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by Natalie Krebs 09.16.2015
Posted In: News at 10:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Cincy searches for a new police chief; Buddy the marijuana mascot hits college campuses; Kasich gears up for second debate

Good morning, Cincy! Hang in there: We're halfway through the week and crawling closer and closer to Oktoberfest this weekend. Here are some headlines to help pass some of the time until your next beer.

City Manager Harry Black, who fired Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell last Wednesday, said he will look high and low, near and far, and leave no stone unturned to find Cincinnati's new chief. Ok, well, he actually said that he will do a national search as well as post the position internally within the next two weeks to find the replacement. Mayor John Cranley has said that he supports the interim Police Chief and former Assistant Chief Eliot Isaac for the job. But the call goes to the city manager, who was given the power to hire and fire the police chief in 2001.

• Better late than never--the streetcars are finally coming. CAF USA, the Elmira, N.Y. company building the cars has said the first car will arrive by Oct. 30. The rest are arriving between the end of this year and early next year. The cars were supposed to arrive mid-September for the opening day, but the company pushed back the date due to manufacturing issues.

• ResponsibleOhio's executive director Ian James and Secretary of State Jon Husted are still going head to head over the Nov. 3 ballot initiative to legalize marijuana in Ohio. Husted has now claimed that ResponsibleOhio knew about the fraudulent signatures on its initial petition to get the measure on the ballot. James denies this. But Responsible Ohio charging full speed ahead to get the initiative passed. They've recently unveiled "Buddy the Marijuana mascot" at college campus to get the youth vote--a move so wild that they've attracted the attention of Late Show host Stephen Colbert. You can watch his segment here.

• Gov. John Kasich will take the stage again tonight for the second GOP debate on CNN. Things have changed since the first Fox News debate a few weeks ago. Then, Kasich barely made it into the top eight contenders to debate with front runners Donald Trump, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. This time around, Kasich didn't have to sneak into the debate. According to recent polls, Kasich has moved from the tail end to the middle. He's still way behind leaders Donald Trump and Ben Carson, but he's ahead of Walker, who has taken a rough tumble from the top to Kasich's former position. Some speculate that Walker, who turned Wisconsin into a right-to-work state, might launch some attacks at Kasich for backing off an anti-union movement, but the main target will still probably be Trump. 

• Trump isn't just the target of fellow GOP contenders. Tuesday morning, conservative group the Club for Growth launched a series of advertisements attacking Trump calling him "the worst kind of politician." It seems the group has some issues with statements Trump has made on supporting higher taxes on capital gains, healthcare and rejecting cuts to Social Security and Medicaid, which could ultimately be helping Kasich climb the polls. According to a Politico story on Monday, some Wall Street executives are afraid of a Trump presidency and have instead shoveled money towards Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and Kasich.

My email is nkrebs@citybeat.com, and I'd love to hear from you!

 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.15.2015
Posted In: News at 10:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

GE to Cincy: It's not you, it's the GOP; families of those killed by police to rally in Cincy; Ohio, Kentucky pretty miserable, study finds

Good morning all. Here’s what’s going on in the news on this amazing fall day. No, seriously, it’s pretty much ideal outside right now so take a minute to go outside for a smoke break or to get some coffee or do some jumping jacks or pull ups on a street sign or something. I’ll wait.

OK. Back? Here we go. Maybe you’ve heard about the fact that our fair city was a’courtin one heck of a catch recently, but came away heartbroken. The object of our affection is really, really rich, into engineering and science stuff and already has a pretty close relationship with us. But when we tried to take that relationship to the next level, we were spurned because our elders have some conflicting political viewpoints. 

I’m talking about the fact that General Electric won’t be locating its corporate headquarters in Ohio at least in part because four high-level GOP politicians in the state oppose renewing the authority of the federal Export-Import Bank, which underwrites loans for companies that do lots of exporting. GE, which already has more employees in Ohio than any other state, does more exporting than any other company here. U.S. Reps. Steve Chabot and Brad Wenstrup, both hailing from the Cincinnati area, as well as Ohio Gov. John Kasich and tea party firebrand Rep. Jim Jordan from Urbana all oppose the so-called Ex-Im Bank, saying that the private market could do a better job financing the corporate export game. 

It’s a little like having your crush over to your house when you’re a teenager and then your dad starts talking about the constitution while wearing a Gadsen flag T-shirt, only there are like, four dads and your crush employs thousands upon thousands of people. Hard to know who to root for here. On the one hand, I feel like corporations should get federal money exactly never and shouldn’t be throwing their political weight around. On the other hand, well, tea party nuttiness. Other politicians, including most Democrats in the state, support the Ex-Im bank, which is the flip side ideologically of what you’d think it would be. Kind of a lame situation all around.

• Western & Southern Financial Group President and CEO John Barrett discussed the company’s plans for a whole corner of downtown Cincinnati yesterday at a gathering for real-estate professionals. Barrett outlined plans for new restaurants, rooftop bars and other attractions in the area around Lytle Park in downtown’s southeastern corner, near where the company’s headquarters are located. Among the attractions will be a luxury hotel in the building that formerly housed the Anna Louise Inn, a women’s shelter, for more than 100 years. Western & Southern’s real estate arm, Eagle Realty, purchased that building after protracted legal wrangling with Cincinnati Union Bethel, which runs the shelter now located in Mount Auburn. I could tell you more about the awesome swanky rooftop bars and glitzy restaurants planned for the area, but I’d rather just pose a question: Since when does the CEO of a corporation, even one who’s been in the neighborhood since 1901, get to plan what a big chunk of the city looks like? I could go further but I’m just going to leave that right there because I’m a reporter and we don’t actually have opinions.

