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by Nick Swartsell 10.03.2014 77 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Sen. Mitch McConnell

Morning News and Stuff

Officials release new information about Crawford shooting; local brewery breaks crowd funding record; breaking news–Congress is full of rich people

Hey all! It’s rainy and gloomy, but it’s also Friday, so there’s that. Grab a cup of your morning brew of choice (no beer or liquor just yet, please; let's maybe wait until at least noon for that) and let’s talk about the news.

The Bureau of Criminal Investigation has released new information about the Aug. 5 police shooting of John Crawford III in a Beavercreek Walmart. The documents show that at least three other people proceeding Crawford had picked up and carried the unpackaged pellet gun Crawford had with him when he died. The reports also indicate at least one employee expressed concern about Crawford carrying the pellet gun because it was hard to tell if the weapon was real or not. The documents also reveal that the officers did not identify themselves as police, and that the officer who shot Crawford, Sean Williams, is not the one who gave alleged orders for Crawford to put the weapon down. However, the police story that officers shouted those orders is corroborated by at least three other witnesses in the documents, though the length of time they say police gave Crawford to comply with those orders varies from one to two seconds to five or more, depending on the witness. An Ohio grand jury declined to indict Williams in Crawford’s death, but the Department of Justice is investigating the case.

• Lincoln Heights fire fighters are back at work this morning after a lapse in the municipality’s insurance police left the department, as well as the village’s police force, off the job yesterday. The police department is still not back at work, and emergency calls for law enforcement are being handled by neighboring municipalities.

• Speaking of law enforcement: The University of Cincinnati has named a new police chief. Jason Goodrich, currently police chief for Lamar University in Texas, will become UC’s new director of public safety on Nov. 1. Goodrich has also been a police captain at Vanderbilt University as well as a chief at University of Indiana Southeast and Southern Arkansas University.

• A Cincinnati-area brewery is one of crowdfunding site Kickstarter’s most popular projects. Braxton Brewing Co. raised $30,000 in just 35 hours from funders on the site. The project set a single-day fundraising record for breweries on Kickstarter. Part of the boost probably came from the really cool Rookwood beer steins they're offering backers. I don't even really drink beer (I'm more of a whiskey guy) and I want one of those. Although one of those steins filled with Wild Turkey would probably mess me up real good. Anyway, Braxton is looking to open in Covington this winter.

• Walnut Hills has been quietly changing for a while now, stacking new development and rehab projects. Here’s an article about an upcoming rehab of a historic building on Madison Road and Woodburn Ave. that local group Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation hopes will spark more development in the area. It’s a preview of what may lie ahead for the neighborhood, one of Cincinnati’s first suburbs and, more recently, one of the city’s lowest-income neighborhoods.

• Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell rolled into Cincinnati yesterday to chat with The Cincinnati Enquirer, making his case for why Kentuckians in the Greater Cincinnati area should vote for him. His pitch is basically that voters should keep him in power because he’s, well, powerful, and could run the Senate if it flips to Republicans in November. Give him power because he’s powerful. Got it? Good. On more substantive issues, McConnell was wishy-washy, providing few details or practical policy ideas on the state’s heroin epidemic or the crumbling, highly trafficked Brent Spence bridge linking Ohio and Kentucky. Oh yeah, and he said Congress can’t get anything done because Democrats are bad, and that if he’s reelected and Republicans take the Senate he’ll run a smoother ship. Or, again, give him power because he could be powerful. He also wants to lower corporate taxes as a way to fix the gap between the wealthy and everyone else. Because giving the wealthiest, most powerful interests in the country a break on taxes is exactly what low and middle income people need. Give them power, because they’re powerful. Got it.

• Finally, speaking of Congress, wealth and power, here’s a Brookings Institution piece on just how many of our U.S. House members come from humble means. Spoiler alert: not many. There are 435 House members overall, and the article finds five who come from something other than a wealthy background. Here’s a quick takeaway: The median yearly income for an incoming House member in 2012 was $807,013. The median income for Americans overall is about $45,000.

