast and lunch foods everyone loves. The four of us had White Bean and Frog Leg Chili; a Pig Tostado (shredded pork, cumin crème, pickled red onion, queso fresco and cilantro); fried cashew butter, jelly and banana sandwiches; a hamburger; some sort of yummy egg dish that I can’t remember the name of; and, of course, bloody mary’s for the adults. Yes, it was a lot of food, and there were leftovers, but for me the best thing about a busy weekend is a Sunday afternoon nap followed by not having to cook. My Oscar watching dinner consisted of Maribelle’s leftovers, Samoas and bourbon.  

Samantha Gellin: I ate a grilled chicken club at Anderson Pub & Grill on Beechmont Avenue, aka APG. Normally I shy away from chicken sandwiches because they tend to turn out dry and tasteless. But I've never been disappointed with the food at APG so I decided to give it a try. It was worth it. So juicy and full of flavor. It's topped with bacon, lettuce, tomato, American cheese, onion, pickle and chipotle mayo. Probably one of the best grilled chicken sandwiches I've had in a long time. If you're on the East Side and you're looking for simple but really satisfying bar food (at decent prices too) this is the place to go.

Anne Mitchell: I've barely left the house since Snowmaggedon began, but luckily we are within slogging distance of several MainStrasse eateries. So Friday night we slushed up to Dee Felice Cafe for cocktails and appetizers. I had the fried oysters with cream sauce, a cup of gumbo, and a delicious Manhattan made by Ron the Awesome Bartender. I may have even had a second, just because even numbers are luckier. On Saturday, we went to Otto's. Their beef short ribs were cozier than a fleece snowsuit, and twice as sexy. I sipped on the Ginger Punch special. I should have deduced, when they said they were trying it out for the menu at their eagerly-anticipated Frida, that it was tequila based. Ole!

Rebecca Sylvester: To pre-game before The Price is Right Live! my husband and I decided to try one of the restaurants in the Horseshoe Casino (where the show was). We weren't wearing elastic waistbands so that ruled out the buffet and we were (luckily) turned away from Margaritaville, which I guess was every other audience members' plan, so we ended up at the fancy option: Jack Binion's Steakhouse. It was easily the quietest place in the casino, even with a live trio playing lounge versions of Nirvana and top 40 songs. The booths look like nap-worthy couches, but we sat at the bar since we were only ordering drinks and snacks. The super exciting part of the menu (for a vegetarian) was The Potato Bar, which listed a few heavily topped baked potatoes, pub fries and a few other potato-based sides. Also a pleasant surprise was the list of salads, all vegetarian friendly and a little more interesting than the standard steakhouse iceberg wedge. The servers were really nice and the wine selection was good. If I'm ever back there and need a place to rest my slot machine arm that is probably the best spot in the building.

Maija Zummo: I went to an Oscar's potluck on Sunday and I was tasked with bringing dessert. Usually I'll make something fruit based — a pie or a cobbler — but my friends wanted chocolate. I'm not a huge fan of brownies or anything really cakey and chocolately, so I made cute little chocolate pot de cremes in bright teal ramekins. I found a super easy recipe that just calls for pouring your hot custard into a blender and then refrigerating it to set versus making a water bath and baking the little things. They turned out really well — I added some vanilla and coffee to the custard mix because I'm fancy like that —  and were super easy. Top them with some homemade whipped cream and they seem much more impressive and hard to make than they actually are.

 
 
by Hannah Bussell 02.20.2015 7 days ago
Posted In: fish at 03:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
fish fry

Fish Fry Fridays

Living in a historically Catholic city comes with fried fish benefits

You don't have to be religious to reap the benefits of the fish fries of the Lenten season. Area churches, Catholic high schools, Masonic lodges and more are offering up all variety of fried cod and other fish on Fridays, with bonus side dishes like homemade mac and cheese and coleslaw. The fries also frequently try to one-up each other, so expect special additions like Bingo, beer and wine and even costumed characters.

All Saints Catholic Parish
 
Choose from fried cod, grilled salmon, grilled tilapia, cheese pizza, french fries, baked potatoes, sweet potato fries, slaw, tossed salad, applesauce and assorted desserts. Fish tacos back by popular demand. Beer and wine available. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 8939 Montgomery Road, Montgomery, allsaints.cc. 

American Legion Post 318 
Enjoy fried or baked fish, shrimp and chicken nuggets dinners with sides and a beverage included. Soft drinks and alcohol will be available for purchase at the bar. Enjoy this fish fry dining-in, or carry-out. $5-$8. Feb 20, 27, March 6, 13, 20, 27, Apr 3. 

