WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home - Blogs - Staff Blogs - Latest Blogs
Music
 
by Mike Breen 03.24.2015 61 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 12:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
884501609968.600x600-75

Ray’s Music Exchange Returns, "Rays" Stick Around

Popular late ’90s/early ’00s band reunites and announces off-shoot group, Rays

One of Cincinnati’s best groups from the late ’90s/early ’00s, Ray’s Music Exchange, is returning to the stage this weekend for its fourth annual reunion show. The band, which crafted a wide-ranging sound that incorporated everything from Jazz and Rock to Electronic, World music and beyond, performs at Over-the-Rhine's Woodward Theater this Saturday at 9 p.m. Tickets are $15 in advance here and $18 at the door. Local video artists Big Bang Productions are providing visual backdrops for the concert.


Saturday’s show will feature most of the members that performed with the group throughout its run, many of whom now live out of town. Guitarist Brad Myers (who is set to release his own Jazz album on June 2) says that after the reunion the “local core” of the band — which will debut new material at the show — will continue to perform locally and regionally, carrying on under the name Rays. Joining Myers in Rays are Mike Darrah (keyboards), Michael Mavridoglou (trumpet), Nick Blasky (bass) and Jason Smart (drums). 


For those that may have missed out on Ray’s Music Exchange the first time around (or those who might want to complete their Ray’s collection), the group’s entire back catalog — including the live double album A Live Rayunion, which was recorded at the band’s first reunion show (and also filmed and released on DVD) — is available through most major digital music retailers. (Click here to check out the releases on CDBaby.)

For more on Ray’s Music Exchange, visit the group's Facebook page here


 
 
by mbreen 03.16.2015 70 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Festivals, Local Music at 09:45 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
20-download

Cincy Blues Fest Announces 2015 Headliners

Popular, long-running music festival returns to Sawyer Point Aug. 7-8

The Cincy Blues Society has announced the Main Stage headliners for this year’s Cincy Blues Fest, which returns to Sawyer Point Aug. 7-8. It is the Blues Fest’s 24th anniversary. 


Friday’s (Aug. 7) Main Stage performers will be Blind Pig recording artists Cash Box Kings, singer/guitarist Samantha Fish and Toronto Blues/R&B/Rock & Roll crew The 24th Street Wailers


The Cash Box Kings - Black Toppin from Tibo on Vimeo.


On Saturday, Aug. 8, the Blues Fest welcomes genre heavyweights Tab Benoit and Tommy Casto & the Painkillers (Friday performer Fish toured with Benoit and Castro last year on the Six Strings Down Tour), as well as Shawn Holt and the Teardrops (former backing band for the late, great Magic Slim; Holt is Slim’s son), to the Main Stage. 




The festival has also announced the Kelly Richey Band and the Chicago Women in the Blues Revue will perform on the Showcase Stage on Aug. 7.


Tickets are available for just $20 each day or $33 for a two-day pass. Click here to get yours now. And click here to keep an eye on the schedule as the organizers announce more performers. Many of the local acts slated to appear at the festival will be determined at the 2015 Blues Challenge, which takes place June 7 at Germania Park. 

 
 
by Mike Breen 03.11.2015 75 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Live Music, Music Video, Music News at 08:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
wtmellen

WATCH: Walk the Moon on 'The Ellen Show'

Cincinnati band takes "Shut Up and Dance" to daytime TV

Yesterday, Cincinnati Alt Pop foursome Walk the Moon continued its promotional blitz behind its sophomore major label album, Talking is Hard, with a performance on Ellen DeGeneres' popular daytime talk/variety show. After being introduced by DeGeneres as a "great Rock & Roll band from Cincinnati, Ohio," the group played its single "Shut Up and Dance" and singer Nicholas Petricca ran into the crowd to rock out with audience members.

Coincidentally, another Cincinnati-born band, The Afghan Whigs, appeared on national television the night before, performing "The Lottery" from their latest album on late night's Jimmy Kimmel Live. Watch it here and a web-exclusive performance of "I Am Fire," with a dash of Fleetwod Mac's "Tusk," here. WtM also played Kimmel late last year when the new album was released.