 
 
by Rick Pender 10.03.2014 77 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
antoinette lavecchia in i loved, i lost, i made spaghett_ photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Spaghetti, Macbeth and More

Last night I was at the Cincinnati Playhouse for the opening of I Loved, I Lost, I Made Spaghetti, a charming one-woman play based on Giulia Melucci's foodie memoir from 2009. The frame of the show is that it's set in a stylish kitchen where actress Antoinette LaVecchia prepares a meal while sketching out her numerous disconnects in search of love, feeding boyfriends but finding herself starving. Four couples pay a bit more ($35 apiece beyond the ticket price) to sit at tables directly in front of her kitchen where she serves antipasti, salad and spaghetti Bolognese that she prepares as she talks about a series of amusing but unpromising relationships, convincingly painting portraits of her ill-fated choice in men. La Vecchia is so natural in the role (which she originated in 2012 and has played at several regional theaters since then) that you'll feel like you're one of her best friends. Running through Oct. 26, this Shelterhouse production gets a Critic's Pick. Tickets ($30-$75): 513-421-3888

I also thoroughly enjoyed New Edgecliff Theatre's production of The Little Dog Laughed (at Hoffner Hall, 4120 Hamilton Ave., Northside). The four-actor comedy by Douglas Carter Beane is about Diane, an acerbic agent, and Mitch, the actor whose career she's advancing. He's found a boyfriend he really likes (even though boyfriend is a male prostitute with a girlfriend), but she's convinced that this news could ruin his chances … and hers. Kemper Florin is a hoot as the motor-mouthed agent, spouting all sorts of crazy theories about how things should be in monologues that directly address the audience. The entire cast does a fine job, and I gave this one a Critic's Pick. Tickets ($20-$27): 888-428-7311


Area universities have two classics to offer. At UC's College-Conservatory of Music in a brief weekend run (through Sunday) it's Shakespeare's classic tragedy, Macbeth. In an unusual twist, the production features third-year female drama student Laura McCarthy as the power-mad military man who seizes the throne of Scotland. Tickets ($27-$31): 513-556-4183 … South of the Ohio River, Northern Kentucky University presents Euripides' The Bacchae, a play first performed in 405 B.C. The tale of power, revenge, decadence and debauchery takes place in Thebes, where citizens are torn between worship of the god Dionysus and the centrality of reason and humanism. Sunday will be the conclusion of a two-week run of the production. Tickets ($14): 859-572-5464

The musical Dirty Dancing, based on a hit movie from 1987 about young love at a family resort in the Catskills, wraps up two weeks of performance at the Aronoff Center. The touring production, presented by Broadway in Cincinnati through Sunday, features some dazzling video and lots of dancing. The story is pretty predictable, but it's one that people love. "Don't put Baby in the corner." Tickets ($39-$89): 513-621-2787
 
 
by Samantha Gellin 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: Human Rights, LGBT Issues, LGBT at 02:07 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
domestic_partner_registry_resized

City Kicks-Off Domestic Partner Registry

Cincinnati’s LGBT community can celebrate another move toward legal equality today — City Council kicked off its domestic partner registry this morning on the steps of City Hall.

The registry is designed to give couples in a domestic partnership a legal record of their relationship. This will make it easier for employers or hospitals to extend health care benefits to partners of employees.

The measure was unanimously passed by City Council back in June.

Chris Seelbach, who spearheaded the project and is the city’s first openly gay councilman, called the registry “…one of the last pieces of the puzzle to bring full equality to the laws and the policies to the city.”

Many large companies already offer domestic partner benefits, but the registry will help small companies that don’t have the time or resources to verify a couple’s status.  “The city has taken on the legwork for proving what domestic partnerships are, so that small companies don’t have to come up with a whole variety of ways to determine that,” said John Boggess, board chair of Equality Ohio, an LGBT rights group.

Boggess noted that Cincinnati is the 10th city in Ohio to offer a registry; Toledo, Dayton, Columbus and Cleveland are a few that already do.

Ethan Fletcher, 30, and Andrew Hickam, 29, a couple from Walnut Hills, were the first to sign up on Thursday morning outside of City Hall. “We’re excited that this is actually going to be the first legal document affirming our commitment to each other,” Hickman said.

He and Fletcher are one of six couples suing the state of Ohio in federal court for the right to marry. “This is a great a step towards, eventually, full marriage recognition,” Hickman said.

The registration will run through the City Clerk’s office and cost $45, which is “budget neutral” for the city, Seelbach said.

