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by Staff 09.25.2015 139 days ago
Posted In: Music, Northside, Arts, Comedy, Concerts, Culture, Life, Fun, Events, Drinking, Eats at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List (9/25-9/27)

MidPoint Music Festival, Newport Oktoberfest, apples, fireworks and more

FRIDAY

Spend the weekend at the MIDPOINT MUSIC FESTIVAL

The most common question associated with Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival — besides “Are you going?” — is probably something along the lines of, “Who should I go see?” The festival, which returns to various venues around Over-the-Rhine and downtown this Friday-Sunday, has always been about exploration and discovery, and word-of-mouth recommendations are some of the best ways to find great new music at MPMF. Hopefully CityBeat — which owns and operates MPMF, now in its 14th year — can also be of assistance as you plot your MidPoint adventure. The most common question associated with Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival — besides “Are you going?” — is probably something along the lines of, “Who should I go see?” The festival, which returns to various venues around Over-the-Rhine and downtown this Friday-Sunday, has always been about exploration and discovery, and word-of-mouth recommendations are some of the best ways to find great new music at MPMF. Hopefully CityBeat — which owns and operates MPMF, now in its 14th year — can also be of assistance as you plot your MidPoint adventure. The 2015 MidPoint Music Festival takes place Friday-Sunday at various venues. More info/tickets: mpmf.com.


Mark Mothersbaugh stands among works that feature his altered high-school yearbook photo.
Photo: Jesse Fox

Check out the visual art of Devo's Mark Mothersbaugh in MYOPIA at the CAC

“Cincinnati, in some ways, was the start of me being an artist,” says Mark Mothersbaugh, relaxing as best he can, given his constantly enthused, exuberant state, in a meeting room at downtown’s Contemporary Arts Center. “So there’s something about coming back here that is this completion of a cycle.” In the building on this day, much is going on that is about him. The CAC is preparing to open (at 8 p.m. Friday to the general public) its much-anticipated exhibit, Myopia. The show, curated by Adam Lerner of Denver’s Museum of Contemporary Art, looks at the Akron, Ohio native’s career as a visual artist/designer, as well as his accomplishments as a co-founder and lead singer of the Post-Punk/Art-Rock band Devo and subsequently as an in-demand composer for film and television, creating music for such Wes Anderson movies as The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou and Rushmore, as well as The Lego Movie, Pee-Wee’s Playhouse and Rugrats. Read the full feature on Mothersbaugh and Myopia here. Myopia opens at the CAC 8 p.m. Friday and continues through Jan. 9. Visit contemporaryartscenter.org for more information.

CliftonFest
Photo: Provided
Drink a beer at CLIFTONFEST

The fourth-annual CliftonFest promises the ultimate Clifton experience — casual, eclectic and local. Throughout the weekend, attendees can enjoy local eats from food trucks and restaurants; dance to live music from the likes of Wade Baker, Baoku and The Image Afro Beat band and Elementree Livity Project; run a 5k through Burnet Woods; shop neighborhood stores; interact with street artists and circus performers; watch a costumed pet parade on Sunday; and even throw back a cold one at the festival beer tent. 6-10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. Free. Gaslight District, Ludlow Avenue, Clifton, cliftonfest.com


Drink more beer at NEWPORT OKTOBERFEST

Newport Oktoberfest, purported to be the most authentic Oktoberfest in Greater Cincinnati, kicks off Friday. Modeled after Munich’s fest, this event features everything German, from giant tents and authentic German cuisine to live folk dancing, continuous live German music and tons of beer. 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Riverboat Row, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., oktoberfestnewport.com

Hannibal the Cannibal makes his musical debut in SILENCE! THE MUSICAL

Of course you know The Silence of the Lambs, the creepy movie about “Hannibal the Cannibal.” It was a big hit in 1991 with Anthony Hopkins as the brilliant, manipulative serial killer and Jodie Foster as the young FBI cadet who recruits him to help her catch a different psychopath. Well, wouldn’t you know that someone turned it into Silence! The Musical, an award winner at the 2005 New York International Fringe Festival? It’s become a cult favorite, and the parody-loving folks at Falcon Theatre have landed it after several years of hot pursuit. Bon appetit! Through Oct. 10. $15-$20. Monmouth Theatre, 636 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky., 513-479-6783, falcontheatre.net.

The Michael Lowe Collection: Installation 1
Photo: Provided
Check out modern art in the closing reception for THE MICHAEL LOWE COLLECTION

The Art Academy of Cincinnati provides a rare opportunity to view artwork from the collection of local collector/dealer Michael Lowe. Much of Lowe’s diverse collection features radical, reductive and revisionist art from the 1960s and 1970s, firmly rooted in Minimal, Post-Minimal and Conceptual art, which helped to define the 20th-century avant-garde. Lowe’s exhibition, which features world-renowned artists like Sol LeWitt, Christo, Gilbert and George, Lucio Fontana and Bruce Nauman will have its closing reception this Final Friday. Closing reception: 5-9 p.m. Friday. Free. Pearlman Gallery, 1212 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, artacademy.edu.  


