WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home - Blogs - Staff Blogs - Latest Blogs
Latest Blogs
 
by Steven Rosen 03.16.2015 107 days ago
at 02:16 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
700.hq

The Onion Mocks Cincinnati, The Economist Touts MusicNOW

Cincinnati gets shout-outs in both publications

Some interesting national/international coverage for Cincinnati.

The Onion's Weekender edition for March 15 — the special travel issue — spotlights "Cincinnati in Just 300 Days" on its cover. However, it somehow overlooked publishing the itinerary. Check out the comical cover here.

Meanwhile, the latest issue of The Economist — in its Prospero arts section — has a legitimate feature on the just-concluded MusicNow festival, featuring an interview with its founder, Bryce Dessner.

It does offer some insight into what Dessner might be planning next. He's unsure of MusicNow's future after 10 years of growing success. Attendance was huge this year at Music Hall and Memorial Hall. Here's the except:
After this anniversary festival is over, Mr Dessner plans to take full stock of what it has achieved before deciding which direction to take with future programmes. "I always saw it as a ten-year thing so I'm not sure what happens next," he says. "What I do know is that we'll continue to champion cutting-edge, progressive programming and hope that people will continue to be inspired by that."

Read more here.

 
 
by Staff 03.16.2015 107 days ago
at 11:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
image1

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Ilene Ross hits up Nicola’s and tea time; Zula, Gaslight Cafe and snackin commence

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food.

Ilene Ross: As a food writer, I get to spend a lot of time with chefs. Sometimes it’s work-related, and sometimes it’s not. Chef Jimmy Gibson and I meet for coffee regularly to catch up on world news, local gossip and of course food ideas. The surroundings aren’t fancy, our coffee shop of choice is Jimmy’s “office,” the back hallway off the kitchen at Jimmy G’s, but the coffee is good and strong, and the company is sublime. Thursday was off to a wonderful start.

Spring was in the air, so after a two-mile walk in Ault Park, I decided that lunch should be something fresh and light in order to match the mood of the weather. I’ve been meaning to give the new juice place in Hyde Park, The Weekly Juicery, a try. I ordered Two Roots and a Fruit — carrot, ginger and apple juice — and the teensiest salad comprised of jicama and kale I have ever seen in my life. I left feeling sticker shock at the $17 price tag and still starving. For the same price, I’ll stick to the lunch tray at Jean-Robert’s Table.

I love having friends in from out-of-town so I can show off our locally owned restaurants. On Saturday night I took a Chicago native to Nicola’s for dinner, and of course Chef Joel Molloy’s cuisine wowed the socks off of him. We had the Scallops with spiced fumet, celery root and scallions, the Roasted Beet salad with avocado, black quinoa and goat cheese, the Butternut Squash Tortelloni with speck and fregolotta, the Short Ribs with sunchoke, shiitake mushroom and sunflower seeds, the Duck with wild rice, lavender and sweet potato, and the most delectable pistachio sfoglia. The service was exceptional, and my friend was dually impressed. I, naturally, needed to be rolled home.

My friend Kelly is the consummate party giver. From her son’s first birthday party — an elaborate backyard shindig which turned out to be her own surprise (for us!) wedding — to opening up her home during a snowstorm for all to be wined and dined, every day for Kelly is a celebration of family, friends and love. Sunday was no exception. Afternoon Tea at The Cincinnatian is a truly elegant affair complete with pots of perfectly brewed tea, delightful little sandwiches, scones, pastries, Devonshire cream and of course cocktails. Yesterday, Kelly decided to get a group of her best girlfriends together to “take tea,” and thankfully I was included. It was the perfect way to relax and unwind after a busy weekend with a great group of ladies.

Nick Swartsell: My girlfriend and I went to Music NOW Saturday night, but we forgot to eat dinner beforehand so we just had some beers and ate a ton of that fancy chocolate they sell at Music Hall because you can do that kind of thing when you're grownups at a big grownup event and one of you is wearing a tie.

