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by Brian Baker 12.10.2015
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, New Releases, Music Video at 04:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
keys_parks

Locals and Legends

Latest projects from Cincinnati-area acts Warsaw Falcons and To No End feature icons

David Rhodes Brown's Warsaw Falcons and Nick Dellaposta's To No End could not possibly be any further from each other on the musical continuum. 

The Falcons, recently reborn with the classic lineup of Brown on guitar/vocals, the thunderous John Schmidt on bass and the irrepressible Doug Waggoner on drums, are Rockabilly personified, heavy on the Rock and hypercaffeinated to the point of heart palpitations. 


At the other end of the spectrum, Dellaposta's To No End is a Prog-tinted Blues unit with a propensity for lilting atmospherics and visceral Pop/Hard Rock anthemics.


Oddly enough, both bands are touting new releases, and each one is, in different ways, associated with a legendary entertainment figure. The Warsaw Falcons' new EP, Warsaw Falcons Live with Bobby Keys, features the work of the saxophonist sharing the title, one of Rock's most travelled and compelling sidemen who boasted near-membership with The Rolling Stones and sessions with Joe Cocker, Eric Clapton, Carly Simon and three of the four Beatles, among many others. 


To No End's new video for the track "Twisted Knives" from its third album, Remora, features the on-screen talents of Michael Parks, one of Hollywood's most versatile and durable actors whose television credits include Then Came Bronson in the late '60s and Twin Peaks in the '90s, and who has since become part of Quentin Tarentino's ensemble of reliable players.


The Warsaw Falcons' latest archive release is a five-song excerpt from a live recording done at Top Cat's in Clifton in the very early '90s. Keys, already a fixture in the industry (his iconic blowing was all over the Stones' Sticky Fingers, one of Rock's acknowledged masterworks), had played with Brown in Nashville and had become a semi-official member of the Falcons, eventually guesting on their 2003 album Right It on the Rock Wall.


At the time of the Top Cat's gig, Brown had just returned to Cincinnati to care for aging mother, and had reassembled the Falcons for occasional in-town performances. Bassist John Schmidt reclaimed his spot with the band, while guitarist George Cunningham and drummer Maxwell Schauf rounded out the quartet.


For the Top Cat's recording, the Falcons blew through a jumped-up set of band faves with Keys, visiting from Nashville to lend his towering sax fills. Although there was a good deal more material delivered at the Top Cat's set, the five tracks on the EP represent the songs where Keys was most directly and completely spotlighted. And Live with Bobby Keys might well stand as the most incendiary and pulse pounding 22-and-a-half minutes released this year.


The release starts with the rafter-rattling thrash of "Jello Sal," a five-minute Rockabilly workout featuring Brown's distinctive vocal rasp and his and Cunningham's slinky yet muscular guitar gyrations, grounded by Schmidt's bedrock solid bass and Schauf's technicolor timekeeping. On the EP’s second track, "Sometimes," Keys intros the song by thanking the Falcons for inviting him to the gig and pledging his admiration for Cincinnati and its desire to Rock and Roll. 


"That's what we do," Keys declares in his authentic Texas accent. "Rock and roll!" 


What follows is the Falcons' version of a ballad, a slow-cooking slab of meaty, bluesy Rock that gives way to its primal impulses and howls with blood-boiling intensity, even as the band maintains an almost laconic pace. Brown and the Falcons mix a jaunty Blues stroll with an effervescent Chuck Berry bounce on "You Can't Do That to Me," switching to spy-theme noir for the insistently smoky and sultry "Two Cigarettes in the Dark" and finishing with a pulsating version of Mitch Ryder and the Detroit Wheels' classic cover of the Righteous Brothers' "Little Latin Lupe Lu," with Brown doing his best hip-twitching, lip-hitching impression of Elvis while the band kicks up its heels and swings with deliberate abandon.


Through it all, Keys — who passed away last year at age 70 — does what he always did best; find the emotional heart of the songs and then play the living hell out of them. Keys had the intuitive gift to know when to serve as a brilliant supporting accompanist or elevate his position to an equal partnership in the arrangement, as evidenced by his call and response lick-trading on "Jello Sal." Brown says there may be more recordings of Keys in the Falcons' extensive and as-yet largely unplumbed archive. Based on the results of Live with Bobby Keys, which was officially be released at a Thanksgiving Eve extravaganza at the Southgate House Revival, we can only hope there's a lot more.


Meanwhile, To No End's new release, Remora, the band's third album since forming in 2012, is not only musically dichotomous from the Falcons' EP, it's quantitatively different as well, with an additional 11 tracks over two discs. But, as noted, the one area where the two bands intersect is in their use of a celebrity guest to enhance their presentation. 


With TNE, it's the presence of famed actor Michael Parks in the band's video for "Twisted Knives." TNE frontman Nick Dellaposta secured Parks' services for the video through Dellaposta's lifelong friend Josh Roush, whose journey is the subject of "Twisted Knives," perhaps the most personal and deliberately direct song he's ever written. 


A decade ago, Roush departed Ohio for Los Angeles, where he has worked in the film industry in various capacities, which led to a position last year on the set of director Kevin Smith's horror film Tusk. During production, Roush met and became friends with Parks, who had a role in Tusk. When Dellaposta invited Roush to partner up to produce the "Twisted Knives" video (the two had worked together on TNE's first video, "Somethin' Wrong with You"), the pair decided to ask Parks if he would be interested in appearing the video, which is largely made up of eerie atmospheric footage that Roush has shot himself over the years.



As for the rest of Remora, Dellaposta takes To No End further down the similar path he and the band explored on last year's excellent Peril & Paracosm, which blended the Kenny Wayne Shepherd-meets-Warren Haynes

Blues direction of the band’s debut with a blistering ’70s Hard Rock energy. In addition, Dellaposta has divided Remora into a pair of 30-plus-minute sides that are stylistically distinct. The harder Side A is subtitled “The Underworld,” while the gentler and more contemplative Side B is themed “The Great Unknown.”


“The Underworld” songs clearly follow Peril & Paracosm's general blueprint, with Dellaposta and guitarist Grant Evans soaring and scorching with the intensity and focus of '70s guitar heroes like UFO's Michael Schenker and Budgie's Tony Bourge, polished to a contemporary but never overproduced shimmer. The opener and ostensible title track, "The Afterlife II (The Underworld)," is a perfect example of Dellaposta's modern Blues/Hard Rock translation, a riff-laden celebration of the forms painted with a new brush. The guitars careen and howl while the rhythm section of bassist Eli Booth and drummer David Nester provide a sturdy but flexible foundation for the song's shifty mood swing between jaunty minor key melodicism and darkly menacing wordplay. 


Elsewhere, "Shatter" starts out with the reflective quiet of an O.A.R./Red Wanting Blue ballad but becomes more forceful and expansive as the song unfolds. "Everybody Talks" offers an indiosyncratic New Wave clockwork guitar motif that displays an interesting new songwriting wrinkle for TNE, while "Like Hell" and "Play That Card" show that Dellaposta's heart will never stray too far away from his KWS/Gov't Mule roots — even if they come out in fascinatingly different ways.


