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by Mike Breen 11.10.2014 15 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 11:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: The Soil & the Sun, The Revivalists and More

The brand new Over-the-Rhine music venue The Woodward Theater had a public open house event this past Friday and now it’s time for the venue’s first official show. The Woodward — brought to you by the people who run MOTR Pub, which is just across Main Street from the new club — hosts acclaimed Grand Rapids, Mich., ensemble The Soil & the Sun tonight. The progressive, gorgeously ethereal Indie Chamber Folk group is joined by Wisconsin Country/Folk group Count this Penny for the 8 p.m. show. Showtime is 8 p.m. and admission is just $5. 


For more CityBeat Woodward coverage, click here and here


Here is a clip of The Soil & the Sun performing a session for the Audiotree series. 



• Eclectic drummer/composer Dylan Ryan brings his Dylan Ryan/Sand project to Northside’s The Comet tonight. Ryan’s exploratory Jazz Rock trio will be joined by the Dave McDonnell Group of the free, 10 p.m. show. Ryan (now based in L.A.) and McDonnell (now based in Cincinnati) are both members of the “Prog Jazz” ensemble Herculaneum. 


Click here for a full preview of tonight’s show.


Here’s “Tree, Voices, Saturn,” a track from Sand’s second album, Circa, which was released on Cuneiform Records in late September. 


• Diverse New Orleans Rock band The Revivalists perform at Oakley’s 20th Century Theater tonight. The show starts at 8 p.m. with special guests Black Cadillacs. Tickets are $17 at the door. 


Click here for a preview of The Revivalists’ show from CityBeat’s Brian Baker. 


Here’s the official video for “Criminal” from The Revivalists’ City of Sound LP, which was reissued by the band’s new label home, Wind-Up Records, earlier this year. 



• One of the cool things about The Woodward Theater is that when shows there end, there will always be something going on across the street at MOTR Pub, which typically presents shows at 10 p.m. (and never charges a cover). Tonight’s a great opportunity to test that out as each venue has a great band performing. SubPop recording artists Jaill play MOTR tonight, after the Soil & the Sun show across the street, with guests Smut


Formed more than a decade ago in Milwaukee, Wis., Jaill spent their formative years self-recording and releasing a variety of music on their own or for small labels. In 2008, the band put out its debut full-length, There’s No Sky (Oh My My) — which was reissued on Burger Records (the label also released a collection of early recordings called Cranes last year) — and caught the attention of SubPop.


The band signed with SubPop for 2010’s That’s How We Burn and then in 2012 released the magnificent Traps, a great representation of the group’s jangly, highly melodic Indie Pop. Pitchfork gave the album a positive review, comparing the band to Violent Femmes and the dB’s and describing it as “idiosyncratic pop-rock appealing to geeky outsiders and scene lifers.” I’d say it has a far wider appeal than that. 



Click here for more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight. 

 

 
 
by Mike Breen 11.07.2014 18 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 11:38 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Weekend Music: Primus, Blues & Boogie Piano Summit, More

One of the few “Alternative Revolution” bands left over from the ’90s, Primus, returns to Cincinnati tonight for a special show at the Taft Theatre. The veteran band is still one of the more unique and eccentric groups around that maintains a large fan base. That’s singularity might have something to do with their longevity. Primus has never had anything to do with flash-in-the-pan musical fads. 


Les Claypool and Co.’s latest is a blissfully oddball addition to an already blissfully oddball discography. Primus and the Chocolate Factory is a creative interpretation of the music from the original Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory film. Reviews from previous live shows on Primus’ tour for the album say the band opens with a set of Primus hits; the second set focuses on Chocolate Factory, replete with matching stage production. 


Check out Charlie Harmon’s preview of the show for CityBeat here.


Tickets for tonight’s show are $39.50-$45. Showtime is 8 p.m.


One of Greater Cincinnati’s most unique annual music events, the Blues & Boogie Piano Summit, returns for its 15th year this weekend. For the 2014 edition, the showcase of international Boogie Woogie Blues pianists takes place over two nights (Friday and Saturday) at the Southgate House Revival.


The Boogie Piano Summit was founded by Ricky Nye, Cincinnati’s top purveyor of Boogie Woogie, a rollicking, highly rhythmic style of Blues piano that was influential in the formation and development of Rock & Roll and various styles of Blues, Jazz and Country music. This year’s edition of the Summit is dedicated to the “New Breed of Boogie Woogie,” showcasing three players all under the age of 30 (the same lineup performs both nights). The event features Switzerland’s Chris Conz, Iowa’s Chase Garrett and Germany’s Luca Sestak (watch clips from each below).