SATURDAY
Weeki Wachee Mermaids
Photo: Provided
Suspend your disbelief with the WEEKI WACHEE MERMAIDS at the Newport Aquarium

Mermaids are no longer a myth — they are a limited-time attraction at the Newport Aquarium. Watch the graceful and finned Weeki Wachee Mermaids as they swim underwater with sea creatures daily inside the aquarium’s tanks. The Weeki Wachee Mermaids, a classic roadside attraction from Weeki Wachee Springs State Park in Florida, have been swimming for more than 60 years, delighting visitors with simple magic. Through Oct. 12. Free with admission. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., newportaquarium.com

Country Applefest 2014’s first-place dumplings
Photo: Blue Ribbon Kitchen
Celebrate America's favorite fruit — apples — at COUNTRY APPLEFEST

There are a couple of distinct signs that autumn has hit the Tristate: Leaves begin to fall, pumpkin spice flavor is everywhere and the cooler temperatures force hipsters to start breaking out the flannel. But the most welcome and certainly the most delicious harbingers of fall are the myriad festivals featuring our favorite recurrent foods of the season, especially the most American fruit of all: the apple. Saturday, the 33rd-annual Country Applefest will be even bigger than ever, thanks to its new location at the Warren County Fairgrounds and the addition of more than 100 vendors. “We had outgrown the downtown Lebanon area several years ago,” says Jiffy Stiles, festival chairperson, “This year we were given the opportunity to move to the fairgrounds, which gives us the space to have so many more vendors.” Read more about the festival and find a prize-winning apple dumpling recipe here. Country Applefest takes place Saturday at the Warren County Fairgrounds. More info: countryapplefest.com


Vote for your favorite fireworks at FIRE UP THE NIGHT

Fire Up the Night is an international fireworks competition over Lake Como at Coney Island featuring competitors Fantastic Fireworks of England, News de Brazil, Fireworx/Sky Lighter of Australia and a finale from local favorites, Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks. If the thrills of massive, music-synchronized fireworks shows just aren’t enough for you, admission will also include access to classic rides, a pool party and a hot air balloon show on Moonlite Mall. 4 p.m. gates; 8:30 p.m. fireworks. $30 per carload; $5 walk-ins. Coney Island, 6201 Kellogg Ave., California, coneyislandpark.com.

Cincinnati Street Food Festival
Photo: Provided
Stuff yourself at the CINCINNATI STREET FOOD FESTIVAL

Dine al fresco all day during Walnut Hills’ fourth-annual Cincinnati Street Food Festival. All your favorite food trucks converge on East McMillan Street for you to snack your way through lunch or dinner by-the-truck, complete with local craft beer, live music and family-friendly fun. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. Free admission. E. McMillan Street between Hemlock and Chatham streets, Walnut Hills, walnuthillsrf.org

Cincy Summer Streets
Photo: via Facebook
Play in traffic-less streets during OTR's CINCY SUMMER STREETS

The final Cincy Summer Streets event of the season takes over Pleasant Street in Over-the-Rhine. The street will be shut to car traffic, allowing humans to play. The pedestrian party features free activities, including a climbing wall, mini golf, lawn bowling, life-size paint-by-numbers, yoga and dancing. Stroll the street, chat with neighbors, support local businesses and enjoy a Saturday afternoon in OTR. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Pleasant Street between Washington Park and Findlay Market, Over-the-Rhine, cincysummerstreets.org

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography
Step back in time at the OHIO RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville, renfestival.com

Dine and dance during the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra's OPENING NIGHT GALA
The Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra kicks off its season with a weekend of events, featuring performances of Hector Berlioz’s psychedelic Symphonie fantastique, a tale of “opium, obsession, murder, fantasy (and) hell,” says CSO conductor Louis  Langrée. Before Saturday’s performance, there will be a themed gala with dinner and cocktails in Music Hall’s Ballroom, and an afterparty with desserts, drinks, DJs and dancing. Sunday’s performance will feature a “Stories in Concert” event, in which Langrée shares the story of Berlioz’s life to give listeners a new perspective on his work. 11 a.m. Friday; 8 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Concert tickets start at $12; Gala: $200; afterparty: $50; Stories in Concert: $25. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org

'Zory's Stories: The Other Side of Music Hall'
Photo: Matthew Zory
See the other side of Music Hall in ZORY'S STORIES
Matthew Zory, besides being a bassist for the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, is a photographer with an interest in images that convey a narrative about the neighborhoods surrounding Music Hall and the greater city. A show of his work, Zory’s Stories: The Other Side of Music Hall, opens Friday at Wash Park Art gallery. As part of the event, Ellen Ruth Harrison has composed a piece for Zory to play on bass, “The Window,” and poet Donald Bogen will read from his work. The performance times will most likely be at 6:30 and 8:30 p.m. Opening reception: 5:30-9 p.m. Friday. Through Oct. 25. Free. Wash Park Art, 1215 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washparkart.com


SUNDAY

The Wood Brothers
Photo: Alysse Gafkjen
THE WOOD BROTHERS head to 20th Century Theater

Brothers Chris and Oliver Wood grew up in Colorado surrounded by the campfire music of their father and the storytelling poetics of their mother. So it was no surprise that both ended up as successful creatives, although, despite their shared roots, they didn’t work together for a significant portion of their careers. Oliver started his music career playing guitar and touring alongside Blues/Rock artist Tinsley Ellis before founding his own group, the Blues and Funk powerhouse King Johnson. Chris, on the other hand, studied and mastered Jazz bass, which led to him co-founding one of today’s most popular and highly acclaimed contemporary Jazz acts, Medeski Martin & Wood. Read more about The Wood Brothers in this week's Sound Advice. See The Wood Brothers with Gill Landry Sunday at 20th Century Theater. More info/tickets: 20thcenturytheatre.com.

