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by Nick Swartsell 02.04.2016 8 days ago
at 12:57 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Study: Cincinnati Ranks High for Prosperity, Low for Racial Economic Inclusion

Research from the Brookings Institute found Cincinnati 18th most prosperous city, but 81st for racial inclusion

As the economy continues to rebound from the Great Recession and as interest in urban living continues to build, many cities across the country are seeing a rebound in their fortunes. But who benefits from this resurgence?

A new study from the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program released last week seeks to provide some answers to that question in 100 cities around the country by measuring economic activity in each from 2009 to 2014. Cincinnati’s results in that study are simultaneously promising and troubling.

The Queen City ranks squarely in the middle of those 100 cities when it comes to overall economic growth. But there’s more to the picture than just raw economic activity. The Brookings study also considered prosperity: that is, the degree to which increases in economic activity benefit individuals; and inclusion, which is defined by how much that prosperity extends across different groups of people.

Cincinnati ranked well on those two measures — 18th and 19th, respectively. But there are some caveats to those rankings. What’s more, the city ranks near the bottom of the list — 81st — when it comes to racial inclusion in economic prosperity.

What does each category measure? Brookings' prosperity ranking considers productivity, average annual wage and the standard of living in each city. Inclusion measures the median wage, relative poverty — or poverty measured by the percentage of people below 50 percent of the area median wage — and employment rate in each city. The study’s racial inclusion research considered those factors for non-white groups in each city.

It’s worth noting that economic inclusion is actually trending downward in many cities across the country and that a high ranking doesn’t mean cities are necessarily headed in the right direction. Eighty of the 100 cities in the study saw wages fall. Fifty-three saw relative poverty rise. Cincinnati’s relatively high ranking on the inclusion list comes even though median wages here have fallen in the past five years by 1.4 percent and are still below the levels they were at in 1999. There’s good news, too, of course: The number of jobs and standards of living are up and relative poverty here fell from its Great Recession peak in 2009 through 2013. But that number began rising again in 2014.

Thus, overall inclusion in Cincinnati post-recession can be described as a mixed bag at best, though we’re clearing faring better than many other major cities.

That is, except for one very important category. The most troubling numbers for Cincinnati come from the study’s ranking of how economically inclusive cities are by race. Here, the city is at the bottom of the heap, though it should be noted that five other Ohio cities — Cleveland, Columbus, Youngstown, Dayton and Akron — are ranked even lower. That begs a question for another day: Why are Ohio cities so economically segregated? Statewide policy probably plays some role, but there might be other factors at play.

Meanwhile, Cincinnati's ranking is low for a very simple reason: because wages here are going down for blacks and up for whites, while poverty levels in the city do the inverse.

Median yearly wages for non-whites in the city fell from $25,081 to $24,202 between 2009 and 2014, even as wages for whites rose from $32,714 to $35,295. That’s a 3.5 percent drop compared to an 8 percent gain. What’s more, relative poverty among non-whites in Cincinnati rose from 33 percent to 37 percent in that time period, while poverty for whites fell from 27.5 percent to 25.7 percent. Poverty for non-whites in Cincinnati increased by 4 percent and decreased for whites by nearly 2 percentage points.

What that means is that the economic gaps already present in Cincinnati are rising. There have been efforts to address this — new development aimed at low-income residents in neighborhoods like Avondale, for instance, and the city's recently created Department of Economic Inclusion.

Beyond all the numbers, though, the continuing disparity is causing a great deal of  frustration in the community, as this week's Xavier University town hall discussion on race relations in the aftermath of the 2001 civil unrest showed. As Brookings' study shows, the deeper economic issues many panelists and community members highlighted at that forum are real and growing.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.04.2016 9 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Cincinnati first in state to pass wage-theft law; Hamilton County BOE to move HQ to Norwood; thousands of Uber drivers to protest at Super Bowl

Good morning all. Here’s a quick rundown of the news today.

Cincinnati City Council yesterday passed an ordinance that would punish employers who don’t pay their workers, making Cincinnati the first city in the state to do so. We told you about that ordinance earlier this week. The law would allow the city to better enforce federal and state prohibitions against wage theft, revoke tax incentives and other deals and also allow it, in certain cases, to bar a company caught stealing wages from future city contracts. The ordinance has received praise from progressive groups, and city officials say they’ve received requests for copies of the ordinance from other cities like Columbus.

Victims of wage theft, faith leaders, advocates with Cincinnati’s Interfaith Workers Center and even representatives from contracting groups spoke before the vote, encouraging Council to pass the legislation. The decision wasn’t without some controversy, however, as Republicans Amy Murray and Charlie Winburn moved to amend the language of the ordinance to stipulate that it apply only to those who are working legally in the U.S.

"Wage theft is wrong," Winburn said, but claimed the proposed legislation would "discourage undocumented workers from going through proper channels."

That brought about a flurry of resistance from other Council members.

"It's not even a question of immigration," Councilman Kevin Flynn, a Charterite, said. Flynn said the ordinance is simply about the city not doing business with companies that steal from employees.

Vice Mayor David Mann, who authored the ordinance, refused to accept the amendment. The law passed 7-2.

• Now that the cat’s out of the bag about a potential $680 million in under-scrutinized spending by Cincinnati’s Metropolitan Sewer District over a nearly 10-year period, officials with both the city and the county are scrambling to place blame. Both Hamilton County Commissioners and Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley have called for extensive auditing of the MSD. The sewer district is run by the city but owned by the county, and both say the other is to blame after revelations that a big chunk of a federal court-ordered $3 billion sewer upgrade has been done without competitive bidding for contracts and with little oversight outside the department. Cranley has said that the misspending has taken place “right under the noses” of county commissioners, while commissioners claim they’ve been trying to get better control of the sewer district’s spending for years. Cranley also pointed to former City Manager Milton Dohoney, who gave former MSD Director Tony Parrot a huge degree of latitude in purchasing decisions in 2007.

• The Hamilton County Board of Elections voted yesterday to move its headquarters from downtown Cincinnati to a location in Norwood. The county’s lease on its current headquarters on Broadway is set to expire this year, and BOE officials say the new location is more central to the entire county. However, many have decried the move, including Mayor Cranley. Having the BOE headquarters, where early voting takes place, close to the county’s transit hub is vital for low-income voters, Cranley says. If the headquarters moves to Norwood, another early voting location should be setup near Government Square, Metro’s downtown hub, the mayor says. Two bus routes serve the proposed location in Norwood, though BOE board members point out the location has a lot of free parking. Hamilton County GOP Chair Alex Triantafilou, who sits on the BOE’s board, pointed to the unanimous decision by the four-member, bipartisan BOE board and said Cranley should “mind his own business” in response to the mayor’s criticism. This isn’t the first time a proposed move by the BOE has caused controversy. In 2014, it looked to move its headquarters to Mount Airy, though that plan was later scrapped.

• Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has coordinated closely with conservative right-to-life activists as he targets Planned Parenthood, a new investigation shows. DeWine exchanged congratulatory text messages and emails with the president of Ohio Right to Life. The group has also offered to share talking points and press materials with the AG and advisors to Ohio Gov. John Kasich. Officials with the organization say it’s not unusual for high-level state officials to be in touch with lobbyists and activists. “I’m not going to apologize for who my friends are,” pro-life lobbyist Mike Gonidakis told the Associated Press. But progressive groups and some government watchdogs have cried foul, saying the relationship between the AG and pro-life group is far too cozy.

• Here’s an interesting look by the Associated Press at the business costs of an anti-gay-rights backlash currently going on in Indiana’s state government. Generally conservative chamber of commerce members and state lawmakers there have become increasingly nervous about the state’s business prospects as the state fails to pass legislation banning discrimination against the LGBT community. The perception that Indiana is a place hostile to gays could hurt the resurgence of cities like Indianapolis, business leaders fear.

• Finally, thousands of Uber drivers plan to protest fare cuts by the company by disrupting Sunday’s Super Bowl in San Francisco. As many as 9,000 drivers are expected to congest the streets around Levi’s Stadium there as they decry changes to Uber’s policy that drivers say have left many of them making less than minimum wage. Smaller protests have already popped up in San Francisco and New York City, where on Feb. 1 coordinated demonstrations drew about 1,000 drivers each.

 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.03.2016 9 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Slice of Cincinnati: Cincinnati Art Museum's Conservation Department

It’s the 15th century, and remnants of the Middle Ages hang over Europe as it unknowingly waits for the Renaissance. In the dim candlelight somewhere in Spain shines an altarpiece painted to depict the lives of St. Peter and Jesus Christ along with images of the Virgin Mary and other saints. With its impressive strokes of paint and gold and silver leaf, Lorenzo Zaragoza’s “Retablo of St. Peter” is remarkable to behold.

More than 600 years later, the altarpiece rests under the skilled hands of Cincinnati Art Museum’s chief conservator Serena Urry. With only the clack of museum visitor’s shoes disturbing the quiet peace, the setting resembles the serenity of the piece’s original home.

Zaragoza’s piece has stood the test of time, more or less. While it has been admired by thousands of Cincinnati Art Museum visitors since the museum purchased the piece in1960, it was taken off exhibit in 2010 due to its poor condition. It is now back on exhibit through April 24, as visitors can watch Urry bring the retablo to life again through cleaning all 18 of its panels.

It’s a two-in-one exhibit, giving visitors an insider’s look at the work done by the museum’s conservation department while they view and learn about the piece. Established in 1935, the museum’s conservation department is one of the oldest in the country. Since then it has grown from one part-time paintings conservator to four professionally trained conservators, each of whom have their own specialization in paintings, paper, textiles or objects. The department is in charge of conserving the museum’s entire collection (with the exception of works that are on loan to the museum).

Urry proposed the exhibit because the retablo needed to be treated before it could go back on view in the galleries. However, this is no small task — the retouching is not expected to be complete for another few years. On view in the exhibit is only the first step of the process: cleaning and consolidating.

“Museums usually put conservation on view to the public when the work of art is simply too big to remove it from the gallery or garden,” Urry says. Before the retablo was taken off exhibit, it was the only piece in the room it occupied.
Conserving a work of art like the retablo first involves examining them closely under infrared and ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet light reveals differences on the painting’s surface that are not visible to the naked eye; infrared light reveals what is underneath the paint on the ground layer.