American Legion Post 513 
Enjoy a choice of cod, catfish, fantail shrimp, popcorn shrimp, crab cakes and chicken strips. Dinners include fries, mac and cheese or onion straws and coleslaw. Cupcakes will be served as a dessert. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. American Legion Post 513, 7947 Hamilton Ave., Mount Healthy, 513-729-0061. 
 
Beechwood High School 
Benefits the Beechwood Band Boosters. This fish fry includes fried fish with choice of bun or rye bread, coleslaw, french fries or mac and cheese. Drinks and desserts available. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 54 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell, Ky., 859-620-6317. 

Bishop Fenwick High School 
A fish fry with an added bonus of Monte Carlo. 7-11 p.m. March 7. (Carryout available beginning at 5 p.m.) 4855 State Route 122, Franklin, 513-423-0723. 

Bockfest Fish Fry 
The third annual Old St. Mary's Bockfest fish fry runs along the Bockfest parade route. Enjoy sandwiches, sides and drinks until they're gone. 5 p.m. March 6. 123 E. 13th St., Over-the-Rhine, oldstmarys.org.

Boondockers Fish Fry at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church 
Presented by the Boondockers, choose from a menu of fried fish, baked fish and fried shrimp dinners, you can either dine-in, carry-out or drive-thru. Order a Tommy Boy: fish on a grilled cheese. 5-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington, Ky., 859-689-5010. 

Boy Scout Troop 452 Fish Fry 
Enjoy a choice of main entrée, two sides, dessert and a drink. Papa John's pizza and Frisch's tartar sauce available. Special visit from radio station 94.9 on March 20. Carry-out meals available. The meals will be served by the Scouts at St. Thomas More Church. Fees help the boys earn their summer camp fees. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 7800 Ohio Pike, Withamsville, 513-315-3991, sttmschool.org. 

Boy Scout Troop 271 Fish Fry 
This dine-in or carry-out fish fry is presented by St. Teresa Boy Scout Troop 271 at St. Teresa of Avila Church. Rotating meals throughout Lent such as shrimp and tilapia meals. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 1175 Overlook Ave, West Price Hill, 513-282-0840. 

Brown Chapel AME Church 
Fish, Mac and cheese, green beans, coleslaw, bread and a dessert. 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30- 7 p.m. Feb. 20, March 6 and March 13. 2804 Alms Place, Walnut Hills, brownchapelamecincinnati.org.

Fort Thomas Masonic Lodge No. 808 
Enjoy fish, ,ac and cheese, and/or fries, coleslaw and tartar sauce. 4-8 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 37 N. Fort Thomas Ave, Fort Thomas, Ky., 859-441-1280. 

Germania Society Fish Fry 
The Germanis Society of Cincinnati presents their fish fry with sides including mac and cheese, french fries, coleslaw, collared greens and corn bread. Assorted desserts and beverages are available for purchase. Tea, coffee and lemonade are provided for free. Carry-out and credit card purchases also available.4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 3529 W. Kemper Road, Colerain Township, 513-742-0060. 

Hartzell United Methodist Church 
This all-you-can-eat fish fry has fried Atlantic cod with homemade tartar sauce. Dinners come with sides of homemade mac and cheese, coleslaw, bread and a drink. Also have two-piece grilled chicken breast dinner, shrimp baskets or two-piece cheese pizza dinners. 4-7 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash, 513-891-8527. 

Knights of Columbus Kehoe Council 
Choose from a menu of fried fish, beer-battered and baked cod, chicken, steak, french fries, mac and cheese, coleslaw, onion rings and fried mushrooms. Desserts and refreshments are available for extra. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 828 Elm St., Ludlow, Ky., 859-261-2704. 

Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish 
Enjoy this fish fry as dine-in, carry-out or a drive-thru. Home of the "codfather," expect to see some mafia costumes for photo ops. They use natural cuts of Icelandic cod cooked in cholesterol-free vegetable shortening. Also serves bottled beer. 4-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 1130 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger, Ky., 859-525-6909.

Nativity Parish Fish Fry
Offering hand-breaded fish fry dinners, with sides like mac and cheese, sweet potato fries, green beans and cole slaw. Beer available. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 5935 Pandora Ave., Pleasant Ridge, nativity-cincinnati.org.

Pleasant Run Presbyterian Church 
A menu of fish or chicken nuggets with choices of two sides: mac and cheese, green beans, coleslaw and applesauce. Meal includes bread and a dessert plus a drink of either coffee, iced tea or lemonade. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through March 20. 11565 Pippin Road, Colerain, 513-825-4544. 