Luna Gale
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
LUNA GALE offers no easy answers at Ensemble Theatre
Ensemble Theatre doesn’t pull any punches with the opener for its 30th season. Artistic director D. Lynn Meyers is passionate about shows that tell us about the world in which we live, and Luna Gale is a tough but necessary reminder about how hard it is to do the right thing. Annie Fitzpatrick turns in another memorable ETC performance, this time as a caring but overextended social worker trying to deal with a baby caught in a tug-of-war between 19-year-old parents with drug issues and a religiously judgmental grandmother. No heroes, no villains — and no easy answers in this award-winning drama. Through Sept 27. $28-$44. Ensemble Theatre, 1127 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-421-3555, ensemblecincinnati.org

Drink a sarsaparilla at the OLD WEST FEST
If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg, oldwestfestival.com.

Tom Dustin
Photo: Provided
Laugh along with TOM DUSTIN at Go Bananas

It’s not immediately apparent that comedian Tom Dustin is from Boston, as he doesn’t sound like the guys from Car Talk or the cast of Good Will Hunting. “Every time I get on a plane to go to another part of the country, particularly the Midwest, I make a conscious effort to sound like the locals,” he says. Usually he can pull it off — unless he has a few beers. “You can’t even understand me then. I sound like every scene in The Departed.” While in Cincinnati, Dustin will be recording a CD. “I’ve been told my act is kind of mean, but I pull it off in a likeable way.” Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com

Art Off Pike
Photo: Provided
Stroll local arts and crafts at ART OFF PIKE
The 11th-annual Art Off Pike is an urban arts festival that transforms Covington’s Seventh Street into an art walk full of performance works, installations and live music, with added food trucks and beer. The work of more than 60 local and regional emerging artists will be showcased and available for purchase. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Seventh Street between Madison and Washington streets, Covington, Ky., artoffpike.org.

 
 
by Rick Pender 09.25.2015 139 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 9-25 - frankie & johnny @ net - sara mackie & dylan shelton - photo provided by new edgecliff theatre

Stage Door

Frankie & Johnny and a taste of Hannibal

New Edgecliff Theatre’s Frankie and Johnny in the Clair de Lune is under way a week later than initially announced following some issues with its not-quite-ready new home in Northside. So it’s been moved to the Essex Studio (2511 Essex Place, Walnut Hills), in a performance space routinely used by Cincinnati Actors Studio & Academy, a training group for teens. It was bit of hustle and strain to move a half-built set from Northside to Walnut Hills, but it fits nicely into CASA’s black box. Rather than rattling around in a big old church sanctuary (Northside’s work-in-progress Urban Artifact), NET’s staging of Terrence McNally’s 1987 romantic dramedy works beautifully in this more intimate space. But I suspect no matter where it was staged, the two-character show would be well received thanks to actors Sara Mackie and Dylan Shelton, smartly put through their paces by director Jared Doren. As lonely co-workers in a New York greasy spoon diner, they’ve finally connected — at least for a night. They’re both kind of needy although in very different ways. Frankie, a sweet waitress, has been bruised by bad relationships and seems happy with her own insular existence; Johnny, the motor-mouthed short-order cook who can quote Shakespeare, is driven by angst and passion — filled with desperation that he doesn’t have any more chances for romances. This naturally frightens Frankie, and their navigation through this minefield, full of passion and snark, makes audiences laugh and love them both. It’s definitely worth seeing. Because of the move, it’s a short run, just through Oct. 3. Tickets: 888-528-7311

The folks who run Falcon Theater, performing in Newport at the Monmouth Theatre (636 Monmouth St.) have staked a claim on comic musical satires — they’ve produced Debbie Does Dallas: The Musical, Poseidon: The Upside-Down Musical, Evil Dead: The Musical and several more. So they worked really hard to get the rights to Silence: The Musical, based on The Silence of the Lambs, the creepy 1991 movie about “Hannibal the Cannibal” starring Anthony Hopkins as a manipulative serial killer and Jodie Foster as the young FBI cadet who needs him to solve another serial murder. The musical version was a big hit at the 2005 New York International Fringe Festival and over the past decade it's become a cult favorite. It opens tonight and continues on weekends through Oct. 10. Tickets: 513-479-6783

The first production of the season at Northern Kentucky University, Ken Ludwig’s Moon Over Buffalo, is a comedy about a pair of fading actors from the 1950s on tour in Buffalo. Their marriage is coming apart, but a famous movie director is coming to see their matinee and just might cast them in an upcoming feature. But everything goes wrong when they start confusing the two shows they’re performing — Noël Coward’s Private Lives and Edmond Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac. Tickets: 859-572-5464

Speaking of Cyrano, there’s a fine production of it (not to be confused with anything else …) at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company, with an excellent performance by company veteran Jeremy Dubin in the title role. It’s onstage through Oct. 3. 513-381-2273. • Also closing on Oct. 3 is the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s beautiful production of The Secret Garden, a musical based on a cherished novel from a century ago. This is one of the Playhouse’s “family-friendly” productions — like A Christmas Carol — suitable for multiple generations. It looks great, and the talent onstage — much of it from Broadway — is top-notch. Tickets: 513-421-3888

If you haven’t seen Rebecca Gilman’s Luna Gale at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, you really should try to get there this weekend for one of its final showings. This new play hat will make you uncomfortable because it’s about a tough conflict with no obvious right or wrong — a custody fight over a baby between her irresponsible parents and her religiously conservative grandmother, refereed by an over-burdened social worker. The cast (including three former ETC apprentices who do a great job) is led by Annie Fitzpatrick as the weary social worker. She’s especially good in this role, a woman trying to do the right thing who’s thwarted at every turn. Final performance is 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: 513-421-3555

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Tony Johnson 09.24.2015 139 days ago
at 02:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Spoonful of Cinema: Mistress America

I thought I was going to see Sicario, the border crime drama starring Emily Blunt, Josh Brolin and Benicio Del Toro on Sunday night. I originally didn’t think it was in town yet, so when I Googled the movie and a lone show time for 7:30 p.m. popped up, I immediately headed out to catch it. I had been under the impression that Sicario wasn’t expanding from select venues for at least another week, but I did not hesitate to trust Google. Turns out I should have. Sicario still had not hit Cincinnati. But I was in the mood for a movie, so I caught a showing of Mistress America instead.