Walk the Moon will play a hometown show at Bogart's on April 1 (like many shows on the band's current tour, it has already sold out), then returns this summer to play the Bunbury Music Festival in early June (tickets available here).

 
 
by Mike Breen 02.18.2015 95 days ago
 
 
mpmf-2

Artist Submissions Open for 2015 MidPoint Music Festival

Fall fest puts out call to artists interested in performing at 14th annual event

Musical acts interested in being considered for a showcase slot at the 14th annual MidPoint Music Festival (scheduled for Sept. 24-26 in various venues around Downtown and Over-the-Rhine) can begin submitting today.

The festival — owned and operated by CityBeat — has announced a new partner for facilitating submissions, switching from Sonicbids to the locally-based CloudPressKit. The move will save artists some money — the submission fee for MPMF 2015 is $15 (through Sonicbids, it was $25, plus a Sonicbids membership) — and CloudPressKit is described as more “artist friendly.”

Click here for MPMF submission details. MPMF.com has a Q&A with the fest's head honcho, Dan McCabe, about the application process that answers a lot of questions submitters may have (other questions can be directed to info@mpmf.com). Applications are being accepted through May 17. 

 
 
by Amy Harris 02.11.2015 102 days ago
Posted In: Live Music at 11:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
chevelle_ah19487b 1200p

Getting ShipRocked

A recap of the sixth annual Hard Rock concert on the water, ShipRocked

You know you are not in Kansas anymore when you hear a voice on the load speaker of the cruise ship that says, “This is Fred MotherF*ucking Durst, your captain speaking.” Fred claimed to be driving the boat and getting a blow job at the same time. And so it began, the vacation of a lifetime, ShipRocked 2015. It became very obvious that sleep was not going to happen for the next five days.

When you step on the deck of the ShipRocked boat you realize immediately that this is a special place where artists and their biggest fans can rock the nights away with show after show for five days on the high seas aboard the Norwegian Pearl. In the festival at sea’s sixth year, ShipRocked offered a lineup headlined by Limp Bizkit, Buckcherry, Black Label Society and Sevendust. The lineup was rounded out by Metal Allegiance, P.O.D., Tremonti, Andrew WK, Living Colour, Filter, Lacuna Coil, Nonpoint, Otherwise, Zach Myers, Crobot, Icon for Hire, Thousand Foot Crutch, Wilson, Gemini Syndrome and many more.


ShipRocked 2015 kicked off with a mega Super Bowl pre-party on Sunday where fans could sport their favorite jerseys and watch the game on big screens all over the ship. Zakk Wylde started off the cruise with a full Metal version of the star spangled banner and then Chevelle hit the deck stage performing hits like “Hats Off to the Bull” as the sun set over the port of Miami. 


The ship pulled back into Miami on Monday to pick up more passengers and head out to the Bahamas for the ultimate Rock & Roll experience at sea. Limp Bizkit took the stage for the official sail-away party on Monday evening and blew away any skeptics as Fred and Co. got the party started dancing in the crowd on deck and closing out their set with “Break Stuff.” Fred seemed genuinely excited to be on his first cruise, saying how much he loved a “good buffet.” Wes Borland, who never disappoints, was ready to rock the cruise with full clown makeup, cowboy boots, and no pants, as he shredded on his bikini girl guitars. That’s right, ladies — no pants.


VIP guests were treated to rum runners and a private acoustic show on Monday with Nonpoint, Zach Myers and Lukas Rossi from The Halo Method. Zach Myers’ band previewed some new acoustic music off their upcoming album that showed off Myer’s vocals and guitar skills with fellow members JR Moore and Zack Mack.


One band that really stole the ShipRocked show this year was Sevendust. The Sevendust crew has been on every ShipRocked cruise and their shows onboard always bring a packed house. This year fans were treated to three Sevendust performances. For the first time the band played their entire first album live on stage, which was a special treat for the ShipRocked family. They also did an electric set on deck and a more intimate acoustic set in the Stardust Theater that featured guest appearances by frontmen Elias Soriano of Nonpoint and Aaron Nordstrom of Gemini Syndrome, who took the stage to help LJ sing “Angel’s Son.”


