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by Samantha Gellin 10.09.2014 74 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 09:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Oct. 8 issue of CityBeat

Morning, readers. I haven't had my coffee yet so ... let's skip the intro and  jump right into the list of "Words Nobody Uses or Knows" found in this weeks issue.

Best word of this issue is gustatory, found in Rick Pender's warm review of I Loved, I Lost, I made Spaghetti, the current one-woman show at the Playhouse. 

gustatory: of or having to do with tasting or the sense of taste (adj.)

In this issue: "Cooking is the thread that runs through her story, and while she recounts her gustatory encounters — portraying Giulia’s lovers vividly using her physical and vocal talents — LaVecchia simultaneously prepares and serves a meal of antipasti, salad and spaghetti Bolognese (with fresh pasta she’s made as she talks) to four couples, seated right in front of her kitchen counter." Sounds delightful. I'd attend this gustatory show with gusto. (See what I do there?)

Next best word is demarcate, found in Garin Pirnia's review of Fireside Pizza, a food truck-turned-brick and-mortar restaurant. (Another pizza place in Cincinnati!? Great! There aren't enough of those!)

demarcate: to set or mark the limits; delimit; to mark the difference between, distinguish (v.)

In this issue: "After making a selection and ordering at the bar, guests receive a record sleeve to demarcate their table."

beleaguered: beset by trouble or difficulty (adj.) We have a beleaguered office building. Like, really beleaguered. In the span of just a week and a half our elevator broke, bits of ceiling fell to the floor, a fluorescent light fixture fell (and is now hanging haphazardly form the ceiling) and the heat, well, it's on and off. 

But you know. We here at CityBeat like to live on the edge. Heat?! That's for LOSERS.

Another one that caught my eye is ectrodactyly, which I think is a great-sounding word (I'm not even sure I can pronounce it) with a not-so-great meaning. It's in Jac Kern's weekly TV roundup.

ectrodactyly: the deficiency or absence of one or more central digits of the hand or foot (n.)

In this issue: "Evan Peters as a man with ectrodactyly (giving him lobster claw-like hands)..."

 
 
by Mike Breen 10.09.2014 74 days ago
Posted In: Music Video, Local Music at 09:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

WATCH: Founding Fathers’ ‘Welcome Home’ Video

Early this year, Cincinnati Indie Dance Rock crew Founding Fathers released a tease of their forthcoming debut full-length release with a music video for their funky track, “Stop Drop and Roll.” Last week, the band unveiled another cool video clip to accompany its fantastic new song, “Welcome Home.” 

The clip, directed and edited by Peter House, starts off with a young man finding out he’s lost his job after he wakes up presumably hungover and his car won’t start. From there, the video follows his efforts to find a new gig, applying at local haunts like Mac’s Pizza Pub, Union Terminal and The Esquire movie theater to no avail. Frustrated, he returns home and loses himself in a wild party that happens to be going down. It’s a cool clip for an even cooler song, loaded with infectious hooks and grooves (think a tight mix of LCD Soundsystem and Walk the Moon), which should have fans and non-fans alike excited to hear more from Founding Fathers. 



You can listen to earlier Founding Fathers material here, while "Stop Drop and Roll" and "Welcome Home" can be downloaded for free here. Keep tabs on the band through their Facebook page here for upcoming shows and updates. 



 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.09.2014 74 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brent spence bridge

Morning News and Stuff

Winburn, Thomas debate; Ky. Senate candidate Grimes draws crowds in Newport; who's trolling over tolling?

Good morning! Apparently two tuba players are dueling with chainsaws outside our window, or at least it sounds like it. I’m going to try and fight through the distraction to give you the morning news. Today’s update is mostly a politics sandwich, but stay with me here, because things are getting interesting as we speed toward Nov. 4.

Republican Councilman Charlie Winburn will do anything for your vote as he runs for state Senate in a heavily Democratic district encompassing much of Cincinnati — but he won’t do that. I told you yesterday about Winburn’s recent evolutions on issues near and dear to most liberal hearts and minds. He’s pulling for expungements for folks who have marijuana convictions under a now-rescinded Cincinnati law, and though he says he’s pro-life, he recently lost endorsements from right to life groups after he signaled some reconsideration on women’s choice issues.

