WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home - Blogs - Staff Blogs - Latest Blogs
Latest Blogs
 
by Jac Kern 10.15.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Movies, Music, Humor at 11:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-2

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Who you gonna call? Lady Busters! After years of talk about another Ghostbusters film, Paul Feig (Freaks and Geeks, The Heat, Arrested Development, Bridesmaids, The Office) say he will direct a femme-centric sequel and co-write the script with The Heat’s Katie Dippold. Here’s to them casting Melissa McCarthy, Kristen Wiig and Mindy Kaling with Seth Rogen as a Dana Barrett character!

Other sequels/spinoffs happening include a Lego Batman flick and…sigh…Joe Dirt 2.

Katy Perry will be the halftime performer at Super Bowl XLIX. Expect plenty of day-glo, emojis, personified junk food, accessories from Claire’s 1999 collection and just the perfect amount of cultural appropriation. Hopefully Riff Raff will be in tow.

But Katy Perry isn’t just a Pop star with an awesome gig — she knows her football, too. In fact, she was recently a guest picker on ESPN’s College GameDay for the recent LSU v. Auburn game. I was...interesting.

Men in Hollywood are facing an epidemic. Too often Everyman-looking funny dudes disappear for a minute only to reemerge changed. Thin. Toned. Chiseled. We saw Jonah Hill shrink, Chris Pratt turn to stone and even Drew Carrey get slim. Now we have skinny Zach Galifianakis. What has the world come to?

If you haven’t seen or read Gone Girl, go do one or both right now so you can enjoy it before it inevitably gets spoiled for you. If you have experienced the mind-fuck that is Gone Girl, you know about the series of Amazing Amy books Amy Dunne’s parents wrote throughout her life. Soon, you’ll be able to buy actual Amazing Amy books. Meta. Peep a preview here.

As speculated earlier when a Twin Peaks casting call made its rounds on the Internet, the beloved David Lynch series is returning to television! The limited nine-episode series will air on Showtime at some point in 2016 — just don’t expect this to be a direct continuation of events from the last season that aired in 1991.

Who doesn’t like to fire up Sam Smith, dim the lights and have a good cry? Dude has soul. But for a lighter, more humorous take on Smith’s hit "Stay With Me,” check out Daniel “Forever Damien from Mean Girls” Franzese in “Please Go Home.”

All together now: “You can’t stay with us!”

Three years ago, Parks and Recreation introduced the world to “Treat Yo’ Self” Day (typically observed on Oct. 13, when the episode originally aired). So if you’re in need of a little pampering, Buzzfeed has a few ideas about how to celebrate this week.

Bill Hader hosted Saturday Night Live last weekend — despite him having only left the cast a year ago — bringing the return of some favorite characters (of course Stefon) as well as fan favorite Kristen Wiig. Did you miss the episode? Apparently everyone did — it was the show’s lowest rated episode ever matched only by Charlize Theron’s episode from just 5 months ago. Woof. And it was actually pretty good!

One the flipside, everyone watched the crazy Walking Dead premiere Sunday. Let's celebrate the show's return with a new Bad Lip Reading, shall we?


New movie trailers to hit the Interwebz: Haley Joel Osmet stars in Sex Ed as a sex-starved dude (…named Eddie…) who lands a gig at a middle school teaching — you guessed it! — human sexuality; Disney mystery-adventure Tomorrowland, starring George Clooney; and holiday comedy A Merry Friggin Christmas — one of Robin Williams’ final films.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 10.15.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pizza-topping-87127713332743vt

Morning News and Stuff

Hunter found guilty on one count; the city has enough extra money to buy every resident $60 worth of pizza; Ebola patient flew from Cleveland to Dallas recently

So much stuff has happened in the last 24 hours. I’m just going to hit you with all of it without my usual witty introduction.

A jury found Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter guilty on one felony count yesterday. The jury says Hunter broke the law by gaining access to confidential files relating to the firing of her brother, an employee of the juvenile court, and passing them on to him. The jury could not reach a decision on eight other felony charges against Hunter, for which she may or may not be retried. The conviction carries a penalty of up to a year and a half in prison. Hunter will be sentenced in December. It’s also very likely the state Supreme Court will take disciplinary action, which may include disbarring her. Hunter has been on suspension with pay as the trial took place and will now be suspended without pay until she is removed from the bench officially.