Urry says determining the full condition of a piece of art before beginning its conservation treatment is the hardest part of conserving art. The two most important tenants that guide painting conservation are reversibility, which ensures that nothing will be done to the work that cannot be removed later, and dissimilarity, which means suing conservation materials that are not found in the original painting.

Of course, Uri’s conservation efforts are not the first for the retablo. With a piece of art this old, it is common for there to be many years of retouching — the first effort to conserve the retablo may have occurred around the early 1500s. It is believed that the central sculpture of St. Peter was created to replace the original lost piece.

Urry’s work includes using a variety of solvents, hand tools and a hot air gun to remove the effects of older retouching campaigns, such as discolored varnish and wax. This includes a layer of wax added by the Art Museum in 1960 to contain flaking. Since then it has become clouded with dust and grime, and the wax tinted to match the gold leaf of the painting has discolored to a greenish metallic hue.

After cleaning, painting conservation also involves structural treatments, such as modifying or replacing the canvas, its lining and stretcher. There may also be surface treatments done to conserve paintings, such as filling losses of paint, toning the fillings and adding layers of varnish.

“All of the paintings in a multi-piece work like this should be worked on together to ensure consistency,” Urry says. “The gallery space gives me an opportunity to have all of them on view as they are conserved.”

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.03.2016 9 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Sittenfeld proposes new pedestrian, cyclist safety efforts; ICE agents in Price Hill put immigrant community on edge; will Kasich get rolled over by Rubio?

Hey hey Cincy! How are you all on this fine spring morning? Wait, it’s early February? Guess I better change out of these jean shorts and put the slip-n-slide away. Bummer. Be right back.

OK, where were we now? News. Right. Let’s get to it.

Last night Xavier University held a packed town hall discussion on the state of Cincinnati 15 years after the police shooting of unarmed black citizen Timothy Thomas and the civil unrest that shook the city afterward. Here’s my story about that ahead of a more in-depth dive later. I also live tweeted last night’s event and you can find quotes from panelists on my feed.

• Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld has proposed a new measure aimed at increasing pedestrian and bicyclist safety, according to a news release sent out this morning. Sittenfeld’s proposed motion, which would ask the city to identify the area’s most dangerous intersections for non-car-drivers and present options aimed at mitigating the dangers there. Sittenfeld says his motion, which comes in the wake of a hit-and-run accident that killed a popular Cincinnati cyclist in Anderson last week, has support of the rest of Council. As a cyclist and a walking commuter, I very much hope the city follows through on this.

• A visit by the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency in East Price Hill has some members of the immigrant community and their advocates on edge. Agents with ICE showed up yesterday morning at an apartment complex that houses a few Central American immigrant families, and now some in the community fear the visit is the precursor to a larger raid by the agency tasked with enforcing America’s immigration laws. Late last year, the Obama administration announced it would begin more strictly enforcing those laws and deporting undocumented families who arrived after 2014. Several states have already seen raids from the agency.

• Cincinnati’s Metropolitan Sewer District spent hundreds of millions of dollars over nearly a decade without necessary city oversight, city documents and officials say, much of it through contracts to third parties for work it didn’t put up for competitive bids. The spending has its roots in a policy shift started in 2007 that gives large amounts of control to MSD director without proper oversight from city officials outside the department, according to this Cincinnati Enquirer story. City Manager Harry Black has vowed to change the way the department operates so that spending is more transparent and accountable.

• Welp, we’ve talked a lot about how Ohio Gov. John Kasich has his hopes pinned on New Hampshire as he chases the GOP presidential nomination. But then Iowa happened. Specifically, Republican young gun U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio didn’t do that terribly in the state’s caucus, the first contest in the country where primary voters pick their favorites for their party’s nominee. Rubio finished third behind surprise winner U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz and real estate hustler Donald Trump.

Consensus among political pundits is that Cruz and Trump are unelectable, but that Rubio could consolidate support from establishment GOP power players, putting him in position to surge ahead in polls. That’s got political talking heads going all crazy like this (only replace “Ru-fi-o!” with “Ru-bi-o!”), which could make their punditry a self-fulfilling prophecy in places like… you guessed it… New Hampshire. Kasich has been doing markedly better in that state, which he has identified as his make-or-break stand. He’s scooped up the vast majority of newspaper endorsements there and is polling a strong third behind Trump and Cruz. But that could change if Rubio-mania continues. So will Kasich go on the offensive against the Florida senator, who has some pretty big weak spots in terms of his congressional attendance record, his personal finances and other issues? We’ll see. Primaries in New Hampshire are Feb. 9.

• Here’s a brief, but important presidential election update: U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky suspended his presidential campaign this morning so he can focus on his Senate re-election bid. Once though to be a big contender this election, Paul’s less interventionist foreign policy ideas and criminal justice reform domestic policy ideas have failed to gain traction in a GOP primary race full of war-loving ideologues convinced a wave of illegal immigrants is coming to rob us blind. Go figure.

• Finally, we’ve seen a lot of journalism about how much the various presidential campaigns are raising in contributions, which PACs and Super PACs are spending millions on those candidates, and the like. But under-covered until now has been the little-known but completely vital pizza primary. How much has your choice for president spent on pizza? Spoiler alert: Ohio’s big queso Kasich hasn’t spent much dough on the cheesy stuff.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.03.2016 10 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Panelists and Community Discuss 2001's Ongoing Legacy

Police practices might be better, many say, but much work looms for Cincinnati 15 years after civil unrest

Xavier University held a packed town hall discussion last night on the state of Cincinnati 15 years after the police shooting of unarmed black citizen Timothy Thomas and the civil unrest that shook the city afterward.

Thomas was the 15th black Cincinnatian killed by police during the previous three years, and frustrations in the black community over those killings, and deep economic and social isolation, bubbled over in Over-the-Rhine and other neighborhoods around the city.

Even after a decade and a half, the town hall was as timely as ever: Last summer saw the death of unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose at the hands of University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, and events in the past year and a half across the country have brought the issue of racially charged police violence front and center. As evidenced by the sometimes-contentious discussion last night, frustration remains even as Cincinnati has enacted some meaningful reforms in its approach to policing.

Charlie Luken, who was Cincinnati's mayor in 2001, gave introductory remarks to the crowd. Luken admitted that officials at the time were slow to pay attention to the signs of unrest.

“Our community, including me, was slow to grasp the depths of legitimate complaint," he said.

Luken said he doesn't condone violence but also called the unrest in 2001 “part of the American tradition.” He said activism during the unrest led to positive change, a significant shift from statements he made in 2001 when he remarked that “some of them seem to be out here just for the fun of it.”

Activist Iris Roley of the Black United Front argued that the historic Collaborative Agreement that came after the unrest by federal order was a positive step, but that much more work is still needed. For example, Roley advocated for expanded community presence for the Citizen’s Complaint Authority, which handles citizens’ complaints against officers under the city’s police reforms. In 2014, the last year for which data was available, complaints about discrimination rose by 100 percent from the year prior. Complaints about excessive use of force rose 30 percent and firearm discharge allegations rose by 60 percent. Only improper pointing of a firearm complaints went down, by 67 percent. Overall, allegations rose 39 percent over 2013, though those percentages are somewhat skewed by the small numbers involved. Of the 320 complaints filed with the authority, 67 were investigated.

"Children want to know what the people did for them," Roley said of Collaborative Agreement, which she says is still very relevant now. Still, “policing is so huge in the black community. I wish we could think about other things," Roley said, and, "it's more stressful now" because much of police oversight work is done at the city level, and less is in the hands of activists.

Rev. Damon Lynch III, a pastor in OTR in 2001 whose church has since moved to Roselawn, said police issues are just a part of the city’s race problem and that much of the rest of the racial disparity, including huge socioeconomic gaps, haven’t shifted in Cincinnati since 2001.

"Childhood poverty won't start the next civil unrest," he said, suggesting that the economic issues that set up those conditions are the real issue. 

Civil rights attorney Al Gerhardstein echoed Roley in his analysis that the Collaborative Agreement was a good step and that strategies like problem-oriented policing are better than previous law enforcement techniques even if larger systemic problems keep racial disparities in place.

“The original ask (in 2001) from my clients was addressing economic inequity,” Gerhardstein said of the fight the Black United Front and other activists waged in court over police reforms following Thomas’ death. “You can't sue capitalism. That's a problem."

Cincinnati Police Department District 4 Capt. Maris Harold, meanwhile, maintained that policing in Cincinnati has gotten remarkably better in the last two decades, touting what she calls the data-driven “science of policing,” which she says can result in fewer arrests by targeting the few violent criminals in an area.

“Policing is a paramilitary organization," and thus, all about strategy, Harold said. That strategy before 2001 was, "zero tolerance, arrest everything that moves," Harold said, but, “unless you're an irrational person, you have to realize the strategy wasn't working." She says police have since realized a small number of people commit violence and that to be effective they must narrow in on those individuals.

Black Lives Matter activist Brian Taylor, however, argued that a shift in police tactics can’t mask deeper problems and that the most powerful way to address those inequalities is through street-level activism. If policing is paramilitary, Taylor asked, “Who is the enemy? Racism is institutional, bound to the system on a molecular level." Taylor brought up the fact that officers who corroborated Tensing’s story around the shooting of DuBose this summer are still on the force and what he says are lingering questions around the CPD shooting of Quandavier Hicks last summer in Northside.

Audience members had loads of questions surrounding the deeper issues that sparked the unrest in 2001, including socioeconomic inequalities and lack of jobs and educational opportunities in the black community.

Many audience members also decried what they see as the inequitable development of Over-the-Rhine, which came about during the years following the unrest when then-mayor Luken helped put together the Cincinnati City Center Development Corporation. 3CDC and other developers have subsequently spent nearly $1 billion redeveloping OTR, in the process changing parts of the neighborhood from a low-income community into a more upscale enclave.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.02.2016 10 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 12:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Iowa Caucus: Razor-Thin Victory for Clinton, Cruz Takes GOP Win

It was a photo finish this morning for the Democratic candidates with former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton squeaking by with an apparent victory over Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) with a 0.3-percent lead in the Iowa caucus. Some in the media such at the Associated Press aren’t ready to declare a victor.

