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by Nick Swartsell 12.04.2014 118 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Shocker: Boehner says redistricting reform not necessary; Gannett reaches out, gets spurned; Cleveland cop who shot 12-year-old was deemed "unfit" at last police job

Hello all, hope you’re doing well this morning. I’m having a bit of trouble getting started today, maybe due to CityBeat’s Bourbon and Bacon event last night. The party at Newport’s New Riff Distillery (which is amazing, by the way) featured nearly unlimited amounts of bacon-infused items. Bacon is one of my favorite things. I’m also a big fan of whiskey, which was also available in seemingly endless quantities. I’m still recovering.

Anyway, news time.

Usually, we think of the staunch conservatives in our state House of Representatives, bless their souls, as lovers of the smallest government possible. So it’s surprising that GOP state lawmakers have been working on a bill to pick cities’ pockets by reverting tax receipts usually going to municipalities to the state government. That bill got a little less pernicious yesterday, when a revised version passed the Ohio Senate. Mayor John Cranley touts the bill as a better deal for Cincinnati than it could have been. The proposal, which amends and allegedly simplifies Ohio’s tax rules for cities and other local governments, would cut the amount of money municipalities receive from businesses doing work in their jurisdictions. Many agree the current system is incredibly complex and makes it difficult for businesses to operate in multiple municipalities. But opponents of the original bill proposed by GOP lawmakers say the cuts to municipal tax receipts were too deep and, taken with other recent cuts to tax receipts, could hamper cities’ abilities to provide services. Cincinnati could have lost as much as $3 million a year from those cuts. The compromised bill minimizes some of those losses by keeping the municipal tax on items a company ships to places where it doesn’t have a storefront.

• A slightly fictionalized Hamilton County Christmas play in one act:

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil:
Hey guys, can I get a Harley? Maybe two Harleys? I want them for Christmas. They get better gas mileage than cars and the city taught us how to ride them.
Hamilton County Commissioner Chris Monzel: I don’t know. Ask Greg Hartmann.
Sheriff Neil: He wrote me a letter. He said I have to wait.
Hartmann: Jim, I can’t believe you’re asking for this right now. You know money is tight and we can’t afford two Harleys. We’ve gotta tighten our belts, you know. Have you thought about a nice used Suzuki? Or maybe some bicycles? Red Bike is big right now.
Sheriff Neil: But everyone else is asking for cool wheels, too.
Monzel: We’ll just have to wait and see what Santa brings. We already gave you those cars you asked for.

• Surprise, surprise: House Speaker John Boehner, who is camped out in his safely Republican district just north of Cincinnati, doesn’t want any changes to the way Ohio draws its congressional districts. He says that having one party dominate the process isn’t a problem because both parties have done so over the years and that everyone working on rule changes for redistricting should see what shakes out in Arizona. The Supreme Court is currently hearing challenges to that state’s constitutional amendment cutting the state legislature out of redistricting in favor of an independent panel, a similar arrangement to some proposals for reforming Ohio’s redistricting process. But let’s not be hasty about working to change the process that has created Ohio’s ridiculously gerrymandered districts, Boehner says.

"For 40 years the Democrat Party had the pencil in their hands, and for the last 20 years we've had the pencil," Boehner told The Enquirer yesterday. "When you've got the pencil in your hand, you're going to use it to the best of your advantage."

CityBeat contributor Ben Kaufman, who writes our "On Second Thought" column and "Curmudgeon Notes," tipped me off to this great exchange. Apparently, Enquirer parent company Gannett is reaching out to veteran journalists seeking help recruiting “leaders for the newsroom of tomorrow,” whatever that means. Gannett has been sugar-coating layoffs with this newsroom of tomorrow thing for a while and has even gone so far as to make reporters reapply for their jobs in a Hunger Games-esque battle for employment. A recruiter got a less than favorable response from three-decade veteran journalist Rick Arthur, who has been an editor at major newspapers and magazines. Arthur responds to the missive, which is, after all, not recruiting him but simply asking for help in recruiting others, with the following:

“I would never refer anyone to Gannett, an organization that has such disdain for copy editors and that treats its employees so shabbily, and whose executives, publishers and editors willfully deny that there are problems while creating — for the second time in a decade — the laughably Orwellian 'Newsroom of the Future.'

All the best, Rick”

Ouch.