Jac Kern: I went to a friend's St. Patrick's Day party and tried a bunch of homemade Irish favorites: beef and potato stew made with Guinness, Irish soda bread, corned beef sliders, grasshopper brownies (they're green, OK?), plus plenty of Jameson. I think it's a definite sign of adulthood when you trade in kegs of green Bud Lite for a Celtic-inspired dinner (also when you're partying in West Chester), but don't worry, I still got pretty drunk. Sláinte!

Jesse Fox: I went to Chicago this weekend to see my friend’s band The Orwells play and I consumed a lot of strawberry vodka and High Life on Friday evening.  On Saturday I went to The Chicago Diner for my only proper meal that weekend. I got the vegan Poutine, a chocolate and peanut butter milkshake and a Titanic BLT burger. The poutine was incredible and I kind of wish I would have just got two orders of that because the burger, although super filling, didn't have much flavor for being something made up a variety of grains and veggies.  

Rebecca Sylvester: If you're 30-plus and want late night pizza but know you're going to have night terrors if you call Adriadico’s, there is a respectable solution for you: flatbread at Zula. They have a late-night “flatbread” menu (flatbreat is adult for pizza). I recommend the Bulgarian Feta. :)

Danny Cross: A friend’s housewarming party in Pleasant Ridge led my girlfriend and me to stop by Gaslight Café on the way, where we were met by many people in full St. Paddy’s Day party mode. Gaslight has a super neighborhood feel and the locals were plenty welcoming even if they were mostly shouting and unabashedly dancing in very near proximity to our table. A girl asked us if her cell phone was left at our table. It wasn’t but she found two quarters on the floor and a guy with her asked me to hand him the green man suit sitting in the corner of the booth, which I gladly passed along. Our burgers were pretty straightforward but I tried an onion ring and it was better than I expected. Probably shouldn’t have waited 15 or so years between eating them.

 
 
by mbreen 03.16.2015 107 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Festivals, Local Music at 09:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
20-download

Cincy Blues Fest Announces 2015 Headliners

Popular, long-running music festival returns to Sawyer Point Aug. 7-8

The Cincy Blues Society has announced the Main Stage headliners for this year’s Cincy Blues Fest, which returns to Sawyer Point Aug. 7-8. It is the Blues Fest’s 24th anniversary. 


Friday’s (Aug. 7) Main Stage performers will be Blind Pig recording artists Cash Box Kings, singer/guitarist Samantha Fish and Toronto Blues/R&B/Rock & Roll crew The 24th Street Wailers


The Cash Box Kings - Black Toppin from Tibo on Vimeo.


On Saturday, Aug. 8, the Blues Fest welcomes genre heavyweights Tab Benoit and Tommy Casto & the Painkillers (Friday performer Fish toured with Benoit and Castro last year on the Six Strings Down Tour), as well as Shawn Holt and the Teardrops (former backing band for the late, great Magic Slim; Holt is Slim’s son), to the Main Stage. 




The festival has also announced the Kelly Richey Band and the Chicago Women in the Blues Revue will perform on the Showcase Stage on Aug. 7.


Tickets are available for just $20 each day or $33 for a two-day pass. Click here to get yours now. And click here to keep an eye on the schedule as the organizers announce more performers. Many of the local acts slated to appear at the festival will be determined at the 2015 Blues Challenge, which takes place June 7 at Germania Park. 

 
 
by Steven Rosen 03.16.2015 107 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 08:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
rw

Rondle West Piece Finds New Home

One of my favorite Cincinnati artists is Rondle West, whose "assemblage sculptures" round up all manner of strange found objects (often toys) and adheres them, sometimes like appendages, to the surfaces of "host" objects. They can look like something ready to start walking or like shelving that has been attacked by miniature aliens. The finished work often has a monochromatic, other-worldly appearance.

I was hopeful his association last year with Miller Gallery would lead to a large, dramatic, high-profile one-person show, but it didn't. Now, the 2014 piece "My Date With Barbie" has turned up in an unexpected but welcome place, the front window of Electronic Arts at 1428 Race St. It's just the right touch of creative weirdness needed for an OTR store window, and it's great to look at its pinkness as other buildings reflect on the glass and add their own richness to the view. Definitely worth a visit.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 03.13.2015 110 days ago
Posted In: News at 02:42 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
weed

Marijuana Legalization Effort Moves Forward

Ohio attorney general approves ResponsibleOhio's ballot language for marijuana legalization amendment

A controversial effort to legalize the growth and sale of marijuana is one step closer to the November ballot. Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine today approved ResponsibleOhio's ballot summary language, or the description of its proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize pot but restrict growth to 10 sites owned by the group’s investors across Ohio.