Click here for more on the show.




Tickets are $30 for a seat or $25 for standing room only. (Save $5 on tomorrow’s show by purchasing them in advance here.)


• The Rusty Ball, organized and starring fun, popular local ’80s cover group The Rusty Griswolds returns to the Duke Energy Convention Center tomorrow night at 8 p.m.. Tickets range from $75-$175. The show is the Griswolds' annual charitable event, with proceeds going to numerous local charities (the show has generated nearly $2 million for over 300 charities since it began in 2008). Special guest this year is ’80s/’90s Pop star Taylor Dayne. Click here for full details. 


• Toronto Rock twosome catl. performs a free show Saturday at MOTR Pub. It’s a night of duos, as the Canadians are joined by locals Halvsies and Brooklyn’s Mark Rogers & Mary Byrne. Showtime is 10 p.m.


Here’s a clip for catl.’s bluesy, boogying “Gotta Thing for You” from their album Soon This Will All Be Gone. This spring the band released its fourth album, The Shakin’ House.


• Rootsy Nashville rockers The Wild Feathers play Oakley’s 20th Century Theater on Sunday. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $15 in advance or $17 day of show.


The Wild Feathers began at the start of the decade, when guitarist/singer Ricky Young and bassist/singer Joel King decided to put together a band that featured four lead vocalists, each as important as the next. The resulting ensemble, with the addition of guitarists/singers Taylor Burns and Preston Wimberly (Ben Dumas plays drums) clicked instantly. The band signed to Warner Bros. and released its self-titled debut last year. Rolling Stone gave the album a glowing review, saying the LP brings to mind “everyone from the Allman Brothers ("Hard Wind") to the Jayhawks ("Got It Wrong”),” and that “the five-piece band fuses the essentials of rock, country, folk and blues into an intriguing new approach.”


• Influential British Metal crew Carcass performs Sunday at Covington’s Madison Theater. Considered pioneers of Grindcore and melodic Death Metal, the band was also a favorite of British taste-making DJ John Peel. Carcass split up in the ’90s but reunited in 2007 for a string of shows, leading up to their entire back catalog being reissued. In 2013, the group released its first album of new music in 16 years, Surgical Steel. Next week the band is releasing a five song EP, Surgical Remission/Surplus Steel, which features tracks recorded during the Surgical Steel sessions. 


Here’s the lyric video for the EP’s “Livestock Marketplace”:



Read Brian Baker’s preview of the show here.


Carcass headlines the Madison Sunday with fellow Metal giants Obituary and guests Exhumed and Noisem. Showtime is 8 p.m. The show is open to all ages. Tickets are $25.


• The local chapter of the Guitars For Vets nonprofit organization, which provides musical therapy in the form of guitar lessons to military veterans at the local VA Hospital suffering from Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, presents its second annual benefit this Sunday at 1 p.m. at Jim and Jack’s on the River (jimandjacks.net). The event is free and features performances by noted local guitarists Sonny Moorman and Dick Buchholz, who will perform with Guitar For Vets students. There will also be a guitar auction and raffle to raise funds for the cause. For more information on Guitars For Vets, visit guitars4vets.org


Click here for more live music events this weekend in Greater Cincinnati.

 
 
by Charlie Harmon 11.07.2014 18 days ago
Posted In: Music History at 11:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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These Walls Have Heard It All: Woodward Theater

It’s 1791, and as William Woodward’s many siblings head out into the world — some to sea, some to South Carolina — he decides to head into the vast Northwest Territory to a little town that looks like hardly anything more than an outpost. Little did he know that a little more than a decade later he would be living in the Union state of Ohio, and that by a century later those woods and fields would be covered with busy roads and pounding industry.

At this time, however, people lived in small townhouses with acres of land to farm, and Woodward came as a surveyor to work with that land. In the process, he began investing in real estate, got himself some land and settled on a good sized plot near Fifth Street Market — now known as Fountain Square.

Hammering down coarse boards gathered from the flat boats that were dismantled upon reaching Cincinnati, Woodward built a house in 1803. Years later, in 1816, he upgraded, building the Woodward Mansion, a beautiful house of brick and hand-carved woodwork. All around the northern side of that house he fixed the problem of Cincinnati having no good fruit by starting a huge apple orchard that would crank out around 500 barrels of cider a year (ever wonder where Orchard Street in Over-the-Rhine got its name?).