Silver Grove Firefighter Association 
This fish fry benefits the Fire/EMS for Campbell County Fire District 1. 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 5011 Four Mile, Silver Grove, Ky., 859-441-6251. 

St. Aloysius Gonzaga Church 
You can carry-out, drive-thru or dine-in choosing from a menu of fried and baked fish, shrimp, pizza, mozzarella sticks, homemade mac and cheese, green beans, coleslaw and homemade desserts. Beer is available for purchase.4:30-7 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 4390 Bridgetown Road, Cheviot, saintals.org. 

St. Antoninus Boy Scout Troop 614 
Dine-in, carry-out, or drive-thru with a curb-side pick-up. Choose from a menu of fish sandwiches, jumbo shrimp, grilled salmon, pizza, grilled cheese, homemade soups and homemade desserts plus other side dishes. 5-7 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 1500 Linneman Road, Cheviot, 513-922-5400. 

St. Augustine Church 
Enjoy deep fried and baked fish, shrimp, and cheese pizza. There will be a choice of side dishes including french fries, hush puppies, coleslaw and mac and cheese. Desserts available. 4-7 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 1839 Euclid Ave., Covington, Ky., 859-431-3943.

St. Barbara Fish Fry 
Enjoy fried fish, baked tilapia, shrimp and cheese pizza. Adult dinners include three sides. You can enjoy your fish fry either by dining in or carrying out. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-3100. 

St. John the Evangelist 
Pick from baked or fried fish and shrimp, fish sandwich, cheese pizza, crab cakes, side dishes and dessert. New for 2015 is a kid’s fish stick meal. This fish fry benefits the Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Campton Mission, Christ Renews His Parish, the West Chester Firefighters and Knights of Columbus. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 7121 Plainfield Road, Deer park, 513-791-3238. 

St. John the Evangelist West Chester 
Choose from fried fish sandwiches, breaded and unbreaded baked fish, shrimp, crab cakes, cheese pizza, mac and cheese, french fries, green beans, coleslaw and applesauce as well as a large selection of desserts. There is even a supervised kids room back. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 9080 Cincinnati-Dayton Road, West Chester, 513-777-6433. 

St. Lawrence Elementary 
Breaded jumbo shrimp, baked salmon, beer-battered or breaded cod, spaghetti with tomato sauce, grilled cheese sandwich or garlic grilled cheese sandwich and pizza bread. 4-7 p.m. Fridays. Through April 3. 1020 Carson Ave., East Price Hill, 513-921-4230 

St. William Fish Fry
A fish fry with weekly live entertainment. The Magnificod Platter features a piece of hand-breaded cod, fries, two hush puppies and coleslaw. Go healthier with baked salmon. Pizza available for kids. Beer and dessert sold separately. 5-8 p.m. Fridays. Through March 27. 4108 W. Eighth St., Delhi, stwilliamfishfry.com.

 
 
by Kathy Valin 02.20.2015 7 days ago
Posted In: Dance at 01:31 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
oneway

Performance and Time Arts Series Hosts Original Production

Examination of unrequited love debuts this weekend at College Hill Town Hall

Performance and Time Arts (PTA), a project of Contemporary Dance Theater, is the longest-running performance art showcase in the city, but until this weekend it has never been host to a single production. One Way Road on a Two Way Street, an original multi-act examination by an all-female cast of unrequited love and its ramifications, debuts Friday and Saturday at the College Hill Town Hall. Producer, flugelist (yes, someone who plays the flugelhorn), dancer and choreographer Shakira Rae Adams reveals that the theme is derived from personal experience. “A certain woman has sparked this creation — someone very close to my heart,” she says.

Acts include spoken word, dance, live and recorded music, visual media and theater. A post-performance reception offers pastry treats from Oliver’s Desserts.

Adams, born in Findlay, Ohio, is an outgoing personality with a contagious smile who describes herself as an “outside-the-box nerd.” Her life so far has included pre-med and nursing studies, work as a doula (a person trained to assist in childbirth) and a trip to West Africa, from which she brought back the African dance techniques she uses to teach her own choreography. Oh, and she also designed and teaches a class on the dissection of the human body for kids 5-14.

“I found dance through jazz dance, and it’s help me keep my sanity,” Adams says. “I think music and science and dance all go together. Anyhow, it’s worked for me. I hope One Way Road on a Two Way Street inspires people to be more honest and open with their emotions, not to be locked down like the society we live in.” 