Last night during a debate with state Senate opponent Democrat  Cecil Thomas, Winburn made the case that he’s “an independent thinker,” willing to listen to his potential Democratic constituency but also able to use clout gained with the GOP as a long-time member of the party and reformed hard-core right winger. But one place he’s not bending: same-sex marriage rights. While Thomas, who was once opposed to gay marriage, has changed his tune on the issue, Winburn’s staying put on that one. “Let me be clear about what I believe,” he said during the debate. “I do not support gay marriages. Period.” Tell us how you really feel, Charlie.

• Former Mahogany’s owner Liz Rogers has a new deal she wants the city to think about. Rogers, who recently threatened the city with a lawsuit if it didn’t forgive a $300,000 debt she owes on her former restaurant at The Banks, now wants the city to cut that debt almost in half and suspend payments until July 2016. Rogers has proposed paying $800 a month for 12 years, interest free, to pay back the loan. City Manager Harry Black has passed the proposal along to City Council for a final decision.

• There’s another big development project happening in Walnut Hills. Developers Model Group are working with the Walnut Hills Redevelopment Foundation on a $9 million project to renovate 3 buildings along East McMillan Street in the neighborhood. The buildings will house about 7,200 square feet of retail space and 30 market-rate apartments. The aim is to attract residents interested in urban living who can’t afford or don’t want to pay downtown or Over-the-Rhine prices.

• Who’s trolling over tolling? Was the head of the OKI, the region’s planning office, being overly provocative when he said yesterday that drivers who avoid the crumbling Brent Spence Bridge are “realists?” Those opposed to tolls on the bridge, who call themselves by the equally provocative name "No BS Tolls," say OKI head Mark Policinski should publicly rescind his statement about the safety of the bridge, calling it “unacceptable” and calling him out for fear-mongering. Policinski says he’d didn’t say the bridge was going to collapse tomorrow, just that reports show it is degrading. The battle rages on.

• It’s one of the most-watched 2014 races in the country, and yesterday the clash came to Northern Kentucky. A big throng of supporters, along with a healthy group of national press and local press, came out to hear Alison Lundergan Grimes, Kentucky’s Democratic candidate for Senate, make her pitch to the area. Grimes came to Newport yesterday to talk about two of the region’s biggest concerns: the aforementioned Brent Spence Bridge conundrum and the burgeoning heroin crisis. Grimes slammed her opponent, Senate Minority Leader and 20-year incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell, saying he didn’t have a plan for either issue. She promised she could secure funding for a replacement for the Brent Spence Bridge by closing some of the state’s corporate tax loopholes. She also pledged to use some of that money to hire more law enforcement officers and fund drug treatment programs.

McConnell’s campaign shot back against Grimes’ speech. McConnell said he has floated the idea of rolling back state rules that require companies working government contracts to pay the prevailing wage in an area. The campaign says the savings from that move could be used for the bridge. He’s also laid out plans for increasing the number of counties under scrutiny as drug trafficking areas, though he hasn’t mentioned Northern Kentucky specifically. 

A recent poll commissioned by the Louisville Courier Journal put Grimes ahead by two points in the race, though other polls have her trailing McConnell.

• Finally, the Greater Cincinnati area ranks lowest in the region, and very low nationally, in terms of public transit and job accessibility. It’s very hard for people to use public transit to get to their jobs in Cincinnati, according to a new University of Minnesota study. The area came in 41st out of 46 cities, well below Columbus (27), Cleveland (26), Indianapolis (38), Pittsburgh, (22), Louisville (36) and Detroit (34). Bummer.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.08.2014 74 days ago
Posted In: Education at 02:23 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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NYC Vice Mayor Tours CPS Community Learning Centers

New York interested in CPS practices as the city looks to ramp up its own program

New York City Vice Mayor Richard Buery is in Cincinnati today and tomorrow touring the city’s groundbreaking community learning centers. He’s in town to glean best practices from CPS as New York Public Schools ramps up its own community learning center program.

"What Cincinnati does, that they have probably done better than any other city, certainly better than New York at this time, is not just to have a collection of great community schools, but to have a system of community schools," Buery said to reporters in New York Monday. "I want to see what it means for a city to build a system of community schools. What did that take in terms of the political will, in terms of how different city agencies and the private sector have to work together."