Through his investments and business endeavors, Woodward gained significant wealth, which he would then turn around and give back to the community out of his love for others and his era-appropriate fear of God.

One of the major ways he gave back to the community still stands today — in 1831 Woodward High School opened thanks to his efforts and donations. Woodward High School was not only the first in the city, but the first high school to exist west of the Allegheny Mountains.

When Woodward eventually grew old and passed away, his land and home was given to his wife, who also passed it on when she died. Eventually, by the time it was almost 100 years old in 1912, it was in the hands of a man named George C. Kolb.

Kolb razed the house with the intention of building a theater in honor of Woodward. Not simply a businessman without a care for the history of the house, Kolb had a committee choose certain items from the mansion to be preserved. The wooden mantel and the front door were given to Woodward High School and, according to a news article at the time, the committee also saved a cupboard, balustrade and a window Woodward had been known to look out from into the woods.

Once it was properly gutted of relics, the building was knocked to the ground and on top was built the beaux art-style building we see today (though the statues on either side of the door are replicas).

It was opened as a movie theater on June 18, 1913, in the days when film was still a fresh and developing art form. To say silent film at that time was redundant, because recorded — and especially synchronized — sound was a concept beyond reality. For example, in 1917 you could have seen the then-new but now lost film The Railroad Raiders.

The theater only lasted until 1933. While there are no records of why it closed, most speculate that the Great Depression kept people from having a nice night at the movies, causing the theater to go under.

By 1935 the building was again showing something, but this time it was used cars under the name Andy Schain Inc. A newspaper ad from 1937 shows that you could buy a ’36 Chevy Town Sedan for $525, a ’29 Chevy Coach for $60 and a ’31 Chevy Sports Roadster for the mindboggling price of $10. In other words, you could’ve purchased that Coach for the amount you might spend at today’s Woodward Theater in a night of heavy drinking with your spouse (or alone, if you’re that hardcore).

Around this point is where the trail runs dry except for a few sad drips. The used car shop closed sometime in the 1940s. While it’s hard to brush the dust off and find evidence, apparently there was a Kroger in the building in the 1950s. And jumping ahead to the ‘70s, it was a nightclub called Wanda Bear’s.

In 1990 Greg Starnes bought the building, using it as storage for his antique shop further down Main Street until 1995, when he opened it as the second location of Greg’s Antiques.

The end of Starnes’ tenure there is where Dan McCabe stepped in with his partners Chris Schadler and Chris Varias to begin work on this old building that has seen and heard it all.

It’s heard the silence of an early 20th century film; the passionate debate between two 1930s jocks over the price of a hot ride; the chatting of lovers shopping for lemons and mustached men cheering a band; the cooing of an old lady over a doll that reminds her of her younger days; and most recently, the buzzing of drills and booming of hammers.

Now once again the halls of this honorary building might listen to the rumbling and rattling of Rock music, the soft crying of a mother watching her daughter wed, or the perfectly timed joke of a comedian to the background of rollicking laughter. Whatever it is, as time rolls on these walls won’t stop listening.

The Woodward Theater opens to the public tonight. Read more about Main Street’s newest music and events space here.

 
 
by Mike Breen 11.06.2014 19 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 11:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Restorations, Tas Cru and More

Philly rockers Restorations play Newport’s Southgate House Revival tonight. Labelmates The Smith Street Band open the show at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10 at the door.

Restorations recently released its third album, LP3 (following LP1 and LP2, of course), though the great label, SideOneDummy Records. Rolling Stone said of the new album, “When their trio of guitarists aren't busy auditioning for Ozzy or Springsteen, they summon dynamic, smartly-shaded echo caverns more reminiscent of Sunny Day Real Estate and Modest Mouse – elevating the nicotine-ravaged bloodletting of Jon Loudon, the toughest young old man at the bar, to lip-quiveringly dramatic heights.” The band also had a great piece written about them and new album on Grantland; check it out here


• Blues singer/songwriter/guitarist Tas Cru and his band of Tortured Souls play West Side club Legends tonight. The upstate New York ace has released four well-received albums and has a new one, You Keep the Money, due out soon. Here’s the title track from his 2012 full-length, “Tired of Bluesmen Crying.” 