Another highlight of the trip was Metal Allegiance performing the entire original Van Halen album start to finish with special guest Wolfgang Van Halen. The ShipRocked Metal Allegiance lineup consisted of Joey Belladonna, Frank Bello, Chris Broderick, Rex Brown, Dave Ellefson, Gary Holt, Scott Ian, Mike Portnoy and Troy Sanders


On Tuesday and Wednesday the boat was docked at Grand Stirrup Cay in the Bahamas and a beach stage was erected to host performances in the perfect weather while passengers disembarked for some beach relaxation while listening to their favorite bands. Over the course of the two days, Letters From the Fire, Thousand Foot Crutch, P.O.D. and Nonpoint took over the beach stage to perform.


Tuesday night, Fred Durst hosted a late night DJ party at Bar City, dancing the night away with die hard fans starting at 2 a.m.


Buckcherry played two sets onboard and have never sounded better. They played classic songs like “Crazy Bitch” that every fan can sing along to and highlighted songs off their new EP, Fuck.


One of the coolest things to see on the boat is how all of the band members are true Rock music fans. They all attend each other’s performances while onboard. Every night you could find Anthrax’s Joey Belladonna rocking out in the crowd, singing every word to his favorite songs. Almost every band on the ship turned out for the performance of Rock legends Living Colour with special guests like Anthrax’s Scott Ian and LJ from Sevendust performing on stage with the band during their set.


ShipRocked is all about the fans and the fan experience. Every single band member was out of their room enjoying the ship, meeting fans, taking pictures and signing autographs every day. I saw fans wait patiently to speak to their favorite band members and they were all very respectful of the artists throughout the cruise. This is not my first music cruise but this is the first one where every band on board did a formal meet and greet so that their fans could have a photo with all band members either onboard the ship or on the island. The most dedicated fans waited in line for several hours on Thursday to get photos with all of the headlining bands.


Many of Thursday’s "day at sea" fan festivities were canceled on deck because of inclement weather but the shows were all moved inside and the schedule was re-arranged to accommodate all the performances that were planned. Black Label Society, Tremonti, Crobot and others rocked the boat throughout the day and Limp Bizkit closed out the 2015 ShipRocked cruise with a performance that laid to rest any doubts that the band is back in peak condition. Fred said over and over how much he loved his experience onboard and now he “finally gets it,” referring to why people go out into the middle of nowhere in the ocean to vacation and listen to Rock music.


Click here for more of Amy Harris' photos from ShipRocked 2015.


 
 
by Nick Grever 02.02.2015 111 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music at 11:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
27354_med

Beyond Idol Chatter: America Meets Jess Lamb

With her 'American Idol' journey, noted Cincinnati musician Jess Lamb is presented with numerous opportunities and challenges

For many Cincinnati natives, seeing Jess Lamb perform her audition in Kansas City for the American Idol judges was the first time they had ever heard her powerful and emotive voice or seen her honest, determined spirit. But for anyone who has their ears to the ground in Cincinnati’s local music scene (or has drunkenly wandered into Japps on a Tuesday night) knew that Lamb was more than ready for the limelight. Lamb has been performing all across town for years and has consistently turned heads with her stable of classics and originals, paired with her pronounced and technical work on the keys. (In 2013, Lamb was nominated for an R&B/Funk/Soul Cincinnati Entertainment Award and performed at that year’s ceremony, a mini-clip of which was used in her initial biographical segment on Idol.)

But a rise in local and national exposure brings a great deal of opportunities and challenges tied together. And it is those opportunities and challenges that my series of posts following Lamb’s experience will reflect upon. Lamb is an indie artist to the core; she writes and records with many different projects beyond her solo work. She plays all around town in the hopes of steadily increasing her visibility. But how does an artist used to local coverage deal with the sudden influx in national attention? What effect will American Idol have on local attendance or the reception at her shows? Will there be any long term changes or will this ultimately be a flash-in-the-pan experience for Lamb? These are the types of questions that will be explored as the show carries on.


Of course, to answer where Lamb will be going, it helps to know how she even became a part of American Idol. It all happened by chance.


“I went to Columbus for what they call the ‘Bus Tour.’ Basically you go down there and stand in front of executive producers of the show. From there, they just call you and tell you where to go next. You’re just playing the waiting game after that,” Lamb says.