ONE WAY ROAD ON A TWO WAY STREET takes place at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday at Contemporary Dance Theater Studios at College Hill Town Hall. More info: http://cdt-dance.org/1502pta
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.20.2015 8 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news1_kasichtaxcuts

Morning News and Stuff

City Hall might get metal detectors; will Oxford get Amtrak service to Chicago?; Kasich proposal would funnel nearly $1 billion a year to charter schools

Hey all! Here’s a quick morning news rundown.

In the wake of last month’s infamous pickup truck incident (wherein a disgruntled man tried to ram his vehicle into our seat of city government), City Hall might be getting metal detectors. Council voted yesterday to find out how much the security measure will cost. The city has already stationed another guard in the City Hall lobby and instituted a requirement that visitors to the mayor or council members be escorted. The extra security measures also come as a response to death threats received by Mayor John Cranley and Councilwoman Amy Murray. Cranley has declined a body guard but has said that the recent events have left him a bit shaken.

• Oxford could be on the path to getting its first train service in half a century. Officials in Butler County are discussing an application for a federal TIGER grant that would fund a stop in the city for trains heading to Chicago. Miami University hosts many students from the Chicago area, officials with the school say, and there is great demand for easy and affordable transit to the Windy City. Last month, officials with the school, the city and the county asked Amtrak to do a feasibility study on picking up passengers there. Currently, Amtrak’s Cardinal Line runs from Cincinnati to Chicago, but only in the middle of the night and only a few times a week. There are efforts underway to expand that service led by transit advocacy group All Aboard Ohio.

• Gov. John Kasich’s proposal to make some Medicaid recipients pay premiums could block access to health care for low-income folks, a new study finds. The report by liberal-leaning Policy Matters Ohio says the proposed premiums, which would start at $15 to $20 a month, would prove a significant hardship for low-income people making just above the federal poverty line (about $12,000 for a single person). The study looks at past efforts in other states to require low-income people to pay premiums on government-subsidized health care. In examples from many states over the past decade, health care costs went up as a result of low-income people having less access to preventative health care, causing them to develop serious conditions for which they seek emergency treatment.
Policy Matters’ study suggests the same could happen in Ohio should Kasich’s proposal be adopted.

• There’s actually a raft of news about Kasich, now that we’re talking about the gov, so I’ll just briefly run through the rest of it here. First, an analysis of his budget proposal finds that it would funnel more money into Ohio’s controversial charter school program, bringing the funding devoted to charter schools by the state to nearly $1 billion a year. Charters in the state have come under criticism over the past year due to sometimes-poor performance and lack of accountability. Ohio’s system takes money from public school districts and gives it to privately run schools that are held to a lower standard by the state. Some of these schools have excelled, delivering better student performance at a lower cost, but a number of others haven’t been nearly so successful. What’s more, several schools have been rocked by allegations of financial and other improprieties. There is movement at the state House to hold the schools to higher standards, but so far no legislation has been passed. You can read our in-depth story on the state’s charter schools here for more on that. Critics of Kasich’s plan to provide more funding for charters say it’s time to reform Ohio’s charter system entirely.

• Speaking of education, Kasich and his budget proposal, Ohio state legislators are going to change Kasich’s proposal for pubic school funding, Republican lawmakers have revealed. Though it’s unclear just what they’ll do when the get under the hood of Kasich’s funding changes, they’ve already chosen Rep. Bob Cupp, R-Lima, to take the lead. Kasich’s public school funding proposal, which seeks to shift some state aid away from wealthy districts toward lower-income ones, left many scratching their heads earlier this month. Kasich’s complex proposed funding formula left some low-income districts with cuts while giving big percentage increases to wealthy districts like Indian Hill, which would get 21 percent more state aid under the model. There are reasons for that and other counter-intuitive increases, as we explored in our story on the proposal a couple weeks ago, but it still doesn’t sit right with many folks. Cupp has said there seem to be some “anomalies” in the formula, but that he won’t know exactly how everything is working until he and other lawmakers dive in and look at everything piece by piece.

Annnnnnd. I’m out. Happy Friday y’all. Tweet news tips, your favorite winter beer recommendations or Parks and Rec finale sadness/spoilers to me over the weekend: @nswartsell. Or you can e-mail me with all of that: nswartsell@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Rick Pender 02.20.2015 8 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
little women_cincy shakes-photo cal harris

Stage Door: Fatherless Families on Cincinnati Stages

Just how can Tracy Letts' sprawling play August: Osage County be wedged into the tiny Clifton Performance Theatre on Ludlow? Director Buz Davis knows that this show is more about characters and great dialogue than the set; he told me so. (Read more in my Curtain Call column here.) He's made it possible for you to sit in the midst of the home of the cantankerous Westons as they fuss and fight when their father goes missing and their mother's addiction to pain killers spills over into everyone else's lives. The show won both the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award in 2008, so it's one you should have on your list to see if you're a serious theatergoer. (Through March 13). Tickets: 513-861-7469.