Local Blues heroes The Sonny Moorman Group open the show at 8 p.m. Admission is $10 at the door. 


• New York City-based instrumental trio Consider the Source plays Covington’s Madison Theater tonight. The self-descriptions from the band’s Facebook — “Sci-Fi, Middle Eastern, Progressive, Psychedelic, Jamband, Funk, Fusion” — give a great sense of the diversity inherent in the band’s music. Played with virtuosity and a sense of adventure, the threesome’s unique style and entertaining live presence has earned the group a cult following across the country, in Europe and even the Middle East, as well as dates performing with the likes of Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey, Victor Wooten and Oteil Burbridge. Consider the Source recently released the World War Trio EP (Part 1), which consists of a “six-part composition” titled “Put Another Rock in That Bag.” Part 2 will be a double album due for release this winter. 


Here’s an extended version of Radiohead’s “Paranoid Android,” a rare full cover from Consider the Source recorded live in the studio.


Consider the Source is joined by local acts Common Center, Elementree Levity Project and Don’t Fear the Satellites for tonight’s 9 p.m. show. Admission is $10.


Click here for more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight.


 
 
by Anne Arenstein 11.06.2014 19 days ago
at 10:47 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra Appoints Interim Music Director

Kelly Kuo will lead the CCO in 2015

Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra this week announced the appointment of Kelly Kuo as Interim Music Director. Kuo will oversee the CCO's new festival format that debuts in August 2015. Currently the artistic director of the Oregon Mozart Players and the music director and conductor of the Butler Opera Center at the University of Texas in Austin, Kuo has a growing reputation as an innovative leader, educator and conductor.

Maestro Kuo has been part of the Cincinnati music scene since 2007, when he served as the CCO's assistant conductor between 2007-2009. He was the director of the Xavier University Chamber Orchestra and, in 2013, he conducted Phillip Glass' Galileo Galilei at Cincinnati Opera.

His responsibilities working with the CCO board and staff to determine the course of the orchestra, its programming and community relations. The program for the August festival has yet to be announced.

The CCO's next performances are Gian Carlo Menotti's Amahl and the Night Visitors at Xavier University Dec. 19-22. Go here for more information.

 
 
by Mike Breen 11.05.2014 20 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 11:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: Oozing Wound, Jeezy and More

Chicago Thrash band Oozing Wound are in town tonight for a show at Rake’s End in Brighton. Forced Opinion, Monitor Lizard and Iron Oath also perform. Showtime is 9 p.m.


Heavy on dark and clever humor and creative riffage, Oozing Wound is touring behind its second album release, Earth Suck, which came out Oct. 21 on the Thrill Jockey label. The album comes on the heels of the band’s debut, Retrash, which received widespread praise last year from The New York Times, Decibel, Pitchfork and many other outlets. Noisey recently profiled the band, writing, “So refreshingly anti-bullshit are Oozing Wound that they could conceivably turn out to be the Nirvana of thrash.” 


• Grammy-nominated Hip Hop star Jeezy brings his tour in support of his new album, Seen It All, to Bogart’s tonight. Doors open at 7 p.m. and tickets are $47.36.


Better known as Young Jeezy (and, to his family, Jay Jenkins), the Atlanta rapper is also quite the motivationalist. His first two albums for Def Jam were called Let’s Get It: Thug Motivation 101 and The Inspiration: Thug Motivation 102 and he’s proven that that angle isn’t just talk. Yesterday, Grantland ran a piece about Jeezy’s pep talk to the Temple football team (which was coming off of two losses in important games) on Halloween, which was followed the next day by Temple’s win over No. 23 East Carolina. The win over ECU was the first time Temple beat a ranked opponent at home ever and only their third victory over a ranked team in the school’s history. 


So if you’re having a tough time in life right now, tonight’s show might help you turn it around. At worst, you’ll probably have fun.


• Pittsburgh’s Cello Fury, a “Chamber Rock” group featuring three cellist and a drummer, kicks off its current tour tonight at West Side club Legends. Showtime is 9 p.m. and admission is $10 at the door.


Fans of Prog Rock will appreciate Cello Fury’s winding arrangements and driving intensity. The instrumental ensemble has released a pair of album and has collaborated with a wide range of artists — from Rock acts to work in the theater, opera, dance and orchestral world. 