Lamb and her friend’s spontaneous trip to Columbus led to the next stage of the journey — performing for Keith Urban, Jennifer Lopez and Harry Connick Jr. (one of Lamb’s musical idols). 


 


There was a month in between both auditions, leaving plenty of time to think and speculate. After the audition in Kansas City and the announcement of her participation on the show, Lamb has been speaking to the media while still finding time for her day job and performing at night.


With “Hollywood Week,” featuring the singers who made it past the initial auditions, approaching, Lamb’s Amercan Idol adventure is just about to truly take off. Here at home, she’s already seen a change in her local reception.


“I’ve felt a lot of support from the people that I look up to. Frankly, I’m shocked at the support. I’m shocked that a lot of people see where I’m going with this,” Lamb says.


After her audition aired, Lamb played a show in West Chester, where she was greeted by an entirely different type of crowd than the Main Street district mainstays. Instead of young people buying her shots, she was met by a group of older women who brought her flowers.


The crowds aren’t just growing at her shows either; her online presence has grown as well. American Idol fans have flocked to Lamb’s Facebook, Instagram, email box and Reverbnation page. So many, in fact, that Lamb is having a hard time keeping up with all the attention.


“There’s been so much [growth] on social media, so many great emails. I’m trying to respond to every email and I have to take hours out of every day to do it and it’s amazing, I love it,” Lamb says.


In many ways, that excitement is indicative of Lamb and her Idol journey thus far. It’s been a whirlwind of activity that is guaranteed to grow as the show progresses. But she has taken it all in stride and is taking every opportunity the show has provided her. We’ll just have to tune in to see what other opportunities arise in the coming weeks.


The Hollywood Week episodes of American Idol air locally this Wednesday and Thursday on Fox 19.

 
 
by Amy Harris 01.30.2015 115 days ago
Posted In: Live Music at 10:37 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
soundadvice_umphreys_mcgee_photo_chris-monaghan700x615

Q&A with Umphrey's McGee

Long-running jam band superstars play the Taft Theatre tonight

Umphrey’s McGee is one of the most popular bands in America on the Jam Band scene. Its sound can attract an eclectic audience with hints of Rock, Jazz and R&B and the well-rounded, phenomenal musicians in the lineup. The band has been touring nationally for over 15 years and is a staple on the summer festival scene. Umphrey’s have produced eight studio records; its most recent offering, Similar Skin, was released in the middle of last year.

CityBeat caught up with keyboard player Joel Cummins and discussed the changes over the years on the road and the fun and challenge of making every show a unique experience for the audience. The band plays the big room at the Taft Theater tonight at 8  p.m.; TAUK opens.

CityBeat: Your band is so famous for having ever-changing set lists. How do you determine what you are going to play each night?

Joel Cummins: We use a lot of different ways to figure out what to play. One of the main ones we use now is a website called allthings.umphreys.com, developed by a friend that has a complete tour history and everything we have played. It is a really interesting and interactive site that the fans can use to see what they haven’t seen us play before. We use it to look back and see what we have played in certain markets or make sure we do something different and don’t repeat the same thing. It is a really useful tool. 

As far as making the set list, I will compile a history of whatever it is that we have played and whoever is feeling it that day will pick songs and make a set list for that night. It’s interesting — one of the things that makes it fun for the fans is that any combination of the six of us can write a set list, we try to mix it up throughout the tour so it is staying fresh for us and the fans every day. And now that we have about 180 original tunes, we have quite a few to choose from every day. So it is nice to be able to play for five or six days in a row and not have to repeat a song.

CB: I am just amazed that you can remember that many songs over that period. It is very impressive.

JC: You get to a point where you learn a song and as you are thinking about it and connecting the thoughts to the hands … after a while it becomes muscle memory. I think the only reason we are able to do this is because we made sure we play all these songs at a minimum once every couple months so you still remember it and we know how to play them. When we do different covers, one or two every show, we may only play those once or twice a year so that is something where we will run those entire songs the day of the shows and pick what we want to do to get it back. Thank God for muscle memory or we’d be in big trouble otherwise.