Mistress America is a sweet-hearted comedy with something to say about itself. The 86-minute romp is warm and witty and cozy, too. Writer/director Noah Baumbach is known for keeping it real with considerations of generational conflict and coming-of-age, and this time Baumbach is willing to push his story template into the realm of the absurd. The script is packed with dialogue that flies rapidly out of the mouths of leading ladies Lola Kirke and Greta Gerwig.

The story is preposterous and the delivery is silly, but the film is kept grounded with an overarching observation of art and honesty. The story follows college freshman and loner Tracy (Kirke) as she begins to discover New York City as an accomplice to Brooke (Gerwig) on frivolous adventures after they meet due to an eventual family wedding that will make the pair sisters. Things get real when Tracy uses her experiences with Brooke as an inspiration for a short story that might gain her entrance into a campus literature group. But things get zany when Brooke begins to actively pursue her dream of opening a restaurant and the lead investors back out. When Brooke and Tracy visit Brooke’s psychic for counsel, they conclude that Brooke must face her ex-fiancé and ex-best friend, who are now married and wealthy in Greenwich, Conn., and fully capable of funding Brooke’s entrepreneurial venture. So the two girls set off to “Greenwich grossville” to get the money that Brooke desperately needs.

Along the way we discover that Brooke’s former best friend, Mamie-Claire, stole Brooke’s T-shirt design and made a company and decent profit out of it. Meanwhile, Brooke’s current best friend, Tracy, is feeding off of Brooke’s life for writing material. The parallels and paradoxes begin to mount, and eventually culminate in a modest but meaningful conclusion.

Mistress America never sacrifices its message for laughs and doesn’t have to sacrifice dignity for them, either. It is new but familiar territory for Noah Baumbach, whose off-the-screen partnership with Gerwig hopefully reflects the chemistry evident on set of production. Gerwig is an absolute star that can make us feel as young and optimistic as her characters often feel. And Baumbach knows exactly what to do with her on screen.

Baumbach’s most recent movie is brief but bold enough to satisfy. It makes no apologies for its rat-a-tat pace and brings us along for a youthful rush that ends with a smile. Baumbach’s talent is on full display here — this comedy is a fun, clever and endearing look at what it means to grow up, what it means to be a friend and what it means to be an artist. Sometimes, as Mistress America maybe helps us understand, there’s more to art than art. There are months of maturation and countless random encounters that develop the crafter and, in turn, their craft. There are broken promises and broken dreams and fresh starts and lucky breaks. Overall, Mistress America is mostly somewhere in between fresh and lucky, with only a few pieces that could use some fixing. Grade: B

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 09.24.2015 140 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Cincy community college president steps down; Wright State University to host presidential debate; Ohio senate introduces bill to defund Planned Parenthood

Good morning, Cincy! Here are your morning headlines. 

Cincinnati State Technical and Community College President Dr. O'dell Owens has stepped down to become the medical director of the Cincinnati Health Department. Cincinnati's health commission approved Owens' appointment Tuesday night, and he stepped down Wednesday evening after he reportedly felt like tensions between him and the college's board of trustees made it to difficult for him to continue. Provost Monica Posey will serve as interim president of the college and the school will launch a nationwide search for a permenant replacement. The position of medical director has been open since July 1 when Dr. Lawrence Holditch retired. 

• Wright State University in Dayton is set to host the first presidential debate next fall. The school has already created a website for the much-anticipated event that will take place almost exactly a year from now on September 26, 2016. Many details, such as the format of the debate or number of candidates that will participate, are still uncertain at this time. But if you're wondering how much time left until this action packed event down to the second, the debate's official website includes a countdown. Just 368 days, 10 hours, 34 minutes and 8 seconds to go (ed. note: that's now 368 days, 10 hours, 29 minutes and 16 seconds left to go, errr... 15 seconds... 14... ah)... 

• Need a new job? Ride-sharing service Uber will double its workforce next year by adding 10,000 news drivers to Ohio, including 3,000 in Columbus, which currently has 2,500 registered drivers. Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger has called the addition a "monumental task," and State Legislators are considering a bill that would make transportation regulations for Uber. In the meantime, Uber will start hosting recruitment events over the next few months. This announcement bring me one step closer to selling my car. Now, if only Cincinnati could attract Car2Go to come here, I'd be set. 

• Republican Senate President Keith Faber has introduced a bill to divert government funds from Planned Parenthood. A similar bill was introduced into the House in August. The move comes after the release of controversial footage recorded by anti-abortion activists that shows a Planned Parenthood official describing how the group benefits from selling fetal tissue. Planned Parenthood claims it has broken no laws and that the video is heavily edited. But it had lead to a push by Republicans across the country to defund the health clinics.