Still, officials were quick to note that the fight towards full equality for Ohio’s LGBT citizens isn’t over. Karen Morgan, steering committee co-chair on Greater Cincinnati’s Human Rights Campaign, said “Ohio remains one of the only states where citizens can be denied housing or employment based on their sexual orientation or gender identity.” In addition, Ohio doesn’t allow same-sex couples to adopt children or transgender people to change their names on their birth certificates.

“We celebrate today with what has happened…but we also realize that there’s still a very long road to go before all Ohioans are valued,” Boggess said.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: Business at 01:37 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Living wage

Cincinnati Unveils Living Wage Initiative

Program will recognize businesses paying employees at least $10.10 an hour

While Congress has been wrangling back and forth for months about raising the federal minimum wage, the City of Cincinnati is doing what it can to encourage businesses to pay their employees enough to get by.

The Cincinnati Living Wage Employer Initiative will officially recognize employers paying their employees at least $10.10 an hour, the same hike congressional Democrats have been pushing in the House and Senate. The program looks to reward businesses and nonprofits that take the step, providing a website, cincinnatilivingwage.com, where consumers can check to see which businesses pay employees a fair wage.

Though the program is voluntary, the hope is that positive recognition and consumer pressure will encourage businesses to pay employees a wage that allows them to be self-sustaining.

“Although the city of Cincinnati cannot legislate a higher minimum wage–that’s left up to the state–we do feel we have a crucial role to play in creating a culture of living wage employers,” said Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld at an Oct. 2 news conference announcing the initiative, which he’s helped push.

“Cincinnati cannot wait on Congress to take action,” he said. “But our local businesses and organizations can raise their minimum wage voluntarily and immediately, and individuals can make conscientious consumer decisions about spending their money with those employers.”

So far, four organizations, including the city, are listed as partners in the initiative. One is Cincinnati-based Grandin Properties, whose CEO Peg Wyant appeared with Sittenfeld at the Oct. 2 announcement.

Another is Pi Pizza, which is opening its first store in Cincinnati downtown at Sixth and Main Streets on Oct. 13. The company, based in St. Louis, has paid non-tipped workers at its seven locations in Missouri, Washington DC and elsewhere $10.10 an hour for five months. The company looks to employ about 100 people in Cincinnati.

Pi Pizza CEO Chris Sommers estimates about 75 percent of those employees will be hourly and not working for tips, meaning they’ll benefit from the wage boost. Sommers said the increased payroll costs are more than balanced by reduced employee turnover rates and increased productivity.

“We did it without raising prices, and we did it after extensive quantitative and qualitative analysis to make sure we could pay for it and that we could still grow and expand to cities like Cincinnati,” Sommers said of the wage boost.

He encouraged other businesses to make a similar commitment.

“If Pi Pizza can do it, you can do it,” he said. “It’s the right thing to do. It’s good for business–more people walking around, with not only more money to put gas in their cars, more money to get their cars fixed, but also more people to buy pizza. And that’s important, right?”

Boosting the minimum wage has caused a deep debate in the United States. Proponents, including President Barack Obama, who called for the boost to $10.10 during this year’s state of the union address, say that low-wage workers don’t make enough to survive easily or raise families, boosting dependence on government programs like the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or food stamps. Opponents, however, including Republicans in Congress like House Speaker John Boehner, say that it will cost businesses more and stifle job growth. Republicans also say that most low-wage jobs are held by high school students, part-time workers who aren’t trying to sustain themselves independently or raise families.

Bureau of Labor Statistics data, however, show that two-thirds of minimum wage workers are over the age of 19. Sommers said that few, if any, of the 107 employees at a recent orientation for Pi Pizza’s Cincinnati location were young students.

The federal minimum wage is currently $7.25, though 23 states, including Ohio, have a higher minimum. The highest wage in the country is in Washington State, where employers must pay adult non-tipped workers at least $9.87. Ohio’s minimum wage is currently $7.95, which will increase to $8.10 in January, thanks to a 2005 constitutional amendment that pegs the state’s minimum to inflation. Even at this new state minimum wage, however, a worker working 40 hours a week will still gross less than $17,000 a year. At $10.10, the same worker would earn $21,000– enough to put a family of three just above the federal poverty level.

“While even the higher hourly wage will leave some people vulnerable, the extra earned income represents the difference between people being able to sustain a basic existence or not,” Sittenfeld said.