The final results for the Democrats were Clinton with 49.9 percent, Sanders with 49.6 percent. The Clinton campaign claimed a humble win 3:35 a.m., hours after the Republicans found Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas as their victor. However, some precincts are still unaccounted for and the Sanders campaign is calling for a raw vote count.

Clinton was awarded 699.57 state delegate equivalents, versus 695.49 for Sanders. Former Maryland Gov. Martin O’Malley suspended his bid for the presidency only about an hour into the night.

Matt Paul, Hillary for America’s Iowa State Director, released a statement following Clinton’s caucus victory: "Hillary Clinton has won the Iowa Caucus. After thorough reporting – and analysis – of results, there is no uncertainty and Secretary Clinton has clearly won the most national and state delegates."

Sanders' spokeswoman Rania Batrice noted that one precinct remained outstanding, and said there were questions about the results in several other counties. "We definitely don't feel comfortable yet," she said early Tuesday.

NBC dubbed last night as the closest Iowa caucus for Democrats in history. The nail-biting battle for Iowa was literally decided by coin tosses to settle ties between the Vermont senator and former first lady. Some coin tosses went in Sanders' favor but some reports suggest Clinton made out with the most coin toss victories.

Neither candidate made a formal victory speech, however they both spoke to their supporters.

“Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” was chanted as the Democratic underdog took the stage to thank supporters. “Iowa, thank you,” he said. “Nine months ago, we came to this beautiful state. We had no political organization. We had no money. We had no name recognition and we were taking on the most powerful political organization in the United States of America.” Sanders went on to declare a “virtual tie.”

The smile on Sanders’ face was not the smile of a man that just lost a state — it was the smile of a man that knows he proved he can take on establishment politics.

Clinton gave a nod to Sanders’ strong showing in the Hawkeye state, saying, “I am excited about really getting into the debate with Sen. Sanders about the best way forward.”

“We have to be united against Republicans who will divide us,” she continued. “I intend to stand against it.”

Clinton started the race with a huge lead over Sanders, and while she can technically claim victory, her razor-thin win signals that her inevitability has drastically evaporated.

Some Clinton supporters might be worried the former secretary of state’s underestimation of Sanders’ populist campaign could lead to a repeat of 2008 when Barack Obama seemingly swooped out of nowhere and stole the election.

Polls showed Clinton as the presumptive nominee, with 60 percent when the fight for the Democratic nomination kicked off in May (Sanders had just 10 percent support). Few people in America knew who the Independent Vermont senator was.

The field of only two Democratic candidates goes into Tuesday’s New Hampshire with Sanders in the lead by 19 points, according to the latest NBC/Wall Street Journal poll.

Without a clear loss in Iowa, the momentum can give Sanders the needed financial and popularity boost to battle Clinton well into spring. "We're going to fight really hard in New Hampshire and then we're going to Nevada, to South Carolina, we're doing well around the country," Sanders said getting off a plane in New Hampshire this morning.

For young liberals around the country, the summer blockbuster was not the potential for the first woman president — it was a 74-year-old white Jewish career politician. Sanders is a frequent guest on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher, which could be how some on the left initially knew about the Democratic socialist.

His rhetoric of lifting the weight of student debt and increasing the minimum wage plays well to the college crowd, who on average graduate with $29,000 of debt, according to the Department of Education.

Entrance polling of caucus-goers in Iowa showed that Sanders controlled the young vote with 90 percent of voters under 30 “feeling the Bern” along with voters making $50,000 or less. Clinton owned the female demographic with 57 percent, and moderate voters.

The Republican war for Iowa was not as much as an edge-of-your-seat ride. Sen. Ted Cruz claimed an early victory with 28 percent of the vote.

Donald Trump claimed a close second-place finish with 24.3 percent and Sen. Marco Rubio took an expected third-place with 23.1 percent.

Ben Carson ended the night with 9.3 percent of the vote, Sen. Rand Paul got 4.5 percent, and Jeb Bush came in with a disappointing 2.8 percent despite pouring $16 million into Iowa advertisement.

Despite losing Iowa, Trump gathered the second-largest amount of votes in Iowa caucus history — Cruz of course received a historic level of support with the most support in the state’s history.

Trump delivered a humble and short defeat speech.

“We finished second and I just want to tell you something — I’m just honored,” Trump said to supporters.  “I want to congratulate Ted and the I wanna congratulate all the incredible candidate including Mike Huckabee who has become a really good friend of mine. We will easily go on to defeat Hillary or Bernie who whoever the hell they throw up there” Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee suspended his campaign last night.

Cruz didn’t mention Trump by name in his victory speech, but continued his firebrand politics that secured his Iowa victory.

“Tonight is a victory for every American who understands that after we survive eight long years of the Obama presidency, no one personality can right the wrongs done by Washington,” the freshman senator said.

Rubio delivered what sounded like a speech that was written in case the Florida senator secured Iowa. "So this is the moment they told us would never happen,” he said. “They told me my hair wasn't grey enough. They told me my boots were too high. They told me to wait my turn."

The polls missed foreseeing Cruz’s victory, but virtually all predictions going into Iowa showed Rubio taking third place.

The Ohio primary is March 15.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.02.2016 10 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Police Chief Eliot Isaac reveals new plan to fight crime; City Council to vote on ordinance against wage theft; UC closer to moving law school to The Banks

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are today's headlines. 

Cincinnati Police Chief Eliot Isaac unveiled a new crime reduction strategy that would target certain high crime locations in the city. Isaac presented the plan called Place-based Investigations of Violent Offender Territories, or PIVOT, Monday to the City Council's Law and Public Safety Committee. The idea is law enforcement will start to tackle super specific places and try to change the culture at that location. The "place-based" strategy means targeting these locations is as important as targeting people as other new offenders will just take the place of those who are removed from a particular "hot" location. The plan detailed 20 spots across the city in neighborhoods including Avondale, Over-The-Rhine, Walnut Hill and East Price Hill. Many locations are are businesses that are known centers for criminal activity. Isaac the businesses targeted will not necessarily face closure--unless they are non-compliant with police. 

• City Council is set to vote on an ordinance today that would help protect workers from wage theft. The ordinance, which was written by Vice Mayor David Mann, would allow the city to cut tax-agreements and force repayment of financial incentives if a business is found guilty of withholding worker wages. Migrant workers are often victims of this because of language barriers and possible undocumented immigration statuses.

• The University of Cincinnati is closer today to moving its law school to riverfront development The Banks. The finance committee of the university's board of trustees has voted to approve that move, which still needs full board approval. Should the board approve the proposal, the university will need to raise funds for a new facility and select a site at The Banks. Discussions about moving the law school to the riverfront have been circulating around the university for at least four years and have  taken on more serious potential in the last few months.

• Xavier University tonight will host a town hall discussion on the state of Cincinnati 15 years after the city's civil unrest in Over-the-Rhine and other neighborhoods over the police shooting death of unarmed Timothy Thomas. Thomas was the 15th black citizen shot by Cincinnati police over the course of just a few years, and his death uncovered deep inequities in the city's policing and beyond. While national media has celebrated Cincinnati's historic collaborative agreement, which ushered in big changes to CPD, deep socioeconomic inequalities remain here and police shootings of unarmed black citizens remain a huge issue in other Ohio cities and nationwide. Tonight's discussion will include police reform activist Iris Roley, Rev. Damon Lynch III, Cincinnati Black Lives Matter activist Brian Taylor, civil rights lawyer Al Gerhardstein, and CPD Capt. Maris Harold. It starts at 7 p.m. at Xavier's Cintas Center.

• As Gov. John Kasich hangs out in New Hampshire trying to play nice with his fellow GOP presidential nominees, the Washington Post published a story on his attempted aggressive takeover of Youngstown City Schools. Last summer, Kasich's administration introduced a last minute amendment to an education bill that would put a state-appointed highly powerful executive in charge of the low income-area school district and would offer a cash-bonus charter, private, parochial or suburban schools that took Youngstown students. Kasich's crew made sure the bill and the 66-page amendment sailed through the legislature within a matter of days after they had worked with non-elected Youngstown officials for months to carefully craft the plan. The legislation was only halted by a legal challenge that its speedy passage violated legislative rules. The matter is still pending.  

• Republican Texas Sen. Ted Cruz pulled in the state's evangelical Christian voters out to help him beat business tycoon Donald Trump in the Iowa caucuses Monday night. While the two Democratic candidates, Hillary Clinton and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, finished neck and neck. The Associated Press said that race was too close to call. This has probably left Clinton must be shaking in her suit as she heads off to New Hampshire--where Sanders' has the advantage of winning his neighboring state.

Story tips go to nkrebs@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.02.2016 11 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Council Set to Pass Anti-Wage-Theft Ordinance

Legislation would allow city to revoke tax credits and bar employers caught cheating workers from future city contracts

Employers who don’t pay their workers might have new penalties to worry about after Cincinnati City Council’s Feb. 3 meeting.

Council is poised to approve a new ordinance that would allow the city to rescind tax agreements and force repayment of incentives such as grants if a company is caught committing wage theft. The city could also bar a company caught not paying its workers from receiving future city contracts.

Council’s Budget and Finance Committee passed the ordinance 6-0 Feb. 1. Though it doesn’t create any new laws, the ordinance gives the city more options for enforcing existing state and federal anti-wage theft legislation.

Vice Mayor David Mann authored the ordinance, which came about through a push from the Over-the-Rhine based Interfaith Workers Center. Brennan Grayson, director of the IWC, says the ordinance is modeled on similar measures taken in other major cities.

A number of wage theft cases have been documented in Cincinnati and across Ohio. Between 2005 and 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor seized more than $6.5 million in wages construction companies shorted 5,500 Ohio workers laboring on public projects.

This summer, CityBeat wrote about immigrants who were initially shorted wages for their construction work on a fraternity near the University of Cincinnati. The workers were eventually able to gain back thousands of dollars in unpaid wages with the help of IWC.

Migrant workers are especially vulnerable to wage theft, often due to vulnerabilities that arise from limited language proficiency or, sometimes, their undocumented status.