• More local Muslim leaders have spoken out against GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson's comments the former physician made saying he wouldn't support a Muslim president. Carson, who is a Seven-Day Adventist, told Meet the Press on Sunday that he would not advocate for a Muslim as president. Roula Allouch, an attorney who chairs the Council on American-Islamic Relations told the Enquirer she questions Carson's ability to run for president after making "very bigoted remarks," which shows a lack of basic knowledge of the Constitution and Islamic relations. Carson addressed his comments during his visit to Sharonville on Tuesday claiming they were taken out of context.                   

Email me at nkrebs@citybeat.com. I'm out for today!
 
 
by Kerry Skiff 09.23.2015
Posted In: Literary at 11:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Beyond the Books

Signature Series at the Campbell County Public Library's Fort Thomas Branch

Writing can be so frustrating. As I sit here trying to spit out a catchy introduction, I struggle to make sense of anything in my brain, which seems to cause an even greater muddle. Most of the time writing is simple; you put a thought into words on a page. But the more I write the more I realize there’s more to crafting a paragraph than simply ordering the words correctly and sticking a period at the end. To be a good writer you must capture the heart of the message, sending it from inside yourself and into the reader. And if you’re a great writer, you’ll get something back.

On Friday night I was settled in a chair at the Fort Thomas branch of the Campbell County Public Library, waiting for the first author visit of the Signature Series to begin. I watched the crowd of middle-aged women around me fidget impatiently in their seats, waiting for the nationally-acclaimed author, Beverly Lewis, to appear. As I, too, waited, I caught snippets of conversations as ladies swapped stories of reading Lewis’ novels, describing what her writing meant to them. I listened, wondering why Lewis didn’t write about her audience, for their stories seemed as touching as the books they seemed to adore. Perhaps one of the most touching tales came from the row right behind me. Paul and Janet Devotto were telling the woman seated beside them about Janet’s twin sister, Joan Braun, who passed away last October. Joan had a stroke several years ago that left her partially paralyzed. Because she couldn’t move her left arm or left leg, Joan came to live with Paul and Janet, so they could take care of her. “She was the greatest person,” Janet said when I caught up with her later, her voice catching slightly.

“She loved to read more than anything else,” Paul explained to me. “Reading was a passion for her.” According to the couple, Joan’s favorite author was Beverly Lewis. “Joan loved her,” said Paul. Although Joan was an avid reader, her partial paralysis kept her from holding a book, so Janet and her husband bought Joan a Nook. “We got all her books to read, and we would sit and read until four in the morning,” Janet recalled.

The couple eagerly relayed their story to Lewis as she signed their book, thanking her for the way her novels touch lives. As Paul later told me, “Not many people know they’ve made a difference, but this woman has. Joan needed something and this woman gave it to her.”

The Devottos’ story is one of many Lewis has heard over the years. “I love to meet [my readers] and hear their stories, because they always tell me little tidbits about how the stories touched their hearts in a particular way,” she confided to me. “They say, ‘I know you, Beverly, I’ve read your heart. I’ve read your heart in all the books you’ve written.’ ”

As I talked with Lewis about her audience, it’s evident from the softness of her voice that she has a very personal connection with her fans. “There’s some sort of a bond between me and my readers I think, now, from all the years and all the books, which I think is important,” Lewis said.  “I always call them my reader friends because, for all these many years, it seems like they have been so faithful to continue to show up for my new books, which is awesome.”

Even as a self-proclaimed compulsive writer with more than 80 published works, Lewis has not lost the heart of her message, that very core that has inspired thousands across the globe. As I walked out the door at the end of the night, I realized all these people came because of a story. They each had one story that in turn influenced their life, providing comfort or peace or inspiration. These women came not to hear a story, but to share their stories, sequels that began in the pages of a book. I don’t know about you, but to me, that’s good writing.  

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.23.2015
Posted In: News at 10:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

No fed money for CPD body cams, but some for extra cops; should Burnet Woods change?; Kasich schmoozes on late night TV

Hey hey! Here’s what’s going on around the city today.

The Cincinnati Police Department won’t get federal money to supply officers with body cameras, but that won’t stop CPD from equipping its officers with the technology. The department has planned on purchasing the cameras for months, and the issue became even more urgent after footage from a body camera worn by University of Cincinnati Police officer Ray Tensing revealed that he more than likely acted improperly in the shooting death of black motorist Samuel DuBose at a routine traffic stop in July. UC police are required to wear the cameras. CPD officers aren’t yet, but that will change. The city says its goal is to begin equipping officers with the cameras by next May. Meanwhile, CPD will get help from the feds in other ways. Yesterday, the city announced the department will get a $1.9 million federal grant to add 15 more officers for three years.

• Do you like Burnet Woods? Or does it scare you? If you’re like the author of this editorial, it’s probably the latter, though you've only been there once so maybe give it another try. One of the oft-mentioned projects that could be funded by a proposed property tax levy to fund improvements to the city’s parks is a revamp of the urban forest just north of UC’s campus. That’s not surprising; in the past, Mayor John Cranley, who is pushing the tax proposal, has called the park “creepy” because… well, basically, because it has too many trees. He’s described his vision for the park as something akin to Washington Park in Over-the-Rhine, which underwent a multi-million dollar renovation in 2011. I just want to be a contrarian voice here: Don’t change the woods. They’re lovely. I’m in there at least a few times a week, and I always see other folks there running, fishing, riding their bikes — all the things the mayor and others who want a revamp say they wish people did there. Having a densely wooded area in the midst of such a bustling set of neighborhoods is wonderful. What’s more, it doesn’t seem to impact crime in any way. If you’re curious, here are reported crimes in Burnet in the last year. Notice anything? Yeah, there was like, one, and it was a guy trying to steal an air conditioning unit from a park building.