Although it's about another family struggling to get along while husband and father is absent, there's a whole different dynamic in Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, presented by Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. This adaptation by Emma Reeves should offer an excellent opportunity to see some of Cincy Shakes' best actresses onstage; it's being directed by Sara Clark (who would likely be in the show, but she's pregnant right now, wich doesn't quite fit this story). It opens tonight and runs through March 21. Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1.

The short run of a touring production of Cole Porter's jaunty Anything Goes is over on Sunday. Need a mid-winter getaway? Take a madcap cruise on the S.S. American and watch as love affairs go overboard and confusion reigns. This show from 1934 has been reinvented numerous times, most recently in a 2011 Broadway revival that won a boatload of Tony Awards. Tickets: 513-621-2787.

It's always worth paying attention to productions on our local university stages, where fine renditions of classic theatrical works are the norm. Northern Kentucky University just opened a production of the great musical Les Misérables, onstage through March 1. I'm told most performances are sold out, but if you show up in person (no calls) you can be put on a wait list and fill seats available just before curtain time. At Xavier University this weekend (through a 2 p.m. Sunday matinee) you'll find a production of Shakespeare's most beloved comedy, A Midsummer Night's Dream, staged by Jeremy Dubin, veteran member of Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. Tickets: 513-745-3939.

Continuing productions this weekend include the Cincinnati Playhouse's staging of the charming romance between dog and cat lovers, Chapatti (through March 8; CityBeat review here) and Falcon Theater's production of the tense drama about race relations in 1960s Alabama, In the Heat of the Night (through Feb. 28). Falcon performs in a small theater space on Monmouth Street in Newport. … It's also the final weekend for Know Theatre's production of the one-woman version of The Handmaid's Tale, Margaret Atwood's dystopian novel adapted for the stage. Cincy Shakes veteran Corinne Mohlenhoff is doing a bravura job with this thoughtful and frightening piece. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Rick Pender's STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.
 
 
by Staff 02.20.2015 8 days ago
 
 
aclead_artoffoodatthecarnegie_joesimonphotography

Your Weekend To Do List (2/20-2/22)

The Art of Food, 20th Century Cincinnati design show, The Price is Right Live!, Oscar parties and more

Looking for things to do this weekend? There's plenty of reasons to leave the house — once you put on like six layers of clothes, a hat, gloves, some snow boots and tire chains. 

FRIDAY 20 
Celebrating the ways in which food appeals to our senses both orally and visually, The Carnegie’s ninth annual The Art of Food event and exhibition features some of our most experimental local chefs, bakers and sweets-mongers showing off their most artistically inspired creations. In addition to all the yummy eats, artist Pam Kravetz is organizing a multi-gallery “Candy Land” theme that corresponds with the classic board game. 6-9 p.m. Friday. $25 members advance; $40 non-members advance; $35 members at the doors; $50 non-members at the door. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington, Ky., thecarnegie.com.


500 Miles to Memphis, one of many Greater Cincinnati acts showing love for WNKU this weekend
Presented by the Good People Festival, 30 bands — locals plus out-of-towners Charlie Mars, Will Kimbrough and Jason Wilbur — will perform over two nights in honor of WNKU radio station’s 30 years on the air. The bands include 500 Miles to Memphis, Noah Hunt & The Scotty Bratcher Band, The Tillers, Buffalo Wabs & the Price Hill Hustle, Frontier Folk Nebraska and plenty more. All proceeds will benefit WNKU to help keep them going strong for another 30 years. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $30 weekend pass; $20 single-day ticket; $50 VIP weekend passes (includes Saturday reception with food, drinks and private performances from Chardez and special guests). Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky., wnku.org.


Nikki Lane
Photo: Glynis Carpenter
One of the great Wanda Jackson’s biographical talking points is the fact that she toured with and fleetingly dated Elvis Presley back in a time when her Rockabilly star shone as brightly as his. In a good many ways, Nikki Lane represents the 21st century manifestation of that vaunted pair’s musical DNA — she twangs and bangs with the ferocity of a roadhouse Rock band churning out amped up Country covers behind the sturdiest chicken wire known to man. Deals don’t come any more real than Nikki Lane. Lane’s appearance in Cincinnati at MOTR Pub during last fall’s MidPoint Music Festival was a near religious experience … if your religion allows whiskey shots, a foul-mouthed choir and a hymnal packed with classic Outlaw Country and scorching Rock. Nikki Lane plays at Woodward Theater Friday, Feb. 20. Find tickets/more info here.