• Sometimes you put on that pair of jeans you haven’t worn in a long time and find some cash you forgot about wadded up in one of the pockets. I love those days. Cincinnati just found $18 million in its pants somewhere, and now the city is debating how to spend it. The cash is a budget surplus from better-than-expected tax revenues and cost-cutting. City Manager Harry Black has some ideas on how to use that money, including kicking more than $4 million to a fund for winter weather response, using another $4 million to pay back neighborhood development funds the city borrowed, holding $3 million in reserve for possible future police and fire expenses, $275,000 to make sure the city hires more businesses owned by women and minorities, $400,000 for a new city government performance analysis office and other ideas. I always just spend extra money I find on pizza, but that’s probably among the reasons why I don’t run the city. But seriously, $18 million is enough to buy each resident of the city $60.50 worth of pizza, maybe combined into one enormous Adriatico’s MegaBearcat the size of Mt. Airy Forest. Think about it, Mr. Black.

• You’ll note that using any of the surplus to fund streetcar operating costs is not on that list, presumably because Mayor John Cranley has drawn a hard line in the sand about using city money for its projected $4 million annual shortfall. But others are more open to using money from the city’s coffers to plug that gap, including Vice Mayor David Mann, who suggested at yesterday’s City Council Transportation Committee meeting that while not ideal, he hasn’t written off the idea. That’s significant because Cranley's suggestion to draw down operating hours to close the funding gap would have to be approved by City Council. Other options include raising funds through a parking plan, special improvement or other means.
Council seems split on whether it would vote for a reduction in service hours

• Mayor Cranley thinks there are "too many" transitional living houses for those recovering from addiction in the city, but Price Hill-based New Foundations Transitional Living can stay in the neighborhood, according to a settlement it reached with the city recently. The six homes for men and women recovering from addiction to drugs and alcohol have been the focus of controversy in recent months. Neighbors complained earlier this year about the houses, saying the neighborhood wasn’t zoned for them. Price Hill is zoned for single occupancy, not the so-called “congregant occupancy” needed to normally run group homes. The city investigated removing the homes from the neighborhood. But under the Fair Housing Act, transitional homes such as New Foundations are allowed in single occupancy neighborhoods. Under a compromise, the for-profit group will reduce the occupancy of the houses and promise not to expand in the neighborhood.

• Another building along Central Parkway in Over-the-Rhine is being rehabbed, and this one’s really cool news. The Central Parkway YMCA is getting a $27 million renovation that will include the creation of affordable housing. The update will modernize and augment the building’s fitness equipment, adding new weight rooms and group fitness areas, a cycling studio and put affordable housing for seniors on the top floors. I love the building and have recently pondered getting a membership because they’re one of the few fitness places in town with an actual track for running. I should probably wait a little bit on that, though, because the building will be closing in December for renovations. It’s expected to open back up in early 2016.

• If you’re not tired of the tea party vs. conservative establishment narrative that has dominated the political news cycle the past, oh, seems like forever now, here’s another one for you. Some prominent local tea party activists are bummed because they weren’t allowed into a Monday rally for Gov. John Kasich in Butler County. The group, including Cincinnati Tea Party President Ann Becker, was outside the rally protesting Common Core, the educational initiative that looks to standardize performance measures for U.S. students. They say they were denied admission because they were wearing anti-Common Core T-shirts. Officials with the Kasich campaign say it had nothing to do with their shirts and everything to do with the fact they were being disruptive to the event. I honestly don’t know who to root for here so I’m just going to move along on this.

• While we’re on the “suburbs are cray” tip, let’s talk about this story for just a sec. State Rep. Ron Maag is throwing a fundraiser he’s calling a “Machine Gun Social” in Lebanon Oct. 25. By throwing Maag a little cash for his re-election campaign, you get to fire machine guns in a nature preserve. Just like when you were in high school and your cool gun rights friend would invite you out to the rock quarry to shoot at bottles and cans! But don’t worry — you have to be at least a teenager to fire the guns, they’ll be permanently pointed downrange and there will be instructors present to, like, instruct you on the best way to neutralize a threatening soda can with a hail of semi-automatic rifle fire. Maag’s Democratic opponent is of course pitching a fit, but has chosen, oddly, only to take issue with his use of the word “social.”

• Whoa, this is already too long, but I need to get at least one national story in here. Another medical worker in Texas has tested positive for Ebola. That worker apparently flew from Cleveland to Dallas the day before she started having symptoms. I usually try to end this stuff on a positive, non-terrifying note, but today I failed.