“It’s no secret that people who don’t speak English are viewed as not being in a position to complain,” Councilman Wendell Young said at the budget and finance meeting.
Young would like to see additional measures that involve the city’s newly created Office of Economic Inclusion in wage theft-related issues.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.01.2016 11 days ago
Posted In: News at 01:08 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Judge: Third Party to Take Control of Neglected Apartment Buildings

Five buildings owned by PF Holdings will be placed in receivership until repairs are made

Tenants of several Cincinnati low-income apartment complexes will see relief from the starkly sub-standard conditions found in those buildings after a court decision today.

Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Beth Meyer ruled that five buildings with more than 600 units of affordable housing owned by New Jersey-based PF Holdings company will be placed in receivership with a third party, effectively keeping it from collecting rent from tenants and the more than $5 millions it gets annually from the Department of Housing and Urban Development until repairs are made. Those funds and repairs will be handled by court-appointed receiver Milhaus Management, a property management company requested by U.S. Bank Wilmington Trust, which holds mortgages on the properties. 

CityBeat in March reported on conditions at The Alms Apartments in Walnut Hills, one of the properties placed in receivership. Tenants in that building suffered from lack of heating, plumbing problems, insect infestations and other substandard conditions. In November, the roof collapsed on another PF Holdings-owned building, the Burton in Avondale, due to heavy rains and lack of maintenance. All told, that building had more than 1,800 municipal code violations, city inspections late last year found. The total cost of fixing the buildings is more than $3 million, according to court filings.

Tenants at those buildings and others owned by the company organized to demand better conditions in their buildings with the help of the Greater Cincinnati Coalition for the Homeless and the Society for Legal Aid of Greater Cincinnati. Advocates and tenants say the company "willfully" hid conditions in the buildings and failed to do basic maintenance. They hailed today's decision as a step in the right direction.

"Finally, after a year of fighting, residents should start to see improvements soon," the Homeless Coalition said in a statement. "We still have a ways to go and a lot of work to do to ensure these buildings become what they should have always been, but today we took a major step forward at saving these invaluable affordable homes."

Trouble at the PF Holdings properties has come as the Greater Cincinnati area and many other areas around country face historic shortages of affordable housing. Federal guidelines say housing should cost no more than 30 percent of a household’s monthly income. However, 11 million people in the U.S. pay more than 50 percent of their income for housing, and that’s expected to swell in the coming years as rental markets across the country continue to heat up.

 
 
by Mike Breen 02.01.2016 11 days ago
Posted In: CEAs, Live Stream, Local Music at 10:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Entertainment Awards 2016: The Winners

Plus, watch a replay of the 19th annual CEAs right now

Last night at the Madison Theater in Covington, CityBeat hosted the 19th annual Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, honoring Greater Cincinnati’s rich music scene. Check out this week’s CityBeat for a full wrap-up. In the meantime, here’s who won what:


World Music/Reggae: The Cliftones

Jazz: Cincinnati Contemporary Jazz Orchestra

Singer/Songwriter: Kate Wakefield

Country: Taylor Shannon

Punk/Post Punk: Tweens

Indie/Alternative: Us, Today

Rock: Wussy 

Electronic: Black Signal 

Blues: The Whiskey Shambles

Bluegrass: Rumpke Mountain Boys

Folk/Americana: Buffalo Wabs & the Price Hill Hustle

Hard Rock/Metal: Casino Warrior

R&B/Funk/Soul: Krystal Peterson & the Queen City Band

Hip Hop: Buggs Tha Rocka

Best Music Video: Molly Sullivan – “Before” 

New Artist of the Year: Dawg Yawp

Best Live Act: The Cliftones

Album of the Year: Honeyspiders – Honeyspiders

Artist of the Year: Jess Lamb


If you missed the show in person (or perhaps your memory is a little foggy), you can watch a replay courtesy of ICRC-TV below.

 
 

 

 

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by Natalie Krebs 02.12.2016 16 hours ago
Posted In: News at 05:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bill Clinton Calls on Cincinnati to Support Hillary

Former president speaks in Clifton in support of his wife's presidential run

Former President Bill Clinton urged a group of more than 200 people in Clifton today to support his wife and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential bid.

Clinton called his wife a “changemaker” who held the expertise and experience to become the next president.

Much of his speech touched on the need to grow the country’s economy in the aftermath of the financial crisis through lowering the country’s high student loan debt and increasing the number of jobs.

“We suffered a terrible wound in that financial mess,” Clinton said.

Clinton also addressed the sixth Democratic debate that took place last night between Clinton and her competitor for the Democratic nomination, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, without ever mentioning Sanders’ name. He recapped Hillary’s points from the debate on refinancing student loans and avoiding another financial crisis.

“I love the closing of the debate last night when Hillary said, ‘Look I agree we’ve got to do something to make sure the economy doesn’t crash again. You have your solution. I have mine. Most experts say my plan is stronger, and it’s more likely to prevent the financial crisis,’ ” he said.

Bill Clinton has been touring the country in support of his wife’s bid for the Democratic nomination in the wake of disappointing outcomes for Hillary in the last two weeks. She came in neck and neck with Sanders in the Iowa caucus on Feb. 1 and lost significantly in New Hampshire Democratic primary on  Feb. 9.

At the rally, the former president expressed disappointment at the current Supreme Court for upholding the Voting Right Act and the “Citizens United" decision, which allows unlimited spending on political campaigns by corporations and unions.

He emphasized how such issues could change with the next president, as he or she will likely appoint two Supreme Court judges.

“She’ll give you judges who will stick up for your rights,” he said.

Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley and former mayor Mark Mallory introduced Clinton. Vice mayor David Mann and council members Chris Seelbach and Yvette Simpson were also at the event.

Christie Malaer of Green Hills says she attended the rally because she believes Hillary, along with her husband Bill, will make a good team together again in the White House.

“Hillary and Bill have stuck together through everything they’ve been through,” Malaer said. “That says a lot.”

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.12.2016 22 hours ago
Posted In: Holiday, fish at 12:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Friday Fish Fry Guide

Don't have to be religious to enjoy some beer-battered cod

For those of the Christian faith, Lent is the time between Ash Wednesday and Easter spent in religious observance preparing for the resurrection of Christ. It's a time to reflect, repent, fast and engage in some Americanized self-denial — like giving up Coke products or chocolate. It's also a time when people abstain from eating meat on Fridays — fish good; red meat bad — so in Cincinnati there's a flurry of end-of-week activity at local churches and parishes, who are all serving up fried fish dinners and raising money in the process. 

The competition is stiff, so if you're looking to indulge in some down-home, damn-good weekly beer-battered cod and hearty mac and cheese through March, here's where to dine. Some churches even offer adult beverages and parishioner-baked desserts, along with catchy themes and specialty items. Here's a list of local favorites — those offering unique twists or with "best of" votes from area media outlets. 

For a full list of local fish fry events, visit thecatholictelegraph.com/fish-fry-guide.

All Saints
Two words: fish tacos. Why wait in line in OTR when you can pop on out to Kenwood for some fan favorite fried fish, nestled in a lovely tortilla. Menu also features grilled salmon, tilapia, fried cod, sweet potato fries and pizza. And local beer. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 8939 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, all saints.cc.

Beechwood High School Fish Fry Drive-Thru
One of the more popular local drive-thru fries. Head to the high school's concession stand to pick up your order — email in advance so it will be ready. Meal includes choices like a baked salmon dinner, fried fish dinner with two sides, fried fish sandwich, pizza, chicken nuggets and sides. 4-7 p.m. Fridays through March 25. 54 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell, Ky., 859-620-6317.

Bridgetown Finer Meats
Ok. So this deli is not a church. They still do Fabulous Fish Fridays. Every Friday through Easter, you can grab a fish sandwich as big as a house (with cheese, lettuce and homemade tartar sauce on two slices of giant bread), a shrimp boat, lobster mac and cheese and other fancy specialties. They also have a contest on their Facebook page where if you guess the closest to how many fish sandwiches they serve that day, you win a free sandwich. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fridays through Easter. 6135 Bridgetown Road, 513-574-3100, bridgetownfinermeats.com. 

Hartzell United Methodist Church
All-you-can-eat fish fry, featuring hand-cut and hand-breaded cod. Menu also includes chicken breast, shrimp, cheese pizza and sides including mac and cheese, cole slaw, applesauce, bread, dessert and drinks. Also available for carry out. $10 adults; $5 children 6-11; free under 5. 4-7 p.m. Fridays through March 11. 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash, 513-891-8527, hartzellumc.com.

Immaculate Heart of Mary
Offers standard fish fry fare — shrimp, crab cakes, pizza, mac and cheese, french fries — but is also home of the famous Tommy Boy, a piece of fried fish nestled inside of a grilled cheese. Also available at the drive-thru. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington, Ky., ihm-ky.org.

Mary, Queen of Heaven
Home of the Codfather, aka the alter ego of John Geisen of Izzy's dressed in mafia-wear and carrying a stuffed cod (photo ops welcome). Offers dine-in, carry-out and drive-thru options so you can get a Holy Haddock sandwich on a hoagie bun, Icelandic beer-battered cod cooked in vegetable shortening, mac and cheese, green beans and more. Menu also features homemade desserts, pizza, grilled cheese and BEER, which you can imbibe waiting in line to get in. 4-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 1150 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-2622, mqhparish.com/#!fish-fry/rhwto.
  • All Izzy's restaurant locations are also offering the Codfather special through March 24: North Atlantic cod filet, battered with Izzy's special blend of 17 spices, served on a kaiser bun with lettuce and tartar sauce. izzys.com.

St. Barbara 
For dine in or carry out. Menu features a cod fish dinner with three sides, the Bob Lee special (baked tilapia and four shrimp), shrimp dinner (8 shrimp with three sides), baked tilapia and a la carte options. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-3100.

St. Columban Church
Lots of choices here. Dinner choices include two sides — fish sandwich dinner, fried shrimp (five pieces), grilled salmon dinner, grilled tilapia dinner, fish taco dinner or buffalo shrimp wrap dinner, with side choices of waffle fries, green beans, baked potato, french fries, mac and cheese, coleslaw, applesauce or tossed salad. 5-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 894 Oakland Road, Loveland, 513-683-0105, stcolumban.org.