Remora's second "side," “The Great Unknown,” dials down the volume but not the songwriting intensity. Two songs from “The Underworld,” "Twisted Knives" and "Trash Day," are reprised on the second disc, with "Twisted Knives II" presented in an almost Folk/Americana light. "Trash Day" is similarly counterpointed between the pummeling Zeppelinesque boogie of “The Underworld” version and the lilting yet still powerful take of "Trash Day II.” And for sheer beauty, look no further than the acoustic heart-tug of "Hinterland Empire," a gorgeous evocation of The Beatles' classic "Blackbird."


While Remora's 16 songs would have fit comfortably onto a single CD, Dellaposta was clearly more interested in thematic continuity than production costs. Rather than interspersing Remora's more sedate songs with its amped-up fist-pumping anthems, Dellaposta and To No End show two different sides of themselves to suit your listening moods, further proof of his thoughtful creativity and amazing talent.


Warsaw Falcons’ Warsaw Falcons Live with Bobby Keys is currently only available at live shows (look for copies in brick-and-mortar, local-friendly record shops soon). Click here and here for show updates and more.


For more on To No End, click here. Remora is available on iTunes, Amazon and Google Play. Click here and here for more on the album and the band.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.10.2015
Posted In: News at 03:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ghiz

Judge's Radio Show Comments Prompt New Hearing

Court says Judge Leslie Ghiz made inaccurate assertions about manslaughter case during appearance on 700 WLW

A Hamilton County Appeals Court has ordered a new hearing for a man convicted in the death of his girlfriend’s 1-year-old child. That order comes after Hamilton County Court Common Pleas Judge Leslie Ghiz made critical statements on a radio station the day after she sentenced the defendant last year.

Hamilton County Court Judge Peter J. Stautberg, writing on Wednesday to order the hearing for Daniel Hamberg, pointed out that Ghiz was in error when she claimed Hamberg had admitted to beating 13-month-old Cohen Barber and might have been biased against the defendant when she handed down his 11-year prison sentence and $20,000 fine.

“The trial court’s remarks at the sentencing hearing and on the radio show made plain that the court imposed the maximum prison sentence based not on the sentencing purposes and factors, but on its disregard for the opinions of the defense’s experts and the unfounded belief that the victim’s death had resulted from an intentional '“beat[ing],' ” Stautberg wrote.

Hamberg received the sentence from Ghiz last April after taking a plea deal on involuntary manslaughter charges for his role in Cohen Barber’s death in 2012. Hamberg says the child fell down the stairs and hit his head. Prosecuting attorneys in his trial last year, however, alleged Hamberg shook or beat Barber. Prosecutors initially sought murder, aggravated murder, felonious assault and endangering children charges for the defendant, but later offered the plea deal, citing difficulty in getting murder convictions in cases like Hamberg’s from juries who don’t want to believe an adult would kill a child.

Heather Noonan, the child’s mother, told authorities that Barber would often jump down the small stairset into the arms of waiting adults. Noonan’s family would later call for Hamberg’s conviction on murder charges, however.

While prosecutors said they had experts ready to testify that Barber was shaken, several medical experts for the defense testified that the child’s death was brought about by a single blow to the back of the head and subsequent swelling and seizures, not from a series of blows or shaking. That evidence seemed to back up Hamberg’s assertions that while he might have been negligent in looking after the child, he did not strike or shake him.

Hamberg is a veteran of the Marines disabled by injuries he sustained while serving in Afghanistan.

During his sentencing, Ghiz blasted Hamberg for killing the child, then said on the air with 700 WLW's Bill Cunningham the next day that the child’s death “came from a number of different things, but they can’t pinpoint exactly what it was… a lot of people know that as shaken baby syndrome. I don’t know that that was the case here. I think the kid was just beat.”

Ghiz also asserted that, “He admitted to it. I don’t care if he had been president of the United States, he’s perfectly capable of behaving in an appropriate manner, and beating a child and admitting to beating that child, and pleading to that is not OK.”

The judge, who is a former Cincinnati City Council member, also shrugged off expert testimony that seems to back up Hamberg’s side of the story, saying that “you can get an expert to say anything.”

Ghiz handed down the maximum sentence, 11 years in prison, which Hamberg is currently serving. His attorneys appealed that sentence after Ghiz’s remarks, and now Hamberg will receive a new hearing regarding his sentence by another judge.

Stautberg was joined by Hamilton County Judge Sylvia Hendon in his call for a new trial. Judge Patrick DeWine dissented, citing procedural concerns he had with the court’s decision.

 
 
by Tony Johnson 12.10.2015
at 11:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Spoonful of Cinema: Room

Irish-born director Lenny Abrahamson last charmed us with the post-modern indie drama Frank. It was a film about finding harmony and friendship — rather low stakes compared to his newest film. The 49-year-old director is hitting us where it hurts in latest effort, Room, a tense indie drama with its fair share of thrills that plays off of a screenplay from Emma Donoghue based on her novel of the same name. Abrahamson boldly and unapologetically drops us into Donoghue’s world. It’s a small shed inhabited by a mother, Joy (Brie Larson), and her 5-year-old son, Jack (Jacob Tremblay). Held against their will by a caretaking yet maniacal captor, the room that they inhabit comes to be their physical world. But what is even more intriguing is the son’s understanding of the world that he has never been exposed to.

Jack hasn’t formed his beliefs based on his own observations. His mother has taught him that the room they inhabit is “Room” — what seems to be perceived by Jack as a separate dimension from the world in the same way that the world would be considered a separate dimension from Heaven or Hell. This makes plans for breaking out exceedingly troublesome when Jack’s mother is forced to use her son as the main piece of her escape plan. How do you explain to a 5-year-old when to jump out of a truck, where to run or how to get help when the boy has never even seen the light of day?

When they finally escape and are thrust into reality, neither of them is prepared for it. But both of them are caught in shock for different reasons. Joy must face the fallout from her parent’s divorce, an unwanted celebrity status when her story that becomes sensationalized by a ruthless mass media and the reclamation of a life once lost. Jack is thrust into a world he once thought uninhabitable. It shakes the foundation of his entire perspective, and the unraveling of his mother only makes things more difficult for everyone involved.

Led by Brie Olsen and Jacob Tremblay’s mother-and-son chemistry, the film unfolds at a pace and with a grace that is sorely lacking from too many pictures. The movie hardly drags for a second. Every detail of every conversation warrants something to consider beyond what we hear and see. As we come to witness Joy and Jack’s re-entry into the world as we know it, they must grapple with a loss of every sense of familiarity, having spent the last five years captive in their room. Joy and Jack are the only link each one of them has to a painful past.

