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by Maija Zummo 01.13.2014 93 days ago
Posted In: National food at 03:36 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
onflict kitchen

Conflict Kitchen Serves Food from U.S. Geopolitical Enemies

Pittsburgh, Pa. take-out serves cuisine from countries with which America is in conflict

Pittsburgh, Pa.'s Conflict Kitchen (221 Schenley Drive, Pittsburgh, Pa., conflictkitchen.org) is a new kind of "pop-up" dining experience. The restaurant serves only cuisine from countries with which the United States is in conflict, according to their website, and rotates the country of food based on current geopolitical events. 

Each iteration of the kitchen is complemented by events, performances and discussions seeking to expand the public's engagement with the culture, politics and issues of the current "conflict" country. Their mission, according to their site, is to use "the social relations of food and economic exchange to engage the general public in discussions about countries, cultures, and people that they might know little about outside of the polarizing rhetoric of governmental politics and the narrow lens of media headlines."

The kitchen is currently focusing on North Korea. In concert with the menu — which features items like Bibimbop (seasoned veggies on rice), Manduguk (vegetable dumpling soup), Haemul Pajeon (seafood and scallion pancake), Kimchi and more — they recently passed out candy on Kim Jong-Un's birthday (Jan. 8), the same free candy the dictator passes out to children under the age of 10 in North Korea on his birthday. Their food wrappers (it's take-out only) also feature interviews with North Korean defectors of varying viewpoints. The website also offers additional educational resources about the country in question.

They have previously featured food from Iran, Afghanistan, Cuba and Venezuela. Upcoming versions will feature food from Palestine/Israel.

Read more on locally based roadtrip planning website Roadtrippers' blog. Or visit conflictkitchen.org.


 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.13.2014 93 days ago
Posted In: fundraising, Events, Cincinnati, Openings at 03:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
breadsmith bread

Breadsmith Hyde Park Opening to Benefit ArtWorks

100 percent of proceeds from Saturday fundraiser go to youth development and community art projects

Breadsmith, a chain of independently owned retail bakeries, is opening a new shop in Hyde Park (3500 Michigan Ave., breadsmith.com). And before they open their doors, they'll be hosting an open house and preview to "raise dough" for ArtWorks — the local nonprofit organization that empowers and inspires the creative community to transform our everyday environments through employment, apprenticeships, education, community partnerships and civic engagement — from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 18.           

One hundred percent of the sales of the bakery on Saturday will benefit ArtWorks and their youth development programs this summer.

“Breadsmith is committed to giving back to the community that we live and work in,” Ward Bahlman, owner of the Breadsmith and resident of Cincinnati, says in a press release. “We want to celebrate our new store by supporting the worthwhile projects of ArtWorks which is doing so much for our community’s landscape.”

Tamara Harkavy, the founder, CEO and artistic director of ArtWorks added, “ArtWorks is grateful to Breadsmith for donating their sales to our Adopt-an-Apprentice campaign that will directly support the 120 teen apprentices we’ll hire this summer to work on ten new community murals and other creative projects.” 

The fundraising event for ArtWorks will also include behind-the-scenes tours and free samples of Breadsmith's award-winning breads, muffins and sweets. Customers will get a look at the European-style interior design which allows them to see the “hand-made, hearth-baked” Breadsmith process. 

For more information visit artworkscincinnati.org.


 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 01.13.2014 93 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 02:22 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
downton

'Downton Abbey' Season Four, Episodes 1-2

Bringing the Latest in Uppity British Television

Downton Abbey Season Four is here, guys. Well, at least for those of us who live on this side of the pond and refuse to download PBS illegally. It’s here, and Masterpiece Classic has delivered that beautifully crafted stiffness that can only be described as “English” once again. Two episodes into the season and we’ve already had countless snide remarks and drama from both upstairs and downstairs, all while the ever-crumbling 20th century class system hangs over everyone’s heads. So, while I work on my interpretive dance to the opening score, here is your weekly analysis and recap.