• Finally, there’s continued anger around the nation over unarmed people, especially people of color, dying at the hands of police. Two brief developments: 

A grand jury in New York yesterday declined to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his role in the death of Eric Garner, who Pantaleo put in a chokehold. Pantaleo died moments after the confrontation in an ambulance and can be heard on a video of the incident telling officers repeatedly he couldn’t breathe. The grand jury decision has sparked protests in New York City.

In Cleveland, there are new revelations in the death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who police shot on a playground. The officer involved in that shooting, Timothy Loehman, was asked to leave another police force in the small town of Independence, Ohio, in 2012 after being deemed unfit to serve there. Loehman reportedly had an emotional breakdown on a shooting range and was “uncommunicative and weepy” during the incident, reports on his dismissal say. The report also calls his performance with a weapon “dismal.”

 
 
by Maija Zummo 12.04.2014 118 days ago
Posted In: Coffee, Events, News at 11:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Carabello Coffee Launches Kickstarter

Philanthropic-minded coffee company is looking to expand, donate more

Carabello Coffee in Newport, Ky., is a philanthropic coffee shop and roastery owned by husband and wife Emily and Justin Carabello. As a craft coffee bar, they have all the latte art and pour-overs you'd expect, but they also do something unexpected — the business gives back by turning over a portion of their profits to third world coffee regions in Nicaragua and Kenya. 

The couple had a vision for the shop in 2009, with the idea to start a company that would source coffee equitably and sell it to the U.S., investing the profits in sustainable initiatives in third world coffee communities. The Carabellos have visited these regions in Africa and Central America, sourcing their beans from coffee farms and helping the community by doing outreach and raising money for an orphanage in Nicaragua, where some of the world’s best coffee is grown. The kickstarter campaign Carabello just launched is not only aimed at helping Carabello itself expand, but also expand the amount of good they can do. Their goal is to eventually be able to give away $100,000 a year.

With a kickstarter goal of raising $40,000 (the city of Newport will kick in $15,000 if they spend $30,000 themselves), the money will assist the shop in doing renovations to expand to include a coffee training lab (for baristas and members of the public), a community event space and a slow bar, for true coffee geeks. The slow bar will be the first in the city and showcase alternative brewing methods that don't work in a faster-paced environment. 

To learn more or to back the Carabellos, visit their kickstarter project here.
 
 
by Mike Breen 12.04.2014 118 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: The Pass, Nora Jane Struthers and More

Louisville Electro Pop artists The Pass, who’ve become popular with local audiences thanks to repeated visits to the Cincinnati area (providing highlight sets for more than a couple MidPoint Music Festivals), performs a free show tonight at Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub. Local trio JetLab (which just released its self-titled debut last week) opens things up around 10 p.m.

The Pass’ show tonight is the start of a tour in support of the band’s new EP release, High Road, which follows the release of four 7-inch singles at the start of 2014 and comes out this Tuesday. “Take You Out,” a track from the new release, was debuted on the website We All Want Someone to Shout For yesterday. The site says the track "deliver(s) a world of glossy synths, love-sick vocals, and a feel-good atmosphere that you can’t shake anywhere else but the dance floor. With so many electronic groups relying heavily on computers and other effects these days, it’s great to see The Pass deliver such groovy tunes as a full live band. It truly separates them from the rest of the pack."

Check it:

• Nashville-based Americana artist Nora Jane Struthers and her band The Party Line play Newport’s Southgate House Revival tonight. Mike Oberst of local Folk faves The Tillers opens the show at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. 


Struthers was born in Virginia and raised in New Jersey, getting her first taste of the musician’s life as a tween fiddler and traveling to festivals and conventions with her father (a banjoist). Struthers decided to pursue a career in teaching, but after a few years she switched her focus back to music, inspired by watching Tim O’Brien perform at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Her 2010 debut solo album showcased her stellar lyrical abilities and mastery of traditional Americana and Bluegrass sounds. She hit her stride with last year’s Carnival, bolstered by her full-time band, The Party Line. 


Struthers is gearing up for the release of her new album with The Party Line, Wake, which is due in February of next year. The album is said to be more eclectic and nods in a more Rock direction, inspired by her love of recent albums by Hayes Carll and Jason Isbell. 


NPR’s Ann Powers recently interviewed Struthers about the new album (read it here) and unveiled the new album track, “The Same Road.”


• According to B-105 FM’s website, tonight’s Toys for Tots benefit show at Toby Keith’s I Love this Bar and Grill is sold out (the bar’s website says there may be “limited tickets” available at the door tonight). The 8 p.m. concert features headliner Easton Corbin, plus up-and-comers Maddie & Tae and RaeLynn


Click here for show details and read Deirdre Kaye’s preview of Maddie & Tae’s performance for CityBeat here


Click here for more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.03.2014 119 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Hunter won't get new trial; Reds bling for sale; Republicans sink tax cuts for low-income

Hey all. Here’s the news this morning.