Room signifies the beginning of what will be an onslaught of artsy independent films taking trips during awards season. As of this morning it’s garnered three Golden Globe nominations: Best Motion Picture – Drama, Best Actress – Motion Picture Drama (Larson) and Best Screenplay. From an industry perspective, I imagine it will have a similar role as Whiplash did for 2014’s movie season. It has an up-and-coming director like Whiplash’s Damien Chazelle. They share the quality of leading millennial festival darlings in Brie Larson and Miles Teller. And both of them had low figures at the box office — Whiplash brought in less than $15 million, while Room hasn’t even broken $4 million (this will change if it comes to be nominated for an Academy Award, as most distributers will re-release a film as did Whiplash’s Sony Spotlight partners when awards-hype sets in).

Ultimately, I don’t expect that Room has any sort of chance to do serious damage during awards season, but I can’t imagine a scenario where Brie Larson doesn’t bring home some sort of hardware for her efforts. She is absolutely stunning at every turn of the nearly-two-hour story. If someone beats her to the Oscar or Globe for Best Actress, it will be difficult to imagine someone being a clear favorite to win beforehand. It is impossible to take our eyes off of her every move in Room.

Larson likely finds herself now at a moment in her career that may soon take her places in the realm of Jennifer Lawrence, Mia Wasikowska, and Rooney Mara as some of the most discussed, beloved and talented Hollywood actresses of their generation. The emotional toll on Larson of portraying Joy in Room could only be imagined for anyone outside of the production process, but I can at least imagine that it will change the way Larson carries herself. Building off of her work in the heart-wrenching Short Term 12, Larson is no longer most notable for her shy-gal cuteness in 21 Jump Street.

Rather, she has grown into more mature material with a vastly daring emotional breadth. She has gained and exhibited whatever it is that makes an actress into a star, a character into a friend and a girl into a woman. Brie Larson — not unlike Joy — has seemingly grown up suddenly and without so much as a flinch. She still carries brightness about her, but now there is something more to illuminate. Brie Larson is no longer just a good actress. She is a rare talent worthy of our acknowledgment, our awe, and our admiration. Get to the Esquire before you miss her in Room.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.10.2015
Posted In: News at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sherrod brown

Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar funding again in question; city names Isaac new permanent police chief; Sen. Brown calls Ohio lawmakers "lunatics" for gun bill

Hey Cincy! Here’s the news today.

Happy holidays. If you like political drama, then the city’s streetcar is the gift that keeps on giving. The latest dustup comes over Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black’s memo to Mayor John Cranley and City Council late last week that questions whether the $4.2 million operating plan Council passed earlier this year will provide sufficient funds to run the streetcar. According to an not-yet-complete independent audit cited by Black, that plan could fall as much as $1.5 million short of the money needed to keep the 3.6-mile loop transit project running. That shortfall counts a $9 million overall financial pledge from The Haile/U.S. Bank Foundation to help fund operations of the streetcar in its first few years. The alarm comes from new independent projections about the operating costs and income of the streetcar when it starts running next year. The results of that audit have yet to be revealed, but preliminary numbers suggest the project might run between $750,000 to $1.5 million over budget. Hopefully, city officials, council members and media will wait until the full audit comes in before they start more interminable bickering about this shit. Oh, wait, too late.

• Cincinnati yesterday became the first city in the country to pass a ban on so-called conversion therapy, an often religiously based practice that attempts to turn LGBT people, often minors, straight. The legislation comes a year after transgender teen Leelah Alcorn committed suicide following bullying. Alcorn's parents took her to conversion therapy for a time. You can read more about the new legislation in our story published yesterday.

• The city today swore in its new police chief following the firing of Chief Jeffrey Blackwell earlier this year. Their pick? Interim police chief Eliot Isaac, who has been the only named candidate in the search for a new permanent head to the police department. City officials promised a national search for a new CPD leader following Blackwell’s ouster, though some have questioned whether that search was thorough enough and whether Isaac was intended to be the city’s pick the whole time. Yesterday, City Council wrangled over raising the pay grade for the police chief to $180,000 a year, which proponents said was a key bargaining chip in keeping Isaac chief on a permanent basis. Council ultimately passed a pay raise for the position, but Democrat Council members Yvette Simpson, P.G. Sittenfeld, Wendell Young and Chris Seelbach balked at the raise, saying the city needs to focus on better pay for its rank-and-file workers.

• According to personal finance website Wallethub.com, which regularly cranks out interesting factoids about cities, Cincinnati is the eighth-best place in the country to celebrate New Year's Eve. That’s kind of a strange ranking to me, since New Year's is all about the parties you go to, and parties are all about who you know at them. But Wallethub found other ways to quantify the quality of New Year's Eve festivities, including price of NYE party tickets, forecasted precipitation, legality of fireworks and other metrics. Cincy came out pretty well all things being equal — just behind Portland, Ore. and just ahead of Las Vegas somehow. So if you have great friends in every major American city (or the money to fly 100 of your nearest and dearest to any of them), or, hell, if you don’t have any friends at all, this ranking should give you a great idea of where to go.

• A week or so ago, we told you about a bill the Ohio General Assembly is considering that would allow concealed carry permit holders to bring their guns into day care centers, college campuses and private airplanes, among other places. Now U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, who represents Ohio, is making news with his reaction to that bill. The Democrat says Ohio lawmakers are “lunatics” for considering such a law, citing mass shootings as among the reasons he thinks the bill is a bad idea. One funny thing to emerge from the debate: Concealed weapons will still be forbidden at the State House. Republican lawmakers call that an oversight. They also say Brown should learn more about the 2nd Amendment before calling them crazy. And on and on the gun debate goes.

• Finally, here’s a bummer bit of information. For the first time in decades, Americans who are considered “middle class” are not a majority of the country’s population, according to a new study by the Pew Research Center. Pew’s data shows America’s middle class is receding quickly, now making up about 50 percent of the total population, a drop from 54 percent in 2001. Meanwhile, the ranks of the low-income and high-income are swelling, demonstrating the widening income gap in America. What’s more, an increasing amount of the earnings in America are heading toward that upper income group. In 1970, 62 percent of earnings went to the middle class. These days, it’s more like 43 percent. At the same time, high-income households are now taking home 49 percent of America’s aggregate income these days, up from 29 percent at the dawn of the 1970s. Pew considers “middle income” to be between 67 percent and 200 percent of America’s median household income, or between about $42,000 and $126,000 last year for a family of three.

I’m out. Later all.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.09.2015
Posted In: News at 10:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Will streetcar get later hours?; city won't hand over MSD operations to county; Ohio GOP leaders say they would stand behind Trump if nominated

Hello all! Let’s talk about news today.

Let’s play a rousing game of “would you rather” shall we? As in, would you rather take the upcoming Over-the-Rhine/downtown streetcar late at night when you’ve got your swerve on from your sixth OTR-brewed high-ABV craft beer, or early the next morning when you’re hungover and on the way to work? The good news: You might be able to do both. Cincinnati City Council’s transportation committee yesterday asked the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority to study whether it would be feasible to run the streetcar later than the initially proposed 10 p.m. weekday and 12 a.m. weekend cutoffs. Some businesses in OTR, as well as Mayor John Cranley, would like to see the cars run later Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights to capture the weekend bar crowd. But Cranley also suggested the cars start running at 7:30 a.m., a time many streetcar supporters say is too late to capture early-morning commuters. Other plans put forth by SORTA would start operations at 7 or even 6:30 a.m., which streetcar boosters like more. A 7:30 a.m. start time would make Cincy’s system the latest-starting of all the modern streetcar systems around the U.S., supporters of earlier times say.