Upstairs Recap:

The season premiere did not start out with the usual shot of Labrador butt; instead, a dark view of the abbey. Matthew’s death, comparably shocking to the beheading of a certain Game of Thrones character, left us all in pieces. Julian Fellows, the show’s creator – who is like the Hitchcock of period dramas – cruelly chose to skip ahead six months, robbing us of our chance to grieve with the Grantham family. What about the viewers, Julian? Am I the only one who spent the last year in darkly beaded clothing, mourning the death of beloved Matthew? I need closure, or at least a hug from Carson, the overly attached butler.  

While Lady Mary is busy perfecting her dead-behind-the-eyes look and ignoring her son George, Edith is living in scandal with an (almost) divorced man. “Poor Edith” is constantly trying to prove herself and her love to her father, who is so god forsakenly set in his old ways. Meanwhile, Lord Grantham mutters little gems like, “Who’s the glamorous pirate?” and “What does one say to a singer?” while secretly gambling away all of his family’s money.

Rose, the blonde cousin from the Highlands, has been a rogue element since last season. From dressing up in a housemaid’s outfit to sneaking off to smoking houses and dance halls, she seems to represent everything new and threatening to upper-class English society. Maggie Smith, who plays the matriarch and Dowager Countess of Downton, is as snarky as ever: “If I were to search for logic, I should not look for it among the English upper-class”. Oh, Violet, how right you are.

And of course, with the ever-changing times comes the impeccable 1920s women’s fashion. Think neutral colors, beaded flapper outfits and perfectly pleated day dresses.

Downstairs Recap:

The lady’s maid we love to hate, Miss O’Brien, abruptly moved to India with some distant Scottish relatives, and there’s no telling when she’ll be back. But hold up, there’s a new bitch in the abbey: Edna Braithwaite. Last season, Braithwaite was fired from Downton because she was hitting on Tom Branson, the widower of the family’s youngest daughter. (RIP Sybil, you could have had a future in politics.) This season, Braithwaite’s weaseled her way into another job, and is taking full advantage of Tom’s vulnerability. (Seeing that his wife is dead and he doesn’t know how to mingle with high society.) And Thomas Barrow, the under-butler, stirs up trouble with quips like: “There’s no one so jealous as a lady’s maid,” because obviously everyone knows that. And the plot thickens.

Molesley seems to be developing a severe case of asthma to pair with his mid-life crisis while Mrs. Hughes intervenes in Carson’s personal life. Ms. Patmore continues to run around like a chicken with her head cut off trying to handle the stress of cooking for all of these stuck up rich people and eventually goes into full-blown panic mode.

Disappointingly, the end of this week’s episode leaves us with the unsettling rape scene of Anna, something that was both unexpected and horrifying to watch as a critic and lover of the show. I would advise viewers to watch with caution, as it may be potentially triggering for many. Let’s hope the rest of the season handles this delicate subject in a tasteful manner.

So, in the words of Isobel Crawley, “They say life must go on and of course it must.”

 
 
by German Lopez 01.13.2014 94 days ago
Posted In: News, Transportation, Courts, 2014 election at 10:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ohio statehouse

Morning News and Stuff

State fights for minor party restrictions, local judge disqualified, Oasis rail line draws critics

Ohio officials will appeal a court ruling that blocked tougher requirements on minor political parties and allows them to run in the 2014 primary and general elections under previous rules. The Republican-controlled Ohio legislature and Gov. John Kasich approved the stricter rules last year. Democrats and Libertarians argued the new law, which they labeled the John Kasich Re-election Protection Act, was put in place to protect Kasich from conservative electoral challengers upset with his support for the federally funded Medicaid expansion.

The Ohio Supreme Court disqualified Hamilton County Juvenile Judge Tracie Hunter Friday after she was indicted on eight felony charges for, among other accusations, backdating and forging court documents. The disqualification could further burden a court that’s already known for a large backlog of cases. It remains unclear how long Hunter’s case and disqualification will last and whether she’ll be replaced while the legal battle unfolds.