• Will the media be allowed to continue covering a trial involving a racially charged confrontation in June between police and pool-goers in Fairfield? That’s up for debate. A 12-year-old and 15-year-old are charged in Butler County Courts with resisting arrest in connection with that incident. The 12-year-old is also charged with assaulting an officer, and the 15-year-old with disorderly conduct. Attorneys for the juveniles have requested that press be barred from the ongoing court proceedings. The incident caught national attention after cell phone video emerged of the family in question being asked to leave the pool and subsequently being arrested. They and their supporters say police used inappropriate force during that incident and that their removal stems from the fact they are black. They’ve asked that charges against the children be dropped. Fairfield Police, however, say they were justified in their use of force and will be proceeding with the charges against the children.

• A meeting yesterday of Cincinnati’s Fraternal Order of Police yielded a vote of confidence in CPD’s interim chief Eliot Isaacs. That’s a big turnaround from the meeting's original purpose, which was to express no confidence in now-ousted chief Jeffrey Blackwell. Isaac is an insider with the department, having spent more than 25 years with CPD. Officers within the department had said morale was at a very low point due to communication issues, outdated equipment and low staffing. Those complaints came as controversy swirled around Blackwell, who garnered praise for his approach to community relations but criticism for his handling of internal affairs within the department. Blackwell’s supporters maintain he was fighting impossible headwinds within CPD as a chief hired from the outside against the wishes of incoming mayor John Cranley.

• Local families of those killed in police shootings will rally this Saturday at the University of Cincinnati, then march to the spot in Mount Auburn where Samuel Dubose was shot and killed earlier this summer. That rally will start at 6 p.m. in front of the UC police center at 51 W. Corry St. The families of Samuel Dubose, Samantha Ramsey, Tamir Rice and John Crawford III are expected to attend and address the crowd before marching.

• Finally, are you happy right now? Like, actually happy? According to a new study released by finance website WalletHub.com, the chances you answered yes to that question are much lower here in Ohio or Kentucky than in many other states. Wallethub’s recent ranking of happiest and least-happy states did not look favorably on the Tri-state. Ohio ranked 43 out of the 50 states plus Washington D.C. and Kentucky ranked 49. Ouch. At least Indiana ranked a little higher at 38. The study took into account depression rates, sleep surveys, suicide rates, average work hours, income growth, unemployment rates and other factors to give a rough indication of the happiest places in the U.S. Number one? Utah, of all places. Number two was Minnesota, somehow, which you’ll have to ask CityBeat reporter Natalie Krebs about, since she hails from the land of cold-ass winters and weird accents. Just kidding Natalie, I’m sure it’s great up there.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 09.14.2015
Posted In: News at 10:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ac_redbike-700x615

Morning News and Stuff

Red Bike turns 1; Music Hall renovators announced; Police union to vote on interim police chief

Happy Monday, Cincy! Hope everyone had a great weekend. Here are your morning headlines. 

• The Cincinnati Red Bike program celebrates its one-year anniversary tomorrow, and it's had a great start. In the past 12 months, the bike share program has blown the lid off of initial first year projections. It has logged more than 87,000 rides, 69-percent more than initial predictions,  and membership is at 1,330, 42-percent more than predicted. Stations were expanded out to Northside and northern Kentucky earlier than planned due to its popularity, and it now has 50 stations, 20 more than when the program launched. Best yet, the Red Bike hasn't lost a single bike! Red Bike officials say this kind of growth into the second and third year isn't expected, and some stations — like the ones in Northside and Uptown — aren't being used as much as they'd like. But that's not stopping the program from celebrating. In addition to throwing itself a birthday bash at Taft's Ale House in OTR, bike rentals will be only a dollar on its anniversary tomorrow. 

• Officials from the city and the arts community this afternoon will reveal the group that will be renovating Music Hall. The 2 p.m. press conference will include details about the crew that will help with the $125 million project. The historic building is in dire need of repairs and updates, as duct tape holds the carpet in place in some areas, old hemp rope is still used behind the scenes, buckets are set up to catch leaks and narrow passageways and doors make staging difficult to get through the 137-year-old structure, officials say.  

• The Cincinnati Fraternal Order of Police is expected to issue a vote of confidence for Interim Police Chief Eliot Isaac today. Isaac was promoted to assistant police chief in July and received this quick bump up in ranks after City Manager Harry Black fired former Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell last Wednesday. Isaac is a 26-year veteran of the CPD and had been serving as captain since 2004 before being promoted to assistant chief this summer. 

• City Manager Harry Black's memo released last Wednesday, the day Blackwell was fired, cited low morale, frequent absences and described Blackwell as too self-promotional, among the reasons why the police chief was fired for cause, but the Enquirer is questioning whether his community-focused policing approach played a part in his dismissal. Blackwell's approach to working with kids in the community through programs like the Right to Read program and a recently launched pilot program that would extend hours in community centers has been cited as a model for police stations by some outside of Cincinnati but possibly shook the city's confidence in him during a recent spike in shootings. 

• The great recession has robbed many Ohio young people of valuable formative career experience, resulting in a rise in poverty even as unemployment goes down, according to a report detailed by the Columbus Dispatch. Employers are more hesitant to hire workers with less experience or transient work histories, which is what a lot of young people who emerged during the recession have on their resumes. Instead jobs like the ones at call centers and manufacturing, which have historically gone to young less skilled workers, are going to older workers. By some estimates, 30,000 16- to 24-year-olds are without a job and not in school.

That's all for now. Email me story ideas at nkrebs@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.11.2015
Posted In: News, Police at 01:07 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
screen shot 2015-07-30 at 10.12.49 am

Report: Dubose Shooting "Entirely Preventable"

Report says UC officer made tactical errors, recommends reassessment of UC police mission.

An internal review released today by the University of Cincinnati finds that the July 19 shooting death of unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose by UC police officer Ray Tensing was "entirely preventable" and resulted from tactical mistakes made by Tensing. The report also says Tensing made misleading and untrue statements about that incident.