CB: You guys have been together for almost 20 years now. Have you experienced multi-generational fans yet?

JC: We have. It is a pretty cool thing. There are a lot of things I never expected to hear when we were talking to fans. Certainly one of those things is finding parents and their kids who are both fans, finding all these people that have said they make great friends at the shows and (travel) around the country to see each other, maybe somebody met their husband or their wife at a show. Those personal connections and stories that have happened with the band because of our music I think are one of the main things that keep me looking forward to the shows because I know that there are a lot of people out there that this means a lot to. It’s an engaging thing musically, but it has become a really cool social event bringing people together. Our fans, more than most bands, like to have a good time but they are there for the music. You go to our shows, you are going to meet some friendly, hopefully intelligent people. Our fans aren’t starting fights or getting crazy. It is cool to see the community develop as it has. It is something I never imagined that would happen.

CB: I (photograph) a lot of different genres of music and talk to a lot of different people. The Jam Band music scene seems to be a little more collaborative and supportive group with each other. You have collaborated with a ton of artists over the years. Do you have any favorite collaborations you have done? How do you go about choosing who you are going to work with next?

JC: I think some of that sense of community emanated from the festival scene. It is interesting because it is a shared thing with the bands as well as the fans. One of the things I do is Jam Cruise; I have done 11 of the 12 of them. I know all the artists like family. It’s cool to have these bonds develop and I think because of the style of music we play, because it is more collaborative and there are a lot of good musicians on the scene, it encourages the idea of collaboration. 

If I had to name one as my favorite, we actually just got to play three concerts in New York with Joshua Redman, who is this really talented, really adventurous sax player. He has won Grammys and played with the best of the best, and the fact that he still wants to come back and play with us every once in a while is a really great challenge for us and really engaging to do. I think we have one of the most extreme varieties of styles in our music. As a result, we either play with people like Josh, who are in the Jazz scene, or someone like Mavis Staples, who is obviously a legendary R&B singer. We are friends with Huey Lewis, who is one of the most amazing guys out there in the music business, (and we’ve played more) current things like something Electronic with STS9 or something acoustic with Yonder Mountain String Band. I think we are lucky that we are in the time we are because bands used to be more closed off and competitive with other acts out there. It is a lot more fun when you can be friends with people and make music together.

CB: You lost your original drummer, Mike Mirro, last year. 

JC: Yeah, inevitably things come up (about him) all the time. Most of the time it’s funny things that he said or jokes that have carried on. Most recently, we did a holiday show with some members of the band in Chicago. He actually has a charity now in his name, the Michael A. Mirro fund for Neuroscience Studies. We were able to give a pretty sizable chunk of money to that. It is good to have his presence pop up in daily conversations, but even more than that, the charitable aspect of trying to contribute to studies that help people who have the challenges like Mike had. We miss him dearly and he was a close personal friend, so even though he wasn’t with us in the band anymore (when he passed away), we had collaborated a bunch of times since he left the band. It was a really horrible, tragic loss.

CB: The festival lineups are being announced really early this year. Can you tell me what you look most forward to with the festival performances? What do you think is one of your greatest festival moments?

JC: I think the artist camaraderie is a really exciting thing with festivals. We have been lucky to play so many great festivals. One of our favorite annual ones we always do is Summer Camp in Illinois and that is something we co-headline with moe. and they always have other great headlining artists. Steve Miller Band is going to play this year. Widespread Panic is going to come back. There are a lot of great artist always at that one. 

As far as career defining festivals for us, I’d have to go with Bonnaroo. We played the first one. Up to that point we had been playing at clubs in Cincinnati like Ripley’s, and maybe the Southgate House. We got asked to be a part of that first Bonnaroo. We were nervous because we got like a 5 p.m. Friday slot. We were wondering if anyone was even going to be there yet. We ended up playing in front of 10,000 people that day, a completely jam-packed tent. It was in 2002, and that was our first moment where maybe people knew who we were on a national scene. That is something I will always remember.

CB: You mentioned some bars you played in Cincinnati over the years. Do you have any favorite Cincinnati moments or memories?