Many streetcar supporters oppose the Oasis rail line and the rest of the Eastern Corridor project. Critics of the project point to a recent study that found the Oasis line would generate low economic development in seven of 10 planned stations. Instead of supporting the Oasis line, Cincinnatians for Progress says local officials should work to first establish a transit line — perhaps through a piece-by-piece approach of the defunct MetroMoves plan that voters rejected in 2002 — that could act as a central spine for a broader light rail network. Opposition to the Oasis line is also rooted in a general movement against the Eastern Corridor project, which some say would expand and rework roads and highways in a way that could damage and divide the East Side and eastern Hamilton County. Officials are taking feedback for the Eastern Corridor and Oasis rail line at EasternCorridor.org.

Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune, who might challenge Democratic gubernatorial Ed FitzGerald in the May primary, discussed the gubernatorial race in a nearly 40-minute interview with The Cincinnati Enquirer’s editorial board Friday. View the full interview here.

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear whether groups have the right to sue in a local case that could have broader implications for free-speech rights and limitations. The legal fight between former Rep. Steve Driehaus and the Susan B. Anthony List could resolve whether political campaigns have the right to lie.

As local and state officials work to address the opiate epidemic, a drug history scholar from the University of Cincinnati proposes alternatives to the failing war on drugs.

One drug helps prevent opiate addicts from getting high.

The Ohio Department of Health says flu activity in Ohio is now widespread.

Ohio’s chief justice says it’s time to reform how judges are elected. It remains unclear exactly how Chief Justice Maureen O’Connor would reform the system, but she says she wants to uphold courts’ attempts at impartiality.

Reminder: January is Human Trafficking Awareness Month. Find out more at HumanTrafficking.Ohio.gov.

Ohio gas prices increased in time for the new workweek.

Racism could accelerate aging among black men, according to a new study.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
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by Mike Breen 01.13.2014 94 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Live Music, Music News at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
spillit_justintodhunter

Music Tonight: Instrument Recovery Benefit

Friends unite at MOTR tonight to help local musician replace stolen instruments

Just after Christmas, multi-instrumentalist Justin Todhunter, who performs with the Folk/Americana band Jake Speed and the Freddies and the Bluegrass group Rattlesnakin’ Daddies, was the victim of a home invasion that resulted in the loss of most of his valuables, including the tools of his trade — his instruments.

The instruments taken are likely making their way around the black market, so keep an eye out at local music and pawn shops, as well as online sites like Craigslist. Here are the instruments, which Todhunter posted on his Facebook page just after the break-in at his Westwood home: a 1985 Kentucky KM-1000 mandolin; a 2008 Eastman MD 815 mandolin (red finish); a 2005 Martin OOO-M acoustic guitar; a 2000 Blue Fender Stratocaster guitar (Mexican); a 1949 National 1088 Triplex Lap Steel guitar; and a 2009 Douglas bass guitar (Hofner copy).

If you spot any of the instruments, let Todhunter know through his Facebook page at facebook.com/jdogfreddies.

Besides keeping a lookout for the instruments, you can also help Todhunter tonight when MOTR Pub (1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, motrpub.com) hosts a benefit show to assist in replacing the items. Both the Freddies and Rattlesnakin’ Daddies are scheduled to perform. Showtime is 9 p.m. There is no cover charge but, obviously, donations are strongly encouraged.

If you can’t make the show, fellow member of the Freddies Chris Werner has also set up a donation site through FundRazr. Visit fundrazr.com/campaigns/6fkQ4 to donate. When we went to press with this story last Tuesday, $700 had already been donated. That has doubled in less than a week.
 
 
by German Lopez 01.10.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: News, Drugs at 03:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
home grown

Drug History Scholar Touts Alternative to War on Drugs

UC professor suggests different approach to addressing opiate epidemic

Rises in heroin and prescription painkiller abuse have languished lawmakers in Ohio and across the country in the past year, with some calling it an epidemic and others blaming it for an increase in crimes and deaths.

The issue has taken particular root in Ohio, where lawmakers have joined a chorus of advocates to prevent more drug abuse. On Thursday, Gov. John Kasich announced an initiative that encourages parents and schools to talk with their children about the dangers of drug abuse. In the Ohio legislature, lawmakers are hashing out harsher penalties and regulations in an attempt to prevent prescription painkiller and heroin abuse.