 
 
by Mike Breen 10.15.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 08:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
bone travis shinn

Music Tonight: Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, Surfer Blood and More

• Ohio Hip Hop crew Bone Thugs-N-Harmony are still kicking. The ensemble, called by MTV the “most melodic Hip Hop group of all time” (thanks largely to their deft ability to work melodies not only into chorus hooks, but also their rhymes), performs at Bogart’s tonight at 7 p.m. 


The group, which came into the national spotlight in 1993 when Eazy-E signed it to Ruthless Records, won a Grammy in 1997 for “The Crossroads” (a tribute to their late mentor). Bone Thugs’ current tour is their first in a while to feature all of the original members. The group recently made news when it started its own “TV channel,” which is actually an internet channel that will simulcast the crew’s homecoming concert in Cleveland tomorrow night (for a fee). The big homecoming show will feature backing from a full orchestra; proceeds from the pay-per-view broadcast benefit their hometown non-profit, Roots of American Music.


This should be one of the last times to catch the original Bone Thugs — the group has announced its next album and upcoming dates will be its last with the full lineup.



• Indie Rock heroes Surfer Blood perform tonight at The Southgate House Revival in Newport. The Florida-based band broke through in 2010, the same year Surfer Blood appeared at Cincinnati’s MidPoint Music Festival (where so many people showed up for the show, many had to be turned away at the door). The band is currently touring behind its sophomore album, last year’s Pythons. Surfer Blood recently came off a tour with We Are Scientists. The two bands also released a tour-only split single; you can hear Surfer Blood’s contribution here.


Read Jason Gargano's preview of the show from this week's CityBeat here.



Virginia based trio Eternal Summers opens tonight’s 8 p.m. show. Tickets are $17.



• Folk/Roots duo The Hobo Nephews of Uncle Frank play a free show tonight at MOTR Pub. The Minnesota-based twosome’s 2013 album Number One Contender was called one of the best Minnesota-made albums of last year by the Minneapolis Star Tribune. You can listen to it in its entirety below.


 


Know of other good live music options for tonight in Greater Cincinnati? Share details in the comments.




 
 
by Jac Kern 10.14.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: Events at 02:20 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_ironfork-700x615

Iron Fork Transforms Brewery Into Kitchen Stadium

CityBeat's inagural Iron Fork event takes place at Moerlein Brewery tomorrow

We’ve all seen Iron Chef, right?

That’s basically what’s happening at CityBeat’s inaugural Iron Fork event from 5:30-10 p.m. Wednesday. The Christian Moerlein Brewery in Over-the-Rhine will transform into a local version of Kitchen Stadium with area chefs Frances Kroner (feast, Sleepy Bee Café, Random Snacks of Kindness), Jose Salazar (Salazar) and Joe West (The Cincinnatian Hotel and The Palace) going head-to-head in a cook to the death!

OK, not death — these three will be competing for the coveted Golden Fork Award. Beginning at 6 p.m. with Kroner, the chefs will each take a turn in the kitchen creating a dish using a secret ingredient (which they won’t know about until an hour before they begin). Salazar will follow at 7 p.m. and West will go at 8 p.m. Each chef will get help from a youth apprentice from Gabriel's Place, a local food education nonprofit. CityBeat dining contributors Anne Mitchell and Ilene Ross will join Kristen St. Clair, Kitchen Director and Resident Chef at Gabriel’s Place, as the competition judges.

As the chefs do their thing, there will be live feeds of the action on monitors around the event, so guests will be able to catch the fun while they enjoy beer from Christian Moerlein, Four Roses cocktails and bites from more than 20 area restaurants and food vendors including Django Western Taco, Huit BBQ and Jimmy G’s.

Tickets are $30/$40 day-of and include two Moerlein beers, a Four Roses drink and ample food samples. Get ‘em here. Proceeds benefit Gabriel’s Place.

 
 
by Charlie Harmon 10.14.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: Music History, Local Music at 12:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sudsys

These Walls Have Heard It All: Sudsy Malone's

When researching Bogart’s for the first of these columns, I discovered a place that used to be its side-stream neighbor. Sudsy Malone’s, which sat just across the street from Bogart’s until 2008, may be a well-known name to older Cincinnatians, but to those of my generation I imagine it’s a legend unheard.

Sudsy’s, as those who knew it well referred to it, was more than just a bar or music venue. It was a laundromat. A gathering place of locals who fancied having a beer and hearing a tune as their clothes turned over in bubbly cleanliness. And while it was only open for a fraction of the time many of the big venues around here have been, it occupies a deep space in the history of Cincinnati and its local music scene.