JC: There are lots, to be honest. One of the early ones I’ll never forget. We played the last night at Ripley’s before it closed with our buddies Ray’s Music Exchange, a great Cincinnati band. That was kind of an emotional and cool night. That was the first night of us going out on a tour on the East Coast and Ray’s was headed out to the West Coast. I also remember probably just three or four years ago, one of my favorite things we did (was when) we played at Moonlite Gardens and Mad Dog, who is Ray’s former trumpet player, put together a horn section for us. We did a little back and forth competition, playing songs back and forth, and we had the horns up in the balcony and we were on stage and it was just one of those cool unique moments that hasn’t happened before. People are always trying to come up with fun things like that to do. You never know with Cincinnati because there are guys looking to get some kicks out once in a while and do something interesting and out of the box.

The Taft is one of our favorite rooms to play. I think we have only played there twice before. It is exciting to come into one of your favorite rooms and play for a sold-out crowd.


 
 
by Brian Baker 01.23.2015 122 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Live Stream, CEAs at 10:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cea15_logodate-blue

And the Winner is … Us

Think the CEAs are an Illuminati plot to chip away at your self-esteem? As Judas Priest so eloquently stated, you got another thing coming

There are a couple of things that have been on my mind of late, and this always seems like a decent forum to vent my musings, particularly since I'm not in therapy. First of all, what exactly constitutes medical attention for an erection lasting more than four hours? Does a stereotypically sexy nurse, um, give you a hand? Or does a mummified doctor from the bygone era of bone saws that could drop an oak tree and hand-cranked skull drills apply leeches to the affected area and then show you pictures of Yogi Berra and golf videos to bring down the swelling, so to speak?

While we wait for an answer to arrive, let's move on to the other, perhaps more salient issue that I've been pondering. As everyone knows, the end of the year brings the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards nominations, which then inspires a good deal of grumbling speculation about who has gotten nominated and, more importantly, who has not.


Look, no one understands better than I the elation that accompanies being recognized for your work. Six years ago I nabbed second place in the Non-Daily Newspapers Feature Personality Profile category of the Ohio Excellence in Journalism awards. I know, right? At the same time, I can count on fingers and toes the number of letters I've received over the years about things I've written, and many of those have been from the subjects I've written about just to say thanks.


My prized correspondence was from now-deceased Rolling Stone/Billboard editor Timothy White for getting the title of his Beach Boys biography wrong in a piece I wrote about Dick Dale. I had cited White's book as The Nearest Faraway Beach, largely due to my love of the Brian Eno song, "On Some Faraway Beach," and partially because I jotted down my notes in Joseph-Beth Booksellers when I was in the throes of a flu that would have eaten a vaccine for an appetizer. White's book was, in fact, The Nearest Faraway Place, and in it, he mentioned that Dale had been born in Beirut, Lebanon, among other interesting tidbits about the legendary guitarist. When I asked Dale about some of the entries in White's book, he countered with, "Does it say Dick Dale was born in Lebanon?" (he referred to himself in the third person, a lot). I said that it did, and he responded, "Then throw that book in the garbage." 


It was a great quote so I used it in the story, which prompted White's letter, where he first corrected my idiot error and then clarified that he had interviewed Dale personally at a time when White speculated that Dale thought being born in Lebanon would make him seem more exotic (he was of Lebanese extraction), but when Beirut became synonymous with terrorism, he claimed Boston as his birthplace. All in all, though, he was very complimentary about the article. 


As usual, I digress. As much as people love being hailed for their accomplishments, they are stung when they feel they've been passed over, for whatever reason, and that's completely understandable. It becomes slightly problematic when people demonize the process in an effort to explain their absence from the end result.


Here's the thing; those of us who comprise the nominating committee try not to take ourselves too seriously, but we are very serious about the task of establishing these nominations on an annual basis, for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, we love music and we respect the people who make it. We also feel it is extremely important to recognize great work and to share that recognition with the entire music community.


And that's pretty much it. We don't have an agenda to push. We don't nominate our friends (although our friends sometimes get nominated). Speaking for myself, I really try to set personal feelings aside when the time comes to look at the past year and determine who has done work worthy of CEA recognition.