• A lot happened in Cincinnati’s startup scene over the past year, including big successes by minority entrepreneur support program Mortar, lots of activity from individual grant-giving philanthropy People’s Liberty, a big expansion by startup incubator The Brandery and more. All told, a ton of things happened in Cincy's entrepreneur-centered startup economy, and you can check out a whole year-in-review piece here.

• Amid rate hikes and investigations into possible mismanagement, will Hamilton County take over operations of the Metropolitan Sewer District, which is currently run by the city of Cincinnati? Not so fast, city officials say. Mayor Cranley and members of Cincinnati City Council have warned the county that they’re not ready to hand over the reigns just yet, and while they’re open to discussions about challenges MSD is facing, they’re in no mood to cede control of the enormous operation. Last month, county commissioners sent a letter to city officials proposing a new arrangement in which the county would take over management of MSD, citing price increases for ratepayers and allegations that the sewer district is being mismanaged. But the city says those allegations are baseless. Currently, the county owns much of MSD and the city runs the sewer system, per a 1968 agreement. Much of the current strife over the MSD stems from a federal court-ordered $1 billion overhaul of the sewer system.

• It’s a rough week to be into sweets, right? First, Kroger recalled some of its brownies yesterday on the worst possible day of the year, National Brownie Day (yes that’s apparently a thing). The retailer is pulling the brownies because they might contain walnuts, even though that isn't mentioned in any allergy warning labels. And this morning, the OTR location of Holtman’s Donuts had a kitchen fire that will shutter the location for an indeterminate amount of time. This is the most upset I’ve been about baked goods since that truck ran into Servatti last year.

• Ohio lawmakers are considering a bill that would ban charter schools from using public money to advertise themselves. Democrats in the Ohio Senate are pushing the legislation because they say public schools aren't allowed to use taxpayer funds to promote themselves to parents of potential students or to take political stands on issues, but that privately run but publicly funded charter schools do so all the time. The bill wouldn't prohibit those schools from using donated money or other non-public funds to advertise.

• The Butler County GOP failed to settle on an endorsement for any of the candidates vying to replace former House Speaker John Boehner in Congress. Boehner is retiring after a two-decade run in the House, mostly due to strife within the GOP between tea party conservatives and more establishment-allied Republicans. Butler County makes up a big part of Boehner’s former 8th Congressional District, and an endorsement from the county GOP could have been a big win for a candidate looking to take the party’s nomination in the upcoming special primary election. The district, which encompasses many suburban areas north of Cincinnati, is heavily 
Republican, meaning that Boehner’s successor will almost certainly be decided in the GOP primary. Who that will be, however — and whether they will be allied with the more establishment wing of the GOP or a tea party insurgent — is still very much up in the air.

• Speaking of the GOP, the fight for the party’s presidential nomination has been a non-stop circus lately, and it’s mostly thanks to one man. Yes, yes, this is another blurb about Donald Trump. The real estate mogul’s comments earlier this week suggesting the U.S. prohibit any Muslims from entering the country caused a huge outcry, drawing condemnation even from many staunch conservatives.

Despite that, however, bigwigs in the Ohio Republican party say they would stand behind Trump should he win the nomination. At least one big local party name has diverged from that trend, however: Outgoing Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann, who has said that the party needs to distance itself from Trump's rhetoric. Presumably, other party leaders are still under the assumption that there is no way Trump, who has been the GOP frontrunner for months now, can actually win the nomination and that an establishment candidate like Marco Rubio will start surging in the polls any day now. Trump has been surpassed in some polls in the GOP’s first primary state, Iowa. Unfortunately for the GOP establishment, he’s been passed up by a candidate many hate just as much: Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, who has continually helped goad tea party Republican representatives into defiance of party leadership in the House.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 12.08.2015
Posted In: News at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
newyork_donaldtrump-wikicommons

Morning News and Stuff

Parks Department under fire again; Boone County Sheriff calls on residents to carry guns; Trump calls on U.S. to ban Muslims in wake of shootings

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines. 


• Cincinnati Parks Director Willie Carden is under fire again. This time for messing with one of a reporter's all time favorite things: public records. Carden recently changed the retention schedule, a listing of public records available in the Parks Department for public use, without state or local approval prompting questions from State Auditor Dave Yost. But strangely enough, Carden appears to be unsure of what the retention schedule even is. The Enquirer reports when they asked him something about it while covering election issues, he responded that he didn't know what it was, and that it wasn't part of his administration. An attorney for the City Hall issued a statement saying the whole thing was a misunderstanding by the department's staff, who didn't know they needed approval prior to changing the schedule. The Parks Department has been under scrutiny in the past few months for top officials' pay and campaign donations brought on by Mayor John Cranley's election push for a parks tax levy, which failed at the polls.  


 Cincinnati may get a new police chief by the end of this year, and it looks like he already might be getting a raise. City Council voted in committee yesterday to increase the top salary for police and fire chiefs to $165,000 a year. Former police chief Jeffrey Blackwell was making $135,000 a year when he was fired last September. The only candidate for the position is currently interim chief Eliot Isaac, who has hired Democratic Party Chair Tim Burke to negotiate his salary. City Manager Harry Black has said he hopes to have a new chief in place by the end of this year. 


 The recent mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif., the 355th in the country this year, has reignited the heated debate on gun control. While many have demanded further restrictions on guns, Boone County Sheriff Michael Helmig posted a message on his Facebook page requesting that those with conceal and carry permits carry their weapons for the safety of themselves and others. He called on his fellow Kentuckians to uphold the second amendment and protect the country from foreign and domestic terrorism. 


• Several Greater Cincinnati school districts have made Niche's list of top school districts. The San Francisco-based start-up that uses data to rank schools put Indian Hill Exempted Village School District as ninth on its list of the 100 best school districts in the U.S. Also making an appearance is Sycamore Community School District at no. 66, Wyoming City School District at no. 69, Mason City School District at no. 79 and Mariemont City School District at no. 93. To see the list for yourself and an explanation of their methodology, or to guess my own home school district, which is somewhere on the list, but is far from Ohio, click here


• Cincinnati's also made a list of one of the fastest growing areas for the creative classes. The Atlantic's CityLab found Cincinnati has a 21 percent growth in the creative class from 2000 to 2014. It's nestled comfortably between Salt Lake City and Charlotte. The post also has more fun maps and facts and figures so check it out. 