 
 
by Mike Breen 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Festivals at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Another Music Fest-Filled Weekend Awaits

Local music lovers have three music festivals to choose from this weekend

Those jonesing for more music fest goodness after last weekend’s spectacular MidPoint Music Festival have some great options this weekend. Bluegrass fans should be especially excited for a couple of them.

The Bend in the River Art & Music Festival debuts this Saturday and Sunday in Lower Price Hill (2104 St. Michael St., next to The Sanctuary: Center for Education and the Arts). The festival/fundraiser runs 5-11 p.m. Saturday and noon-6 p.m. Sunday with the goal of bringing the community together (and showcasing it to others) and raising money for the Community Matters (cmcincy.org) and Education Matters (emcincy.org) organizations. 


Along with food trucks and booths, beer from MadTree Brewing and Rhinegeist and a variety of vendors and artists showing their wares, local musical acts from a variety of genres will provide live music. Tim Caudill, Pike 27, Blue Caboose, Under New Order, The Part-Time Gentlemen and Ohio Knife perform Saturday, while Wild Carrot, Sibling Rivalry, Matthew Schneider and Phoenix (the local Rock cover band, not the internationally famous French Indie Pop group) play Sunday.


Admission to the Bend in the River Art & Music Festival is $7 or $10 for a two-day pass (Lower Price Hill residents receive a coupon to attend for free).


For more information on “Bend Fest” and the cause, visit facebook.com/bendfest and cmcincy.org.


• The DevouGrass Festival presents its first-ever event Saturday at the Devou Park Bandshell (1700 Montague Road, Covington). The family friendly event runs noon-dusk, and while there is no admission charge (even free parking is available throughout the park), organizers are asking for donations to the Children’s Home of Northern Kentucky


Along with food trucks, other vendors, various children’s activities and performances by Circus Mojo and kids’ fave Joel the Singing Librarian, DevouGrass will also feature sets by area Roots/Bluegrass outfits Blue Caboose (noon), Ma Crow and the Lady Slippers (3 p.m.), Hickory Robot (3 p.m.) and the Downtown County Band (6 p.m.). 


For complete festival info, visit devougrass.com


• The Versailles State Park Bluegrass Festival returns with a new location and name: the Friendship Music Festival at the Old Mill Campground in Friendship, Ind. (facebook.com/oldmillcampground), which hosts the very popular Whispering Beard Folk Festival annually and is only about an hour drive southwest of Cincinnati. Despite moving from the state park and changing the moniker, the fest will continue to spotlight some of the region’s finest Bluegrass and Roots music practitioners. 


On Saturday, the music starts at noon with a lineup featuring Mamadrones, Common Ground, Rural Route 2, Lee Sexton with John Haywood and Brett Ratliff, Whiskey Bent Valley Boys, The Tillers and Bradford Lee Folk & the Bluegrass Playboys. The music picks back up Sunday at 11 a.m. with Mt. Pleasant String Band, followed by James White & Deer Tick, Blue Mafia, Whipstitch Sallies, Rattlesnakin’ Daddies and Tony Holt and the Wildwood Valley Boys. 


Weekend passes for the Friendship Music Festival are $10; one-day passes are $5. Camping is available. Visit friendshipmusicfestival.com for full details. 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pride_seelbach_jf

Morning News and Stuff

City launches living wage and domestic partner registries; CPD officers will carry anti-overdose drug; the tri-state is not a happy place, apparently

Heya! CityBeat reporters fanned out across the city this morning picking up what’s happening. We’re omnipresent, omniscient and fueled by dangerous amounts of coffee. Nah, just kidding. There were two of us, and we each swooped in on a story or two. Here’s what we found.

Cincinnati Police officers in the Central Business District as well as some neighborhood-based officers will begin carrying the overdose reversal drug naloxone today. Some medical personnel with the city’s fire department already carry the antidote, but select CPD officers will carry it on a six-month trial basis since officers are usually the first on the scene of drug overdoses. If the trial is successful, the practice of carrying the antidote may be expanded throughout CPD. The drug prevents respiratory failure from overdoses of heroin and prescription opiates.

• Cincinnati’s domestic partner registry kicked off today. The registry lets same-sex couples register with the city so that employers who offer same-sex benefits can verify employees’ partner status. Councilman Chris Seelbach, who sponsored the original measure in council, held a kick-off at City Hall this morning. Several couples filled out applications and a notary was on site to notarize them. The registry will make it easier for businesses that provide same-sex partners benefits, since the companies won’t need to spend their own resources verifying couples’ partner status.