But many of these ideas, while genuine in their effort to address the problem, fall under the same framework of the war on drugs, a policy that has largely failed in reducing the demand or supply of illicit drugs over the past few decades.

Isaac Campos, a drug history professor at the University of Cincinnati and author of Home Grown: Marijuana and the Origins of Mexico’s War on Drugs, is highly critical of the war on drugs. He talked to CityBeat over the phone Friday. The interview, below, is edited for length and clarity.

CityBeat: What do you make of the ongoing discussion about an opiate epidemic?

Isaac Campos: From what I’ve read, there’s been a big increase in overdoses throughout the Midwest. The most interesting and plausible thing is that the Mexican distributors started distributing much higher-potency heroin as the crackdowns of cocaine and other things have had some effect. They moved into the heroin business and started distributing higher potency of heroin, which allows the people along the supply chain to make higher profits by cutting the heroin so they can get a lot more bang for their buck, basically. It also means users can get heroin for much cheaper than OxyContin or whatever they normally use. That’s No. 1.

No. 2 is they can not only get it cheaper, but it tends to be much higher potency than what they got before and maybe what they’re used to. That’s the No. 1 cause of heroin doses: the lack of knowledge about the potency of the particular drug that somebody’s taking. So if the potencies are substantially higher, you’re very likely to get tons of overdoses.

CB: The governor unveiled an initiative essentially asking parents and schools to more openly discuss drug use with students. And then the state legislature is considering strengthening rules on prescription painkillers. Based on what you know, do these kind of solutions work?

IC: The thing about it is clearly the problem is a mini-balloon effect that always happens. In this case, you put pressure on prescription opiates, and that has led to being harder to get them. They’ve also changed the formula to make OxyContin less pleasurable for users. And so they made it less desirable to take the stuff that people were taking before, so what people have done is started taking something else.

They’ve also made it more difficult for the drug distributors to make a profit with what they were distributing before, so they’ve changed to something else.

I think the idea that students don’t know that heroin is dangerous is utterly preposterous. … I suppose it’s a good thing to tell students — if they are actually going to tell them the truth — that these potencies are unpredictable and could kill them. But I imagine they might not tell them that; they might just tell them, “Heroin is dangerous for you.” You’d have to be living under a rock to not know that.

CB: As you alluded to, one study found cracking down on prescription painkillers might push people to use heroin. We’ve talked about the hydra effect before, in which one drug or dealer inevitably replaces a suppressed drug or dealer. Do you think this situation shows the same cause-and-effect?

IC: Absolutely. The hydra effect is usually used in respect to dealers, but we’ve seen this before back in the 1930s. A lot of people were smoking opium. It was the fashionable thing to do — and smoking opium really isn’t that bad for you — but there was a crackdown on that.

Also, when the Italian mafia took over the business, they decided to make it more profitable and squeeze out the smoking opium.

So all these smoking opium users switched to morphine or heroin, which are more dangerous and harder to predict. So you end up getting more deaths because the really dangerous thing about heroin is you just don’t know what the dosage is.

CB: Based on your research, what kind of solutions do you think would work? I know before we talked about Switzerland and the success they’ve had there with a maintenance-dose program.

IC: I always thought the much smarter course of action is to allow opiate addicts to have safe doses of opiates while trying to get them help to stop using opiates if that’s what they want to do. Most of these addicts I’m sure would love to stop using at one point, but maybe they’re not ready yet. But they would be much better off knowing what they’re taking while they’re not ready yet than overdosing on the street and buying from black-market dealers.

CB: Another aspect is how rarely officials go after the root of drug habits. It’s mostly more penalties, criminalization, imprisonment and attempts to cut supply. But there are huge socioeconomic problems surrounding drug use. What do you think they could be doing better in this regard?

IC: One of the big problems is people don’t realize drug problems are complex, so addiction is not simply a biological issue. The disease model does not explain what addiction really is. Addiction is a social, cultural and psychological problem; it’s not simply a disease of the brain.

I think that’s a big problem because that suggests the root of the problem is these drugs that hijack your brain, as some like to say, when really the problem is a much broader one that involves what’s going on in your life when you become a drug addict.