Former Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter won’t get a new trial, a judge has ruled. Hamilton County Judge Norbert Nadel has denied all three of Hunter’s motions for retrial after she was convicted last month of one of eight felony counts in relation to her time as judge. Since her conviction, three jurors have recanted their guilty verdicts, however, and Hunter’s attorney has alleged procedural mistakes mean she should get a new trial. With those motions denied, Hunter will be sentenced this Friday. She plans to file an appeal on her conviction.

• Cincinnati must pay Duke Energy $15 million for moving utilities that stood in the way of the streetcar, a Hamilton County judge ruled Monday. The city already had that money in escrow as it awaited the ruling but plans to appeal Judge Carl Stich’s decision. That’s a good move, according to former city solicitor John Curp. Curp says the way Stich decided the case — by declaring the streetcar an “economic development project” — could set a hard precedent for other Ohio cities in the future. In order for Cincinnati to avoid paying Duke to move the utilities, the project would have to be something that benefits the city’s general welfare. Stich cited cases from the 1930s and the 1950s to justify his decision. Back then, public transit was run by private companies, a much different situation than today. Curp thinks the Ohio Supreme Court might have a different opinion of the streetcar and should hear the case to set a more modern precedent on transit projects.

• Do you have about $6,000 just sitting around taking up valuable space that could be used to, say, store an enormous ring? Do you need a sports-themed piece of jewelry so ostentatious no one will ever question your love for America’s favorite pastime? If so, I have a solution to both of your weird, unlikely problems. A Cincinnati Reds 1990 World Series ring has gone up for sale at a local auction house, and for a few grand you can make it yours. But be advised: It’s not Chris Sabo or Eric Davis’ ring. Heck, it’s not even Glenn Sutko’s, who saw action in one game that season. It belonged to one of the team’s part-time accountants, who I’m sure did great work counting the Reds' money. Every position is important on a winning team. Anyway, it’s big, it’s red, it has the logo on it and you should buy the ring. Or, I dunno, you could buy me a nice used car instead. Up to you.

• So it’s no secret the state’s Democratic party is hurting after last month’s disastrous statewide election. Ohio Democratic Party Chairman Chris Redfern stepped down after losing his own state representative seat to a guy accused of burglary. Now there’s a scramble to take his spot, and former Cincinnati city councilman and recent attorney general candidate David Pepper is a frontrunner. But he’s got a challenge ahead of him  in becoming the top Dem in the state: Ohio’s powerful Sen. Sherrod Brown has backed one of his opponents, former candidate for lieutenant governor Sharen Neuhardt, for the job. Pepper still sees himself as a front-runner in the contest to lead Democrats in one of the country’s most important swing states ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The new state chair will be decided by a vote within the party Dec. 16.

• Chicago City Council voted yesterday to raise the city’s minimum wage to $13 an hour over the next five years. The move was a proposal by Mayor Rahm Emanuel ahead of proposed Illinois laws that could hamstring city governments when it comes to raising minimum wages and February’s Chicago mayoral election. The boost is expected to benefit about 400,000 workers in the city. Other cities like Seattle have passed similar increases recently.

• Finally, Republicans have scuttled an extension on tax cuts for low-income and middle class workers while pushing bigger corporate tax breaks. The cuts were part of a $400 billion bipartisan tax deal lawmakers in Washington were working to put together. But President Barack Obama’s announcement last month of an executive action allowing some undocumented immigrants to stay in the country has killed the deal as Republicans pull back from the low-income tax cuts like the Earned Income Tax Credit and double down on the corporate breaks. They say undocumented immigrants will take advantage of the EITC and other credits in large numbers and therefore can’t support the cuts. Translation: Obama made us mad so we’re taking the ball that keeps millions out of poverty and going home.

 
 
by Mike Breen 12.03.2014 119 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Every Time I Die, Lera Lynn and More

Veteran metallers Every Time I Die play Bogart's in Corryville tonight. The Ghost Inside, Hundredth, Architects and Backtrack are also on the bill. Doors open at 6 p.m. and tickets are $26.27.

ETID's creative approach has earned them fans outside of just the Metal world (though they don't seem to have suffered the wrath of purists like Deafheaven or other act that dare to stray from the imaginary blueprint). Here's what Brian Baker had to say about the band's most recent album in his preview for this week's CityBeat.