• Veteran singer/songwriter Garland Jeffreys performs at the Southgate House Revival in Newport tonight. Jeffreys spoke with CityBeat’s Steven Rosen about his “comeback,” which began in 2011after he put his career on hold to raise his daughter. His critically-acclaimed 2011 album The King of In Between was his first new material since 1992. Check out the full interview here.


Here’s Jeffreys performing on David Letterman’s show upon the release of The King of In Between


Jeffreys’ show tonight in Newport begins at 8 p.m. and tickets are $25 at the door.


Click here for more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati. 


 
 
by Nick Grever 11.04.2014 21 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Live Blog at 02:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Valley of the Sun Tour Diary: The Rules of Dibs

Hours spent in the van, hours spent waiting for sound check in the venue, hours spent wandering European cities waiting for the venue to open, hours waiting for show time and hours spent waiting for the show to wrap up. All of this adds up to lots of free on our hands and not much to do with it. So what is a Rock & Roll band — and its merch and sound guy — to do with opportunity? 

Why, play Dibs of course.

Dibs is one of those rare games that has no end point. No one wins at Dibs; it is played simply to pass time and help spice up the long stretches of mind numbing nothingness that touring sometimes produces. As a public service to other bands in this situation, I would like to provide you with the objectives and rules of Dibs, as I have observed them, so that you may also join in on this wondrous game.


First, a few opening remarks on Dibs. One: this game may sound a little inappropriate at times. This fact is not lost on us. But after four hours of staring out of the window of a van and seeing not much more than trees, plains and gas stations, your brain starts to atrophy. Dibs helps bring it back to back to life. Two: if, while playing Dibs, you question your values or moral code at any time, don’t be alarmed — this only means that you are human.


Now, on to the good stuff!


Objective: The objective of Dibs is to see an attractive person and call dibs on said person. Being that this tour is comprised of five straight men that are either single or separated from their significant others for three weeks, this means that attractive women of all kinds are being dibsed with a speed and fury unrelenting. But if your preferences differ, feel free to switch it up. Dibs is a game for all.


Now, the objective is easy enough to grasp, but like all great games of skill and wit, it is easy to learn and hard to master. Which is why we have set up several unofficial rules that I will now place into record.


Rules:

  1. A dibs-able person must be within eye contact. This means that I can’t call dibs on a girl that has gone around a corner or into a store and is no longer within my sight line. This rule works in conjunction with rule two.
  2. A dibs must be made with a witness present. No dibs can be called while you are alone: the witness must be able to see said dibs, verify the dibsworthiness and (if you’re lucky) become upset that they didn’t see said dibsworthy subject first. Seeing your friend’s pain is almost as satisfying as the initial dibs and should be celebrated.
  3. If a subject is dibsed, the decision cannot be reversed. This helps eliminate dibs calls made without full knowledge of the subject. There have been times where we’ve each made a dibs call early, only to regret the decision.
  4. On rare occasions, a special call may be utilized. We’ve classified this as a dibs grenade but other nomenclature may be used as well. It allows a player to blanket dibs a group of subjects. For example, when we played at a venue full of women wearing spiked leather jackets with black hair and facial piercings, I threw my grenade like an MLB pitcher. (4a. This power must be used selectively and with great precision. All witnesses present must verify the usage of a dibs grenade and vetoes made by said witnesses render the grenade null and void. A cool down period is in effect for each player’s grenade, generally accepted as one in each town or venue. Larger grenades [such as a grenade meant for the entire venue, such as mine] have longer cool downs and should used sparingly.
  5. If a subject is dibsed and then re-dibsed by another player, the witness has the responsibility to back up the original dibsee on their right to the call. If two dibsees and their witnesses cannot come to a consensus, timelines should be discussed and consulted to ascertain the true dibsee.

And with that, you have the basics of Dibs. It is a game with a rich strategy behind it, a strategy that I will leave to you to discover. Due to its never-ending nature, it can keep you and your bandmates entertained for hours. Or at least until you’ve seen everyone who has walked through the door at the venue. Then it’s back to Tetris. Happy hunting!


CityBeat contributor Nick Grever recently traveled Europe with Cincinnati Rock band Valley of the Sun and blogged about it for citybeat.com. His other dispatches can be found throughout the music blog.


 
 
by Mike Breen 11.03.2014 22 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Music Tonight: PUP, Ora Iso and Hoodie Allen

Toronto punk rockers PUP play MOTR Pub in Over-the-Rhine tonight. The free show also includes performances by NYC's Chumped and Washington, D.C., Garage Pop group Typefighter.