• On the other side of downtown, Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld held an event announcing a voluntary initiative encouraging Cincinnati businesses to pay employees higher wages. The initiative will recognize local businesses that pay employees at least $10.10 an hour. That rate, initially proposed by President Obama, has been batted about in Congress for the last six months. The event took place at soon-to-open Pi Pizza, a St. Louis-based company that has been paying workers at its seven locations in St. Louis, Washington, DC and elsewhere $10.10 for four months. The pizzeria is located at Sixth and Main and will open Oct. 13. Along with Pi, long-time Cincinnati business Grandin Properties is also among the first organizations to be recognized by the city for paying its workers a living wage.

• Lincoln Heights Fire and Police Departments were both shuttered this morning due to a lapse in insurance coverage. Dispatchers for Hamilton County said both stopped responding to calls at midnight. Lincoln Heights leaders are meeting this morning to discuss the situation, and neighboring municipalities, including Lockland, have taken over response to emergency calls in the meantime. The Lincoln Heights Police Department has been rocked by recent allegations of corruption, though there is no indication the sudden closure of the department is related to the accusations of widespread officer misconduct.

• If you’re planning on heading to the West Side this weekend, be advised: the lower deck of the crumbling Western Hills Viaduct will be closed most of the day this Saturday for emergency repairs. The exit ramp from southbound I-75 to Harrison Ave. will also be closed until 10 a.m. that morning. The aging viaduct has been the focus of a lot of attention over the past number of months as engineers develop plans to replace it.

• State Rep. Dale Mallory is under investigation for campaign finance violations stemming from his failure to accurately report Bengals tickets he received from lobbyists. The Democrat, who hails from the West End and whose family has a half-century history in state politics, could face legal repercussions for not reporting tickets worth nearly $400 given to him by payday lender Axcess Financial and law firm Taft, Stettinius and Hollister. The lobbyists have already paid fines for failing to report the gifts. Mallory’s lawyer calls the issue a “paperwork error or technical violation” and says he is working with the Franklin County Prosecutor’s office to resolve the matter. Mallory faces misdemeanor charges for filing false disclosure forms, which could result in a maximum penalty of 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine.

• Kentucky’s intense Senate race may come down to one key issue: coal. This long-form piece explores how both Republican Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and his Democratic challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes are falling over themselves to be seen as a big friend to big coal, which for years has held the fate of Kentucky in its hands. Yes, the piece is from Yahoo News. Stay with me here, it's pretty good. It’s shaping up to be the most expensive Senate race in history, and it has big implications for whether Democrats keep their slim majority there.

• Finally, Ohio is America's 44th happiest state, and Kentucky is 47th, according to a study by finance website WalletHub. Funny, I felt much less happy in the other states I've lived in, but I guess the data says that's just me and I'm a weirdo because I like it here.

 
 
by P.F. Wilson 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Reviews at 08:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
chvrches

REVIEW: CHVRCHES at Madison Theater

It was an eventful night at the Madison Theater in Covington when CHVRCHES came to town Sept. 29. A pretty good sized crowd turned up at Covington’s Madison Theater, which was a little surprising, since they shamefully receive almost no local radio airplay. Oddly, our local “alternative” station The Project sponsored a meet and greet contest with the band, even though the station has never played a CHVRCHES song. Across the river, WKNU has played them. Once. Five months ago, according to a search of the station’s online playlist.


The make-up of the crowd was another surprise. It was an almost teen-free show, with most folks falling between late college and near retirement. That could be due to the fact that CHVRCHES make modern Electronic music but with a very retro feel. And they’ve got tunes.


The Range (who opened for Chromeo at the MidPoint Music Festival) came on stage promptly at 8 p.m., and began his first song. After 45 minutes, that song finally ended. CHVRCHES were set to take the stage at 9:15 p.m., but just after 9 p.m., the fire alarms in the theater went off. Here’s a handy tip: when you’re in large venue, look not only for the nearest exit, but all exits. Security decided it would be cool to deny access to the fire exits at the back of the theater. What the fuck!? Do you not know what happened not three miles from here in 1979? Or in Rhode Island a few years back? Fortunately, everyone was able to file out safely, and pass the time in a well-behaved manner out on the blocked-off street while fire officials investigated.