Of course, that’s way too complicated for politicians to utter.

But addiction problems are real problems. People really do become addicted to drugs and it ends up being bad for their lives. But most of the bad things that happen to them are because the drugs are illegal. …

We can’t really expect the government to figure out all these issues. But we could hope that the government would have a more rational policy, like, for example, what’s going on in Colorado and Washington, where they’re dealing with marijuana in a more rational way.

CB: Switching subjects a bit, in the past year, Cincinnati saw a rise in local homicides and gun violence. Police say gang-related activity and drug trafficking is to blame. We’ve talked about this before, but do you think decriminalization or legalization could help put an end to this kind of violence?

IC: Oh, yeah. I don’t know what percent of shootings and that sort of thing in Cincinnati are related to drugs, but they’re related to illicit drugs, not people taking drugs.

Changing policy would have a big impact. You wouldn’t have these people fighting out this black-market turf over these drugs that are incredibly profitable because they’re illegal.

It would also have a huge effect in not sending so many people to prison, which are essentially schools of crime that totally screw people up psychologically and are places where you’re breeding more violence.

CB: Do you think that creates a vicious cycle in which people are moving in and out of prisons?

IC: Absolutely. And not only the people who are actually going in and out of prison, but all the kids of the parents who are in prison who are growing out without their parents. I think it has a massive effect. There’s so many pernicious effects to this policy. It’s incredible.

CB: Last time you and I talked about this, I mentioned that some war on drug supporters say gangs would just resort to selling other contraband if drugs were legalized. But you said, “How much easier is it to move two kilos of cocaine, which are worth $50,000 or so, across the U.S. border than it is to move $50,000 worth of assault rifles?” That stuck with me. Could you elaborate on that?

IC: There’s no doubt that even if we legalized all drugs tomorrow, you’d still have these big criminal organizations that have been making a lot of money off them. But over the long-term — or medium- or short-term, even — they’d start feeling a really strong pinch from losing all this drug revenue. They’ll still try to make money, but they’re not going to sustain their operations without the incredible revenue stream that they’re getting from drugs. Ultimately, all those organization will be weakened.

I mean, they’re so strong today because they can afford to arm themselves like an army and they can afford the kind of technology to thwart the high technology being directed at them.

Right now, they’re legitimate security threats to states. But they would never be that on just arms running, prostitution or that sort of thing.

 
 
by German Lopez 01.10.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: News, Development, Transportation, Streetcar at 02:35 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
news1_streetcar_jf2

Streetcar Supporters Oppose Oasis Rail Line

HDR study finds low economic development along intercity line

At first glance, it might seem like a rail line between downtown Cincinnati and the city of Milford would earn support from the same people who back the $132.8 million streetcar project, but streetcar supporters, including advocacy group Cincinnatians for Progress, say they oppose the idea and its execution.

Critics of the overall project, called the Eastern Corridor, recently pointed to a November study from HDR. Despite flowery language promising a maximized investment, HDR found seven of 10 stations on the $230-$322 million Oasis rail line would result in low economic development, five of 10 stations would provide low access to buses and bikes, and the intercity line would achieve only 3,440 daily riders by 2030.

HDR’s findings for the Oasis line stand in sharp contrast to its study of Cincinnati’s streetcar project. The firm found the streetcar line in Over-the-Rhine and downtown would generate major economic development and a 2.7-to-1 return on investment over 35 years.

Given the poor results for the Oasis line, streetcar supporters say local officials should ditch the Oasis concept and instead pursue the 2002 MetroMoves plan and an expansion of the streetcar system through a piecemeal approach that would create a central transit spine through the region.

“To have (the Oasis line) be our first commuter rail piece in Cincinnati … just doesn’t make sense to me,” says Derek Bauman, co-chair of Cincinnatians for Progress.

MetroMoves spans across the entire city and region, with the rail line along I-71 from Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport to downtown Cincinnati to King’s Island fostering particularly high interest.

Voters rejected the MetroMoves plan and the sales tax hike it involved in 2002, but streetcar supporters say public opinion will shift once the streetcar becomes reality in Cincinnati.