 • Efforts to develop the riverfront in Northern Kentucky will get a big boost from state grants. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet and Gov. Steve Beshear have awarded the city of Covington nearly $4 million in Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality grants, the city announced yesterday. That money will be used toward a $10 million walking and biking path along the Ohio River along with other upgrades to the area. A total of $5.4 million in CMAQ grants will go to Northern Kentucky, according to the a news release by the city.

• North College Hill Mayor Amy Bancroft has resigned, citing acrimony between herself and the City Council in the municipality just north of Cincinnati as one of many reasons for her departure. Bancroft said the atmosphere in city government “borders on harassment and bullying” and that the workplace is a “toxic environment.” At least one city council member has fired back at those accusations, saying that it’s the city administration led by Bancroft that has caused the toxic environment and that council merely sought transparency from the administration. Bancroft was appointed to the position after the previous mayor Daniel Brooks left the position. Brooks had served as mayor for three decades. Bancroft was up for election this fall, but will not register as a candidate. Besides the tumultuous atmosphere in city government, Bancroft said she was resigning to spend more time with her family.

• OK, so I know you’ve been waiting. It’s time for your daily update on Gov. John Kasich. Last night he appeared on Late Night with Seth Meyers and joked about his dance moves, his low polling numbers and the fact that he’s a Steelers fan and is still somehow governor of Ohio. Not really much new here on the policy front, or in terms of campaign strategies. But Meyers did give Kasich props for running what he called a “reasonable” campaign in the midst of the Trumps and Cruzes getting all crazy-like. It’s yet another moment in which Kasich is working hard to sell himself as the plain-speaking moderate who is friends with the working class average Joe and Jane. Again, many of his tax policies and attempts to bust up public unions might suggest otherwise, but in a field where folks like former Texas Gov. Rick Perry and Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker can get drummed out of the race for not being conservative enough, you have to take what you can get when it comes to “reasonability.” Walker and Perry bailing on the primary hasn’t seemed to help Kasich much yet, but only having to duel, like, 13 other people instead of 15 probably can’t hurt.

• Finally, the Pope is hanging out in America. It’s a big deal. He said some stuff about climate change and income inequality. Conservatives are angry. Etc. You’ve heard this one already so I’ll just stop there.

I’m out! Twitter. Email.  You know how it goes.

 
 
by Tony Johnson 09.22.2015
at 02:53 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Spoonful of Cinema: Black Mass

My movie weekend started at 7 p.m. Friday night, when I went and saw Black Mass, the true-crime expose of the Boston crime boss James “Whitey” Bulger. The picture stars Johnny Depp as the murderous, opportunistic kingpin, while Joel Edgerton portrays fellow South-Bostonian and conspirator, FBI agent John Connolly. It’s a somewhat typical, mostly entertaining look at one of America’s most notorious most-wanted criminals of the time.

Black Mass has a few things going for it. First of all, Depp is in good form as “Whitey” Bulger. He commits cold-blooded murder to solve any inconvenience along the way to ruling Boston’s scummy criminal underworld. Depp’s Bulger is a methodical, cunning and careful small-time mobster who takes every opportunity granted to propel himself to the big leagues of the black market. We get a particularly riveting piece of the character’s psyche when he explains the ethics of punching people in the face to his elementary school-aged son. “It’s not what you do”, he tells the boy. “It’s when and where you do it and who you do it to or with. If nobody sees it,” Bulger reassures his son, “didn’t happen.”

Along the way, we get solid work from an impressive cast. Supporters Benedict Cumberbatch, Dakota Johnson, Jesse Plemons, Kevin Bacon, Adam Scott and Corey Stoll all come along to fight the fight that sees the eventual downfall of Bulger’s Winter Hill Gang. It’s a tense cat-and-mouse game throughout, but we only get short glimpses of the damage done.

The crime drama covers roughly seven years in just over two hours, and director Scott Cooper takes on the difficult task of packing such a long period into 122 minutes. It’s a movie with fundamental flaws in its nature. A highly calculated, brutal and bloody war unfolds on the streets of Boston. But it all happens so fast, and some moments and spaces that Agent Connolly, “Whitey” Bulger and their respective peers occupy feel more intriguing than others. It left me wishing that the story had something to say about itself, and didn’t just serve as a series of glimpses into the acts of a real-life villain.

Interestingly enough, the real James “Whitey” Bulger has denounced what he’s heard of Black Mass and Depp’s portrayal of him. Former member of the Winter Hill Gang Kevin Weeks claims that what we have on our hands is pure “fantasy.” It seems strange that the makers of a true crime story about “Whitey” Bulger would veer from the facts and into the realm of exaggeration when a movie already exists that does just that. I’m talking about Martin Scorsese’s The Departed. Not even 10 years old, the Academy Award-winning movie was a loose interpretation of “Whitey” Bulger’s eventual end. Perhaps if The Departed had not been released, Black Mass would be more worthwhile. But the new, supposedly more genuine representation felt hesitant, as if trying to straddle the line between fact and fiction while propelling us a month-per-minute through the timeline.