PUP put out its debut album last year on the Canadian label Royal Mountain Records and then the subsequent buzz landed them a deal with L.A.'s SideOne Dummy Records before the end of the year (the label reissued the self-titled debut album this past spring). The quartet has received a lot of positive notice for their adrenalized and melodic sound; Stereogum called them one of the best new bands of last year and Noisey proclaimed the LP a "perfect 10," saying, "If Weezer made a punk record somewhere between the blue album and Pinkerton, this would be it. Or if The Bronx covered Modest Mouse songs."


• Experimental/Industrial/Noise duo Ora Iso play Rake's End in Brighton tonight at 9 p.m. Inbreeder, Evolve, No Heat and DJ Inhuman also perform.

Brooklyn-based Ora Iso, featuring classically trained pianist/vocalist Kathleen Malay (born in Indonesia and former Australian resident) and guitarist Jason Kudo, released its debut album, Bathcat, on the Ba Da Bing! label just a few weeks ago. The twosome's Industrial/Post Punk sound has been likened to acts like Throbbing Gristle and The Dirty Three.


• Hip Hop acts Hoodie Allen and Chiddy Bang perform tonight at Bogart's in Corryville. Max Schneider also performs. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

From Reyan Ali's Hoodie Allen preview for CityBeat:

People Keep Talking, which landed in mid-October, marks his inaugural full-length after a string of mixtapes and tours. Armed with a massive trove of pop cultural references, a handful of guests (Ed Sheeran, most notably) and a really solid repertoire of beats, Hoodie spends People speaking about ambition, money, life as an underdog and relationships. That last category is truly his specialty; although he occasionally shoots for the badass rapper vibe, he really has a sensitive Justin Timberlake thing going on that he’s never afraid to embrace. Markowitz recently tweeted his interest in touring with One Direction — a move definitely up his alley.



Find more live music options for tonight here.

 
 
by Nick Grever 10.31.2014 25 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Live Blog at 02:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Valley of the Sun Tour Diary: Würst Merch Guy Ever

I crowd surfed for the first time ever in Strasbourg, France. And I did it in a hot dog costume.

Man, I can’t wait to tell my grandkids this story.

The hot dog spawned from a Facebook Messenger conversation before we even left. As we were preparing for the trip, the group bought me a glow in the dark skeleton onesie. It proved far too comfy and warm for it to be a nightly outfit in dirty, sweaty bars. I know this because I happily wore it around my house on several occasions.


Through the conversation it was eventually decided that I needed an Elvis outfit to wear during shows. I agreed and took a trip to a local Spirit Halloween in search of my tour uniform.


I was quickly disappointed.


Not only did they not have any Elvis costumes, the employee told me that the only place she knew that had one was a costume rental shop across town. The price put the costume way out of my price range. So I had to come up with something just as American (i.e. over the top and ridiculous). I browsed around, shot down the idea of a German beer girl costume — no one needs to see that much of my upper thigh — and stumbled across an area of cheap, lazy costumes. One of which was the hot dog suit. I snapped a picture, sent it to the boys and was met with joyous approval. I was still under my assigned budget so I picked up a Flavor Flav-sized dollar sign pendant and made my way to the register. Now, I was truly ready for Europe.


The hot dog costume has made an appearance a handful of times at shows, typically during the last song of the set or the encore. Sometimes I’ll put it on and rush to the front of the stage to get the guys to laugh and mess up. Being the consummate professionals that they are, they’ve never flubbed a song as far as I can tell.


But recently, they’ve been requesting the hot dog from stage, meaning I have to quickly dig it out, throw it on and run out to the crowd. They usually do so for their own amusement or to drive sales at the merch booth by proclaiming they have the würst merch guy in history. I never said that these guys were comedians …


Now, the majority of crowds just look confused by the sudden appearance of a hot dog at a Rock show but some get it and boy are their reactions spectacular. You haven’t lived until you’ve headbanged with two long hairs in a sweaty Halloween costume. But the crowd reaction in Strasbourg takes the cake.


The show was Punk Rock all the way — the sound was awful, the fans were packed in like sardines and the beer was flowing freely. The crowd had already spawned a crowd surfer, which is an admirable feat due to the fact that the venue is in a basement. Crowd surfing and grazing the ceiling of a club rarely go hand-in-hand. When the band called for the hot dog, I pushed through and found myself in an open pit in the center of the crowd. The final song started and I began my “dancing” and headbanging with the crowd. Pictures were taken, laughs were had, and I thought that was the end of it.