• The Trump-Kasich war of 2015 continues. Gov. and GOP presidential candidate John Kasich has recently taken on the strategy of attacking fellow headline-grabbing GOP candidate and real estate tycoon Donald Trump. In response, Trump has released a 15 second video on Instagram that combines a speech given by Kasich with the sound of crickets while Trump is shown speaking to a roaring crowd, leaving just one obvious question for viewers: When will these two grow up? 


• Trump has again succeeded in making headlines for another extreme, ill-informed statement. Yesterday, Trump called on the nation's leaders to ban all Muslims from entering the U.S. until authorities have figured out exactly what happened in the Dec. 2, San Bernardino, Calif. shooting that left 14 dead at a social services center by two Islamic extremists. Trump's comments, unsurprisingly, have been met with criticism across the country from many including Rick Kriseman, the mayor of St. Petersburg, Fla., who tweeted Monday night that he was banning Trump from his city until "we understand the dangerous threat posed by all Trumps."


Email me at nkrebs@citybeat.com for story tips, questions, comments or concerns.

 
 
by Kerry Skiff 12.07.2015
Posted In: Literary, Movies, Film at 11:18 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
covington library

Beyond the Books

Movie screening at Kenton County Public Library's main branch

While this time of year is the season to go out and explore various holiday happenings, sometimes it’s nice to have a quiet movie night. As a seasoned college student, some of my favorite times with friends are the nights we hole up in bed and watch a Disney film. So when I saw that the Kenton County Public Library’s main branch was hosting a free movie screening last Tuesday, I found myself venturing to Covington for the event. The screening was of the 1993 film, And the Band Played On, a docu-drama depicting the beginnings of the AIDS virus in America. The screening was held on Dec. 1, World AIDS Day, as a way to spread education and awareness of the virus.

My first worry was about walking in a few minutes late, but that concern was quickly doused when I entered the large but empty room. The film had already been started and was running through the beginning credits at the front, where dozens of vacant chairs sat in rows facing the screen. As there was no one in the audience to protest, I settled down, taking up more than my fair share of seats as I cozy. After about an hour, I looked around and noticed that I was still alone, a fact I attributed to the cold and rainy weather of the day.

The film itself was an interesting depiction of how the U.S. medical and political communities first handled the virus, especially in the wake of a changing presidential administration and the changing dynamics of the gay community at the time.

“This is the third year we have screened this film,” says Gary Pilkington, Adult Program Coordinator for the Kenton County Public Library. “At previous screenings, most people enjoyed the film. They don’t usually think about AIDS very much in their day-to-day lives, so this helped to re-focus their awareness.”

According to Pilkington, it’s important to host events that bring attention to health concerns in the community. “We chose to screen And the Band Played On … to help the community understand that HIV and AIDS haven’t disappeared,” he says. “Most people don’t think twice about it unless a major celebrity reveals they have it or are HIV-positive … It has reached the point where it isn’t in the public consciousness as much as it had been, yet it is still a real threat to health.”

I learned a lot about AIDS from the film, since most of my prior knowledge had been brief training on how to safely avoid contracting HIV and AIDS from the lifeguard training I received years ago. While I personally enjoyed the film, it was disappointing to see that no one else took advantage of the free screening, but perhaps with better weather and more awareness the next showing will be packed.

Find this event interesting? Check out similar events at the Kenton County Public Library:
Star Wars Bash: The Force Awakens at the library with themed crafts, food and a costume contest.
Film Friday Matinee: Come to the library for a showing of Far From the Madding Crowd.
Classic Movie Matinee: Join the crowd for a special showing of holiday film Christmas in Connecticut.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.07.2015
Posted In: News at 10:03 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pride_leelahalcornvigil_jf2

Morning News and Stuff

Metro, rail transportation could see boost from transit legislation; NAACP severs ties with COAST; Seelbach proposes conversion therapy ban

Good morning all. Hope you had a great weekend and are quickly chipping away your holiday shopping duties. I… have barely even started, unfortunately. Anyway, here’s the news today.

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority could see a boost from a new federal transportation spending package. The five-year, $305 billion transit spending bill is expected to clear Congress and be signed by President Barack Obama as soon as this week, and it could mean up to $20 million more a year for Ohio’s transit agencies. In addition, agencies will be able to apply for access to a pot of extra money totaling up to $300 million a year specifically aimed at improving bus service. Metro hopes to compete for some of that cash as it looks to improve service over the coming years. A report released last month found that current bus service only connects riders to about 40 percent of jobs in the city.

• Tucked away in that same transit bill might be more money for rail travel as well, which could be a great thing for an effort to bring daily rail service between the Queen City and Chicago. The local chapter of transit advocacy group All Aboard Ohio has been working hard to expand that service along Amtrak’s Cardinal Line, which currently runs trains between here and the Windy City three times a week. Those trains leave Union Terminal in the middle of the night, however, and aren’t seen as a practical transit option for many in the city. The total amount in the bill set aside to revive old train routes or expand existing ones is only $20 million for the whole country; an amount experts say won’t get Cincinnati to the finish line by itself. Though All Aboard Ohio estimates expansion of the existing Cardinal Line would only cost about $2 million, our region will have to vie with some strong contenders for the a very small pot of money. Still, transit advocates say, the increased funding is a start.

• Cincinnati City Councilman Chris Seelbach will introduce legislation designed to ban so-called conversion therapy, he has announced. The Christian-based therapy seeks to “convert” LGBT people, often youth, to heterosexual preferences. Transgender teen Leelah Alcorn, who committed suicide last year after she was bullied for her status, was enrolled in the therapy after coming out to her parents. Seelbach's proposed law would fine therapists in the city administering conversion therapy $200 a day. Cincinnati would be the first city in the country to have such a law should council approve the legislation.

• Cincinnati’s chapter of the NAACP elected new leadership last week after a year of controversy and political wrangling, and incoming officials say they’re going to bring the civil rights organization back to its roots. Robert Richardson Sr., president-elect of the Cincinnati NAACP, has announced the organization representing black Cincinnatians is severing its ties with the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes, a conservative group the local chapter often allied with under former NAACP president and now-Cincinnati City Councilman Christopher Smitherman. The change in direction comes after the chapter’s last president, Smitherman ally Ishton Morton, was sued by the civil rights organization’s national office over an allegation that it incorporated as a branch of the NAACP fraudulently and was spending money allocated to the organization without authorization to do so. Richardson says that under his tenure, the Cincinnati NAACP will return its focus to core civil rights issues such as voting access.

• A short, sad note: Local AM talk radio station 1230 WDBZ The Buzz is no more. The station, which served as Cincinnati’s main talk station serving the city’s black community, has been replaced by gospel programing by parent company Radio One. The Buzz was more or less the only station in town airing a number of programs dedicated to exploring and discussing issues within the black community. Talk show host Lincoln Ware, whose show runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., will stay on the air, as will a syndicated program by Al Sharpton, but all other Buzz programming has ceased.