The report, prepared by an outside investigative company called Kroll, utilizes witness testimony, Tensing's body camera footage and other evidence to reconstruct the events that led up to DuBose's shooting death.

While the report finds that Tensing's initial stop of DuBose for a missing license plate was lawful, it also says that Tensing subsequently engaged DuBose in a way that created an escalating situation as DuBose refused to produce a driver's license or exit his vehicle.

Using a frame-by-frame breakdown of Tensing's body camera footage, the report demonstrates that Tensing reached into DuBose's car even when DuBose posed no threat to him. It also shows that Tensing's arm was not caught up in the car's steering wheel, as the officer claimed, and that DuBose's car did not start moving until after Tensing shot him in the head.

The report issues a number of recommendations to prevent future incidents, including testing officers involved in fatalities for drugs and alcohol. Many of the report's recommendations involve further training to prevent the mistakes Tensing made at the moment of the stop, but a few also address the wider problems with UC's policing in neighborhoods around the university. The first two recommendations concluding the report suggest UC and the city of Cincinnati consider limiting campus cops' ability to patrol off campus and also reassess the entire mission of the campus police force.

"Kroll’s preliminary assessment of the UCPD is that, while it does many things well, as a Department it lacks the experiential skill sets necessary to perform all of the operational requirements of urban policing," the report reads, "which requires the training and experience to not only conduct routine traffic stops, but also to investigate serious crimes, engage diverse multi-ethnic communities, and patrol areas of the city not affiliated with the university or its mission."

DuBose's death occurred in an isolated corner of Mount Auburn, about a mile from campus. Questions about off-campus policing come as the university has beefed up its police force and increased the number of tickets it gives. As it has done so, disparities in who gets those tickets have widened. UC police records show that 62 percent of the 932 tickets given by UC police through July this year went to black motorists. In 2012, blacks got 43 percent of UC police tickets. 

Ray Tensing has been indicted on murder and manslaughter charges in connection with DuBose s death. His trial was scheduled for next month, but has been postponed until an as-yet-unannounced later date.

CityBeat will update this story as more information becomes available.

 
 
by Staff 09.11.2015
Posted In: Arts, Benefits, Comedy, Concerts, Culture, Drinking, Eats, Events, Food, Fun, Life, Music at 11:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List (9/11-9/13)

Cincinnati Food + Wine Classic; ComiCon; MainStrasse Oktoberfest and more

FRIDAY
MUSIC: THE DAMNED
What do The Pretenders, Pink Floyd, The Clash, The Sex Pistols, Motörhead, Culture Club, T. Rex, Nick Lowe, Naz Nomad and the Nightmares, Goth Rock, The Lords of the New Church, The Sisters of Mercy, Miami Vice, The Young Ones, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones have in common? They all have a one-degree-of-separation connection to The Damned, one of Great Britain’s most renowned and durable Punk bands, touring this year on the eve of its almost inconceivable 40th anniversary. For anyone who would doubt the legitimacy of The Damned’s place in Punk history, the group’s early credentials speak for themselves. The Damned play Friday at Bogarts. More info/tickets: bogarts.com.

Harvest Home Fair
Photo: J. Klug
EVENT: HARVEST HOME FAIR
End your summer at the 156th-annual Harvest Home Fair. The fest opens Thursday with a parade, followed by various contests, including a flower show, art show and horse show, live music, a cooking demonstration by Buddy LaRosa and a Dog Walk and Mutt Mingle on Sunday. Other attractions include the 4-H petting zoo, auto show, cooking and baking exhibitions, carnival rides and games and a playground. 6-11 p.m. Thursday; 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; noon-10 p.m. Sunday. $5 adults; free children under 1; free admission Sunday until 3:30 p.m. Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Cheviot-Westwood, harvesthomefair.com

Kevin McDonald
Photo: Leif Norma
COMEDY: OTR IMPROV FESTIVAL
Calling all comedy fans: OTRimprov, a local sketch group dedicated to creating a strong improv community in Cincinnati, will host its second Improv Festival Cincinnati at the Know Theatre to fête the group’s fifth anniversary. The four-day fest will feature improv acts from around the country in addition to workshops in storytelling, sketch writing and more. Emmy-nominated comedian Kevin McDonald of Kids in the Hall (see also: That 70s Show, Arrested Development) is headlining. Thursday-Sunday. $15-$35 single day/evening; $75 all-access pass; $65 weekend pass. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, ifcincy.com

MainStrasse Oktoberfest
Photo: Matthew Andrews
EVENT: MAINSTRASSE OKTOBERFEST
Oktoberfest season in Cincinnati rolls on with MainStrasse’s Oktoberfest celebration this weekend. The festivities kick off Friday evening with a ceremonial keg tapping at Goose Girl Fountain with the German American Citizens League and affiliated sister organizations, followed by live German music, German food and other family-friendly entertainment. 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. MainStrasse Village, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org.

Cincy Beerfest
EVENT: CINCY BEERFEST
From the people who bring you the Cincy Winter Beerfest at the Convention Center comes Cincy Beerfest, an outdoor brew fest on Fountain Square. It’s a craft beer block party with live music, more than 250 craft beers (local and national) and food trucks. Friday and Saturday. $15-$45; $10 DD. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, cincybeerfest.com.

EVENT: MALTS IN AULT
Head to Ault Park for a beer festival featuring craft beers from across the nation, including MadTree, Dogfish Head, Revolution and more. 6:30-10:30 p.m. $25; includes 20 tastings. Ault Park, Observatory Ave., Hyde Park, aultparkac.org

EVENT: CLITON COUNTY CORN FESTIVAL
Celebrate Clinton County’s agricultural heritage with a three-day festival of corn. The fest features antique farm machinery, parade games, a quilt show, live music, all types of food made from corn and the Corn Olympics. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. $4-$7. Clinton County Fairgrounds, 958 W. Main St., Wilmington, clintoncountyohio.com.