“We are very happy with today’s news,” said ResponsibleOhio Spokesperson Lydia Bolander in a news release. “Voters deserve a thoughtful conversation on this important issue, and we are eager to continue this conversation in the coming months.”

DeWine initially rejected the group's ballot proposal over quibbles with its summary language. ResponsibleOhio tweaked its proposal, and now the initiative is ready for the ballot.

The group built its ballot initiative in the mold of Ohio’s successful 2009 casino legalization effort. Opponents, including other pro-marijuana groups, say that like the casino amendment ResponsibleOhio’s proposal would create a state-ordained monopoly on marijuana farms that mainly benefits the group’s investors. Other critics, including many conservative statewide officials, say the plan will increase drug use and crime.

In response to criticism from other pro-marijuana activists, ResponsibleOhio last month announced it was changing its proposition to allow private growth of small amounts of marijuana.

The group says its proposal will decrease the black market for weed, alleviate some legal injustices, save law enforcement money and increase tax revenues.

“Marijuana prohibition has failed,” Bolander said. “Black Ohioans are four times more likely to be arrested for marijuana offenses than white Ohioans. Patients are denied access to treatments that could ease their suffering. And the state is wasting $120 million each year to enforce these bad laws.

Local ResponsibleOhio investors include basketball hall of famer Oscar Robertson, philanthropist Barbara Gould and venture capitalist Frank Wood. Cincinnati attorney Chris Stock is also involved with the group, helping draw up the language for the ballot initiative. Three of the proposed 10 marijuana farms would be in the Greater Cincinnati area.

Next, ResponsibleOhio will need to finish collecting the more than 300,000 signatures required to put the amendment on this year’s statewide ballot. The group has until this summer to do so.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 03.13.2015 110 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 11:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stephanie cooper he who sups with the devil

REVIEW: 'Figurative Folklore' at Covington Arts

Selena Reder, a former contributor to CityBeat's visual arts coverage, has curated the current Figurative Folklore exhibition at the City of Covington's gallery at 2 W. Pike St. It's devoted to six artists whose figural work tells a strong narrative. Particularly noteworthy at the show is the work of two artists who do three-dimensional work.

Ken Page brings a sense of fun an visual playfulness to his "Hole in the Wall," a sculpture that is like a small wall shelf. On that shelf a boy — carved and painted — has apparently cut a circle out of the painted "brick" wall behind him and is attempting to "roll" it away. It is not a kinetic piece, thus the necessity for those air quotes as the sense of movement is illusory. It's quite well done.

The absolute standout of this show is Stephanie Cooper — who has six pieces, some quite large. These are wood sculptures with added elements. I hate to call them carvings, as that implies folk art and these use folk art as a reference point to build from.

Her "He Who Sups With the Devil Needs a Long Spoon" features a dapper, well-dressed man at a dining table (he looks a bit like Ronald Reagan) holding a spoon. You can hand-crank the spoon to get some movement. And "Hermes" — a large piece with a height of 76 inches — is a scary wooden figure from whose head sprouts a tangle of twigs and roots, like a bird's nest.

Her other contributions, too, are good.

This show is on display through March 27. Gallery hours are 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday. You may find a note on the door to call a city employee to come and unlock the place (a number is provided), but it's worth it. And the employee's office is just a short distance away — I waited at most five minutes for her arrival.

 
 
by Jac Kern 03.13.2015 110 days ago
Posted In: Arts community at 11:20 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
retail

CAC Unveils New Lobby This Weekend

The Contemporary Arts Center will open its renovated lobby to the public Saturday after a members preview Friday night. The $1.1 million upgrade includes a new lounge area, a much-needed cafe and overall artsy facelift.

Local architecture and design firm firm FRCH Design Worldwide reimagined the interior space, which was under construction since Jan. 6.