“That’s been proven in other cities, especially ones that have not historically been transit-oriented,” Bauman says, pointing to Houston and Miami as examples of cities that built spines that are now being expanded.

Opposition to the Oasis line is also more deeply rooted in a general movement against the Eastern Corridor project. The unfunded billion-dollar project involves a few parts: relocating Ohio 32 through the East Side, the Oasis rail line and several road improvements from Cincinnati to Milford.

Supporters of the Eastern Corridor claim it would ease congestion, at least in the short term, and provide a cohesiveness in transportation options that’s severely lacking in the East Side.

Opponents argue the few benefits, some of which both sides agree are rooted in legitimate concerns, just aren’t worth the high costs and various risks tied to the project.

“When it comes to widening roads and highways, it’s kind of like loosening your belt at Thanksgiving. Somehow traffic always fills to fit,” Bauman says. “Highway expansion, especially in urban areas, is not the future. It’s not even the present in some areas.”

The big concern is that the relocation of Ohio 32 might do to the East Side and eastern Hamilton County what I-75 did to the West Side, which was partly obliterated and divided by the massive freeway.

“It hurts the cohesiveness of our communities when you create these big divides,” Bauman argues. “You would see that repeat itself.”

Officials are taking feedback for the Eastern Corridor and Oasis rail line at EasternCorridor.org.

This article was updated to use more up-to-date figures for the cost of the Oasis rail line.

 
 
by Jac Kern 01.10.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: Events at 12:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cover_artofhair_jf11

Your Weekend To Do List: 1/10-1/12

German composer/musician Volker Bertelmann, aka “Hauschka,” performs at the Contemporary Arts Center Friday. Hauschka performs on a prepared piano, placing foreign objects on the strings, dampers and hammers to create a unique sound. The CAC show begins at 8 p.m. Go here to read our interview with Hauschka.

Souped up car show Cavalcade of Customs returns to the Duke Energy Convention Center this weekend. The 54th annual expo’s highlights include more than 500 cars on display, live music, a motorcycle stunt show and appearances by Rick and Kyle Petty, WWE’s Shawn Michaels and Chris Jerico, Shane Harper of Disney’s Good Luck Charlie and more. Cavalcade runs Friday-Sunday. Get tickets and daily schedules here.

Cincinnati native and rising comic Geoff Tate makes a homecoming to record his third comedy album at Go Bananas nightly through Sunday. Tate spent the last year touring the country and with with Doug Benson and Bill Burr. Find show times and ticket info here.

Top stylists from an array of local salons will create works of living art Sunday at The Art of Hair at The Carnegie in Covington. Tresses take the spotlight at this runway show, running at 1 p.m. and repeating at 3. Check out our cover story to get a glimpse of the preparation for this event; buy tickets here.

Trackside seats at Cincinnati Rollergirls matches only get you so close to the action. Want to get even more involved? CRG are looking for skaters, referees and volunteers for their upcoming season. Roll on over to tryouts at The Skatin’ Place in Colerain Twp. Sunday for a chance to join the team. Go here for more details.

For more art openings, parties and other stuff to do this weekend, check out our To Do picks, full calendar and Rick Pender’s Stage Door for weekend theater offerings.

 
 
by German Lopez 01.10.2014 97 days ago
Posted In: News, Pensions, Human trafficking, Budget, Prisons at 10:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

City looks at railroad sale, sex trafficking mapped, youth prisons combat sexual assault

Councilman Charlie Winburn, City Council’s new budget and finance chair, suggested selling the Cincinnati Southern Railroad to help pay for the city’s $870 million unfunded pension liability. But other city officials, including Mayor John Cranley, Councilman Chris Seelbach and Councilwoman Amy Murray, voiced doubts about the idea, saying it would cost the city annual revenue when there are other options for fixing the pension problem. Meanwhile, the city and state’s retirement boards appear to be looking into what it would take to merge Cincinnati’s pension system into the state system, although that solution could face political and legal hurdles.