St. Francis de Sales
Fish fry featuring fried and baked fish, pizza, the famous "DeSales Slammer" and mac and cheese. 5:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 1600 Madison Road, Walnut Hills, 513-961-1945.

St. Francis Seraph
For $8, grab a meal with two sides (mac and cheese, applesauce or coleslaw). 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom, 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, stfrancisseraphschool.com.

St. Joseph Academy
Adult fried/baked fish dinner includes 12 oz. fish with three sides, drink and dessert, or adult six piece shrimp dinner for $11 (senior dinners $8). A la carte items include Cajun shrimp gumbo, fish sandwich, hush puppies and sides like scalloped potatoes, mac and cheese, french fries, salad and green beans. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 48 Needmore St., Walton, Ky., 859-485-6444, sjawalton.com.

St. Joseph Catholic Church
Menu features hand-breaded cod and catfish, plus shrimp, crab cakes and salmon. Also includes homemade desserts. 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 6833 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs, Ky., 859-635-5652, stjosephcampspringsparish.com.

St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish
The parish's 11th-annual fish fry. Carry out and dine in available. Menu includes beer-battered and fried cod and shrimp, baked cod, grilled salmon and a seafood combo (with all three!). Dinners include two hush puppies and choice of sides (baked potato, green beans, mac and cheese and more). 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 5720 Hamilton Mason Road, Liberty Township, 513-777-4322, saint-max.org.

St. William 
Annual fish fry with drive thru or dine in. Features weekly live entertainment. Menu includes choices like Magnificod Platter (hand-breaded cod, fries, hush puppies and coleslaw), Baked Salmon Platter (baked salmon, green beans, roasted potatoes and coleslaw), Shrimp Platter (eight pieces of butterfly shrimp, sauce, fries, hush puppies and coleslaw) and other dinner platters and sides. Baked goods sold weekly. 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 4108 W. Eighth St., Price Hill, stwilliamfishfry.com.


 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.12.2016 23 hours ago
Posted In: News at 11:08 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

UC officer Ray Tensing to testify in October trial; Bill Clinton to speak in Clifton; Kroger will sell antidote for heroin overdoses

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines. 

Former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing is expected to testify at his trial, which has been set for Oct. 24. Tensing is charged with the murder of motorist Samuel Dubose during a traffic stop in Mount Auburn last July. Tensing's attorney indicated in a pre-trial motion that Tensing would be on the list of more than 20 witnesses scheduled to testify. Other listed witnesses include Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters and UC President Santa Ono. 

• Former President Bill Clinton is coming to Clifton today. Clinton will speak at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center at 3 p.m. at a Get Out the Vote event. The event could mark the beginning of the aggressive campaigning from presidential candidates in Ohio in the coming months. Not surprisingly, Clinton is expected to urge people to vote for his wife and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton for president as well as discuss the current election. Doors open at 2 p.m., and you can RSVP here

• Grocery giant Kroger announced today that it will start selling Narcan, the heroin overdose antidote, without a prescription at its pharmacies in Ohio and Northern Kentucky. The drug, which is often carried by emergency personnel, is currently only available in 27 state pharmacies without a prescription. Kroger's announcement follows the one made earlier this month by drug store CVS, which said it would begin selling Narcan in its Ohio stores next month. The corporations' decisions come as more attention has been brought to a recent spike in the number of heroin-related deaths sweeping the region. 

• Weed and redistricting are several issues on the minds of legislators. At the Associated Press Legislative Preview Session on Thursday, House and Senate leaders said they were each holding their own separate hearings on medical marijuana. Senate President Keith Faber (R-Celina) said while thinks there's support for it in the legislature, if marijuana is legalized it will probably be not be available in smoking form in order to keep from creating a loophole for those who just want to get high legally. Leaders also said they were kind of, sort of working on redistricting reform, which was approved by voters last November. Senate Minority Leader Joe Schiavoni (D-Boardman) said the proposals received so far are going to a seven-member commission, which includes four lawmakers. 

• Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders faced off in the sixth Democratic debate last night on PBS. Clinton, who has faced disappointing results from the Iowa caucus and New Hampshire primary, attacked Sanders' revolutionary plans, saying they are unrealistic. She also circled her knowledge of foreign politics again and again in an attempt to knock Sanders' lack of overseas experience. Tension between the two Democratic presidential candidates has risen along with Sanders' popularity, especially with women and the young voters. The debate comes a less than a week before the South Carolina primary on Feb. 20 and the Nevada caucuses on Feb. 23.
 
 
by Staff 02.11.2016 44 hours ago
at 02:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List (2/12-2/14)

VALENTINE TIME

FRIDAY
EVENT: CINCY WINTER BEERFEST
Cincy Winter Beerfest is one of the top 10 craft beer festivals in the nation and one of the Queen City’s biggest beer bashes of the year — and that’s saying a lot (we have a lot of beer festivals). More than 350 craft beers from more than 100 breweries will descend on the Duke Energy Convention Center for two nights of drinking, dancing and dining. This ninth-annual fest not only features samples of all styles, tastes and ABVs of brews, but also live bands, a silent disco and food from dozens of local restaurants. Part of the proceeds benefits the Big Joe Duskin Music Education Foundation. 7:30-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $45 advance; $55 day of; early bird and connoisseurs packages available. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, cincybeerfest.com.

'Cinderella'
Photo: Cincinnati Ballet
DANCE: CINDERELLA
This weekend, Cincinnati Ballet’s Cinderella, last seen in 2010, takes the stage at the Aronoff Center. The timeless tale has fresh choreography by artistic director and CEO Victoria Morgan. There are newly refurbished sets and updated costumes, too, as well as the addition of friendly puppet mice and more children’s roles. Carmon DeLeone conducts the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in perhaps the most rhythmically powerful example of Sergei Prokofiev’s ballet music. “Cinderella charmingly reminds us that generosity and imagination can lead to a different and better life,” Morgan says. 8 p.m. Friday; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday; 1 and 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets start at $32. 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cballet.org. 

FILM: LOVE ME TONIGHT

Cincy World Cinema hosts their annual Valentine's weekend movie special, screening Rouben Mamoulian's Love Me Tonight. As the group notes, "If you like love stories, romantic comedy, great songs, classic cinema and the candid vibrancy of Pre-Code Hollywood, this film is for you!" It's also for your date. For an additional fee, you can take your honey to dinner at the Highland Country Club. Meal includes buffet, with wine and dessert. 6 p.m. cocktails and dinner; 7:30 p.m. film. $35 dinner and film; $10 film. Highland Country Club, 931 Alexandria Pike, Ft. Thomas, Ky., cincyworldcinema.org.

EVENT: ANATOMY OF A VALENTINE DINNER & DISSECTION

Meddling with Nature, a local artistic taxidermy and photography studio, heads to GOODS on Main for a very special Valentine's Day weekend. The weekend not only features your typical lovely dinner stuff, but also a real dissection. The evening kicks-off with a hands-on dissection of a heart, followed by casual discussion over a heart inspired meal. Gloves, wine and hand sanitizer will be provided. Come hungry, thirsty and curious. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $50. GOODS on Main, 1300 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/meddlingwithnature.

EVENT: LOVE MOER ON CAROL ANN'S CAROUSEL

Follow up dinner at the Moerlein Lager House with a romantic carousel ride. Moerlein is teaming up with Carol Ann’s Carousel and the Cincinnati Parks Department to provide everyone who dines at the restaurant this weekend with a pass for a complimentary ride. Carousel operates 7-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 5-8 p.m. Sunday. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown, moerleinlagerhouse.com.


Orchids at Palm Court
Photo: Khoi Nguyen

EVENT: VALENTINE'S DAY AT ORCHIDS

Five-diamond restaurant Orchids at Palm Court serves up Valentine’s Day eats all weekend with two different seatings, including four and six courses respectively. Reservations required. Friday-Sunday. First seating $85; second seating $105. Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, 35 W. Fifth St., Downtown, 513-421-9100, orchidsatpalmcourt.com.


EVENT: VALENTINE'S DAY DINNER AT WASHINGTON PLATFORM

Meal includes fresh oysters, two entrées, salads, a bottle of wine and chocolate-covered strawberries. But that’s not the best part — guests will also enjoy a half-hour horse-drawn carriage ride through the city. Friday-Sunday. $125; $90 without carriage ride. 1000 Elm St., Downtown, 513-421-0110, washingtonplatform.com.


ONSTAGE: CCO PRESENTS LA SERVA PADRONA AND STABAT MATER 

The Cincinnati Chamber Opera performs a double bill of works by Giovanni Battista. The night kicks off with La Serva Padrona, a comedic one-act intermezzo often credited with bridging the gap between the Baroque and Classical eras. The second half of the program is a staging of Stabat Mater, which tells the biblical story of Jesus’ crucifixion from Mary’s point of view. 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $25 adults; $20 students and seniors. St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 100 Miami Ave., Terrace Park, cincinnatichamberopera.com.


EVENT: KROHN BY CANDLELIGHT

The Krohn keeps its doors open a little later for an adults-only date night. Stroll through the conservatory’s current spring show, Hatching Spring Blooms, and stop by the education room to learn about chocolate. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Friday. $12; reservations required. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, 513-421-4086, cincinnatiparks.com.

Do Ho Suh,
Courtesy the Artist and Lehman Maupin, New York
ART: PASSAGE OPENING AT THE CAC
Only a few of us can travel in space like Neil Armstrong or Yuri Gagarin, but we all travel through myriad spaces in everyday life. It’s so common, we rarely even think about it. But the South Korea-born, London-based artist Do Ho Suh thinks about it very much. He approaches public and private spaces with the same sense of exploration that an astronaut devotes to the moon. You’ll be able to see what he’s discovered when the exhibition Passage opens at the Contemporary Arts Center on Friday. It continues through Sept. 11. Using colorful fabric, he has constructed soft, allusive versions of spaces he has known in his 53 years of living and traveling throughout the world. The show features four major fabric sculptural installations, including a stand-out (and stand-up) three-story staircase called “348 W. 22nd St.” Read more about the exhibit here. Passage opens Friday at the Contemporary Arts Center. Do Ho Suh will speak to members at 7 p.m., followed by a public opening at 8 p.m. More info: contemporaryartscenter.org.