According to theater management, who were very upset with the way the evacuation was handled, security was provided by the promoter. After the show, the two sides discussed in detail the proper procedures in order to avoid any such occurrences in the future. 


Once the all-clear was given, security did do a nice job of getting everyone back in quickly and efficiently. CHVRCHES thanked the crowd for their patience and apologized, saying the fog machine they were using is what likely tripped the alarm.


Coming out of the gate strong, the band launched its set with two singles, the very fine “We Sink,” followed by the popular “Lies.” Like many Electronic bands, they don’t move around a lot, with Iain Cook and Martin Doherty stationed at their synth racks, flanking singer Lauren Mayberry. This isn’t as visually limiting as it sounds. Ms. Mayberry is an outspoken critic of sexism and misogyny in music, so it feels a little awkward to point out that she’s quite lovely and very engaging in her stage presence. Flying around the stage a la Dave Gahan of Depeche Mode, or Trent Reznor of Nine Inch Nails simply isn’t her style, yet she still holds the crowd.


Her mates weren’t chained to the instruments all night, at least not Doherty, who traded places with Mayberry while he sang “Under the Tide.” Mayberry returned to center stage for what is arguably the band’s most popular track, “The Mother We Share,” which is also one of the best songs of the past few years. 


The enthusiastic crowd of course wanted more, bringing the band back out for the obligatory, but much-desired, encore, wrapping up with “You Caught the Light” and “By the Throat.”


 
 
by Samantha Gellin 10.02.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 08:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Oct. 1 issue of CityBeat

Good morning readers! I can hardly believe it's October. This week's issue of CityBeat is full of wonderful, esoteric words. (It also has the information you need to enjoy FotoFocus 2014, the month-long celebration of photography and lens-based art throughout Greater Cincinnati. Pick one up!)

Best word in this week's issue: besmirched, in Kathy Y. Wilson's "The Semantics of Weed" (This is probably the only article anywhere in which the words "ISIS air strike" and "weed" are used in the same sentence). 

besmirched: To besmirch is to dirty or spoil something or to damage someone's reputation (v.)

In this issue: "Winburn drops Thomas’ name like an ISIS air strike, incessantly blaming Thomas for the original 2006 weed ordinance that besmirched the records of weed offenders charged with minor misdemeanors who now have problems securing jobs, housing, etc."

Or, as Carrie Nation (a radical member of the 19th century temperance movement) once said:  “Men are nicotine-soaked, beer-besmirched, whiskey-greased, red-eyed devils.” 

Next best word: titular, in the preview of the movie Annabelle.

tiltular: of, or having the nature of, a title; titled (adj.)  Not to be confused with the word titillating, which has a much different meaningbut try saying titillating titular three times fast.

In this issue: "In a world filled with sequels, prequels and spin-offs developed off the flimsiest of premises, Annabelle arrives with solidly built awareness thanks to the presence of the titular doll in last year’s horror release The Conjuring from James Wan (Saw)"

Panoply: beautiful and striking set up, magnificent decor or clothing, or a protective covering. (n.)  

In this issue: It actually appears in the headline "Bind Dancers Present a Panoply of Authentic Indian Dance", a piece by Katy Valin on Articulate Ability.

And lastly, moniker, in Mike Breen's Spill It. I guessed that moniker meant monkeys, or had something to do with monkeys, or maybe money, but no.

moniker: a name or nickname.

In this issue: "Despite moving from the state park and changing the moniker, the fest will continue to spotlight some of the region’s finest Bluegrass and Roots music practitioners."





 
 
by Charlie Harmon 10.01.2014 79 days ago
Posted In: Music History at 12:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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These Walls Have Heard it All: 20th Century Theater

Oakley’s 20th Century Theater has only been the venue it is today for about the last 20 years. When it originally opened in August 1941, the now-vintage glowing sign that lit up the era-glorifying name represented a simple one-screen movie theater. Its history and how it changed from that to what it is today fits into the citywide and national history of cinemas like a plastic rodent fits a Whac-A-Mole machine.

Willis Vance, a local businessman that ended up owning a string of theaters and other establishments around town, was the original owner of the theater. At the time of its inception, no theater that housed more than one screen even existed. In fact, as silly as it may sound now, that concept wouldn’t seriously surface in the industry for a few more decades.