• Ohio Gov. John Kasich has been pulling in the most money of any GOP presidential primary candidate in his home state, but other candidates have more donors giving smaller amounts, according to campaign finance records. Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson led Ohio in terms of number of donors with more than 2,400, followed by U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. But Kasich’s campaign did take home a pretty good amount of cash, raking in more than $2 million from his donors in Ohio. He’s going to need those fat stacks, though. Kasich is still lagging behind in polls, and recent flubs, including a less-than-stellar debate appearance and an abandoned call to create a new government agency to spread Judeo-Christian values, haven’t helped his chances.

• Cincinnati-based Macy’s Department Stores are the subject of a lawsuit out of New York City alleging the store discriminates racially against shoppers there. The lawsuit says the chain takes advantage of a so-called “shopkeeper’s privilege” law which allows stores to hold suspected shoplifters and demand civil penalties without a trial. New York resident Cinthia Carolina Reyes Orelanna filed the suit, saying that in July 2014 she was detained by security employees at a store in New York City and held until she paid a $100 fine. She was then released to the NYPD. Shoplifting charges against her were eventually dismissed. Orelanna’s suit claims that more than 6,000 shoppers were detained in this way by Macy’s stores in New York between October 2012 and October 2013.

And I’m out. Later all.

 
 
by Staff 12.04.2015
at 02:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_redsfestjoeyvotto

Your Weekend To Do List (12/4-12/6)

FRIDAY

SPORTS: REDSFEST

So maybe they came in last in the NL Central last season, but they’re still our Cincinnati Reds, and while they may not win the season, they always win the traditions. Redsfest is the team’s annual winter warm-up, offering fans of all ages a chance to interact with Reds past, present and future with autograph signings, games and other activities. See appearances from the likes of Homer Bailey, Jay Bruce, Todd Frazier, Joey Votto, Marty Brennaman and more, plus play on an indoor baseball field, check out Reds-related booth displays, visit the Hall of Fame and pick up some authentic merchandise. But Redsfest isn’t just about the Reds — it helps sustain the Reds Community Fund, the philanthropic arm of the team, which improves the lives of young people through baseball. 3 p.m.-10:30 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Saturday. $17 single-day pass; $25 two-day pass. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, cincinnati.reds.mlb.com

The Cincinnati Men's Chorus
Photo: David N. Martin
HOLIDAY: SAENGERFEST
Three years ago, Saengerfest — a German tradition that celebrates choir singing groups, or Saengerbunds — returned to Cincinnati after a 60-year hiatus. Although the event was hugely popular after it was established locally in 1849, popularity died down with the rise of the May Festival. Now, Saengerfest is back, and it’s taking over four historical venues patrons can tour while enjoying choral classics: the Christian Moerlein brewery, St. Francis Seraph, the First Lutheran Church and the Over-the-Rhine Community Church. Fourteen choirs, including the Cincinnati Men’s Chorus, the May Festival Youth Chorus, MUSE | Cincinnati’s Women’s Choir and the SCPA Primary Select Choir, will participate. Shuttle buses take concert-goers from venue to venue. 7-11 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $25 per night. christmassaengerfest.com

Trans-Siberian Orchestra
Photo: Provided
HOLIDAY: TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA WINTER TOUR
As part of its annual winter tour, the Trans-Siberian Orchestra is visiting Cincinnati for a musical retelling of a holiday story, recounted in the orchestra’s unique audio-visual way. This year’s performance is “The Ghosts of Christmas Eve,” which follows a young girl who runs away from home and finds herself among the ghosts of an abandoned vaudeville theater. The story includes Christmas classics like “O Come All Ye Faithful,” “Music Box Blues” and “This Christmas Day.” A portion of ticket proceeds benefits Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, Toys for Tots, St. Joseph’s Orphanage and The Music Resource Center. Tickets purchased online come with a digital copy of the orchestra’s recently released studio album. 4 and 8 p.m. Friday. $35.50-$63. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway St., Downtown, usbankarena.com.

Jess Lamb
Photo: Annette Navarro
MUSIC: JESS LAMB
This Friday, Cincinnati-based singer/songwriter Jess Lamb will be putting out a new EP, her first major release since her post-American Idol single, “Memories.” In honor of the release, Lamb is performing a free show Friday at MOTR Pub. Joining Lamb and her band for the 9 p.m. event are Dayton, Ohio’s Moira and Cincinnati’s The Perfect Children.  The EP — titled Free and featuring the tracks “Lovers on the Run” and “Step Out of the Dark”  — marks an expansion of Lamb’s musical approach as she moves into new territories that were only hinted at previously. Dubbed “Industrial Gospel” by Lamb, her new recording is more heavily focused on synths, beats and guitars, which help create an atmospheric sound that’s even darker than her earlier work. Read more about Lamb here. Jess Lamb performs a free show Friday at MOTR Pub. More info: motrpub.com.

Photo: The Cincinnati Zoo
HOLIDAY: FESTIVAL OF LIGHTS
It’s that time of year again — more than 2 million sparkling lights illuminate the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, transforming its exhibits and landscape into an exuberant “Wild Wonderland.” New in 2015 are a Wild Lights Show on Swan Lake and a Frozen-themed area where guests can meet Anna and Elsa. Other festival features include visits with Santa and Mrs. Claus, the Toyland Express Train Ride and a black-light show by Madcap Puppets. Remember to stop by the Holiday Post Office and the newly themed Gingerbread Village, where you can peek through the windows of each house to find the mouse that lives inside. Through Jan. 2. $27 adults; $21 seniors/children. 3400 Vine St., Avondale, 513-281-4700, cincinnatizoo.org

'Irving Berlin's White Christmas'
Photo: Kevin White
HOLIDAY: IRVING BERLIN'S WHITE CHRISTMAS
This holiday tale, full of romance, comedy and choreographed dance routines, is brought from the screen to the stage in 
an all-new Broadway musical. Including classic Berlin songs like “Blue Skies,” and, of course, “White Christmas,” this story follows two war buddies from Florida to Vermont as they plan a fantastic show in the rundown inn of their former general, finding two sweethearts in the process. Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, packed with laughs and some of the best songs in show business, is one of the greatest beginnings to the holiday season. Through Dec. 6. Tickets start at $29. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cincinnatiarts.org


HOLIDAY: CINCIDEUTSCH CHRISTKINDLMARKT

Cincideutsch, Cincinnati’s society for German speakers, hosts its annual Bavarian-inspired Christmas market on Fountain Square. Inspired by the famous holiday markets across Germany, Christkindlmarkt features gifts made by local vendors and artisans, traditional German eats and Glühwein (aka hot spiced wine). Another good excuse to break out the dirndl. Weekends through Dec. 20. Free admission. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com


As You Like It
Photo: Mikki Schaffner

ONSTAGE: AS YOU LIKE IT

Who knew cross-dressing could be such fun? Apparently Shakespeare did. All the actors on the Elizabethan stage were men, so having Rosalind dress as a man while hiding in the Forest of Arden was a kind of double-down trick. While disguised, she finds the forest’s trees covered with love poems about her “real” self. What’s a girl to do? That’s what As You Like It is about. One of Shakespeare’s most popular comedies, it’s a good-natured choice for the holidays. Audience favorite Sara Clark will play Rosalind; she excels with verbal comedy, so be prepared to laugh. Through Dec. 12. $22-$39. Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, 719 Race St., Downtown, 513-381-2273, cincyshakes.com