The CAC's updated lobby features more seating and gathering spaces, a relocated welcome desk and, yes, more art. Previously exhibited mostly upstairs, artworks will now be displayed around the ground-level. Of course, the museum's excellent gift shop is still a part of the lobby, just more centrally located now.

Collective CAC, the museum's new cafe, comes courtesy Dustin Miller and Dave Hart of local favorite Collective Espresso. Located where the gift shop used to be in the corner of the lobby, Collective CAC will serve signature coffees along with breakfast, lunch and dessert items, plus beer and wine. Visitors can sit at communal tables or grab a drink at the bar.

The new CAC gallery hours are 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday-Monday, closed Tuesday and 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday-Friday. Collective CAC will be open 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, 7 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday-Tuesday and 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday-Friday.

The CAC celebrated its 75th anniversary in May 2014.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 03.13.2015 110 days ago
at 10:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brent spence bridge

Morning News and Stuff

Is Cincy's mayor too powerful?; brewery water fees on hold; new developments in Emery debate

What’s up Cincy? Here’s your Friday morning news update.

Here we go again. Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter has been indicted on another felony charge. The charge is a reprise of one of the eight felony counts a jury deadlocked on last year. Hunter is being charged again with misuse of a court credit card. Prosecutors say they have new evidence on that charge that they presented to a new grand jury, which handed down the indictment. Hunter is also facing a new trial on other charges the jury couldn’t come to agreement on in her former case. Hunter was convicted on one count of having an inappropriate interest in a court contract last year over interventions prosecutors claim she took in an investigation into her brother, a county court employee. Hunter’s attorney says the new credit card indictment is unfair since Hunter was already tried for the charge. He says Hunter will appeal it and the other pending charges set for retrial.

• The number of brewers in Cincinnati is exploding, bringing increased stress on the city’s sewage system, according the Metropolitan Sewer District. That’s led to increased fees for brewers to make up for the runoff that MSD must process. But Mayor John Cranley and City Manager Harry Black have halted those fees for now after breweries cried foul. Black says he understands the outcry and is working to find a compromise — a way to enforce water regulations while also keeping the city from dampening one of its fastest-growing industries. Smaller brewers say the fees could hurt their businesses as they operate on small margins and will have to pass the increased costs on to consumers. They’ve also said they were given little warning about the fees. Cranley supports the pause, saying he wants to give brewers who feel they’ve been mistreated a fair shake. Black has said he wants to make sure the system is fair to other rate payers and will be working on a new plan over the next several weeks.

• A citizen task force that has compared Cincinnati’s charter to the governments of 17 other cities says that our mayor has “extraordinary power,” an imbalance that leaves Cincinnati City Council at a disadvantage. The task force is part of a panel studying the city’s charter ahead of possible changes. The group says the mayor has more power than intended by a 2002 amendment to the charter that created a so-called “strong mayor” system in the city, though it stressed that the review wasn’t aimed at current Mayor John Cranley but at the way the city’s government overall is structured. Two ways the mayor is unusually powerful, according to the group, are that he or she sets City Council’s agenda and controls the hiring and firing of the city manager.

• The convoluted case of the Emery Building in Over-the-Rhine got a new chapter this week as the managers of the building agreed to pay $125,000 in property taxes to Cincinnati Public Schools. The building had been property tax exempt, but will now be on the Hamilton County tax rolls. The controversy originated with a complex arrangement to renovate the building, which is owned by the University of Cincinnati. A for-profit developer renovated the upper floors and lower-level commercial space and was to use the proceeds to renovate the historic Emery Theater on the building’s first floor. However, the Requiem Project, a nonprofit that at one point had an agreement with the Emery group, charges that isn’t what has happened, and that renovation efforts have stalled. The Requiem Project sued after its contract with the Emery groups was terminated in January 2013.

• Here’s an alarming statement about national infrastructure investment from former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers: Public investment in infrastructure these days is essentially zero percent (OK, .06 percent) of the country’s GDP, and federal, state and local spending is basically maybe enough for maintenance the infrastructure we already have. Maybe. But the country isn’t investing in new infrastructure at all by the numbers. That statement comes as a debate rages over what to do about the nation’s aging roads, bridges, highways and other publicly funded transportation necessities. The debate hits close to home: We’re years into the struggle to find a way to pay for the 51-year-old, traffic-packed Brent Spence Bridge, for instance, and a solution to the bridge’s $2.6 billion funding dilemma still seems distant. Bummer.