Cincinnati has gotten a lot of attention for its community learning centers, including write-ups in the The New York Times, NPR and other national publications. The centers, usually established in low-income neighborhoods, contain a number of services for the whole community — dental and vision clinics, mental health therapists, after school programs and more. The city started with eight learning centers and now CPS has them in 34 of its 55 schools.

The model has led to increased cooperation between the city, the school system, neighborhoods around the schools and private enterprise. Last month, the city announced a partnership between Powernet, a Cincinnati-area tech company, and CPS to provide free wireless access to the neighborhood of Lower Price Hill around Oyler School, one of the city’s most recognized community learning centers in one of the city’s most low-income neighborhoods. The school is the subject of a documentary film, called simply Oyler, following the school and neighborhood’s progress.

City leaders expressed excitement about the visit.

“It never hurts to be aware that mighty New York City is here to see some of the good things happening in Cincinnati, especially with our school system,” Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld said today. Sittenfeld said Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black will meet with Buery on Thursday.

Buery is in town with
Michael Mulgrew, president of the United Federation of Teachers. The UFT represents more than 300,000 teachers in New York City.

New York City Mayor Bill DeBlasio was one of four mayoral candidates to visit Cincinnati last summer at Mulgrew’s invitation. He made bringing Cincinnati’s model to New York City a major talking point of his campaign, saying it had “unlimited potential.” DeBlasio wants to model 100 schools in the city after Cincinnati’s learning centers.

 
 
by Jac Kern 10.08.2014 75 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Humor, Music, Movies at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

In advance of last Sunday’s Bengals game against the Patriots (I know, let’s not speak of that), some local players were featured on The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon’s popular "Tonight Show Superlatives” segment.

Andy Dalton truly is a personified pumpkin spice latte, isn’t he?

Real Housewives of New Jersey stars Teresa and Joe Giudice last week both plead guilty to multiple counts of fraud and were sentenced to 15 months and 41 months in federal prison, respectively. Teresa will serve her sentence first beginning in January 2015. Joe faces deportation to his native Italy following his jail time. The two sat down with Andy Cohen for an exclusive interview that aired Monday on Bravo. The network reportedly paid big bucks for the one-on-one — according to some sources, enough to cover their restitution — but Bravo denied the claims. A hefty paycheck would explain some of the tough, pressing questions Cohen was able to get away with. (At one point as we were watching Part One, my boyfriend hushed me — “I’m trying to hear this,” he said — which has certainly never happened during a Bravo program. Ever.) Part Two of the interview airs Thursday at 9 p.m.

The Giudices serve as a reminder not to commit bank fraud, mail fraud, wire fraud, bankruptcy fraud or lie on loan applications or forget to pay your taxes. And if you do, try not to throw lavish parties in your tacky suburban castle on national television. On the upside, they did just provide me with an excellent pop-culturally relevant Halloween costume idea. Thanks, Tre!

Related: Fellow New Jerseyan and tanning enthusiast Mike “The Situation” Sorrentino has also recently been charged with tax fraud conspiracy. Way to make the Garden State proud.

Lil Jon, “Lil Lena” Dunham, Fred Armisen, children of famous folks and other celebs teamed up for an epic Rock the Vote video:

Because we just can’t let that terrible club anthem died quietly, can we?

Some of the scariest shows of the season start up this week, with American Horror Story: Freak Show debuting tonight on FX and The Walking Dead’s fifth season premiere Sunday on AMC. Read more about these shows and others to watch in this week’s TV column.

We already know a TWD spinoff/companion series is in the works, though few details have been revealed, and now we’re learning American Horror Story will get a related offshoot. I know what you’re thinking: each season basically is a spinoff of the AHS franchise. But this is a little different. Ryan Murphy will direct a new series based on the same anthology format and American setting for American Crime Story. Each season (presuming its success matches that of AHS) will follow a different true American crime, beginning with one of the most followed court cases of all time: The O.J. Simpson trial. American Crime Story: The People Vs. O.J. Simpson has already been ordered as a 10-episode series for FX. Read more here.

Portlandia’s feminist bookstore sketch may be a hilarious fiction, but it’s filmed in real Portland bookshop In Other Words. The IRL Women and Women First is at risk of closing and it needs your help!

Alfonso Ribeiro of The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is on Dancing with the Stars so of course he did “The Carlton”:

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.08.2014 75 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
winburn

Morning News and Stuff

Winburn's changes of heart; Official: those who avoid Brent Spence Bridge are realists; someone paid $37,000 for Willie Nelson's braids

Hey all. Check out what’s going on right now.