The library's smallest books are on display.
Photo: Courtesy of Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County
ART: TINY TOMES AT THE LIBRARY
Tiny Tomes features 71 of the library’s smallest books, on display in six cases through March 13. It’s a quirky and thoroughly charming exhibit. Who knew so many miniature books of all types existed, or that their subject matter could be so unusual and their graphic design so beautiful? Read more about the exhibit here. Tiny Tomes is on display through March 13 at the main branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. More info: cincinnatilibrary.org.

Seratones
Photo: Chad Kamenshine
MUSIC: SERATONES
Shreveport, La., foursome Seratones began playing together in 2014. After working on its live profile, by the end of 2015, the band had signed a deal with Fat Possum Records, played acclaimed shows at the South by Southwest and CMJ fests and were named one of the 20 best new bands of 2015 by Paste magazine (among other accolades). Considering the band has yet to release an album (its debut is due this year), it’s safe to say Seratones is in a pretty good position to be a “best of 2016” contender as well. Meeting through musical peers in different projects, the group members started out as friends, attending Punk shows together in Shreveport. Read more about Seratones in this week's Sound Advice. See Seratones with Orchards Friday at Woodward Theater. More info/tickets: woodwardtheater.com.

Mike Stud
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: MIKE STUD
As a general rule, adopting the name “Stud” as a Hip Hop handle would be little more than chest-thumping braggadocio. But for Mike Seander, aka Mike Stud, it’s more or less a factual declaration. The Rhode Island native lettered in both baseball and basketball in high school. As a senior, Seander averaged 21 points and seven rebounds per game on the court, but his baseball skills were even more impressive — he earned a 9-2 record and an ERA of 0.91 with 107 strikeouts, and was named the state’s Gatorade and Louisville Slugger Player of the Year. He also received an athletic scholarship to Duke University, where, as a true freshman, Seander notched a 1.61 ERA in nine saves, respectively the lowest and second-highest marks in school history. Read more about the artist in this week's Sound Advice. Mike Stud plays Bogart's Friday. More info/tickets: bogarts.com.


SATURDAY
'The Revolutionists'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: THE REVOLUTIONISTS

A world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (simultaneously with another, Native Gardens). In The Revolutionists, up-and-coming playwright Lauren Gunderson assembles a crowd of badass historical women, including Marie Antoinette and assassin Charlotte Corday, imprisoned during the French Revolution. She imagines how they might encourage, inspire and support one another during the horrific “Reign of Terror” as they await the guillotine. Their short-term future certainly distills their conversations about what’s important, but Gunderson leavens her irreverent fantasia with a lot of sassy humor. “The beating heart of the play,” she says, “is that stories matter, that art matters.” Through March 6. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com

My Furry Valentine
Photo: Provided

EVENT: MY FURRY VALENTINE

Cincinnati’s largest pet adoption event returns to the Sharonville Convention Center for its fifth year of connecting animals in need with forever families. Meet a variety of pets, including cats, dogs, rodents, reptiles and birds. More than 500 adoptable animals from 40 local rescue groups, like Adore-A-Bull Rescue, League for Animal Welfare and SPCA Cincinnati, will be in attendance. Vendors will also sell a variety of products for your current furry family members. Last year, the event was attended by more than 10,000 people, resulting in 729 adoptions; organizers hope to see even bigger numbers in 2016. To ensure the safety of all animals involved, attendees are asked to leave their own pets at home. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $3 entry; adoption fees vary per rescue. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville, myfurryvalentine.com


Jungle Jim's Big Cheese Festival
Photo: Provided
EVENT: JUNGLE JIM'S BIG CHEESE FESTIVAL

Looking for a cheesy way to celebrate Valentine’s Day? Jungle Jim’s has you covered. This year’s Big Cheese Festival promises to be the biggest one yet, featuring 40 booths from more than 80 different companies. Choose from 1,400 types of cheeses and pair your selections with meats, olives, breads, condiments and various liquors offered at stations throughout the building. Wine and beer can be purchased by the glass, and VIP and drinking wristbands are also available. Cheese carver Sarah Kaufmann, who holds a Guinness World Record for her talent, will be creating designs onsite; guests can even sample shavings from the cheese blocks Kaufmann carves. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $12 general admission; $2 children 16 and under; $16 advance two-day pass; $25 wristband. Oscar Event Center, Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Lunar New Year
Photo: Provided
EVENT: LUNAR NEW YEAR

Celebrate the Lunar New Year and ring in the Year of the Monkey with a fusion of cultures in OTR’s newly renovated historic Gothic church, the Transept. Kick off the night with a cocktail hour and dim sum, including steamed pork belly sliders, sticky rice, rock salt tofu, turnip cakes and create-your-own congee. Main party starts at 10 p.m. with DJs and visuals from Chad Shack. Proceeds from the event will support Asian Food Fest and other Asian cultural events in Cincinnati. 8 p.m. cocktail hour; 10 p.m.-2 a.m. party. Saturday. $30 cocktail hour; free party. The Transept, 1205 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, godaspo.com

Whitey Morgan
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: WHITEY MORGAN AND THE 78'S
Well, looky here. The CMA Awards derned got turnt around this past November when the corporate Bro-Country boys and girls got to sit in their chairs and watch a true Honky Tonk hero, Chris Stapleton, win three top honors. The pendulum shift is nothing new — the battle between lame Nashville Pop (the mainstream cookie-cutter horseshit mostly heard on the radio these days) and true-grit Country music has been raging for a very long time. It is no coincidence that Stapleton grew up across the Ohio River in Eastern Kentucky (Paintsville), not far from where Kentucky Music Hall of Famer Larry Cordle was raised; Cordle, along with Larry Shell, co-wrote “Murder on Music Row,” a song about the beginning of the devaluing of the true nature of Country music. Read more about the artist in this week's Sound Advice. See Whitey Morgan and the 78's with Cody Jinks Saturday at Southgate House Revival. More info/tickets: southgatehouse.com.

Urban Hike: Winter Edition
Photo: Provided
EVENT: URBAN HIKE: WINTER EDITION
Lace up your trainers for a group urban hike with the folks from Imago and Park + Vine. Trek through Over-the-Rhine, downtown, across the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge into Covington and finally into Devou Park for a great view. The hike is about eight miles and will consist of some hills. Hikers will stop at Son & Soil in Covington for shots of ginger or turmeric tonic, zoom balls and coffee. Registration includes a snack, boxed lunch and coffee. 9:30 a.m. Saturday. $20. Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, parkandvine.com

EVENT: VALENTINE'S DINNER AT THE ZOO

This wild date night includes special close-up animal encounters in addition to dinner, dessert, a cash bar, wine-and-dine options and complimentary champagne. Guests will learn about the extreme measures some animals take to find a compatible mate in the wild. Saturday-Sunday. $150 per couple. 3400 Vine St., Avondale, 513-281-4700, cincinnatizoo.org

MUSIC: TIGERLILLIES AND THE SUNDRESSES

Acclaimed local Rock band Tigerlilies is taking over Cincinnati all month long, performing a free show every week in February. On Saturday, the band plays Northside’s The Comet with The Sundresses, honoring Valentine’s Day by taking “prom photos” with attendees — come dressed in your tackiest school-dance attire. 10:30 p.m. Saturday. Free. The Comet, 4579 Hamilton Ave., Northside, facebook.com/thetigerliliesusa.

EVENT: ROMANCE IN THE HEAVENS
NKU's Haile Digital Planetarium presents an evening of live music, actors telling romantic constellation lore, dessert and coffee. Adults only. 7:30-9 p.m. Saturday. $20 per couple. Northern Kentucky University, Nunn Drive, Highland Heights, Ky., 859-572-5600.


SUNDAY

EVENT: SPEED-DATING UNPLUGGED AT NEONS

Chill on the Tinder swiping for a second and meet some people IRL. Voted as one of Cincinnati's best bar for singles, Neons is hosting a series of six-minute speed dates, with some pre-written questions to help get things off to a conversational start. Only the first 30 ladies and gents to arrive will be able to participate. Evening includes romantic food spread from Picnic & Pantry (fruit, chocolate, cheese) and Valentine's cocktail specials. 6-8 p.m. Free admission. Neons Unplugged, 208 E. 12th St., Over-the-Rhine, wellmannsbrands.com/neons.

'Noir'
Photo: Provided
EVENT: PASSION: A POLE TROUPE PRESENTS NOIR
Couples looking for an artistic Valentine’s night out can head to Northside Tavern for aerial art, acro-yoga and some thematic burlesque by Passion: A Pole Troupe. The show is part of Passion’s mission to promote pole dance as performance art; ain’t no creep joint. Come be awed by some sultry athleticism from ladies dressed as sassy dames and femme fatales in Noir. Includes special guests Ginger LeSnapps of Cin City Burlesque and Jazz singer Samantha Carlson. 8 p.m. Sunday. $15; $20 door. Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave., Northside, facebook.com/passionapoletroupe.

EVENT: REVOLUTION ROTISSERIE & BAR'S SINGLE'S BRUNCH

V-Day is not just for couples (although couples are also welcome). Celebrate and treat yourself to a boozy brunch. Includes bottomless mimosas, Cards Against Humanity and hourly gift card giveaways. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. 1106 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-381-0009, revolutionrotisserie.com.


ONSTAGE: CATACOUSTIC CONSORT: THE HEROIC BAROQUE VIOLIN

Spend Valentine’s Day with modern and Baroque violinist Krista Bennion Beeney. Accompanied by harpsichord and bass viola da gamba, Beeney takes on pieces by Leclair, Biber and Bach. 3 p.m. Sunday. $25 general; $10 students; free children 12 and under. Church of the Advent, 2366 Kemper Lane, E. Walnut Hills, 513-772-3242, catacoustic.com.


EVENT: SONIC VALENTINE FOR THE EARTH

This local concert is part of a worldwide event called World Sound Healing Day, which combines sounds to generate peace and harmony. Featured musicians include Audrey Causilla, chant and piano; Vivian Hurley, gongs; Baoku Moses, Nigerian drumming and chant; and Janice T. Sunflower, Native American flutes. 6:30 p.m. Sunday. $15. Grace Episcopal Church, 5501 Hamilton Ave., College Hill, 513-541-2415, gracecollegehill.org


COMEDY: JOHN ROY
John Roy has been touring steadily and plugging away at his podcast, Don’t Ever Change, where he talks to comedians about what they were like in high school. We hear a lot of so-called origin stories from comics, but Roy insists there’s quite a bit of variety in people’s backstories if you know how to dig. “There are only so many times you can hear ‘nerd boy discovers Punk Rock and becomes confident,’ ” he says. “I try to have a diverse range of guests on to discuss what challenges they faced in high school.” Showtimes Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com. 