That’s it for me. Tweet or e-mail me news tips or your suggestions for favorite strange corners of the city to explore. I’m planning to be out and about this weekend soaking up the spring weather. Assuming that it’s actually nice out. If it’s not nice out, tweet me suggestions for great places to curl up in a ball and cry.

 
 
by Rick Pender 03.13.2015 110 days ago
at 09:08 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 3-13 - peter & the starcatcher @ cincinnati playhouse - black stache (tom story) threatens peter (noah zachary) - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Not Parrots — It's Pirates!

I seldom laugh out loud when I'm watching a comedy, but I found myself doing just that more than once at last night's opening of Peter and the Starcatcher at the Cincinnati Playhouse. You can read about this show and the appeal of Peter Pan here, but let me simply say this is a deliriously silly but wholly heartfelt prequel about the origins of the boy who "won't grow up." This award-winning play uses simple theatrics, not special effects, to work its magic, and the Playhouse cast of a dozen quick-change performers dive into the wacky storytelling with zest and zeal. Everyone is having a good time, perhaps Tom Story most of all, playing "Black Stache" (the pirate who will become Captain Hook) who spews malapropisms and extravagant posturing: "There's a poet in these pirate veins," he announces. The laugh-inducing moment that sets up his subsequent need for a hook is both ghastly and breathlessly funny, not to mention milked for all it's worth. Everyone in the cast has moments of fun. This is imaginative storytelling and extravagant theatricality at its best. You'll have fun if you bring a kid or two; but even if you don't, go by yourself and feel like a kid again. Through April 4. Tickets: 513-421-3888.

A show that's stuck with me since last June's Fringe Festival, Katie Hartman’s ghostly and mournful song cycle, The Legend of White Woman Creek, is back for a pair of performances at Know Theatre tonight and Saturday at 8 p.m. It's the tale of Anna Morgan Faber, a white woman captured then slowly absorbed into the Cheyenne tribe in 1860s Kansas. Hartman sings about a desperate, lonely woman who finally finds happiness only to have it it brutally snatched away. “It’s not a stand-up-and-cheer kind of show,” I wrote in my review. Instead, “it’s artfully crafted and professionally delivered in an understated way. But it is powerfully effective.” Tickets: 513-300-5669.

Elsewhere you can catch Covedale Center's production of The Marvelous Wonderettes, the story of four high school girls in the ’50s and ’60s who get their big break singing Doo-Wop tunes. This show kicked off a string of hits for Ensemble Theatre a few years back, and I imagine the Covedale's audience will love it, too. Tickets: 513-241-6550.

If Louisa May Alcott's Little Women is a book you've treasured over the years, you can see a stage adaptation at Cincinnati Shakespeare through March 21 (CityBeat review here; tickets: 513-381-2273) or a musical theater version by Footlighters, the community theater that performs at Newport's Stained Glass Theater (tickets: 859-652-3849).

This is the final weekend for August: Osage County at Clifton Performance Theatre. It's a big sprawling play wedged into a tiny space, but with a great script and a fine cast, it's definitely worth seeing. You'll be close enough to feel like a member of the dysfunctional Weston family. I gave it a Critic's Pick here. Tickets: 513-861-7469.

I missed the first two installments of Serials 2: Thunderdome! at Know Theatre, but I was there on March 2, and I'll be back on Monday evening to see which of five 15-minute segments gets to live on. I'm looking forward to Josh Bromels' So In Tents (there's a pun in there) and Trey Tatum and Paul Strickland's Andy's House of [blank], a wild, time-shifting musical. But there will be more surprises, I'm sure. It's a breath of fresh creative air. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Rick Pender's STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday.
 
 
by Jac Kern 03.12.2015 111 days ago
Posted In: Movies, Music, TV/Celebrity, Humor at 01:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-1