Refined searches and several page scrolls through Google turns up hardly anything on the former venue. I finally found a memorial Facebook page that further fascinated me, still only offering a brief and general history but filled with posts by former loyal patrons reminiscing of great times at the bar, offering tales of hilarious happenings along with images, videos and old posters to fill it all in with color.

I wanted to know more in hopes of giving Sudsy’s its due place in Cincinnati music history. To understand where it all started and where it went from there, I talked to Janine Walz, a former managing partner who was around during the establishment’s heyday.

Sudsy’s was originally owned by John Cioffi and opened in 1986. As I understand it, the idea was inspired by similar businesses popping up in the region such as Dirty Dungarees in Columbus. They serve beer, so you can sip some foam while listening to the groan of washers and dryers, but Dungaree’s was never quite a bar. They served drinks in more of a refreshment center style. Cioffi’s vision for Sudsy’s was different.

The decision for the name came from a lot of scrawling and scratching by Cioffi and his family.

“They just had a long list of names that they would write down as they were brainstorming, and then they started crossing names out until it was down to Soapy Tucker’s or Sudsy Malone’s,” Walz says.

Michael Sharp, the highly adored Renaissance man known for his ballet career in Cincinnati and who sadly just passed away in September, designed the character logos. Soapy Tucker was a sort of motherly figure, whereas Sudsy Malone was a true gangster.


He became the face of the place, with his one-eyed look, suds-filled beer and coin-flipping hand becoming the calling card of the bar’s sign.

Upon walking in the front door guests faced a 40-foot bar.

“We would have competitions to see who could slide a mug full of beer the furthest down the bar without spilling it,” Walz recalls with a smile.

They had little round cocktail tables covered with dark blue tablecloths and standard bar stools. The ceiling undulated with the movement of fans under which each had a globular light, providing a sort of soft ambiance to the bar.

At the back of the building sat the laundry area, a brightly lit room where the fluorescent lights glinted off dozens of top-of-the-line washers and dryers.

“I remember some of the bands complaining after a while about the laundry room lights because they would glow into the bar and kill the mood for the crowd,” Walz says. “We strung up some Christmas lights and would just turn those on instead when bands were on stage at night.”

When the place first opened, however, the stage didn’t exist. Live music had never even been part of the idea.

“It was only intended to be a laundromat with frosty-mug beer,” Walz says of the original plan.

Walz recalls being the second laundry customer when Sudsy’s first opened. She worked at the Perkins just up Short Vine, and happened to be John Cioffi’s waitress the day he sat down to get food with the liquor agent that was supposed to be approving Sudsy’s license.

“When they were finishing lunch he asked me to come a few doors down to talk to him about a job,” she says. “I figured it was the same distance from home and might pay better, so I went. Next thing I knew I was hired on as a manager.”

In other words, she was there from the start. Walz watched the bar being built, and she knew it when it was just a place for people to wash clothes and have a drink, the crowd rarely exceeding 10 people.

Only months after the place opened, a local band called The Thangs approached the owners with the idea to play music. Essentially, they just wanted a place to gig when nowhere else would let them. After some hesitation, Sudsy’s let them do it, and much to their surprise the first show was packed with about 100 people. Sudsy’s wasn’t expecting this, and they completely sold out of every drop of beer they had stocked at the time.

With such outrageous success, The Thangs wanted to come back. Before long, music became the detergent to Sudsy’s suds, responsible for consistently bringing in large crowds. At first they charged a very minimal cover, mostly so they had something to give the band, and offered a free soft-drink ticket with entry for additional incentive.


By ’87 they were charging a $5 cover, although they would still let people in for free if they had a basket of laundry. This often resulted in washers full of abandoned clothes the next day, as people brought the clothes to get in and then simply forgot about them in the excitement of music and merriment. Over time, Sudsy’s developed a massive collection of forsaken threads.

This memory sparked another for Walz: “I remember this guy that would show up about once every year driving a station wagon. He would take the clothes people had left over time and pack every inch of his car, literally. He would do something with them, I think donate them.”

As the place continually packed in people like foam to the top of a mug — thanks to the highly praised booking magic of Dan McCabe (Now of MOTR Pub) — problems inevitably occurred that now seem laughable. The carpet in the bar area became so matted and disgusting that it resembled tile, so Walz had it ripped out and replaced with wood. The men’s bathroom was a story of its own. Widely known as “Worst Men’s Bathroom,” Walz said she wouldn’t go near it, even almost buying stainless steel sheets to layer on it so she could just hose it down at night.