Republican Councilman Charlie Winburn is having a lot of changes of heart lately, all of which surely have nothing to do at all with him running for state Senate in a largely Democratic district. Winburn recently softened his stance on abortion (he once was a hardliner, now he says he wouldn’t interfere with women’s rights, which has caused pro-life groups to pull support for him) and the streetcar (he voted against it last year, but now says “a streetcar is not a bad situation” if it’s part of a larger regional transit plan). He’s also floated a proposal that would allow Cincinnatians with convictions under the city’s harsh anti-marijuana law, passed by Winburn’s state Senate opponent Cecil Thomas in 2006, to seek expungements for those convictions. Winburn seems to be expunging some of his own previously held right wing convictions and drifting more to the center. But, as the Business Courier reports, he’ll need to pull out some even more adept political maneuvers should he make it to the statehouse, where the GOP rules.

• Closing statements in the trial of Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter should wrap up today, leaving the case to the jury. It’s been a dramatic 21 days in court for Hunter and the state’s prosecutors, who allege she committed nine felonies, including forging documents, improperly using a court credit card and intervening on behalf of her brother, a court employee fired after allegedly punching a juvenile inmate. Hunter’s attorney says the case is designed to drive Hunter from the bench because she has tried to change the juvenile court system. Though the charges against her carry a maximum penalty of 13 years in prison, prosecutors have indicated they will not ask for jail time for Hunter.

• It’s still unclear whether a Noah’s Ark theme park run by Northern Kentucky religious group Answers in Genesis slated for Williamstown, Kentucky will get state tax credits. Job listings for the park currently stipulate potential employees sign a statement of faith, provide a statement affirming they’ve been saved and affirm that they believe in creationism. That’s a direct conflict with state policies that stipulate employers who receive state money can’t engage in discriminatory hiring practices. Attorneys for the park say the job listing is for parent organization Answers in Genesis, which does not receive state money, not the theme park, which is a separate entity and which they say will abide by all state and federal policies around the tax credits. Kentucky’s Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet sent a letter to the group warning that their tax credits are in jeopardy due to the listing. Officials for the religious group say they’re still discussing the matter with the state.

• If you’re nervous about driving across the Brent Spence Bridge, you’re a “realist,” according to the leader of the region’s planning authority. Ohio Kentucky Indiana Regional Council of Governments head Mark Policinski says recent maintenance reports detailing the bridge’s deteriorating condition are a wake up call. There has been a lot of controversy about what to do with the 51-year-old bridge, which Kentucky officials say is obsolete but still structurally sound. It will take $2.5 billion to replace the span.

• As the sagas in Ferguson, Mo. and Beavercreek continue to unfold, issues around law enforcement, violence and race have gotten increasing attention. The latest case to come to light involves two people in Hammond, Indiana, near Chicago, who are suing police for alleged use of excessive force. The two say an officer shattered a car window and tazed passenger Jamal Jones during a routine traffic stop Sept. 26. Jones and the driver, Lisa Mahone, who are black, allege the officers violated their civil rights. The officers say they saw Jones reach into the back of the car multiple times and were afraid he had a weapon. Two children were in the back seat of the car, one of whom filmed the episode with a cellphone, capturing the officer smashing the window.

• Finally, we all get a little weird sometimes about our favorite entertainers. But this is next level: Someone paid $37,000 for a pair of Willie Nelson’s braids the singer clipped from his head in 1983. No word who the bidder was. All I can think about is that it’s going to take a lot of Willie Nelson impersonator gigs to make a profit on those 30-year-old locks.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 10.08.2014 75 days ago
at 08:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Key FotoFocus Events Begin Today

Today starts the key stretch of FotoFocus Biennial activities at Memorial Hall, which begin at 8 p.m. with Triumph of the Wild, a show of animated firms by Martha Colburn accompanied by music from Thollem McDonas, Tatiana Berman and the four-person Constella Ensemble.

On Thursday, programming at Memorial Hall turns to the theme of Photography in Dialogue. At 1 p.m., the film Gerhard Richter Painting will be screened followed by a response from Anne Lindberg. At 3:30 p.m., FotoFocus Artistic Director Kevin Moore and Contemporary Arts Center Director Raphaela Platow will discuss the FotoFocus show at CAC, The One-Eyed Thief: Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs. And at 5 p.m., there will be a forum on another FotoFocus-sponsored show, Vivian Maier: A Quiet Pursuit.