Cinemas would have a single film they would play every night, generally whatever was very popular at the time. When a new piece of black-and-white gold would come out of Hollywood, they would swap it in, making it the new nightly showing.

Vance opened the theater with the 20th Century Fox (see what he did there) production Blood and Sand. This may have been a thoughtful tribute to the movie’s star Tyrone Power, an American box-office sellout actor that was born in Cincinnati. While he didn’t grow up here, he did return to the Queen City in his early teenage years, during which time he learned and honed his skills in drama. He went on to become extremely well known and sought-after in the industry, appearing in famous films such as The Mark of Zorro, The Black Swan and dozens of others.

The theater thrived for some time, having hit the ground running with notable qualities like air conditioning and valet parking. To people of my generation, that is a “What?” factor, but it was actually the first theater in the city to keep your ass cold during a movie. It also boasted being one of the first fire-proof buildings in the city, taking that extra step in keeping the heat out.

But almost a decade after it first lit its tower and opened its doors, the cinema industry began to slowly change.

A Canadian inventor named Nat Taylor erected a second screen right next door to his theater in Ontario. He showed the same movie on both for several years at first, simply upping his audience capacity. However, he eventually got tired of swapping out movies for new releases when the old movies were still making money, so he started selling tickets to two movies.

I call the change slow because although this idea was birthed mid-century, it didn’t begin to significantly affect the industry until the ‘60s and ‘70s.

In 1963 Stan Durwood, AMC owner, cinema pioneer and self-proclaimed inventor of the multi-plex, opened the Parkway Twin Theater. It was the first theater with two screens under the same roof, although not for long. The idea caught on and throughout the ‘60s other dual-screen theaters began to pop up. Durwood expanded his Twin Theater from two screens to four, then six.

Through the next two decades the multi-plex concept exploded, with competition for the most screens and best accommodations running rampant. Nat Taylor, who also laid claim as the original inventor of the multi-screen theater, cofounded an 18-screen Cineplex in 1979. He garnered a Guinness World Record, it being the largest theater in the world at the time.

These large cinemas wreaked havoc on the industry for the small-time, local theaters. The charm of a little art deco theater with free valet and air-conditioning no longer held up to the big dogs.

By 1974 20th Century was owned by Levin Services, a management company that also owned several additional theaters and drive-ins around the area. Union strikes that year brought mayhem to Levin. Angry union members broke into the Ambassador Theater, just a block away from 20th Century on Madison Road, to destroy the seats, slash the screen and split the speaker wires. They wrecked the projectors by ripping out their innards with a crowbar, and poured cement into the reels of The Sting, the movie being shown at the time.

Levin closed the Ambassador and several other theaters, including 20th Century. Most reopened after a few weeks, at least for some time. The Ambassador eventually closed for a while after became an Ace Hardware.

The 20th Century lasted just under another decade, succumbing to the cloud of the multi-plex and closing its doors as a movie theater for good in 1983.

But it wasn’t the only pebble to be crushed by a boulder. F&Y Construction, the company that built the Streamline Moderne style building for Willis Vance, built several other theaters in the region. They built the Madison in Covington, Ky.,  the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, and the Redmoor in Mount Lookout. Those are the ones that remain open and standing. Among others they built in the area were the Guild Theater, Hollywood Cinema North, Marianne Theater, Norwood Theater, Sunset Theater, Westwood Theater, Valley Theater and the Ridge Theater. All of these are now closed; two of them have even been demolished.

I can’t say for certain that the multi-plex led to the demise of each one, but its reasonable to assume the industry change had great range. And on top of that, those are only the theaters built by that single construction firm.

After 20th Century was closed in ’83, it was left to neglect for almost a decade. It rotted through water damage and vandals left their mark with graffiti and broken windows. To me, imagining this conjures up a similar image to the Imperial Theater, the decrepit building at Mohawk and McMicken that used to screen adult films and host burlesque shows in the ‘60s.

The early 1990s rolled around and found the community caught between demolishing the fallen cinema or pouring money into restoration. Mike Belmont stepped up and went for the latter approach. After extensive work, he reopened the doors of the building as Belmont’s Flooring Company.