At one point the fire department came in and completely cleared house, although there wasn’t a single flame or wisp of smoke. The building’s stated capacity was far under how many people they would pack in, and one night they had to count the crowd back in, one by one. Eventually they completely stopped the music for a period of time to get the building up to code.

Despite its small size, Sudsy’s brought in now-major acts that were rising at the time — Beck, Smashing Pumpkins and Red Hot Chili Peppers — while also helping breed local acts like The Afghan Whigs and Over The Rhine. Almost all the music was original, save some special events like Grateful Dead night.

Even on nights they weren’t playing themselves, members of bands could always be found among the crowd. The music scene at the time was like a circle, made up of bands and fans that truly appreciated music and enjoyed simply watching people express themselves creatively. Bands would come out and support other bands. Non-musicians would out come and support them all.

Even bands and celebrities that were too big to play there live in the storybooks. Popularly known folks like Jackson Browne, "Weird Al" Yankovic and James Taylor stopped in to wash clothes or use the phone. Kate Pierson (B52s) and Chrissie Hynde (The Pretenders) came by during their Tide protest to pass out literature in affiliation with People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals.


Walz recalls the afternoon before a Jefferson Airplane concert at Riverbend when the bar was pretty empty and there were four guys hanging out doing laundry and drinking a beer. They were worried about their cab not showing up and frantically trying to figure out how to get to their hotel — so Walz drove them. Only after dropping them off did she realize the reason the dudes were so worried about being late.

Walz showed me the blueprint of the building, and again lit up when she pointed out the wash sink in the laundry room.

“Some crazy celebrity took a bath in that sink one night,” she says. “I’m pretty sure it was Marilyn Manson.”

And these stop-ins aren’t the only “celebrity” claims to fame for Sudsy’s. The bar itself was given awards throughout the years from Cincinnati’s former alternative weekly Everybody’s News, from “Best Looking Staff” to “Best Rock Club,” and even “Best Place to Ditch a Blind Date.” They were also named the best bar in Ohio in ’93 by Creem magazine, courtesy of The Connells.


However, all the press, awards and celebrities aside, Walz says what really made the place special were the local patrons.

“It was like a family, people were loyal,” she says. “They would look out for others, and for the bands, and would always defend Sudsy’s no matter what. Without the people, everybody, the people that watched the bands, the bands themselves, Sudsy’s was nothing.”

The bar would even cater specifically to bands they knew well, for example stocking extra Hudy Delight when The Thangs would come back because their crowd loved to drink it.


There were also folks she referred to as “family bums”. There was Archie Harrison, a local homeless man who would help clean at night for a little money. During the days he would just hang out, always being jolly and telling jokes sharing what little bit of anything he might have had that day to share.

Then there was Sonny, a good-hearted man who hid behind a hulk of a body. Sonny would guard the back door, despite never being asked.

“I remember one time one of the dryers was broken and the glass wasn’t in there to cover the hole,” she says. “We had an out of order sign but, you know, I guess it disappeared. No surprise there. Anyway, we had given him some money to do laundry and he used that dryer, just picking up the clothes as they fell out of hole and throwing them right back in. It was hysterical. When we asked him why he didn’t switch dryers he said he didn’t want to bother us and cause trouble.”

As the Millennium rolled around, a lot of the core patrons began settling down and showing up less often. The crime in the area would keep people away, and the decline in the laundry business lowered their numbers even further. Walz had just put $12,000 into a new sprinkler system, still trying to keep the building code-worth, but she, too, was moving toward settling down.

“I was pregnant at that pointm too, and I was just kind of done working in the bar business,” she says.

That, along with clashes between Walz and McCabe about making money versus booking acts that would be huge for the scene led to Walz selling the establishment by 2002.

While it seems that Sudsy’s wasn’t as glorious after that time as it once had been, the venue remained open until 2008, at which time it closed its doors for good. The old building at 2626 Vine Street remains a boarded up relic.

One of the most revealing things Walz said during our talk about Sudsy’s was, “If you were there, you were part of the reason you are here talking to me today.”

It saddens me that I didn’t have to opportunity to be there, but for all those who were, as well as for the others that might not have known what this place ever was, this is just a small piece of the big apple pie that was Sudsy Malone’s Rock n’ Roll Laundry & Bar.