Native Gardens
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: NATIVE GARDENS
When longtime, waspy residents are proud of their formal garden and the young Hispanic couple moving in next door prefer a more natural “native garden,” the temperature goes up. And when there’s a dispute about the property line, well, then there’s outright warfare. This world premiere by Karen Zacarías will entertain audiences (her Book Club Play did the same in 2013), but they’ll also think about how we get along with people who aren’t just like us. Kudos to the Playhouse for commissioning a new play by this skilled playwright. Through Feb. 21. $30-$85. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com

Kathleen Wise as the Pilot in 'Grounded' at Ensemble Theatre
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
ONSTAGE: GROUNDED
Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s 30th-anniversary season continues with an intense one-woman story told through the eyes of a fierce fighter pilot whose pregnancy “grounds” her. Instead of spending time flying missions, she is stationed in a windowless trailer in the desert outside Las Vegas, flying military drones above the Middle East to hunt down and kill terrorists. Pulled between two worlds, she is trapped in an unsettling pressure cooker. Kathleen Wise, a Cincinnati native with an impressive professional acting career, plays the pilot. Michael Evan Haney, a Cincinnati Playhouse veteran who knows how to shape solo performances into compelling drama, is the director. Through Feb. 14. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-421-3555, ensemblecincinnati.org.

Read More

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.11.2016 47 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Tensing trial date set; Northside chili parlor has new owners; P.G. Sittenfeld gets biggest endorsement yet

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines.

A trial date has been set for former University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing, who fatally shot unarmed motorist Sam DuBose in Mount Auburn in July. Tensing will face murder and manslaughter charges brought against him by Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters on Oct. 24, a year and three months after he shot DuBose during a traffic stop. Tensing pulled DuBose over for a missing license plate. DuBose refused to exit his car, and after a brief struggle where Tensing reached into the ca and DuBose started his vehicle, the officer shot him. Tensing's next pre-trial hearing will be in April.

• Forty people marched downtown yesterday stopping in front of the John Weld Peck Federal Building on Main Street to protest the U.S. immigration policy.  The protest, which was coordinated with the Christian holiday of Ash Wednesday, was specifically calling on the feds' recent decision to start deporting women with young children and unaccompanied minors from El Salvador, Honduras and Guatemala. The march also comes a week after U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement raided an East Price Hill apartment complex with a large number of Central Americans for unknown reasons. 

• Park Chili in Northside has new owners. The Cincinnati chili staple, which has been in operation since 1937, was bought by Steven and Susan Thompson to be operated by their daughter and son-in-law Allie Thompson and Kevin Pogo Curtis as The Park. Curtis previously operated Tacocracy on Hamilton Avenue. Curtis says they plan to keep it a cozy diner, and they even have the chili recipe from former owner Norm Bazoff, which they bought along with the restaurant. 

• U.S. Senate candidate and city councilman P.G. Sittenfeld may have gotten his biggest endorsement yet. Former Democratic Ohio Gov. Richard Celeste has come out in support of Sittenfeld. Sittenfeld is currently running against another former Ohio Gov., Ted Strickland, for the Democratic nomination. The winner of the March primary will face the Republican incumbent Sen. Rob Portman.

• A bill that would defund Planned Parenthood of Ohio is on its way to Gov. John Kasich's desk. Yesterday, while Kasich was celebrating his second place victory in the New Hampshire GOP primary, the House voted to approve the bill with the amendments added by the Senate. Some political analysts are asking if these two things were strategically planned. The House happened to vote on the legislation the day after the New Hampshire primary where the state's moderate Republicans are likely to be less supportive of defunding Planned Parenthood. But it could help Kasich at his next stop in South Carolina where the state's republicans are more stoked on the idea. Republican Senate President Keith Faber denied on Wednesday the vote was timed to boost Kasich's shot at the presidential nomination, but said he does think the bill will please South Carolina Republicans.

• Gov. John Kasich came in a distant second in the New Hampshire GOP primary. The Ohio governor grabbed just 16 percent of the vote to winner Donald Trump's 35 percent. But is it possible that Kasich can run as the anti-Trump? Exit-poll numbers showed that Kasich was grabbing a different demographic of Republicans than Trump. The ABC poll found that Kasich did much better with voters who wanted an experienced candidate and had post-graduate degrees. He got the vote of 22 percent of those with a grad school degree. Forty-five percent of Trump's supporters had a high school education. This article predicts that Kasich is drawing in a different kind of Republican: those who politely disagree with the state of the nation as opposed to those who are completely enraged by it.

Story tips go here. Stay warm out there!
 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.10.2016 67 hours ago
Posted In: News at 03:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bill to Defund Planned Parenthood Heads to Kasich's Desk

Ohio takes another step toward completely defunding abortion providers

A bill that would strip Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio of all government funding is on its way to Gov. John Kasich's desk. 

The Ohio House of Representatives today passed HB-294 with amendments added by the state Senate that would ban the Ohio Department of Health from distributing state and federal funds to centers that perform non-therapeutic abortions.

Health organizations are already prohibited from using state and federal funds toward abortion services. The bill will take this a step further by prohibiting federal funding for non-therapeautic abortions, meaning organizations that perform abortions as a result of rape or incest or those that are not medically necessary are banned as well. Along with non-therapeautic abortions, organizations like Planned Parenthood also use such funding for things like services that help prevent infant mortality, breast and cervical cancer, infertility, minority AIDS and HIV infection and teen STDs and pregnancy. The bill also bars the state from contracting or affiliating with any such organization.  

It would redirect the funding into other community health organizations like Women, Infant and Children (WIC) clinics.

If Kasich signs the bill into law, it will strip Planned Parenthood of Ohio, the largest abortion provider in the state, of the nearly $1.4 million it receives in government funds.

The added amendments would direct $250,000 toward infant mortality prevention efforts and allow pregnant women to go to government-sponsored medical programs while they are applying for Medicaid, instead of waiting until after they are approved. 

Ohio ranks 45th highest in the U.S. for infant mortality, with 7.3 deaths per 1,000 live births, according the 2013 Centers for Disease Control's National Vital Statistics Reports. 

On the House floor, Democrats argued that even though the bill's amendments were directing more resources toward an issue like infant mortality prevention, the bill overall is causing greater harm by stripping an organization like Planned Parenthood of funding it already uses for that purpose. 

Rep. Janine Boyd (D-Cleveland Heights) said the majority of Planned Parenthood clinics in the state tackle educational issues like this and do not perform abortions.

"You are not defunding abortions with this bill," she said.  

Rep. Kristina Roegner (R-Akron) said she believes the two items are mutually exclusive.

"The rate of infant mortality rate for aborted babies is 100 percent," said Roegner. 

The legislation is the latest move in a long string of new requirements lawmakers have passed for abortion providers.  

Proponents of the requirements say the laws are intended to improve safety standards at abortion providers. Opponents say they are bureaucratic red tape aimed at reducing the number of clinics performing abortions. 

A 2009 law requires that abortion clinics have a patient-transfer agreement with a public hospital but can request a variance, or exception, if they are unable to do so. 

Planned Parenthood in Mount Auburn and the Women's Med Clinic, the last two abortion providers in southwest Ohio, nearly lost their licenses to perform the procedure earlier this year when the Department of Health denied the clinics' request for a variance 

Planned Parenthood sued the state, and a judge ruled in October that the clinics are allowed to operate during the lawsuit. 

If the clinics lose their licenses, Cincinnati would be the largest metropolitan area in the country without access to abortion services. 

Stephanie Kight, the CEO of Planned Parenthood of Greater Ohio, told the Enquirer that its health education programs will see the most funding cuts under HB-294.  

Erin Smiley, a health educator at Planned Parenthood of Southwest Ohio, told CityBeat last October the organization stands to lose a $300,000 federal grant for a sex education class for adjudicated and foster care youth it teaches across 18 Ohio counties. 

"I would welcome anyone, the legislature, Senators, whomever, if anyone ever wanted to come and see what our messages are really like and see the impacts that we have and how these young people are empowered by this information," Smiley said. "I really believe it would be hard for those folks to think that what they're doing right now is the best for young people."

 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.10.2016 67 hours ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 03:16 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
hillary

Clinton's New Hampshire Defeat Highlights Campaign Issues with Women

Bernie Sanders clobbered Hillary Clinton in his neighboring state of New Hampshire last night, and the early dominant performance could send shockwaves through Clinton’s operations.

Once seen as an afterthought in the Democratic primary, Sanders took the Granite State in an impressive 60-percent victory over the former secretary of state’s 38.3 percent.

"Nine months ago, if you told somebody that we would win the New Hampshire primary, they would not have believed you," the Sanders campaign wrote to supporters. With 11 percent of the votes counted, Clinton conceded defeat early in the evening.

“I know what it’s like to be knocked down — and I’ve learned from long experience that it’s not whether you get knocked down that matters. It’s about whether you get back up,” Clinton’s campaign said.

Shortly before Clinton conceded defeat, Sanders’ supporters gathered for a victory speech. Cheers erupted, “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” and chants of “We don’t need no Super PAC” were blared when TV cameras went live as the 74-year-old took the stage with his wife.

"The people of New Hampshire have sent a profound message to the political establishment, the economic establishment and, by the way, to the media establishment," Sanders said in his victory speech.

"What the people here have said is that given the enormous crises facing our country, it is just too late for the same-old, same-old establishment politics and establishment economics — the people want real change."

Sanders’ senior strategist Tad Devine said in an MSNBC interview that they believe this was the biggest margin of victory in a contested Democratic primary in history.

Going through the election results, there is virtually nothing for Clinton to claim as a morale victory. Her margin of losing was too great with most voters.

New Hampshire exit polls show 85 percent of women under 30 voted for Sanders. He won 53 percent of the women’s vote overall.