The Food Wine Classic descends on Washington Park for a weekend of dining, drinking and learning.
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCINNATI FOOD + WINE CLASSIC
If Food Network and Top Chef got married and had a baby, it would be this event. Celebrate the Midwest culinary scene with grand tastings, demos, seminars, competitions, after-parties, and more. Friday-Sunday. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodandwineclassic.com.

SATURDAY
Cincy ComiCon
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCY COMICON
Let your nerd flag fly, Cincinnati. Cincy ComiCon is back once again to ensure comic books get their fair representation in the Queen City. Created somewhat as a response to the Cincinnati Comic Expo, whose tendency is to feature more film and TV stars than comic book creators, Cincy ComiCon is all about the writers and illustrators who bring costumed characters to life on the page. Created by Kendall Swafford of the Cheviot comic book shop Up Up & Away! and Walking Dead co-creator Tony Moore — a well-established illustrator beloved by the industry — Cincy ComiCon will feature Rick Remender (Tokyo Ghost), Mark Schultz (Xenozoic Tales) and many other panelists, booths and special guests. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $20-$50. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, Ky., cincycomicon.com.

'The Secret Garden'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: THE SECRET GARDEN
Blake Robison is the guy who makes the artistic decisions at the Playhouse in the Park, and he’s committed to shows that appeal across generations. He says The Secret Garden is one of his favorite musicals. “So many stories with child protagonists are cutesy and saccharine. Not so in The Secret Garden,” he says. Mary Lennox, 10, is a selfish, spoiled orphan in Victorian England put in the care of an unhappy uncle in a remote British manor. In the midst of unhappiness and loneliness, a secret garden becomes a place of healing for several characters. It’s a powerful show, full of deep, complex emotions and great music. Through Oct. 3. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com

EVENT: HOFBRAUHAUS OKTOBERFEST
Head to the Hofbräuhaus for a stein-holding competition, keg and pretzel toss, circus acts, face painting and bier, bier, bier. Saturday and Sunday. Free. 200 E. Third St., Newport, Ky., hofbrauhausnewport.com.

The Galloping Pig
Photo: The Bowtie Foundation
EVENT: THE GALLOPING PIG
If you’re feeling generous and a bit British, then look no further to satisfy your anglophilic desires. The 2015 Galloping Pig looks to raise funds through the BowTie Foundation toward the education of underprivileged youth as patrons gather to watch the Cincinnati Polo Club square off in an exhibition match. But there’s more than just the polo match: Attendees will pet horses, meet the polo players, hit some balls, drink, eat and dance to live music. Summer dresses and bowties are recommended apparel. 11:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. $20; $125 VIP. Wilshire Farm, 6065 Goshen Road, Goshen, thegallopingpig.com.

Cincinnati Hispanic Fest
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCINNATI HISPANIC FEST
The Cincinnati Hispanic Fest highlights the food, music, dance, sports, art and culture of local Hispanic communities. The main stage features more than 15 musical acts over the course of the two-day event, along with cultural dancing performances, a Festival Queen competition, live mass and a free showing of the film Cesar Chavez on Saturday and Sunday. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $1 walk in; $8 per car. Hamilton County Fairgrounds 7820 Vine St., Carthage, cincinnatihispanicfest.org.

Seabird
Photo: Provided
EVENT: LONGSTONE STREET FESTIVAL
Take to the streets for Milford’s annual Longstone Street Festival. Get your fill of live music, food, games and arts and crafts at this 12-hour, family-friendly event. A live music stage will host nine bands throughout the day, including Folk, Funk, Soul, Bluegrass, Americana and Alt Rockers, including headliners Seabird. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. 200 Main St., Milford, longstonestreetfestival.com

EVENT: TASTE OF INDIA
This festival includes Indian food, shopping, games, pony rides, fireworks from Rozzi’s and a Naach Sitare Indian dancing competition. Noon-8 p.m. Free admission. The Hindu Temple of Greater Cincinnati, 4920 Klatte Road, Summerside, tasteofindiacincinnati.com.

EVENT: ART AND WINE FESTIVAL
The 17th-annual Art & Wine Festival features the work of more than 60 area artists, live music, a grape-stomping competition, food, draft beer and wine from Vinoklet. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday; 1-8 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Colerain, vinokletwines.com.

EVENT: FLIPPIN CANCER FLIP CUP TOURNAMENT
Braxton is supporting Bridgette Hightower in her mission to wipe out blood cancer with a flip-cup tournament. Event includes a costume contest, Strong’s Brick Oven Pizzeria, split-the-pot, door prizes and more. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Check-in starts at 2 p.m. $125 for teams of $5; $1 pints of Sparky; $6 pizzas. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., 859-261-5600. 

EVENT: CINCINNATI JAZZ & BBQ FESTIVAL
MadTree beer, music from Mike Wade & the Mighty Groovers, Ron D’s BBQ, Just Q’in, games for kids, an art mart and more. 3-8 p.m. Free admission. Madison and Whetsel, Madisonville, facebook.com/cincyjazzandbbqfest.

EVENT: APPLE HARVEST WINE DIVINE
Woodstone Creek celebrates the season with wine, mead and craft spirits, plus tastings of apple and brandy wine. Includes five samples. 2-7 p.m. $12. Woodstone Creek Winery & Distillery, 4712 Vine St., Saint Bernard, 513-569-0300.