His business only remained in the building he saved for a year, moving just down the street to the old Oakley Bank where Belmont’s still resides in modern business glory. Apparently Belmont had a thing for old buildings.

After he left the Cincinnati Church of Christ, then a group just over a decade old, occupied the building for 4 years before themselves moving on to some higher calling.

This brings us up through this old cinema’s rise and fall to 1997. It was then that the building was bought and 20th Century Productions rose like an entertainment-driven spirit out of the floorboards. Devoted to special events and concerts, they have turned the building into a beautiful venue that hosts almost anything from a raucous rock concert to a quaint wedding reception.

In 2010 they took a final step in the renovation of the building that had never been done. The 20th Century Tower that stands over its doorway was given back its glow to illuminate the night again, drawing in all who look to be entertained.

Here’s what’s coming up at the old one-screen (now one-stage):

Oct. 8: Cherub

Oct. 16: Ruthie Foster

Oct. 23: Paul Thorn Band

Oct. 29: Suicide Girls

 
 
by Jac Kern 10.01.2014 79 days ago
at 10:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

It’s Oct. 1, which means rent’s due, Halloween season is upon us and Netflix is shuffling its offerings. New offerings starting today include the entire Gilmore Girls series, Romeo + Juliet and Team America: World Police. No longer available are Battlestar Galactica, Center Stage and Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Find a full list of what you can and can’t stream this month here.

In what can only be described as an offering to the Internet gods, Drake got an emoji tattoo.

Still no confirmation on whether that emoji is high-fiving hands or praying hands illuminated by Jesus’ power.

Smart girls gained an epic win over bimbos this weekend as George “Forever Bachelor” Clooney married lawyer/activist/author Amal Alamuddin. Cocktail waitresses across the globe mourn as they realize it wasn’t him, it was them.

American Horror Story: Freak Show premieres in a week and we finally have a look at some actual show footage. This short preview packs in a lot — look out for Pepper (Naomi Grossman), the only AHS character to cross over into multiple seasons (you may remember her from AsylumFreak Show takes place in 1952, about 12 years before the events of Asylum); Sarah Paulson playing conjoined twins Bette and Dot; Kathy Bates as a bearded lady; Angela Bassett as triple-tittied woman (sit down, Jasmine); Evan Peters as a man with ectrodactyly (giving him claw-like hands); smallest living woman Jyoti Amge; John Carroll Lynch’s terrifying clown; and, of course, Jessica Lange in her final AHS performance as the striking German ringleader of it all.

ICYMI: Rhinegeist’s Bryant Goulding is featured in GQ’s “The 50 Best Craft Beers Every Man Must Try.” Goulding serves as an expert with tips on the best “stein filling quenchers,” suggesting Sierra Nevada Summerfest, Weihenstephaner Pilsner, Three Floyds Gumballhead, Double Mountain Vaporizer and Moonlight Reality Czeck Pilsner for when you really want to get yo drink on.

The Magic Mike sequel will be air-humping its way into theaters next summer — without director Steven Soderbergh or Matthew McConaughey. Magic Mike XXL will be helmed by Gregory Jacobs (who co-produced the original); Channing Tatum, Matt Bomer, Joe Manganiello, Kevin Nash, Adam Rodriguez and Gabriel Iglesias are all set to reprise their roles. Newcomers this time around include a very curious mix of actors: Elizabeth Banks, Donald Glover, Amber Heard, Jada Pinkett Smith, Andie MacDowell and Michael Strahan. The official synopsis, found here, is equally confusing. Didn’t the dudes move to Miami at the end? Didn’t Channing Tatum quit stripping for his dead-faced nurse friend?

Am I the only one who wishes SNL’s weird ‘90s sitcom sketch was a real show? By far one of the funniest moments of Saturday’s season premiere.

Apparently this isn’t the first skit of its kind with Kyle Mooney and Beck Bennett — check out this very sexually tense episode with Andrew Garfield, which was cut from his episode last May. From the stiff acting and awkward delivery to the constant laugh tracks, applause and “ooohs,” this bit nails that weird, satirical, almost Tim & Eric-esque humor that’s so popular right now. Hopefully we’ll see it again later in the season.

No movie trailers this week, but know that Zombieland 2, Hot Tub Time Machine 2  and Taken 3 are all happening so we can probably just give up on movies for now.

 
 

 

 

 
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