EVENT: Bockfest Sausage Queen Preliminary Round

Cincinnati beer festival Bockfest hosts the second of four preliminary rounds of a gender-neutral pageant to name the 2015 Sausage Queen, who will lead the Bockfest Parade with a symbolic tray of bockwurst sausage. Based on their personality, presence and talent, judges will move beer enthusiasts through a series of rounds of competition, leading up a final crowning and cash prize. Come out and support the candidates and have a couple of beers yourself. Future rounds Feb. 26 at Washington Platform and Feb. 28 at Crazy Fox Saloon. 9 p.m. Friday. Free. Milton’s, 301 Milton St., Prospect Hill, bockfest.com.


Little Women
Photo: Cal Harris 

ONSTAGE: Little Women

The story of Louisa May Alcott’s classic novel from the late 1860s, Little Women, has long been woven into the American consciousness. The March family lives in refined poverty, with a dutiful father away in the Civil War and a steadfast mother raising four headstrong daughters. Their story is one of hardship and heartbreak, with generous doses of situational humor, all of which are recaptured in Emma Reeves’ new adaptation for the stage being regionally premiered by Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. CSC’s acting company is replete with fine actors, and local stage veteran Annie Fitzpatrick plays loving Marmee, who strives to keep her chicks in order. Through March 21. $14-$36. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273, cincyshakes.com.



SATURDAY 21 
Vintage is the new black, and Cincinnati knows this. Fuelling our desire for nostalgia and simplicity by feeding us quality and value is the annual 20th Century Cincinnati vintage modern design show, returning for its third decade. More than 60 dealers will fill the Sharonville Convention Center with a funky and fabulous selection of furniture, lighting, fashion and more. There will be plenty of period decorative objects featured, including art glass, pottery, posters, metal wares, textiles and dinnerware, with something for every collectors’ budget. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; ticketed preview 9-11 a.m. Saturday. $8 two-day general admission; $25-$30 preview pass. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville, 20thcenturycincinnati.com


You probably won’t see Bob Barker or Drew Carey cruising around Cincinnati this weekend. However, The Price Is Right Live! is in town, so you could still win a BRAND. NEW. CAR! The show is an untelevised stage version of the nation’s longest-running game show, hosted by a celebrity like Marc Summers, Todd Newton or Jerry Springer. Ticket numbers are already limited for both nights the show chugs through the Horseshoe Casino, but fret not. It turns out you can still try your luck and register to compete even without a ticket. Sticky wicket: Without a ticket, you wait in a holding area instead of inside The Pavilion, watching your neighbors play Plinko and spin the wheel. So, ya know, come on doooown! 8 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. $44-$55. Horseshoe Casino, 1000 Broadway, Pendleton, priceisrightlive.com. (REGISTER TO WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS FROM CITYBEAT HERE.)


Jean Yves-Thibaudet
Photo: IMG Artists 
This Saturday and Sunday, famed French pianist Jean-Yves Thibaudet will perform two Khachaturian pieces (the waltz from Masquerade Suite and Piano Concerto) and Holst’s The Planets. The Planets! On Saturday night, Bell’s Brewery is offering flights of its limited beer series, The Planets, for $8 a pop. Bottles will be available at all three concerts while supplies last. 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21; 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 22. $12-$120. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org


Borrowed Landscape
Photo:CAC
Heine Avdal is making a short trip from Belgium to Cincinnati on Feb. 21 and 22 just to visit the Whole Foods Market in Rookwood Commons. It’s sandwiched between theatrical performances that he and his artistic organization fieldworks will be doing in Heine Avdal is making a short trip from Belgium to Cincinnati on Feb. 21 and 22 just to visit the Whole Foods Market in Rookwood Commons. It’s sandwiched between theatrical performances that he and his artistic organization fieldworks will be doing in Budapest and Oslo. So why exactly is he coming here to go to Whole Foods? It isn’t just because he needs goat milk or edible flowers. It will be the site of the U.S. premiere — and only U.S. event to date — of a site-specific performance art piece called Borrowed Landscape, which he has been performing in Europe. He is being sponsored by the Contemporary Arts Center as part of its international-oriented Performances series. 2-4 p.m. Feb. 21 and 22. Admission is free and you can come and go anytime within the two-hour window.