On Friday, Memorial Hall activities center on Landscapes. At 1 p.m., the film Somewhere to Disappear, With Alec Soth screens, followed by a response from Matthew Porter. At 3 p.m. is a conversation with photographer Elena Dorfman and 21c Museum Hotel curator Alice Gray Stites. At 4:30, photographer David Benjamin Sherry — the subject of a FotoFocus show — will be in conversation with Elizabeth Siegel. And at 6 p.m., Jeff L. Rosenheim, photography curator at Metropolitan Museum, lectures on "Shadow and Substance: Photography and the American Civil War."

On Saturday, the subject is Urbanscapes and events get underway at 1 p.m. with the film Bill Cunningham New York, followed by a response from Ivan Shaw. At 3:30 is a forum on street photography with three curators — Moore, CAC's Steven Matijcio and Cincinnati Art Museum's Brian Sholis. At 5 p.m. comes a discussion on the Fotogram project at the ArtHub, which opens today in Washington Park. Participants include its architect, Jose Garcia. And the big event gets underway at 8 p.m., when John Waters presents This Filthy World.

Sunday offers three forums, starting at 1 p.m. when Jordan Tate and Aaron Cowan discuss the FotoFocus show Inpout/Output with artist Rachel de Joode. At 2:30 p.m. is a conversation with Fred and Ruth Bidwell on Bidwell Projects and Tate's Transformer Station, Cleveland art project. At 3:30 p.m., there is talk about film with Moore, Colburn and Kristen Erwin Schlotman.

Attendance at Memorial Hall events requires a passport ticket, which cost either $25 or $75, depending on benefits ($15 for students), and are available at www.fotofocusbiennial.org.
 
 
by Mike Breen 10.07.2014 75 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, New Releases at 03:27 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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The Sounds of the City

A uniquely adventurous, location-based recording project will receive a fitting “listening party” this weekend

The Cincinnati Dronescape recording project stemmed from an idea forged by local resident Isaac Hand over the summer. Hand and a friend went around town recording sounds that they felt were “quintessentially Cincinnati.” The found sounds, Hand says, included “the sound of the Western Hills Viaduct, the train yards, the hum of the (University of Cincinnati Medical Center), the Moerlein Brewery” and other location-specific noises. 

They then distributed the sounds to various musicians, who mixed them into their own unique compositions. 


The results are featured on the mesmerizing and creative Cincinnati Dronescape album, which, along with Cincinnati Drones (an album featuring the original source-material soundscapes), is available to stream and download via cincinnatidronescape.bandcamp.com (see below; hard copies can also be found in local-music friendly record retailers in the area). The sonic adventurers featured on the album include ADM, umin, Molly Sullivan, Jarrod Welling-Cann, Zijnzijn Zijnzijn and several others. 




This Saturday at 7 p.m., the project participants will gather in the West End at the intersection of Gest and Summer streets (near Union Terminal) and play Cincinnati Dronescape from several cars simultaneously. Copies of the CD will also be available for purchase at the listening party event. For more information on the project and listening party, click here.

 
 
by Paloma Ianes 10.07.2014 76 days ago
at 12:48 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Such + Such Recognized in West Elm Small Business Contest

Local design studio one of 20 finalists in the running for $25,000

Cincinnati-based design company Such + Such has been selected as one of 20 finalists for popular home furnishing retailer West Elm’s national “We Love Local Small Businesses Grant” contest. The grand prize winner will receive $25,000 and mentorship from West Elm while three runners-up will have their products featured in West Elm stores during the upcoming holiday season.

“The fact that we were chosen to move forward in this competition has blown us away,” said Alex Aeschbury, co-founder of Such + Such, in a press release. “We couldn't have gotten here without the support of Cincinnati, and it’s fitting that Cincinnati will help take our brand to the next level.” Such + Such’s founders Aeschbury and Zach Darmanian-Harris, former students at University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, have provided design and fabrication services for a variety of clients nationwide, as well as some of Cincinnati’s local favorites Neon’s Unplugged, Sloane Boutique and the Cincinnati Art Museum.

Coinciding with the contest, Such + Such in August launched a product line featuring hand-crafted furniture and home decor pieces including coffee tables, stools and wall clocks. All of the pieces from this inaugural line are sustainably made from naturally felled ash wood locally sourced from the Ohio Valley.