SATURDAY

Dad Day at Rhinegeist
Photo: Rhinegeist
EVENT: DAD DAY AT RHINEGEIST

Party in plaid with dad at Rhinegeist. The brewery celebrates the release of its seasonal brew Dad — a hoppy holiday ale — with a party featuring commemorative glassware and posters for the first 100 guests. The event is BYOD and BYOP (bring your own dad and bring your own plaid), with a special #DadPlaid photobooth and cozy holiday setting. BTW: Dad comes in a plaid can, which is why Dad Day has a patterned theme, not just because tartan is incredibly festive. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Free. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, rhinegeist.com

'This is Our Youth'
Photo: Xavier University
ONSTAGE: THIS IS OUR YOUTH
Wayward young people working hard to grow up — that’s the big picture for Kenneth Lonergan’s drama about three friends on the cusp of adulthood navigating their lives in 1982 New York, out from under their dysfunctional parents but still making a mess of things in the arenas of friendship and love. In this local production, Ed Stern, longtime producing artistic director at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, directs three Xavier University theater students — Mac Blais, Griff Bludworth and Tatum Hunter. He’s excited to work with actors who are exactly the right age for their roles. Through Sunday. $12-$17. Gallagher Student Center Theater, Xavier University, 3800 Victory Parkway, Evanston, 513-745-3939, xavier.edu/theatre.

Findlay Market
Photo: Holly Rouse
HOLIDAY: HOLIDAY MARKET AT FINDLAY MARKET
Findlay Market’s Holiday Market is a shopping wonderland. Local artisans and craft vendors will bring holiday joy through old-fashioned gifts, food and seasonal drinks. Live holiday music will be provided by Cincinnati choirs and musicians while scavenger hunts and craft beer keep market-goers occupied. There will also be holiday cooking demos, kids activities and a performance from the Children’s Theatre of Cincinnati. And, according to our sources, Santa Claus himself will be making a surprise appearance. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, findlaymarket.org. 

All Childish Things
Provided
ONSTAGE: ALL CHILDISH THINGS
It’s 2006 and two thirtysomething guys still pine for the galactic adventures promised by Star Wars when they were kids. In Joseph Zettelmaier’s 2011 play, one guy lives in his mom’s basement; another has a girlfriend who could care less about The Force. But they’ve concocted a plan for their big break that involves raiding a Norwood warehouse storing collectible Star Wars memorabilia by Kenner Toys. A nefarious character says he’s ready to pay big bucks for their take. Zany shows rooted in childhood have become a holiday staple at Know Theatre, and this is right up that weird, happy alley. Through Dec. 19. $20. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-300-5669, knowtheatre.com.

Waxeater
Photo: facebook.com/waxeater
MUSIC: WAXEATER
Waxeater is full-bore Post Punk/Hardcore with brains, brawn and balls. The band launched its 2010 Sleeper album with a track called “Are Those Fucking Beers Ice Cold Yet?” and devoted its latest, 2013’s Baltimore Record, to songs themed entirely around the HBO series The Wire.  It’s not hard to connect Waxeater to the likes of Shellac, Jesus Lizard (they’re named after a JL song), The Melvins and early Black Sabbath, as the trio grinds gears with abrasive dissonance, but still manages to bristle with some semblance of Grunge-tinted melodicism and a wickedly sharp sense of humor. And as the musicians exhibit the concussive power of a monsoon leveling a grass-hut village in the service of songs that are perfectly obfuscating, it becomes infinitely clear that Waxeater is thinking man’s Punk with scorched-earth appeal. Read more about the band in this week's Sound Advice. Waxeater performs Saturday with Wolverton Brothers and Knife the Symphony at Northside Yacht Club. More info/tickets: northsideyachtclub.com.

'Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie'
Photo: Joe Wardwell
ART: GIMMIE GIMMIE GIMMIE AT THE WESTON ART GALLERY
The Weston Art Gallery hosts an opening reception for Gimmie Gimmie Gimmie, an exhibition organized by artist and sometimes-curator Todd Pavlisko. Gimmie will examine “the varied experience of amassing objects and the practice of collecting” by featuring installation work by artists Antonio Adams and Alfred Steiner, as well as iconic works by world-renowned artists including Vito Acconci, Chris Burden, Ana Mendieta and Adrian Piper. Opening reception: 6-8 p.m. Friday. Through Jan. 17. Free. 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cincinnatiarts.org/weston-art-gallery. 

MainStrasse Village Holiday Event
Photo: Provided 
HOLIDAY: WILLY WAHOO'S WINTER WONDERLAND
This special holiday celebration is part of MainStrasse Village’s series of Christmas events. The animated holiday attraction includes a candy cane forest, ice-skating dogs, photos with Santa and more in Goebel Park. The holiday fun keeps going this weekend with a visit from Saint Nicholas on Sunday — similar to Santa, but much more fond of leaving oranges in socks. He’ll stop by Goosegirl Fountain at 6 p.m. to give treats to good girls and boys. Through Dec. 20. Free. Goebel Park, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org

Photo: Provided
ART: SHOP: CINCINNATI AT BRAZEE
Peruse one-of-a-kind gifts for the holidays (or just because) at C-LINK Gallery’s annual SHOP: Cincinnati exhibition. Beginning Friday, the gallery inside Brazee Street Studios will showcase a treasure trove of handmade items crafted by local artists, including everything from jewelry, ceramics and ornaments to greeting cards, paintings and more. Through Dec. 26. Prices vary. C-LINK Gallery, 4426 Brazee St., Oakley, brazeestreetstudios.com

 
EVENT: BRAXTON BLOCK PARTY
Dec. 5 is Repeal Day (the day Prohibition was repealed), and Braxton Brewing Company is throwing a Braxton Block Party from noon-1 a.m., where they’ll release their first bottled beer in the Heritage Series, Dark Charge, “a massive imperial stout that showcases Kentucky’s heritage: bourbon.” They’ll sell Dark Charge and its variants — Dark Charge Bourbon Barrel-Aged with Starter Coffee, Dark Charge Bourbon Barrel-Aged with Vanilla — in bottles and also have them on tap. Besides the new beers, Braxton will have several local and regional beers on tap, along with food trucks and the band Motherfolk. braxtonbrewing.com.

SUNDAY
Repeal Day Celebration
Photo: Provided
EVENT: REPEAL DAY CELEBRATION
On Dec. 5, 1933, the United States passed the 21st Amendment, effectively repealing Prohibition. Celebrate by getting drunk on Sidecars and Mary Pickfords in Jazz Age costumes at the Metropole at 21c. The restaurant and bar’s Repeal Day Celebration honors the end of Prohibition with 1920s tunes, a burlesque show and classic speakeasy cocktails. Period-inspired costumes encouraged; mustaches provided by Metropole. Special room rates apply for those who don’t want to tipple and drive. 7-11 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, metropoleonwalnut.com.