SUNDAY 22
 
In honor of the organization’s 40th anniversary, People Working Cooperatively takes its annual Oscars night party back to psychedelic during a “Hometown Hollywood 1975” event. While watching a live telecast of the annual Oscars gala, guests will enjoy a three-course dinner wrapped up in a funky ’70s theme reminiscent of the era’s groovy game shows. Attire for the night will be either classic black tie in true Oscars fashion or ’70s retro, complete with platform shoes and powder-blue tuxedos, so take your pick. 5:30 p.m.-midnight. Sunday, Feb. 22. $175. Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, 35 W. Fifth St., Downtown, pwchomerepairs.org.


Ring in the year of the sheep at Orient Wok in Fort Mitchell for its Chinese New Year dinner and celebration. You’ll get the full experience of this notable holiday with a delicious and authentic nine-course meal. There will also be a traditional Lion Dance, plenty of explosives during the firecracker celebration and many more forms of cultural entertainment. 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 21. $75; $25 children ages 6-12. Oriental Wok, 317 Buttermilk Pike, Ft. Mitchell, Ky., orientalwok.com.


Adam Cayton-Holland
"I was always doing funny stuff,” says comedian Adam Cayton-Holland from his home in Denver, “but it was more writing behind-the-scenes. I wasn’t one of those guys growing up watching stand-up going, ‘That’s going to be me.’ Never in a million years did I think I’d be the guy up on stage.” At the behest of a stand-up comedian friend, Cayton-Holland tried it on a whim. “I did it and I was hooked,” he says. Today he divides his time between Denver and Los Angeles and has picked up more TV writing gigs. Showtimes Thursday, Feb. 19-Sunday, Feb. 22. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com. 
 

MONDAY 23
Explore how science and art overlap for the perfect date night at the Contemporary Arts Center’s One Night One Craft event. A sommelier will walk attendees through the science of wine making and the art of sampling it, plus artist John Humphries will show you how to make art with less palatable wines. 6-8 p.m. Monday. $20 members; $30 non-members. 44 E. Sixth St., Downtown, contemporaryartscenter.org.




 
 
by John Hamilton 02.19.2015 9 days ago
at 12:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Forgotten Classics: Harry and Tonto

Reviewing lesser-known films that stand the test of time

When I started doing this blog series I promised myself that I would avoid covering movies that had won an Academy Award, especially those that were awarded Best Picture, Director or Actor. When most people decide to look up “classics” to watch, their go-tos are often Oscar winners. But there is a 1974 film that I think has been unfairly ignored and dismissed, despite its Best Actor win. That film is Harry and Tonto.

Co-written and directed by the late Paul Mazursky, this movie follows the eponymous duo — Harry (Art Carney) is a retired widower who looses his apartment building when it is condemned; his only companion is his pet cat, Tonto. The two go on a cross-country odyssey meeting many colorful characters along the way, including a health-food salesman (Arthur Hunnicutt), an elderly Native American (Chief Dan George) and an underaged runaway (Melanie Mayron), among others. Harry eventually reconnects with his three kids who live all across the map.

Just based on that plot, many would think that it’s just a basic road trip movie with a quirky old man and his cute little cat. While it is enjoyable in that respect, it is a truly great film that should be truly appreciated and given another look.

Let’s go ahead and begin with the obvious topic: Art Carney winning Best Actor. Many have found that to be a bad decision. Especially since that year the other nominees included Al Pacino for The Godfather and Jack Nicholson for Chinatown. Many feel that picking Carney for the award was just a sympathy win given Carney’s long career and status as a comic icon.

While I will admit that the other nominees that year were all very good — 1974 was just a great year for movies in general — I will forever be an apologist for Carney being the winner.

Carney’s performance as Harry seems so natural. He never gets overly dramatic with his line reading, and he adds the right amount of comedic charm to his role without reverting back to his Ed Norton character from The Honeymooners.

A great example is in the beginning, when Carney and Tonto are relaxing in the apartment and he reminisces the old days in New York. “There were trolleys, Tonto. Cobblestones. The aroma of corned beef and cabbage. The tangy zest of... apple strudel.” He slowly starts to fall asleep during this monologue, but what really makes it great is that it does sound like a real person. Carney isn’t being overly dramatic, he’s not trying to make it all sentimental — it sounds normal. It is because of that tone that makes the lines powerful and Harry such an endearing character.

With that note, Harry’s arc is a subtle but great one. Through the film and with every encounter he comes across on his odyssey, he begins to change and become more open-minded. The changing of the scenery is a big motif. He starts out in a cramped, confinded and lonely apartment, then he ventures out west like a pioneer to open and warm California. It can be seen in wardrobe changes as well and with those elements we see him go from being a “Things were better in my days” guy to a man who lets go of the past and looks to the future.