SUNDAY
Los Lobos
Photo: David Alan Kogut
MUSIC: LOS LOBOS
Los Lobos began making music back when Richard Nixon was still in office. For the historically illiterate, that’s more than 40 years, during which the Los Angeles crew has put forth its distinctive sounds — from slanted Tex-Mex and Folk to straight-up Country and Rock — via more than a dozen studio albums and a variety of EPs, live records and side projects. The band is still probably best known in the mainstream for its take on Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba,” from the 1988 biopic of the same name. Which is unfortunate, because it’s the least interesting thing Los Lobos has done. Los Lobos plays Sunday at Taft Theatre. More info/tickets: tafttheatre.org.

Luna Gale
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
ONSTAGE: LUNA GALE
This year marks Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s 30th anniversary. It was launched in 1986 to support local professional artists, driven by strong faith in the transformative power of the arts to create sustainable communities. Its founders, David A. White III and Jeff Seibert, pulled together a corps of local actors and aspiring theater professionals and assembled two seasons that were presented at Memorial Hall. Luna Gale tells the story of a social worker who meets two teenage drug addicts accused of neglecting their baby. Luna Gale continues through Sept. 27 at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati. More info/tickets: ensemblecincinnati.org.

Cincinnati Landmark Productions’ 'A Chorus Line'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: A CHORUS LINE
The dancers who back up Broadway productions are called “gypsies.” They lead anonymous lives, but they’re passionate, dedicated performers. They got their star turn in A Chorus Line, a 1975 show about a group of performers competing for spots in the company of a new production. The show was based on composites of real people, but it features some of Broadway’s greatest musical theater numbers. With songs by Marvin Hamlisch — especially “One Singular Sensation” — the show danced off with nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. It ran on Broadway for more than two decades. It’s a great choice to open Covedale’s 2015-2016 season. Through Sept. 27. $21-$24. Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glendale Ave., Covedale, 513-241-6550, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com

EVENT: OLD WEST FEST
If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg, oldwestfestival.com.

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography
EVENT: OHIO RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends (like Time Travelers Weekend Sept. 12; where’s your fez?) and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville, renfestival.com

ART: UNKNOWN ELEMENTS
In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art. This is the premise of a new photography exhibition at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Unknown Elements, which features 26 photos from the museum’s collection “about which some details are unknown.” Displayed in Gallery 212, the photographs range in date from the mid-19th century to the present day and are accompanied by written works from local writers — poems, short stories and other responses paired to selected images to serve as a “prompt” for viewers’ own reflections. Unknown Elements is on display at the Cincinnati Art Museum through Nov. 8. More info: cincinnatiartmuseum.org.









 
 
by Rick Pender 09.11.2015
Posted In: Theater at 09:37 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 9-11 - luna gale @ etc - milly israel, patrick e. phillips & annie fitzpatrick - photo ryan kurtz

Stage Door

And so the season begins...

The fall theater season is fully under way. I’ve seen several productions that I can recommend, starting with Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s staging of Luna Gale. The story focuses on a weary social worker caught on the horns of a horrible dilemma — a custody battle between teen parents with drug issues and a zealously religious grandmother — with veteran actress Annie Fitzpatrick turning in another outstanding acting performance. The production is also an impressive reminder of the fine work ETC has been doing for 30 years since three actors in Luna Gale were ETC apprentices a year ago. The award-winning Luna Gale is being produced at many theaters across America this season, but I can’t imagine that any of those productions will be better than the one we have right here in Cincinnati. I gave it a Critic’s Pick. Through Sept. 27. Tickets: 513-421-3555

Last night I was at the Playhouse for The Secret Garden opening its 56th season. While this is a story about a 10-year-old girl, it’s quite serious and thoughtful. Orphaned and seemingly headed for unhappiness, she finds redemption in nature and friendship, bringing others along on her path to a better place through abandoned garden that comes back to life. In my review, I suggest that this production might be a bit too complex and impressionistic for kids, but the show is physically beautiful and gorgeous musically. Caitlin Cohn’s performance as Mary Lennox is impressive; she’s a student at New York University, but quite convincing as a young girl. The cast features two CCM musical theater grads, Adam Monley and Carlyn Connolly, and a raft of polished New York veterans. Through Oct. 3. Tickets: 513-241-3888

If you’re a fan of the music of the ’60s and ’70s, you’re likely to love the touring production of Motown: The Musical currently rattling the rafters at the Aronoff Center (through Sept. 20). The hardworking cast does a great job of recreating the sounds of Motown — The Four Tops, The Temptations, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Diana Ross and the Supremes, The Jackson Five, Marvin Gaye, and many more. The play in which this is presented, however, is not so stimulating — Motown founder Barry Gordy’s story was written by (you guessed it) Barry Gordy, and it all feels pretty self-serving. But the music is great, and it comes at you hot and heavy — nearly 60 songs, although many are in medleys or shortened versions. Nevertheless, it’s a great reminder of the Pop tunes that kept American singing and dancing several decades ago. Tickets: 513-621-2787

The Covedale Center is offering an ambitious staging of a great musical, A Chorus Line, with some fine dancing in its own right. This is a very moving show about people who put themselves “on the line” to do something they love. It’s still powerful after 40 years, and Cincinnati Landmark Productions has done a fine job with this one. (Through Sept. 27. Tickets: 513-241-6550

There’s a lot of laughter at Know Theatre this weekend where the Cincinnati Improv Festival is underway. I understand that there aren’t many tickets left, but if you’re a fan of this branch of comedy, you should call to see if you can get in. Shows tonight and Saturday. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.11.2015
Posted In: News at 09:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dubose

Morning News and Stuff

Report on Dubose shooting to be released today; NKY theater to become brewery; 2016 is important because judges are old

Good morning y’all. Here’s a brief rundown of the news today before you head off for your weekend.