HOLIDAY: O.F.F. MARKET
Brunch, booze and shopping await at the O.F.F. Market’s winter 2015 event. Vendors, ranging from small businesses and entrepreneurs to farmers and chefs, will sell items specifically geared toward the holiday season. Accompany your perusal with drinks from a full bar that includes local craft brews, mimosas and a special-recipe bloody mary. Brunch, booze and shopping await at the O.F.F. Market’s winter 2015 event. Vendors, ranging from small businesses and entrepreneurs to farmers and chefs, will sell items specifically geared toward the holiday season. Accompany your perusal with drinks from a full bar that includes local craft brews, mimosas and a special-recipe bloody mary.

11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 20th Century Theater, 3021 Madison Road, Oakley, theoffmarket.org


Janet Weiss (left) says Sleater-Kinney reunited because they craved the intensity of the band.
Photo: Brigitte Sire

MUSIC: SLEATER-KINNEY

It seems slightly inaccurate to describe the past decade without the ebullient adrenaline rush of Sleater-Kinney as a hiatus. It implies that the trio’s members — guitarists/vocalists Carrie Brownstein and Corin Tucker and drummer Janet Weiss — have been preoccupied with the scent of long-neglected roses and gazing into heretofore unexplored navels between 2005’s The Woods and this year’s across-the-board-excellent No Cities to Love. Given the artists recent schedules, Sleater-Kinney needed a hiatus from its hiatus. Read a full feature on the band here. Sleater-Kinney plays Bogart’s Sunday. Tickets/more info: bogarts.com.


HOLIDAY: ICE RINK ON FOUNTAIN SQUARE

Fountain Square’s Ice Rink is officially open, offering daily skating and special events all the way through February. Rent a pair of skates on-site and spend the day in the heart of downtown. Open daily. $6 admission; $4 skate rental. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com


Randy Liedtke
Photo: Provided
COMEDY: RANDY LIEDTKE

Randy Liedtke is a Los Angles-based comedian who hails from Oregon. He’s known for obtuse jokes that feature odd turns. “The last few days of my grandmother’s life was spent in a hospice home surrounded by her family,” he tells an audience. “It was getting late at night so we ordered a pizza and the delivery guy shows up to the home and we’re like, ‘Pizza’s here!’ ” But it was at that exact moment his grandmother passed. Liedtke swears this story is true. “How long do you have to wait to eat in that situation? I don’t want to be rude, but we all agreed we were hungry 20 minutes ago.” Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com. 


HOLIDAY: BRICKMAS

Newport on the Levee has partnered with the Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana LEGO Users Group to present BRICKmas. This holiday display is centered around one of the world’s favorite toys, but in large-scale. With more than 13 scenes built out of LEGO bricks — from a life-size Santa head to a Star Wars tribute to giant models of Music Hall, Washington Park and the Roebling Bridge — there’s a bit of everything. Through Jan. 1. $10. Newport on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Newport, Ky., newportonthelevee.com


ART: FIELD GUIDE AT THE CINCINNATI ART MUSEUM

Jochen Lempert, the German photographer whose first major U.S. museum show, Field Guide, is now at the Cincinnati Art Museum, combines the metaphysical with the biological so well that the effect is often magical. Or, I should say, the effect is downright scientific. He’d appreciate that latter term — he’s a trained biologist who turned to art photography in the 1990s. Yet much of his work achieves magic by making something ephemeral concrete and vice versa. This is a show to spend some time with, because the way individual images affect the viewer often depends on the size and placement of the black-and-white prints. And the impact upon our cognitive process of seeing, in close proximity to each other, close-ups of sand (“Etruscan Sand,” a 2009 photogram), “Rain” (a 2003 photograph) and “Crushed Shells” (a 2013 photogram) teaches us as much about ourselves as photography. Read more about the exhibit here. Jochen Lempert’s Field Guide is on display at the CAM until March 6. More info: cincinnatiartmuseum.org.




 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.04.2015
Posted In: COMMUNITY, Culture, Music at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
who

Memorial Marker Unveiled For 1979 Who Concert Tragedy

The cold temperature Thursday night was appropriate for the solemn gathering on the plaza outside the main entrance of U.S. Bank Arena. Since the 30th anniversary of the Dec. 3, 1979 Who concert tragedy — 11 people died in the crush trying to get inside the doors of what was then Riverfront Coliseum — Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation has been having memorial observances with lighting of lanterns outside the site on that date.

At last night’s observance, which drew a sizeable crowd, the organization unveiled the two-sided memorial marker that will now permanently be at the location. It had been a long time in the works.

Before that occurred, Andy Bowes — brother of victim Peter Bowes of Wyoming — gave a speech to the crowd that included reading a statement of support for the memorial from the Who’s longtime manager, Bill Curbishley. Here it is:

“With the laying of the marker in dedication to those that lost their lives at the Riverfront Coliseum, on this day in 1979, I would like to pay tribute from myself and the two surviving members of the Who, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. I can fully understand how difficult it has been for the families who lost a loved one to go forward and attempt to regain their lives. That night will always stay with myself, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. It is a scar from the past and though the wound has healed, the scar is still there to be touched on occasion and felt. The band themselves were not aware of what had happened and were playing on stage when I was informed and saw the devastation on the plaza level. Nothing will erase that memory other than their soft edges.

“It’s with this in mind that I decided not to attend today because I felt it should not be turned into a Who media day or circus. There has to be dignity to this ceremony and the unfolding of the dedication of remembrance. This is not about the Who or their music but it’s about the families involved. Many people suffered as a result of that day and I am sure that many still do. If myself and the band can be of any assistance in the healing process going forward we are there for you.

Love

Bill Curbishley”

Mayor John Cranley, who promised at last year’s observance to dedicate a permanent memorial marker at this one, also gave a brief, moving address. He closed with, “Something happened a long time ago but is still with us. As your mayor, I’m proud to stand with you and say we will never forget.”

The band, itself, posted a short online comment, “Today we remember those 11 Who fans who lost their lives in the crush to enter the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, Ohio. May they rest in peace.”

Incidentally, something that seems to have gone overlooked at the time it occurred here but has continuing resonance and pertinence today can be discovered in a YouTube clip of Pearl Jam playing at U.S. Bank Arena on Oct. 1, 2014.

During that band’s 2000 appearance at a Danish festival, nine fans in the mosh pit died from suffocation. At U.S. Bank Arena, Eddie Veder reminded the crowd about the tragedy outside the arena in 1979 and how the Who “have to go on living with that event that happened 35 years ago. That became something we had to learn about, and they reached out to us when we really needed it.”

Pear Jam then played “The Real Me,” the last song the Who performed in Cincinnati at the December 3, 1979 show. Here’s the clip:


For more background on this new memorial, read my Big Picture column in this week's issue.

 
 

 

 

 
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