Every Time I Die's latest album, From Parts Unknown, is the band's third album for Epitaph and seventh overall, and stands as a stylistic scrapbook of their best qualities — full bore Metalcore anthemics, songs both howled and sung, scathingly focused lyrics and guest appearances from Coalesce's Sean Ingram and the Gaslight Anthem's Brian Fallon. From Parts Unknown may also be the most lavishly praised album in Every Time I Die’s estimable catalog. The title of a song from the new album may provide the best description of the Every Time I Die live experience: “If there is room to move, things move.”



• Another monster of the Metal world, pioneering Bay Area Thrash crew Exodus, is also in the area tonight. The band plays Covington's Madison Theater at 6:10 p.m. Tickets are $25 and the show is open to all ages.

Emerging from the same scene that produced Thrash kings like Testament and Metallica (Kirk Hammett was an original member of Exodus), the band has been tearing shit up for the past 34 years (with a break-up, reunion and then full-time reformation sandwiched in the middle). This past October, Exodus released its 10th album (and first in four years), Blood In, Blood Out.



• If brutal Metal is not your thing, Newport's Southgate House Revival has Texas-born/Georgia-raised/Nashville-based singer/songwriter Lera Lynn tonight in the Revival Room. Locals Wilder open the show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door.

Lynn is usually found in the Folk/Americana section of record stores, but she also sprinkles her endearing sound with a variety of other influences (Jazz, Rock, Pop, Country and beyond). Here's Lynn's soulful, rootsy take on TV on the Radio's "Wolf Like Me," for example:



Lynn's 2014 album The Avenues has been drawing favorable reviews. Here's what NPR's Meredith Ochs had to say:

Long before you figure out exactly what lyrics Lera Lynn is singing, you'll feel the melancholy and mystery in her music. Wistful melodies and the cry of a steel guitar are set to gentle, meditative rhythms. Even the song's sonic spaces suggest loneliness. With the music alone, Lynn creates a tone poem of romantic uncertainty.



Click here for more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight.

 
 
by Charlie Harmon 12.02.2014 119 days ago
at 03:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Pedal Wagon Offers Winter Tours

Pedal around the city for pre-game drinks, progressive dinners and more

If you’ve ever been driving around the interlocking streets of the city and seen a group of hysterical people slowly pedaling a giant wagon, then you’ve been exposed to the wonderful world of the Pedal Wagon. This 15-person rolling party — powered by the pedals beneath each rider’s seat — takes groups on historic tours, pub crawls and more while also offering specials on drinks at participating bars. Here are some special tours Pedal Wagon is offering during the winter season:

Polar Bear Express

Pedal Wagon presents a wonder that would have the likes of Clark Griswold lighting up in uncontainable excitement. This seasonally decorated Wagon takes riders — who are encouraged to don their favorite holiday costumes like Santa, the Grinch or the Abominable Snowman — on a two-hour pub crawl to four of Cincinnati’s most eclectic bars, where they will enjoy seasonal drink specials.

Progressive Dinner

With all the incredible culinary treasures of old and new sprinkled throughout the Queen City, who wouldn’t want to have fun balancing the calories between meals with a Pedal Wagon adventure? This three-hour tour takes riders to Kaze for an appetizer and drink, then Arnold’s for an entree and drink, and Taste of Belgium for dessert and a final drink.

Pedal to the Jungle

With football season upon us yet again and the cold creeping down from the north, standing around a parking lot with a beer sounds just plain chilly. For a more interactive adventure that might also keep you warm, Pedal Wagon offers a two-hour pub crawl that takes fans to some of the city’s best sports bars — Rhinehaus, O’Malley’s in the Alley and Jefferson Social — and drops them off just a half hour before kickoff.

Hair of the Dog

Celebrate the fact that it is indeed 5 o’clock somewhere with a barhopping pedal tour. This two-hour crawl takes riders to four great spots to grab a beer and warm their ears, stopping at HalfCut, Knockback Nat's, Lackman and Rhinehaus.

Go here for more info and to book your ride.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.02.2014 119 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 02:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Art Museum's Popular Curator Benedict Leca Gets Promotion

Benedict Leca, a much-liked curator of European Art at Cincinnati Art Museum whose departure in 2012 to become chief curator at Hamilton, Ontario's, Art Gallery of Hamilton prompted protest, has moved again. It's a promotion. Perhaps his greatest accomplishment at Cincinnati was organizing Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman. Here are a few paragraphs from the press release from the Redwood Library & Athenaeum of Newport, R.I. It is especially notable for the fact the erudite Leca use the term dix-huitièmiste to describe himself in a quote — how many other museum directors would do that?