Such + Such joins 19 other small companies from around the U.S. whose creations include pottery, hand-dyed textiles, organic soap and skincare and handmade novelty goods. These finalists will be judged based on online votes, originality, design, story, commitment to local production and depth of product assortment. Public voting is open through Oct 14, and can be done here. The winners will be announced Nov 19.

There will be a voting party hosted by PB&J, a local PR and design firm that merged with Such + Such in 2013. The party will take place from 5:30-7:30 p.m. tonight at the PB&J offices at 1417 Main St. 1A in Over-the-Rhine. Rhinegeist Brewery will be providing refreshments.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.07.2014 76 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
vote logo

Morning News and Stuff

Early voting starts today; John Crawford activists camp out in Beavercreek Police Department; 99 problems but a bridge ain't one

Hey all! Morning news time. The first bit of news I want to hit you with — today is the first day of early voting in Ohio. From here on out until the Nov. 4 election, you can vote on any weekday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will also be weekend hours starting Oct. 25. So. Go vote. Early voting was slated to start last week, but the U.S. Supreme Court put a stay on a ruling by a lower court that would have expanded voting hours across the state. Instead, Ohio gets the more restricted hours drawn up by the GOP-led Ohio General Assembly and administered by Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted.

• A group of activists protesting the police shooting of John Crawford III in Beavercreek has been camped out in the lobby of the city’s police department for 24 hours now. About 15 members of the Ohio Student Association, a progressive activist group, spent the night in the station. They’ve indicated they won’t leave until they are granted a meeting with Beavercreek Police Chief Dennis Evers. The group is asking for a meeting by Wednesday.

• Hey! Do you want to get married in a former women’s shelter? How about staying the night in a luxurious room that once provided comfort and stability for someone fleeing an abusive relationship or life on the streets? Western & Southern has just the ticket. The company has long been planning on turning the former Anna Louise Inn next to Lytle Park into a luxury hotel, and now those plans are coming into focus. W&S CEO John Barrett last Tuesday discussed the ongoing planning, saying the company envisions the building as a 106-room ultra luxury hotel that can serve as a destination place where well-to-do folks can have weddings and other special events. Awesome.

• Over-the-Rhine’s Chatfield College, a private Catholic institution specializing in two-year degrees for first generation college students, is undertaking a $3.4 million renovation project on two buildings in the neighborhood. The move comes as the college prepares to grow, making goals to go from 300 to 900 students over the next five to seven years. The buildings along Central Parkway will be renovated in a way that preserves their historic character, school officials say, as well as allowing the school to accommodate more students.

• Kentucky’s got 99 problems, but a bridge ain’t one, apparently. A decade’s worth of maintenance reports for the crusty ole Brent Spence Bridge, which carries I-75/71 across the Ohio River, show that its condition has been declining for years. The last report scored the bridge a 59 out of 100, the equivalent of a C- on the system’s rating scale. Yet the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet, which has official responsibility for the span, has spent just $1 million in repairs on the bridge in the past three years, as concrete crumbles and rust gathers. The official reason: The state is waiting for the 51-year-old obsolete bridge to be replaced or majorly overhauled. A replacement will cost $2.4 billion. Meanwhile, a group of powerful business and political leaders in the state calling themselves “No BS Tolls” (get it? Brent Spence? BS? Haha) have banded together to oppose one of the most likely funding options to raise all that money — toll roads. Both federal and state governments have repeatedly signaled that government funding is not available to replace the bridge.

• Now that we’re in Kentucky, let’s revisit the state’s nail-bitter of a Senate race. A new poll says Republican incumbent and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is now trailing challenger Alison Lundergan Grimes, a Democrat, by two points, 44-46. Those results from the Bluegrass Poll seem like a big deal, but keep in mind other recent polls show McConnell with a slight to significant advantage. Translation: This race looks to be going to a photo finish. Grimes’ isn't exactly popular in the state. Nearly half of respondents to a recent poll think she's just an Obama crony. But even more than that said they want someone other than McConnell. Grimes' poll bump comes after her campaign dumped tons of money into new TV ads across the state, including some rather goofy ones where she lectures McConnell on how to hold a gun. The race looks to be one of the most expensive Senate contests in history.

 
 

 

 

 
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