Clinton fell short with every age group except those 65 and older among both genders.

"We are a better organized campaign,” Devine said. We have more people on the ground. And as of today I believe we have more resources, campaign to campaign, to expand. We are demonstrating that resource superiority by going on television all across this country, and it is our ability to organize people — which I think we showed in Iowa, and showed again tonight in New Hampshire.”

One of Clinton’s talking points has been her historic candidacy — the prospect of the first female president has been a major selling point.

However, the gender-politics element of the fight for the Democratic nomination has gotten ugly over the past few days with the recent comment by former secretary of state Madeleine Albright saying, “There’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help each other.”

One Friday’s episode of HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher, feminist icon Gloria Steinem suggested that Clinton’s lack of support with young women is because they’re meeting boys at Sanders rallies.

“When you’re young, you’re thinking, ‘Where are the boys?’ The boys are with Bernie,” Steinem said.

These comments were largely seen as dismissive and sexist, suggesting young women are not politically savvy enough to make their own choices. This rhetoric of shaming women — or any American — into voting for a specific candidate is ugly.

It is a safe bet that these troubling comments did not come from a campaign script, however, this brand of entitlement is exactly what is hurting Clinton with young voters.

We can easily sum up why Bernie Sanders wants to be president — his stump speech is simple: The top one-tenth of the one percent control too much wealth; we have gross injustice in campaign finance, and that it is a moral outrage that Americans might have to go into severe debt for healthcare and education.

Why is Clinton running for president? I’m not entirely sure, and I do not think there is that simple elevator pitch she can give to a voter.

I do not doubt Clinton’s ability to hold the Oval Office. However, I cannot easily identify what her key issues are and where her passions lie.

 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.10.2016 70 hours ago
Posted In: Culture at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
1873 building

Slice of Cincinnati: Cincinnati Observatory

To the naked eye, there are not very many stars visible in the Cincinnati night sky. However, a look through one of Cincinnati Observatory’s telescopes on a clear day makes it possible to catch a glimpse of the galaxy. It’s no wonder that the observatory’s assistant director and outreach astronomer Dean Regas says the most common reaction from visitors is "Wow."

Watching folks look through a telescope for the first time is his favorite part of the job. “They put their eye up to the telescope, and their eyes literally light up,” Regas says. “The light comes from millions to trillions of miles away through the telescope, down the tube, into their eye, and you can see their eyes light up.” He says visitors’ entire faces will then relax into a smile.

Most people do not know what to expect when they walk into Cincinnati Observatory. In fact, Regas himself didn’t know what to expect when he first visited the observatory in 1998 when he attended an event to view a comet passing by.

“It’s a very intimate moment with the universe. I think we really excite people’s imaginations a lot,” he says. “They see a bigger picture of things, in some ways.” Sparking this interest in the universe is at the core of the observatory’s mission. Since it opened to the public in 2000, the observatory has been dedicated to educating all generations and preserving the history of the site.

While it is the first major observatory in the Western Hemisphere, it is also home to the oldest public telescope in the U.S. Built in Germany in 1843, the telescope was first located in Mount Adams on the highest point in Cincinnati. (Just picture 173 years’ worth of eyeballs peering out into space as you look through the telescope).

However, coal smoke and other pollution flooding the valley made it impossible to look at the sky. The telescope was moved to a more remote, rural area for optimal viewing in 1873.

It’s because of the telescope that two of Cincinnati’s seven hills go their names. The telescope’s former home got its name when John Quincy Adams dedicated the observatory, and the land surrounding the telescope’s new home was dubbed Mount Lookout.

The telescope is now house in a smaller building on the observatory’s property, while a telescope purchased in 1904 is housed in the main building. Both are still in use.

Before opening to the public in 2000, the observatory had long been neglected and was seldom in use. “It was hard to notice the creepy building at the end of the street,” Regas says. “It looked like it was abandoned — trees were all over the place, ivy was growing on the buildings — it was black because of the pollution, and they used the telescopes maybe a dozen times a year.”

The old building came back to life when neighborhood residents and a group of amateur astronomers teamed up to reinvigorate the observatory. Yet with its old-fashioned wood floors and furnishings, stepping into the observatory is like taking a leap back in time. Since its rebirth, attendance at the observatory has gone from 1,000 visitors per year to 26,000.

“To think that there are institutions like this in our city makes it a richer city,” Regas says.

In addition to being open to the public every Thursday and Friday, there are many different classes offered at the observatory, including programs for beginners and continuing education classes for adults. It is a destination for many school field trips and special events such as Moon-day Monday and Late Night Date Night. Regas says many events become sold out within seconds of the signup being uploaded to the observatory’s website.

Visitors can look forward to special events each time planets move to their optimal viewing positions, with Jupiter Night on March 12, Marsapalooza on June 11 and Saturnday on July 9. You can also take classes at the observatory to learn how to map out the plants’ movements yourself. Whether you’d like to take classes, catch a glimpse of space or just take a tour of the historic building, that building at the end of a cul-de-sac in Mount Lookout that you never noticed has something for everyone.


For more information on the CINCINNATI OBSERVATORY: cincinnatiobservatory.org.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.10.2016 71 hours ago
Posted In: News at 11:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news1_kasichiowanov_maxgoldberg

Morning News and Stuff

Rhinegeist expanding to new market; Ohio House to vote again on bill defunding Planned Parenthood; Kasich finishes second in New Hampshire primary

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines. 

Recently-released federal airfare data says that flying out of the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky airport is no longer cheaper than flying out of Dayton. The average ticket price is $427 for both. As someone who frequently flies out of every Tri-State area airport but CVG, I'm skeptical, but hopeful. But if CVG can strike a deal with Southwest Airlines, then I'm there. 

• Rhinegeist's Cidergeist is all grown up and is heading out east. The company announced its taking its hard cider to Boston by the end of this month followed by New York at some point. Co-founder Bryant Goulding said the Cincinnati-based microbrewery chose to debut its cider over its beer because market for craft cider market is currently stronger than one for the craft brewing.

• The Ohio House is expected to vote on today on the bill that would strip Planned Parenthood of $1.3 million it receives in state funding. HB 294 would bar health organizations who perform non-therapeutic abortions from receiving state and federal funding. The Senate, which passed the bill on Jan. 27, added minor amendments to the legislation requiring the House's approval before it can go to Gov. Kasich's desk. 

• Public health officials have reported the first two cases of the Zika virus in Ohio and one in Indiana. The Ohio Department of Health confirmed yesterday that a Cleveland woman who had recently returned from Haiti and a Stark County man who also just been to Haiti tested positive for the virus. The virus, which is transmitted through mosquitoes, is most concerning for pregnant women as it has been linked to birth defects. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has taken the unusual precaution of recommending U.S. travelers avoid 22 countries in South and Central America. 

• Gov. John Kasich proved he's holding tight to the presidential race in New Hampshire. After aggressively spending the last month campaigning there, Kasich finished second last night in the state's GOP primary behind Donald Trump. Trump, who finished second behind Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in the Iowa caucuses, grabbed 35 percent of New Hampshire's Republican vote. Kasich, who took 15 percent, didn't exactly come in a close second, but the victory has flung him back into the category of legit GOP presidential candidates. At the very least, it means he won't be dropping out any time soon. 

On the other side, Democratic candidate Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders crushed opponent Hillary Clinton even more than expected. Sanders grabbed 60 percent of the vote as compared to 34 percent for Clinton--the largest gap in New Hampshire's history. Political analysis, however, are predicting a rockier road ahead for Sanders as the candidates head to South Carolina and Nevada. The two states have higher Hispanic and African-American populations, which have shown stronger support for Clinton.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.09.2016 3 days ago
Posted In: News at 04:36 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Local Lawmakers Call on Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice to Consider Grand Jury Reform

State Rep. Alicia Reece, State Sen. Cecil Thomas among those asking for changes including greater transparency

Black lawmakers from the Ohio General Assembly today met with Ohio Supreme Court Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor to press for changes to the state’s grand jury process, including greater transparency in what are currently secret proceedings. 

The Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, which includes State Sen. Cecil Thomas and president State Rep. Alicia Reece from Cincinnati, has pushed for grand jury reform in the state in the aftermath of police shooting deaths of unarmed black citizens, including 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland and 21-year-old John Crawford III in Beavercreek. Grand juries declined to indict officers involved in either of those shootings.

State Sens. Sandra Williams of Cleveland and Edna Brown of Toledo also attended the meeting with O’Connor.

“Many of our constituents around the state are calling for action after the year-long grand jury process that culminated in the decision to bring zero charges against the officers that shot and killed 12 year-old Tamir Rice, and the lack of charges in the police shooting of John Crawford,” Reece said in a statement. “We look forward to working with both the Supreme Court chief justice and our colleagues in the legislature to enact meaningful justice reforms that keep us safe, treat citizens fairly and restore faith and transparency in our justice system.”

Late last month, O’Connor announced she would convene an 18-member panel to review the state’s grand jury process, which has been in Ohio’s constitution since it was written in 1802. Currently, grand juries meet in secret to consider evidence presented by law enforcement authorities and prosecutors, then decide whether or not to indict a suspect. That has led many to question whether the proceedings, and the decisions grand juries reach, are just and impartial.

The panel will consider changes to the system but will not look at a full removal of the grand jury system as some activists have called for. Franklin County Common Pleas Judge Stephen McIntosh will chair the group, which has its first meeting Feb. 17. O’Connor has asked for a report on suggested changes from the group by June.

Rice was on a playground playing with a toy pistol in November 2014 when a neighbor called police to say someone was pointing a gun at passersby. That caller stipulated the gun was “probably fake” and that the person was a minor. That information wasn’t relayed to officers, however, who pulled a police cruiser within feet of Rice. Officer Timothy Loehmann exited the cruiser and shot Rice within seconds, video footage of the incident shows. A Cuyahoga County grand jury declined to press charges against him.

Crawford was in a Beavercreek Walmart with a toy rifle over his shoulder when another shopper called police, reporting he was pointing it at customers. Security footage of the incident doesn’t show Crawford pointing the toy at others, and when police arrived, he had it slung over his shoulder. Crawford was shot by officers and died shortly afterward. A Greene County grand jury did not indict officers in that case.

 
 
 
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