Edwin G. Fischer, M.D., President of the Board of Directors of the Redwood Library & Athenæum, announced the appointment of Benedict Leca, Ph.D., as its new Executive Director, effective January 15, 2015, following a competitive national search.

“This is tremendous news for the Redwood,” stated Dr. Fischer, “An expert in 18th-century art, history, and material culture, Benedict is uniquely qualified to move the Library into the national spotlight as a center of thought and culture. He has a wealth of experience and is extremely well-suited to lead this 268-year old cultural institution.” 

As Executive Director, Leca will articulate and advance the Redwood’s historic mission as a hybrid cultural institution with “nothing in view but the good of mankind.” Building on the Redwood’s unique position as a catalyst for dialogues about education across periods and disciplines, Leca’s work will focus on fully realizing the opportunities inherent to the athenæum model through an expanded array of public programs, forums, and exhibitions—both on-site and on-line—that will foster networks of intellectual exchange locally, regionally, and around the world. 

Prior to his current tenure at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Ontario, as Chief Curator and Director of Curatorial Affairs (2012-14), Leca was Curator of European Painting, Sculpture and Drawings at the Cincinnati Art Museum. 

He was the first Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the French Paintings department at the National Gallery of Art in Washington (2003-2007), and served on the staff of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University (1999-2000). Mr. Leca also currently holds the position of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History in the School of the Arts, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Mr. Leca has curated many important exhibitions: Charles-Nicolas Cochin: Draftsman of the Enlightenment (2003); Rembrandt: Three Faces of the Master (2008); Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman (2010—2011); Monet in Giverny: Landscapes of Reflection (2012); The Painter Pictured: French Nineteenth-Century Paintings and Portrait Photographs (2013); the current The World is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne, executed in partnership with the Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia (2014-15), and the forthcoming Illuminations: Italian Baroque Masterworks in Canadian Collections to be held at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, in 2015.

(Thanks to Judith H. Dobrzynski's Real Clear Arts blog at http://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/ for alerting us to this story.)

 
 
by Mike Breen 12.02.2014 120 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Music News at 11:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Vigil for Concert Tragedy Victims Set for Wednesday

On the 35th anniversary of The Who concert that left 11 fans dead, efforts ramp up for a permanent memorial marker

Tomorrow (Dec. 3) marks the 35th anniversary of the concert tragedy at Riverfront Coliseum (now US Bank Arena) where 11 music fans were crushed and killed after fans pushed their way into the arena to see British Rock legends The Who perform. Tomorrow at 7 p.m., a vigil will be held on the plaza between U.S. Bank Arena and Great American Ballpark, where 11 lanterns will be lit in the memory of the victims.


There have been ongoing efforts to erect a memorial marker at the site of the tragedy. The Cincinnati Music Heritage Foundation got involved in 2009 to work with family members, survivors and city officials to establish the marker, help organize vigils and assist in spreading awareness of the cause. 


The organization, with help from local journalist Rick Bird (who was covering The Who concert in 1979) and input from family members, survivors and others, have drafted text to be placed on the marker, which still needs final approval before it is put in place at the site of the tragedy. 


The Music Heritage Foundation says Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley is “putting his full support behind this effort,” so the marker may be closer to becoming a reality. 


From the Music Heritage Foundation’s press release, here is the proposed text for the marker:

(Side 1)    

Eleven

In Memoriam 


Walter Adams Jr. 22 Trotwood OH 

Peter Bowes 18 Wyoming OH 

Connie Sue Burns 21 Miamisburg OH

Jacqueline Eckerle 15 Finneytown OH 

David Heck 19 Highland Heights KY

Teva Rae Ladd 27 Newtown OH 

Karen Morrison 15 Finneytown OH

Stephan Preston 19 Finneytown OH

Phillip Snyder 20 Franklin OH 

Bryan Wagner 17 Fort Thomas KY 

James Warmoth 21 Franklin OH


Deepest respects to the families, 

friends and many survivors.


(Side 2)  

The Who 

Concert


12/3/79


Eleven concertgoers, trapped 

in a crush of people, died 

at the southwest plaza 

entrance to Riverfront Coliseum 

waiting to see The Who. 

Many others were injured in

what was the deadliest concert 

tragedy in United States history. 