Essentially, Black Mass is a shadow to both Bulger’s true story and The Departed’s artistic falsehoods. It feels aimless despite its grit, its guts and its star, and I think that to some degree there is a good movie hiding somewhere within this Mass. Grade: C-

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 09.22.2015
Posted In: News at 10:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Ben Carson comes to Cincinnati; Hamilton County Sheriff's Department gets body cams; VW gets caught cheating

Hey Cincinnati! Has everyone recovered from all the beer and brats consumed during Oktoberfest? No, not yet? I haven't either. But it was worth it, right? While we take that slow road to recovery, here are today's headlines. 

• GOP presidential candidate Ben Carson is making his first public appearance this morning in Cincinnati after his controversial remarks that a Muslim should not be president and that Islam goes against the U.S. Constitution. Carson, who will be rallying in Sharonville this morning, disappointed Muslims everywhere when he told NBC's Meet the Press on Sunday that he "would not advocate that we put a Muslim in charge of this nation." The Cincinnati office of the Council on American Islamic Relations recently stated that Carson should probably read the Constitution a little closer. Carson, a devout Seven-Day Adventist and retired neurosurgeon, is currently a close second behind Donald Trump in polls for the GOP nomination. He will speak at the Sharonville Convention Center to rally support in the Ohio presidential primary, which takes place on March 15, 2016. 

• Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine's son, Pat, will be running for the one of the two empty seats on the Ohio Supreme Court next year. The younger DeWine is a Republican and currently on the 1st Ohio District Court of Appeals. He is also a former Hamilton County judge. There is no announced Democratic contender yet. Two current justices are retiring next year because they have hit the mandatory age limit of 70. 

• The U.S. Department of Justice will give the Hamilton County Sheriff's Department a grant for just under $140,000 to purchase body cameras. The grant requires a 50/50 match with department funds, a "robust" training and was part of a $23 million program to get body cameras in 73 other agencies across the country.  

• The Ohio Historic Site Preservation Advisory Board is considering a recommendation to put Cincinnati's Heberle School on the National Register of Historical Places. The school, located in the West End, was build in 1929 as an elementary school to serve and aid the low-income population in the area. It was one of the schools developed during the Progressive Movement in the 1920s to fix some of the social issues caused by the industrial revolution. The board will review the property on Friday to decide whether to pass it along to the State Historic Preservation Office. 

• Last weekend was a great time to celebrate all things German, but probably not the best time to buy a certain German-made car. Volkswagen is in big trouble for cheating after U.S regulators found that some of its 2015 diesel cars were equipped with software that gave false emissions data. The company revealed today that the problem is not just in its U.S. cars, but also in 11 million of VW cars worldwide. In the two days since the scandal erupted, VW's stock has dropped 20 percent and the company has told U.S. dealers to halt the sale of some 2015 diesel models. The problem looks like it will be a hefty cost to the German automaker. VW has set aside $7.3 billion to cover the cost of fixing the cars and could face fines of up to $18 billion from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 

• Pope Francis will be making his first visit to the U.S. today after wrapping up his time on the Cuban beaches. The Pope will be here until next Sunday and then will visit Washington D.C., New York City and Philadelphia. He will reportedly give a speech to Congress addressing climate change, a move that is throwing off some Republicans lawmakers, like Rep. Paul Gosar, a Catholic from Arizona, who support one and not the other. Gosar plans to boycott the speech. 

That's all for today. As always, my email is nkrebs@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Nick Grever 09.21.2015
Posted In: Local Music, New Releases at 10:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Casino Warrior Unleashes ‘Centaur’

Area rockers introduce themselves with heavy debut EP

Casino Warrior is a name that many local music fans aren’t aware of. So far, the quartet (bassist Kevin McNair, vocalist and guitarist Miguel Richards, guitarist Billy Buzek and drummer Chad Wolary) has only played two real shows, one of which was its recent EP release party. But rest assured, based on the strength of the band’s live performance and its new, riff-laden, five-track release, the name will become much more recognizable quickly.

Centaur EP follows in the same vein as other Rock/Metal hybrids that are currently dominating many a longhairs’ playlist. If the likes of Red Fang, Black Tusk, Orange Goblin or old The Sword cause your skull and brain to repeatedly high five, then the Centaur EP is right up your alley. Richards and Buzek’s guitar leads show considerable chops; there are enough riffs in these five songs to warrant several back-to-back play-throughs just to unravel the heavy layers. Guitar nerds will be overjoyed; the rest of us will just bang our heads until we get a nosebleed.


Of course, riffs are great, but unless the floor tremors and eardrums pop, the Metal equation is only halfway completed. That’s where McNair and Wolary come in. McNair’s low-end rumbles through the mix and sets up shop in your chest. Playing this record at a high volume (as if there was any other allowable setting) is liable to shake things off the wall. Beware of any loose china or pictures of grandma that you may have sitting around your sound system. Wolary’s skin work rounds out the quartet and he brings the thunder; at times, it sounds like Zildjian gave the Incredible Hulk a gear sponsorship. And Hulk definitely smashes.


Richards’ vocals walk a fine line between ’70s Rock clean singing and the current-day growls. Each chorus and verse is delivered with a ferocity that makes the lyrics even more hilarious. I cannot wait for more people to get their hands on the album, learn the words, and yell “Horse balls!” when Casino Warrior performs “Centaur” at its next gig. In fact, each song on the EP is as ridiculous as the last. When your subject matter involves chupacabras, pterodactyls and the aforementioned centaurs, things are bound to get a little weird.