A new report from The Imagine Foundation found sex trafficking in the Cincinnati area follows the region’s spine on I-75 from Florency, Ky., to Sharonville, I-275 through Springfield and Fairfield and I-74 to Batesville, Ind. “This is real,” foundation Executive Director Jesse Bach told The Cincinnati Enquirer. “There are women and girls who are being bought and sold for sex in the Cincinnati area. The average person needs to take responsibility for what they might see. To use a sports adage, the average citizen has to be willing to say, ‘Not in our house.’ ”

Gov. John Kasich and other state officials yesterday launched a public awareness campaign to combat human trafficking in Ohio at HumanTrafficking.Ohio.gov. “We may not want to admit it — it’s almost too horrific to imagine — but the fact is that human trafficking is real and is happening across Ohio. Over the past two years we’ve improved our laws to fight trafficking and begin getting victims the help they need, but we must do more,” Kasich said in a statement.

In light of the public awareness campaign, some activists say human trafficking should be addressed by going after the source of demand: men.

The head of the Ohio Department of Youth Services told a federal panel that his agency responded quickly and aggressively to reports of high sexual assault rates at the state’s juvenile-detention facilities. A June report found three of Ohio’s facilities had sexual assault rates of 19 percent or above, with the Circleville Juvenile Correctional Facility estimated at 30.3 percent — the second highest rate in the nation. Since the report, the agency increased training, hired a full-time employee devoted to the Prison Rape Elimination Act and installed a tip line for prisoners, their families and staffers, according to Director Harvey Reed.

A northern Kentucky man was the first flu death of the season, prompting some tips from the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

Some national Democrats see Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld as a potential congressional candidate in 2022, assuming the next round of redistricting makes the First Congressional District more competitive for Democrats. The district used to be fairly moderate, but state Republicans redrew it to include Republican stronghold Warren County in the last round of redistricting.

Billions of health-care dollars helped sustain Cincinnati’s economy during the latest economic downturn, a new study found.

Downtown traffic came to a crawl this morning after burst pipes sent water gushing out of the former Terrace Plaza Hotel.

The U.S. economy added a measly 74,000 jobs in December in a particularly weak end to 2013.

Dayton Daily News: “Five things you need to know about butt selfies.”

If the law catches up, robot ships could soon become reality.

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• Music: @CityBeatMusic
• German Lopez: @germanrlopez

 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.09.2014 97 days ago
Posted In: Wellness at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
influenza_virus

First Northern Kentucky Flu Death

Tips for avoiding the flu from the Northern Kentucky Health Department

The Northern Kentucky Health Department just received report of the area's first seasonal flu death this flu season. A middle-aged Kenton County man, with a history of chronic health problems, died from complications of the flu.

“The loss of someone to the flu is a tragedy, and our thoughts go out to the individual’s family,” Lynne M. Saddler, MD, MPH, district director of health, writes in a press release. “We tend to forget just how serious influenza can be, particularly for those with other health problems. Flu can lead to serious complications and even death, as it did in this case.”


While the CDC doesn't track adult flu deaths, they estimate 6.5 percent of all adult deaths nationwide were attributable to the flu or complications from the flu for the week ending Dec. 28. And Kentucky is reporting widespread flu activity, particularly a strain (H1N1) that disproportionately affects young and middle-aged adults, according to Saddler.


The CDC recommends the following precautions to avoid getting the flu:

1. Get a flu vaccine. If you're over 65, also get a pneumonia vaccination.

2. Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze (and then throw it away).

3. Wash your hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand cleanser after you cough or sneeze.

4. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

5. Avoid sick people.


While the flu is commonly treated at home, these symptoms require immediate medical attention.

For children:

  • Fast breathing or trouble breathing
  • Bluish skin color
  • Not drinking enough fluids
  • Not waking up or not interacting
  • Being so irritable that the child does not want to be held
  • Flu-like symptoms improve but then return with fever and worse cough
  • Fever with a rash

For adults:
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Pain or pressure in the chest or abdomen
  • Sudden dizziness or confusion
  • Severe or persistent vomiting
For more information on flu, visit nkyhealth.org/Seasonal-Flu.aspx.


 
 

 

 

 
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