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Seeing locals on reality TV combines two of my favorite things: Cincinnati and trashy television. So I was elated to hear that A&E’s Neighbors with Benefits – a new unscripted series following swingers — is set just north in Warren County. The show will document married couples in a suburban neighborhood that have open, extra-marital relationships. The show hasn’t even aired yet (it premieres Sunday, March 22), but it already has reality red flags, as with many A&E shows filmed in Cincinnati (remember Rowhouse Showdown?). While at least one couple on the show is confirmed local, some residents of the Thorton Grove neighborhood near Maineville question the legitimacy of the other couples and shooting location. There’s speculation that a rental home outside Thorton Grove was used to shoot the series after residents complained about associating the neighborhood with a swinger capital. But honestly, if the worst thing about your neighborhood is that people are having sex with each other, isn’t that something to brag about?

Marilyn Manson is all about his pops these days. He took an unexpected but awesome role on Sons of Anarchy’s final season, saying he took the role because he watched the show with his father, and now the two are in Paper Magazine.

Cute!

New show news:

True Detective Season Two is still without a premiere date, but stars Vince Vaughn, Colin Farrell, Taylor Kitsch and Rachel McAdams have been at work shooting the next installment. Go here to read more about the season’s storyline — public transportation + murder + conspiracy — the characters and directors — various directors will take over for Season One’s Emmy winner Cary Fukanaga — and see photos from set. (Spoiler Alert only if you want to go in to the show with zero background info on the story.)

The ladies of Litchfield will be back for the binging when Orange Is the New Black Season Three premieres June 12. 

American Horror Story’s fifth season will apparently take a look at the horrid world of hospitality because Lady Gaga revealed the next setting will be a hotel. Gaga will reportedly star. AHS: Hotel premieres in October and here’s some totally unconfirmed juice goose (translation: juicy gossip) posted on the AHS Reddit thread. I don’t know about Gaga taking the lead on this — let alone starring in three seasons amidst her very successful music career — but the general storyline sounds good to me! And the present-day setting with flashbacks to different eras is in line with the show’s pattern (so far, odd seasons have been set in modern day — Murder House, Coven — while even seasons were period pieces — Asylum, Freak Show). I love the idea of peeking in on various scandalous guests over the years — so many opportunities for killer guest-stars!

Hannibal returns June 4 and the first image is out. I’m getting Dr. Lecter-meets-SAMCRO vibes and I'm loving it.

Speaking of new shows, check out this week’s TV column for a spring television preview. Winter might finally be gone, Game of Thrones is coming!

Zoolander 2 is officially happening, as evidenced by Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson stomping the Valentino runway as Derek and Hansel during Paris Fashion Week.


Nothing says haute couture quite like Ben Stiller’s old ass on a runway. And if you really want to roll your eyes to the back of your skull and never to see the light of day again, get this: I looked on IMDB for evidence that this sequel is really happening (yes, I fact-check the gossip rags I read; yes, IMDB is a reputable fact-checking source) and found that Stiller is also attached to Dodgeball 2 (predictable) and Space Jam 2 (da fuh?).

Ryan Gosling must be craving some attention since that baby of his stole the spotlight, because he shared some cute throwback dance videos that have everyone saying, “Hey girl,” again.

Ryan, if you think we haven’t already seen all your talent show videos and Mickey Mouse Club clips, you are seriously underestimating the stalkiness of your fans. Speaking of, why is there no term for Gosling fans, a la Cumberbitches? Can I bring up “juice goose” twice in one post?

But I digress. Here’s the little man at work:

Vince Gilligan would like everyone to stop throwing pizzas on Walter White’s house, please. The Breaking Bad creator says fans flock to the real house used for exterior shots in the show, and the current owners are cool with that, except when people creep up at night and recreate the famous pizza scene.

The Dress that captivated the Internet is dead and buried and I’m not trying to resurrect it anytime soon, but if you are curious about the science behind why one dress looks completely different to different people, read here. And see how good you are at differentiating colors here — you may have a fourth cone, which means you probably saw the blue and black dress for what is was: a goddamned blue and black dress.

And here’s Earl Sinclair singing “Hypnotize” because it’s Thursday and we all need this.

(Thanks, Amberly)

 
 

 

 

 
Close
Close
Close