Of particular note is the song that Casino Warrior closed its EP release show with — “Pig Roast.” The track starts with a tribal rhythm from Wolary that’s worthy of accompanying a Fury Road war party, along with a bassline gut-punch courtesy of McNair. Shortly thereafter, Richards and Buzek join in with an earworm of a riff and Richards’ beefiest vocal delivery on the record. His ode to our great city demands attention before the band transitions to an extended outro that allows Richards and Buzek to show off their soloing abilities. And, what do you know — they’re amazing at more than just riffing.


As a whole, “Pig Roast” exemplifies what Casino Warrior is capable of. The band has a rhythm section that lays a rock solid foundation of groove upon which the guitars build a temple to the Riff Lords of old. The songs are more than the sum of their parts — and their parts already have quite a few big numbers involved. The guys have created a rare release that is musically serious, but still fun; heavy, but still accessible. 


If you’re a Cincinnati Rock and/or Metal fan, do yourself a favor and jump on the Casino Warrior bandwagon now — it’s about to get much more crowded.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 09.21.2015
Posted In: News at 10:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Noon News and Stuff

Rally remembering police shooting victims draws 100; did weed legalization effort create a biz tax loophole?; Kasich cuts a rug

Good morning all! Hope you're recovering from your Oktoberfest weekend. CityBeat's news team did the Hudy 7k (not the 14k because we're weak), which is basically an Oktoberfest pre-game that involves running some miles and then drinking free beers and eating free cheese coneys and goetta sliders at 9:30 in the morning. It's a good way to get all limbered up for the world's second-largest Oktoberfest, and also a great way to completely incapacitate yourself for an entire Sunday.

Anyway, here’s what’s up today.

• About 100 people, including the families of several unarmed people killed by police in Ohio in the last year, rallied Saturday on the campus of University of Cincinnati to remember Samuel DuBose and protest his death.
DuBose, who was unarmed, was shot July 19 during a routine traffic stop about a mile from campus in Mount Auburn by former UC police officer Ray Tensing. Tensing has since been charged with murder for that shooting. The rally ended with a march to the spot where DuBose was shot. A break-off march down Calhoun Street near UC’s campus resulted in four arrests. Video of that march seems to show a Cincinnati Police officer using a Taser on one marcher. Police have not released the charges against the four arrested during the march.

• By now, you’re probably familiar with ResponsibleOhio, the marijuana-legalization group that has landed an amendment to the state’s constitution on the November ballot. But did you know that the amendment as written might provide a state business tax loophole for businesses involved in selling marijuana? Some business tax experts say the inclusion of the word “local” in a clause within the amendment proposal would allow businesses related to the marijuana effort to forego paying state taxes on flow-through income. The proposal’s 10 grow sites, which would be owned by investors, would have to pay a flat tax on their earnings as set forth by the amendment. So would any marijuana retail stores that spring up from the legalization effort.

The ballot language also stipulates that such businesses would also have to pay any local taxes associated with doing business. But there’s the rub: former Ohio tax commissioner Tom Zaino says “local” in that context can be read legally to exclude state taxes. ResponsibleOhio says skirting those taxes isn’t the intention, and that it included the language to make sure businesses pay all applicable tax obligations, not just municipal ones. The initiative would allow anyone over 21 to purchase marijuana, but it has caused controversy due to the fact that it would only allow 10 grow sites around the state owned by the group’s investors.

• This has been all over my social media feed, mostly posted by angry Cincy natives. What do you think about this opinion piece from a Cincinnati Enquirer reporter who recently moved here from Florida? I have my own feelings, which I guess I can sum up by saying it’s kind of a bizarre and tone-deaf thing to publish. Who comes to a city and after five months calls oneself and one’s cohort “giants in a place that needs us?” Also, who calls entertainment places “nightclubs” these days? I dunno.

There are consistently more rad things going on in this city than I can make it to in any given week. I mean, if I went to all the cool stuff Chase Public and the Comet alone do in a given seven-day stretch I’d be exhausted, and that’s just in Northside. That’s all beside the point, though. The article’s apparent focus (it’s kind of all over the place) is that the city needs to find ways to attract more young professionals, especially minority young professionals. To which I would counter that is not the city’s biggest problem. We have enough young people, especially young people of color, coming up in the city who need more support. Transplants are welcome, but we can’t remake the city according to their wishes when we have a ton of people born and raised here who aren’t getting the opportunities their potential deserves. So yeah, let’s focus on that and then maybe we can build a new nightclub for the YPs who don’t want to pay Austin prices for their next vocational adventure.

• Ohio Gov. John Kasich can dance if he wants to, and he did just that Saturday night in Michigan after a GOP conference in which he made a distinctly working class pitch to Republican primary voters. Kasich danced to a Walk the Moon song for about 10 seconds, and, honestly, the results were… not disastrous. He looked slightly cooler than your dad at a wedding reception but less cool than like, someone who can actually dance. That’s a good place for a presidential candidate to be, I guess. Kasich wasn’t exactly setting the floor on fire, but it also looked like he didn’t really care that much about it, which is the true key to dancing.

If Kasich's tax policy was as inoffensive as his moves, well, Ohio would be a better place, that’s for sure. Kasich finished third in a straw poll in Michigan behind U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina. Not a bad showing, but Kasich has serious ground to make up before the state’s March 8 primary. The Ohio guv continues to poll low nationally, getting around 2 percent of the vote compared to GOP frontrunner Donald Trump’s 24 percent.

That’s it for me. Email or tweet at me with your best pitch for a new nightclub in Cincy. My vote? A Miami Vice-themed dance club at The Banks called Sax on the Beach where DJ Kasich spins your young professional 80s soft rock favorites.

 
 

 

 

 
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