At a news conference this morning, the Cincinnati Fire Department released a report on the March 26 death of FAO Daryl Gordon, the 54-year-old who was killed after falling down an elevator shaft while responding to a fire in Madisonville. That report reveals that other firefighters wrote a warning on the door to that elevator shaft just minutes before Gordon fell. “Do not enter, open shaft,” the black scrawl on the white door reads. Officials with CFD believe thick smoke and dim lighting conditions may have prevented Gordon from seeing the warning. He was in the building about 10 minutes, working to rescue some of the 29 residents who were eventually removed from the structure. Gordon’s death was the first for CFD in seven years. The department plans to use the report released today to review its operating procedures and avoid a similar accident in the future.

• Another important report is coming down the pike today. The University of Cincinnati Police Department will release its initial findings in the investigation into the police shooting death of Samuel DuBose by UC officer Ray Tensing. The shooting happened after Tensing pulled DuBose over for a routine traffic stop. When
DuBose refused to exit his car and turned the key in the ignition, Tensing shot him in the head. DuBose’s car then rolled for more than a block. Many, including Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters, have called the shooting inexcusable, but Tensing and his attorneys argue he acted in self defense and felt he would be dragged by the vehicle. Tensing is charged with murder in the incident and will stand trial later this year.

• An historic theater in Northern Kentucky could soon become another area brewery. Bellevue City Council yesterday approved a proposal by Cincinnati-based developer Kent Hardman to convert the 73-year-old Marianne Theater in Bellevue into a unique entertainment venue that just happens to brew beer as well. Hardman wants to retain the theater’s stage and screen to show movies and stage live shows. This kind of setup has seen big success in other parts of the country, including my former home of Austin, which has the Alamo Drafthouse, a theater where you can drink. They also serve great food. If developers find a way to bring chicken wings into the NKY plan, I’ll be there every week.

• The latest GOP polls from the early presidential primary state of Iowa are about what you’d expect on first glance, with some surprising details once you dig in. According to the Quinnipiac University poll released today, Ohio’s guy, Gov. John Kasich, aka K-Dawg, aka Big Queso, (OK I’ll stop now) is in fifth place with 5 percent of the vote. That’s surprising considering Kasich hasn’t really been focusing much on Iowa and because other polls in past months have had him down around 2 percent of the vote. That ascendancy is the good news for him, however. The bad news is he’s in a three-way tie for fifth and he and the rest of the GOP field are being dominated by a real estate Svengali with a bad hairpiece. Yes, Donald Trump is still on top, followed by former doctor Ben Carson. Texas Sen. Ted Cruz and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush round out the top four. A surprise at the bottom of the list is Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, who leads Iowa’s next door neighbors and was at one point the front runner in the GOP’s Random House sweepstakes-style contest for president. What a mess.

• Hey, so check this out. Did the above 2016 rundown give you a headache? Are you daunted by the fact we have well over a year of this garbage we have to pay attention to before the election? Are you ready to throw in the towel?

Well, here’s a brief illustration of why all this stuff matters. As Democrats and Republicans tussle over which of their problematic candidates will fight the other party’s problematic candidate in a gross-out battle of yawn-inducing personal attacks, political back-flipping and the like, multiple perches on the U.S. Supreme Court might be at stake. That’s right. Our judges are aging, with three in their 80s, and the next president may well get to appoint a significant number of replacements as they retire. Given the huge role the nation’s highest court has played in recent issues (see: same-sex marriage, abortion, affordable housing, affirmative action, etc.) and the fact that presidents usually choose a judge who roughly agrees with them ideologically, that’s super-terrifying.

So, you know. Pay attention. Vote. All that good stuff.

 
 
by Tony Johnson 09.10.2015
at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
black mass

Spoonful of Cinema: Fall Movie Preview

Autumn 2015 looks unusually strong. Perhaps I’m optimistic, but there seems to be several upcoming titles on the release schedule in the months leading up to the holidays that I find myself looking forward to as much as any fall I can remember. It just comes down to whether you trust the cast and crew around the individual film release or if you trust that the movie studios will stick to the script and deliver the best quality films when they intend to. Sometimes they do. Sometimes they don’t.

Hollywood justifies its existence with its accomplishments. We get bombarded annually with loads of nonsensical big-budget franchise flops — we also get our minds blown when the picture is right, when it all comes together. Here’s to hoping that, this fall, we experience enough excellence to forgive and forget the never-shrinking studio batch of goofy big-budget embarrassment we are sometimes forced to sift through as moviegoers.

September has a lot of movies on the schedule that I wouldn’t raise my hopes for, but a few strike me as intriguing. I would say that M. Night Shyamalan won’t be making another good movie any time soon — The Happening is a great ironic viewing — but sometimes a director has to take a turn for the worse to make an eventual turn for the better. The perhaps too-often-mocked director behind The Sixth Sense and Signs returns to horror with The Visit, set for wide release from Universal on Sept. 11. The premise is as frightening as it is vintage Shyamalan. In the PG-13 “original thriller” (so says the trailer), two kids visit a pair of grandparents who strictly enforce bedtime. Over the course of The Visit, the kids notice strange noises after bedtime, and their grandparents begin to behave strangely the next day. I would say that the idea of a total Shyamalan comeback is outlandish, but Universal seems to be releasing nothing but insanely popular movies this year. I’m not getting excited for The Visit, which seems to feature a heavy found-footage-style dosage of screen time, but I’d be lying if I denied that I typically root for any horror film to scare the living snot out of me.

On Sept.18, Warner Brothers will distribute Black Mass for wide release. The true-crime drama will feature Joel Edgerton, Benedict Cumberbatch and Johnny Depp in what looks like a good old-fashioned gangster film. Depp is already being hailed for a sort of comeback in TV spots and reviews. It’s good to know that he at least decided to play a character that isn’t some sort of mystical being or peculiar sad man. The hype for Depp portraying Boston crime legend James “Whitey” Bulger is astronomically high, and I can only hope that he reaches the performance level that most critics seem to believe he has delivered.