The tragedy spurred passage of a 

crowd safety ordinance, which 

became a model for the world. 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.02.2014 120 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
barack obama 2

Morning News and Stuff

NAACP officially chooses Cincy for 2016 convention; People's Liberty announces grantees; Obama pushes wearable cameras for cops

So my morning donut routine took a dramatic turn today when a box truck plowed into Servatii downtown right before I got there. The whole building was filled with smoke. It looked crazy, and I hope everyone is OK. I’m going to try not to take this as a sign from the universe that I should cut back on Servatii's double chocolate cake donuts.

Anyway, here’s your news.

The NAACP made it official this morning: The civil rights group is coming to Cincinnati for its 2016 national convention. The convention will put the city in the political spotlight and bring millions of dollars from visitors. Cincinnati last hosted the gathering in 2008 when both Sens. John McCain and Barack Obama came to town as part of their campaigns for president. This time around should be equally auspicious. Two-thousand-sixteen promises a heated presidential race, Cleveland is getting the GOP National Convention and Columbus is in the running for the Democrats’ big get together that year. The NAACP indicated in October it was leaning toward Cincinnati pending a site visit, an announcement that surprised Baltimore, which had presumed it had the convention.

• 3CDC Executive Vice President Chad Munitz is leaving the organization to get back into real estate development. He currently works on asset and capital management for the group. Munitz, who previously served as economic development director with the city of Cincinnati, joined 3CDC in 2006. The development company has not indicated plans for replacing him.

• Local grant-making organization Peoples Liberty, funded by the Haile Foundation, launched over the summer with a pledge to fund plans from everyday citizens in a diverse, inclusive manner.

"This is not going to be a playhouse for the hip," the group’s CEO Eric Avner said over the summer. "We will talk to everybody. We will listen to everybody. We will do it with intention."

The group just announced its first two big winners: two guys named Brad. Both will receive $100,000 and a year to work on their projects. One Brad, last name Cooper, will use his money to pay himself a small salary and make two tiny houses in Over-the-Rhine, which he's hoping to sell for $85,000 each. The 200-square-foot homes will be affordable, provided someone can secure financing and the thousands of dollars needed for a down payment. Affordable is a relative term here and seems not to be the main goal of the project. Cooper stressed in an Enquirer article that the idea is about promoting the small-living movement, which has been getting increasing attention over the past few years.

"This is not for poor people," Cooper said. "This is for a wide variety of people who choose this as a lifestyle."

Just don’t call them playhouses for the hip.

The other winner is Brad Schnittger, who will be using his $100,000 to create a music licensing library for area musicians so they can sell their songs to movies, TV and advertising groups. Musicians will pay a small initial fee and then keep all the money they make selling music. Schnittger plays with local vets the Sundresses, so he knows a thing or two about the music industry. He says he thinks this will help Cincinnati’s music scene take things up a notch.

• Former Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter will be in court again today as a county judge hears the last of her motions for a new trial. Hunter was convicted last month on one felony count after she allegedly intervened in the firing of her brother, a juvenile court guard who allegedly hit an inmate. Hunter has filed three motions for retrial, saying there were procedural errors and juror misconduct during the trial. Three jurors have said they’ve changed their minds about their guilty verdicts, though it appears too late for those to be overturned. If Hunter’s last motion for a new trial is denied today, she has said she will appeal her conviction.

• Let’s jump right to national news for the finale. President Obama yesterday proposed a $263 million, three-year package that would increase training for police officers, work on needed reforms in law enforcement and spend $75 million on small cameras worn by police on their lapels. Obama made the announcement in the wake of ongoing protests over a Missouri grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown in August.

 
 
by Mike Breen 12.02.2014 120 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: The Stray Birds

Pennsylvanian Folk/Americana trio The Stray Birds perform tonight at Newport’s Southgate House Revival. Australian Indie Folk singer/songwriter Jordie Lane opens the show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10. 


After self-releasing their debut album in 2012, The Stray Birds scored wide-spread acclaim (NPR put it in its Top 10 of Folk/Americana albums released that year) and began to build a following on the road. The hard work (and engaging music) paid off in the form of contract with the esteemed Yep Roc label (home to artists from Nick Lowe, Robyn Hitchcock and Paul Weller to Fountains of Wayne, The Rev. Horton Heat and The Apples in Stereo), which released the band’s Best Medicine album in October. 


Click here to read Brian Baker’s full preview of the show from this week’s CityBeat.


Here is the title track from The Stray Birds most recent LP: 


Click here for more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight. 

 
 

 

 

 
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