It’s a movie that will make you smile, laugh, think and even get teary eyed. I promise you’ll adore this film and Art’s performance.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.19.2015 9 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
buchanan

Morning News and Stuff

Enquirer publisher Buchanan leaving; Oasis bike path complications; Ohio cities near bottom for economic diversity

Hey all! Here’s a quick rundown of what’s going on today in the news.

Cincinnati Enquirer Publisher Margaret Buchanan will retire from her position, making way for former Enquirer reporter and editor Rick Green to take the helm of the paper. Green is currently the publisher of the Des Moines Register, where he was previously head editor. The move comes as Enquirer parent company Gannett undertakes a drastic restructuring of its newsroom, changing job descriptions and eliminating positions as it seeks to create what it calls “the newsroom of the future.” The changes haven’t been well-received: A dozen long-time newsroom staff left the paper rather than reapply for their jobs late last year.

• Will the railway company that owns tracks next to the proposed Oasis bike trail put a halt to the 17-mile long project between downtown and Milford? This Cincinnati Business Courier article takes a look at the ins and outs of the situation. Genesee & Wyoming Inc., the parent company of the Indiana and Ohio Railway Company, sent a letter to Mayor John Cranley last week outlining its business and safety concerns about the project. The company cites accidents that have occurred when people trespass too close to rail lines as among its worries, but it also claims it may want to use the tracks the bike lane would pave over. It doesn’t own that set of tracks — the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority controls them — but the company says it has the right to use them. That, however, is a matter of legal debate, one that looks likely to play out if the bike trail is to go forward.

Clarification: the stretch of track in question is four miles long. The entire project is 17.


• If you didn’t already know, the Cincinnati Bearcats lost to Xavier in last night’s Crosstown Shootout err, “Classic.” It was the first time in three years the game was held on either team’s arena (the ‘Cats got home court advantage) as the result of a big brawl after the 2012 game. I’ve been watching the game since I was but a wee lad even though I’m not much of a sports fan. I pull for UC every year. And just about every year, no matter how good they are, they lose. That’s about all I’m going to say about the entire unfortunate situation. Next year.

• Here’s an interesting bit of data: According to personal finance site WalletHub.com, Ohio cities rank pretty low in terms of economic diversity. That is to say, the state’s major cities have big wealth gaps, or a large divide between highest and lowest earners with a high concentration of wealth in relatively few hands. In a ranking of 350 cities compiled by the site, Ohio doesn’t even make an appearance until we get to Columbus, which is the 208th most economic diverse city in the country. Cincinnati comes in at 262, followed by Cleveland at 341, Akron at 345, Dayton at 346 and Toledo at 349. Ouch.  Carrolton, Texas had the most economic diversity, followed by Orange, Calif. Flint, Mich., was 350th on the list.

• Today is Ohio’s 212th birthday. We officially became a state Feb. 19, 1803 and were the 17th state to join the U.S., meaning we got in on this whole statehood bandwagon way before it was cool to do so. Happy birthday, you old geezer. You don’t look a day over 200.

• Ohio Gov. John Kasich visited South Carolina yesterday as he does the delicate dance that is running for president before you’ve formally acknowledged that you’re running for president. Such trips are usually two-fold: to court potential supporters and fundraisers and to try out campaigning to see if a run looks promising. Kasich spoke to a crowd of GOPers at the South Carolina House Caucus, trying to thread the needle that is appealing to the party’s ultra-conservative southern base, which he’ll probably need if he wants the party’s nomination, while preserving the compassionate conservative mantle he’s tried to don in a bid for general election viability. We’ll see how that goes.

 
 
by Mike Breen 02.18.2015 10 days ago
 
 
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Artist Submissions Open for 2015 MidPoint Music Festival

Fall fest puts out call to artists interested in performing at 14th annual event

Musical acts interested in being considered for a showcase slot at the 14th annual MidPoint Music Festival (scheduled for Sept. 24-26 in various venues around Downtown and Over-the-Rhine) can begin submitting today.

The festival — owned and operated by CityBeat — has announced a new partner for facilitating submissions, switching from Sonicbids to the locally-based CloudPressKit. The move will save artists some money — the submission fee for MPMF 2015 is $15 (through Sonicbids, it was $25, plus a Sonicbids membership) — and CloudPressKit is described as more “artist friendly.”

Click here for MPMF submission details. MPMF.com has a Q&A with the fest's head honcho, Dan McCabe, about the application process that answers a lot of questions submitters may have (other questions can be directed to info@mpmf.com). Applications are being accepted through May 17. 

 
 

 

 

 
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