October is when things will get pretty exciting. The first weekend of the month will see the wide release of Ridely Scott’s The Martian, a limited release of Robert Zemeckis’ The Walk in IMAX, and a double helping of Tom Hardy in Brian Helgeland’s Legend. The Martian has a bold ensemble cast led by Matt Damon, but its merit will be accomplished or missed behind the camera. I like to liken Ridley Scott to a power hitter in Major League Baseball — sure, he strikes out more than most, but when he gets ahold of something good, he really makes it count. There is a good level of hype for The Martian — some seem to hope that this could be Scott’s finest film since American Gangster, but it could be as disappointing as Scott’s similarly hyped (albeit very different subject matter in) The Counselor, which turned out to be an uncomfortable sitting for movie fans hoping for the best out of a Cormac McCarthy script. The Walk is based on the true story of French high-wire artist Philippe Petit’s 1974 attempt to walk a wire connecting the two towers of the World Trade Center. It stars Joseph Gordon-Levitt and is directed by Robert Zemeckis, the guy behind Back to the Future, Forrest Gump and Flight. The movie should at least be worth seeing in IMAX, and Zemeckis’ films always have an outside shot to be awards-season surprises. Zemeckis’ constant attempt to walk the fine line between broad appeal and powerful visual skills won him an Oscar and massive box office success, but The Walk’s story seems as risky as its protagonist’s goal.

In limited release, Legend seems sure to satisfy the best of the Tom Hardy fan in everyone. We all know that the only thing better than Tom Hardy starring in a movie is Tom Hardy starring with Tom Hardy in the same movie. He’ll be portraying real-life London crook icons, the twin Kray brothers. One is the brain. One is the brawn. The colorful biopic has already garnered mostly mixed but positive-leaning reviews. We are about to discover if Hardy may be ready to prove that he can carry a film at the box office for any studio. The film will not have an initial wide release, but it will be interesting to see if Hardy — practically the entire selling point of the movie based on its trailer — can pull Americans to smaller movie houses for a mobster flick about British criminals. Legend will be another Universal release. If Universal’s box office mojo continues into the fall, Legend will probably surpass expectations.

And that’s only the first weekend of October.  On Oct. 9, we get to watch one of the best actors around — Michael Fassbender — portray one of the most monumental, impossible-to-ignore public figures of our time in Steve Jobs. Danny Boyle (Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionaire) will be directing, and Aaron Sorkin (Moneyball, The Social Network) has penned the script. It’s worth noting that Sorkin has now written two big-time portrayals of tech industry tycoons; but if it works, why not do it again? If the picture shows as well as its producers seem to expect, we could very well see Fassbender at the Globes and Oscars in early 2016. Much of Steve Jobs weight will rest on his shoulders. Keep an eye on this one.

The week after we watch Fassbender take on Jobs, we get two auteurs’ latest releases on the same wide release date. Bridge of Spies will be the newest movie from Steven Spielberg. The legendary filmmaker is teaming up with Tom Hanks to take on a story loosely based on Cold War espionage. It seems a little bland from the trailers, but this is Steven Spielberg, so I’m definitely more optimistic than not for Bridge of Spies. The other half of the awesome Oct. 16 weekend is Guillermo Del Toro’s gothic horror extravaganza Crimson Peak. The trailer footage is stunning, and Del Toro should be capable of scaring us in more ways than we might imagine. The Mexican master of the supernatural has brought us the Hellboy movies, the chilling Pan’s Labyrinth and the outrageous Pacific Rim. His ability to visually stun us with his creations is only matched by his ability to compel us with his mysterious plots and scheming villains.

 
 
by mbreen 09.10.2015
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals at 10:35 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
shinyandthespoon_jenniferdenham_arnolds004

Foxfire, Longstone Fests Spotlight Local Music and More

A pair of music festivals just northeast of downtown Cincy feature wide array of local talent

With the summer music-festival season winding down and Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival just two weeks away (did you pick up this week’s CityBeat for official guide, right? If not, you can find info here), you might think there’d be a music-fest lull this week. But two (very different) festivals northeast of Cincinnati are keeping the vibe alive this weekend — the Foxfire Freedom Festival in Morrow, Ohio, and the Longstone Street Festival in Milford, Ohio. 

The Foxfire fest, dubbed a “music and sustainability festival,” takes place Friday and Saturday at Morgan’s Riverside Campground & Cabins in Morrow, along the Little Miami River (you can even go canoeing if you’re up for it!). The $45 two-day ticket, available at the gate, covers camping Friday and Saturday night (one-day, non-camping tickets are $15). Foxfire will feature vendors and information related to being an environmentally-friendly citizen (the “sustainability” mention), with live music from several area Roots/Americana/Bluegrass performers, as well as acts that play other genres (or a fusion of several). 


Friday’s Foxfire lineup kicks off at 6 p.m. and features Dead Man String Band, Easy Tom Eby, Jared Schaedle, Joe Wolf, Heather Hamlet and Richard Cisneros. On Saturday, music begins at noo. The Saturday lineup features Common Center, Baoku Moses And The Image Afro-Beat Band, Lawson Family Reunion, Simply Dan String Band, Aaron Hendrick Trio, Black Mountain Throwdown, Adam Singer, Little Miami String Band, Allen Talbott, Blue Caboose and a songwriters-in-the-round session with Greg Mahan, Wolfcryer and Achilles Tenderloin. 


Click here for links to more info on all of the artists. 


More on the campground can be found here. And further info on the Foxfire Freedom Festival is available at the fest’s official site and Facebook page.