Then I saw the universal “You want to go up?” hand signal. Apparently crowd surfing crosses language barriers. Before I knew it, I was on top of the crowd trying to simultaneously avoid being dropped to the floor or bounced into the ceiling. It was awesome and scary and ridiculous and unbelievable all at the same time. If that’s not a great commercial for Spirit Halloween, I don’t know what is.


Now I really can’t wait for our Halloween show tonight. We plan on having a merch guy who’s all skin and bones, a blinged out bassist and the würst drummer you’ve ever seen.


Hey, I never said I was a comedian, either.


 
 
by Mike Breen 10.31.2014 25 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 11:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_mursandmayday_strangemusicinc

Weekend Music: Murs + ¡Mayday!, Zach Deputy and More

Halloween shows abound tonight. Elsewhere on our site you can read about several of them, including 500 Miles to Memphis' release party at Southgate House Revival and Gov't Mule's tribute to Neil Young at Taft Theatre. In the Spill It column, find out about tonight's Injecting Strangers' release party at MOTR, as well as two great, free local music double bills in Northside — The Hiders/The Perfect Children at The Littlefield and The Pariahs/The Cincinnati Suds at The Comet. Another great double-bill free show is on Fountain Square. The 5 p.m. Rocktober on the Square happy hour concert tonight features The KillTones and The Sundresses.

There's also a fun show at Over-the-Rhine's The Drinkery; RamonerHead (a tribute to the Ramones and Motorhead), ThoseWhoCannotBeNamed (a tribute to debauched punks Dwarves) and Standinavian Leather (a tribute to Norway's Turbonegro) team up for the club's Zombie Prom. (Another fun tribute band show goes down Saturday at Silverton's MVP Sports Bar & GrilleThe Rocket Queens, an all-female Guns N' Roses tribute band, headline.)

Here are a few more options for tonight and the rest of the weekend.

• Endlessly creative veteran L.A. rapper Murs first teamed up with Miami Rap group ¡Mayday! (featuring a pair of MCs and a full live band) on the latter’s first album, 2012’s Take Me to Your Leader. The two entities (both signed to Tech N9ne’s Strange Music imprint) connected so well they decided to reteam for this summer’s ¡MursDay!, an electrifying, high-energy album with an eclectic musical palette and dynamic live-instrument additives.

The album received positive reviews, with many noting that the music should translate incredibly well in a raucous live setting, meaning the collaborative’s show at Thompson House in Newport could be one of the more entertaining concerts to hit the area this fall. Showtime is 7 p.m. and tickets are $20.


• Successful Canton, Ohio Pop Rock band Relient K plays Bogart's in Corryville tonight with guests Blondfire. The band is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of Mmhmm, its breakthrough LP. The album spawned a pair of hits, including "Be My Escape," their most widely recognized track.


Doors for tonight's show open at 6:30 p.m.

• Austin, Texas' The Bright Light Social Hour have built up a nice following here in Cincinnati thanks to regular visits, though it's been a while since the group has graced a local stage. That all changes Saturday when the band comes back to MOTR Pub for a free, 10 p.m. show with Cincy Indie Pop masters Darlene.

The Texas indie psych rockers are gearing up for the release of their second album. In a recent interview with Fayetteville Free Weekly, BLSH's Jack O'Brien said the full-length is due early next year and will be titled Space is Still the Place.


• The Funkified Hoedown Tour featuring Zach Deputy and Hot Buttered Rum comes to the Ballroom at the Taft Theatre on Sunday. Showtime is 8 p.m. and tickets are $20 in advance/$25 day of show.

Deputy, a South Carolina native, describes his sound as "Island-infused Drum n’ Bass Gospel-Ninja-Soul." CityBeat's Charlie Harmon explains more in his preview of the show from this week's paper:

"When (Deputy) gets up on stage to start one of his infamous dance parties, it’s just him. He is the definition of a one-man band, usually donning just an acoustic guitar, four microphones and the pedals to handle all the looping and layering he does with them. Using the microphones, he creates drum and bass sounds, beatboxing almost all the percussion, as well as synthesized choir noises and soulful vocals."

For more live music options this weekend, click here. And feel free to plug other events in the comments.

 
 

 

 

 
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