The Longstone Street Festival takes place Saturday along Main Street in Milford’s historic downtown district. The annual free event celebrates Milford with various food and arts and crafts vendors, plus a stage featuring a variety of musical acts all day long. This year, the music starts at noon with My Brother’s Keeper (featuring Andrew Hibbard). Other Longstone performers include Seabird, Harbour, Along the Shore, Taylor Shannon, Shiny and the Spoon, Daniel in Stereo, Static Wonder and a band featuring students from the School of  Rock Mason. 


For full details (including info on vendors, kids’ activities and more), visit longstonestreetfestival.com. The times the various performers are playing the Longstone Street Festival can be found at the event’s Facebook page, which also includes music and video samples of several of the artists. 


The Foxfire Freedom Festival and the Longstone Street Festival are both open to all ages and are family friendly.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.10.2015
Posted In: News at 10:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

City Hall ruckus; UC campus featured in NYT Mag; Clinton comes to Columbus

Heya, Cincinnati. Let’s talk about news, because, oh dang, we’ve got a lot to discuss.

As we noted yesterday morning, Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black has fired police chief Jeffrey Blackwell, replacing him with CPD Assistant Chief Eliot Isaac, a 26-year veteran of the department. The firing took place quickly and was announced at the same time a 35-page report on Blackwell’s shortcomings was released. The reports, which you can read here and here, are alarming.

But Blackwell’s abrupt firing sparked something that can only be described as a deeply embarrassing shitstorm at City Hall.

You can read more about that here, but here are the cliff notes: Blackwell’s supporters crammed into Council chambers to speak during the public input session of Council’s regular meeting, only to find they had no place to sit due to a large number of chairs reserved for CPD officers. City Council members complained they did not have time to read the study on the climate within CPD, which was conducted by the city manager, before learning of Blackwell’s termination. The input session was disorganized and chaotic, sometimes degenerating into complete disorder as Mayor John Cranley and individual council members verbally sniped at each other. Cranley had at least a few members of the public removed from the chambers for talking over him and drew boos from the crowd when he was perceived as talking down to opposing council members like Yvette Simpson and Chris Seelbach.

Some on Council, including Charterite Kevin Flynn and Democrat Vice Mayor David Mann, expressed sadness that the situation had come to firing the chief, but said the report — which found 82 percent of the nearly 500 officers surveyed had very low morale and contained testimony from three officers about favoritism, retaliation and vanity by the chief — left no other option. Others, however, including former CPD officer Wendell Young and Simpson had deep misgivings about the process by which the firing took place, decrying what they say is a lack of transparency and professionalism.

Black and Cranley pushed back against those assertions, saying the climate assessment was a careful, methodical effort undertaken over the course of months.

Blackwell himself showed up to the meeting, but did not speak before Council. He left shortly after arriving, a group of supporters and media trailing him. He suggested he would file a lawsuit against the city, called out members of the media he felt had been unfair to him and stressed that he loved the people of Cincinnati.

The dismissal, the subsequent tumult and City Hall and the fact that Cincinnati is once again searching for a new police chief — its third in four years — all made national headlines.

An interesting side note: While considering the until-yesterday unseen evidence against Blackwell, it’s informative to remember past struggles CPD has had with leadership. Here are some articles about former chief Thomas Streicher from back in 2009, published in your favorite Cincinnati weekly. Streicher, who it seems ruled CPD with a harsh, sometimes arbitrary fist, was never removed from his post but instead retired in 2011.

• Phew. So that happened. What else is going on? Well, the New York Times Magazine apparently thinks the University of Cincinnati’s campus is pretty enough to feature it in a big photo essay, highlighting a number of the uptown campus’ buildings designed by famous architects. The photo feature’s title — Cincinnati Starchitecture — is cringe-worthy, but the photos are pretty nice. EDIT: In my morning haziness and rush to give you all the news stuff, I missed this much more substantive article about UC's efforts to build top-notch architecture in a bid to compete for students that, uh, ran with the above photo essay. Oops. My bad. That's much better, New York Times.

• Here we go again: Is House Speaker and West Chesterite John Boehner on his way out as the top dog in the House of Representatives? Rep. Mark Meadows, a Republican from North Carolina, has once again fired warning shots over Boehner’s bow, saying that the speaker’s position on a number of issues could trigger a revolt from conservatives in the House. Earlier this summer, Meadows introduced a measure in the House that hammered Boehner on his leadership and, if voted through, would strip him of his position. That measure hasn’t been taken up for a vote, but there are methods by which conservative members of the House could take it up, Meadows recently said, noting that he and other far-right conservatives are watching the speaker closely.

• Cincinnati activists and legal experts are in Ferguson, Mo. offering advice and warnings as a commission wraps up a report on last year’s civil unrest over the police killing of unarmed 18-year-old Mike Brown there. Community activists Iris Roley and Pastor Damon Lynch III, as well as attorney Al Gerhardstein, were all instrumental in pushing for Cincinnati’s collaborative agreement, which arose from similar unrest here following the 2001 police shooting of an unarmed black man named Timothy Thomas. The three addressed the Ferguson Commission, which is set to release a report with recommendations for ways to improve law enforcement oversight and police-community relations. The group admonished the commission to actively and tirelessly work on the issue, instead of just publishing their report and moving on. You can read more about their advice to Ferguson here.

• Finally, Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton is in Columbus today making a campaign appearance at a “Women for Hillary” organizing event. She’ll focus on issues facing women at that event, including the pay gap, reproductive rights, parental leave and other issues. Clinton is seen as the frontrunner in the Democratic primary, though self-professed socialist Vermont U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders has been gaining in the polls, drawing big crowds to rallies around the country. Clinton thus far has been hobbled by questions around her use of a private email address during her tenure as U.S. Secretary of State. She recently addressed that controversy, apologizing for her use of a separate email address to conduct official government business but maintaining that she did not break any laws while doing so.

That’s it for me. Find me on Twitter or shoot me an email with news tips, bad jokes or suggestions for cool fall road trips.

 
 

 

 

 
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