Of course, that determination is open to a certain amount of subjectivity. We are human beings, after all. That's why we cast our nets as far as we can, to make sure the nominating process is as fair as humanly possible. Is it a perfect system? Not hardly. But I think we've gotten it pretty close to right. This year we involved the public in the process and that helped widen the focus even further, but there still seems to be a certain amount of dissatisfaction about the nominees and conjecture about how they got there. In the final analysis, it boils down to a few simple facts. If you're nominated, congratulations; you've distinguished yourself in a music community that I honestly feel is one of the best in the entire country. If you win, huzzah and holy shit, you've further distinguished yourself within a formidable slate of your musical peers.


And if you're just a spectator, keep working. Keep doing what you do. The accolades are nice, but put things in perspective; at the end of the day, the CEAs are a party with door prizes. Prestigious door prizes, but door prizes nonetheless. And whether you're a winner, a nominee or neither of the above, don't allow your recognition or lack thereof to overinflate or devalue your sense of what you do. What matters is the work. Your work. Whether it garners you a nomination or not.


It's the same in any field of endeavor. How many painters wind up in museums in their lifetimes? How many athletes give their lives over to the sports they love for an almost microscopic chance to get a plaque in their respective halls of fame? Celebrity, wealth and notoriety are all fairly illusory. What matters is the work.


The immortal and forever great Frank Zappa may have put it best: "Information is not knowledge. Knowledge is not wisdom. Wisdom is not truth. Truth is not beauty. Beauty is not love. Love is not music. Music is the best."


And there it is, in it's simplest and most potent form. If you are out there, turning words and melodies in your head into real music with your hands, heart and soul, you are contributing to one of the best things in life. Awards are the icing on a cake that doesn't necessarily need to be iced. When you make great music, we are the winners. And we'd like to thank you. And God and our families and friends and our eighth grade English teacher who said we'd never amount to anything, because he was sort of right. Thank you.


The 18th annual CINCINNATI ENTERTAINMENT AWARDS ceremony is Sunday at Covington’s Madison Theater. Tickets are available at cea.cincyticket.com. Click here for more show details


If you can’t make it to the event, ICRCTV will once again be streaming it live here. You can check out the 2013 and 2014’s ceremonies here and here, respectively. 


 
 
by Mike Breen 01.16.2015 128 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, CEAs, Local Music at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
10931726_10153018370774938_6992836373552335388_n

LISTEN: 2015 'Best New Bands’ Showcase Performers

A preview of the artists performing Saturday at Bogart’s for this year’s new local music showcase

Saturday night, be sure to head to Bogart’s for this year's "Best New Bands" showcase, presented by CityBeat and featuring performances by some of the local musical acts you should keep your eye on this year. 


The 2015 showcase features all of this year’s Cincinnati Entertainment Award nominees for New Artist of the Year, each of whom are profiled in the new issue of CityBeat. The nominees will be joined by four other superb new area acts for the event.


The concert begins at promptly at 7:30 p.m. and will feature performances on Bogart’s main stage as well as on a side stage, keeping the music running non-stop all night. Admission is just $5. 


Here are some audio samples of each of the BNB performers. Click on the artists’ names (listed in order of appearance) to read more on each act.


Prim


Kate Wakefield 


Elk Creek


JetLab


Honeyspiders


Leggy 


Noah Smith 


Harbour 


Dream Tiger 


Near Earth Objects 


You can find out who scores the New Artist of the Year trophy (and who wins in all of the other categories) on Sunday, Jan. 25 at the 18th annual Cincinnati Entertainment Awards ceremony/party, which takes place at Covington’s Madison Theater (Blues nominees The Whiskey Shambles were recently added to the lineup of performers, joining The Cliftones, Mad Anthony, Injecting Strangers, Young Heirlooms and Buggs tha Rocka). Tickets are available in advance through cincyticket.com. Showtime is 7 p.m. and we give you full permission to call in sick to work Jan. 26. 

 
 
by mbreen 12.19.2014
Posted In: CEAs, Local Music, Live Music at 11:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cea15_logodate-whtandblkonblue

Voting for the 2015 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards Starts Now

The ballot box is open for the public to vote for some of the best and brightest musical acts in Greater Cincinnati

The nominations for the 2015 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, honoring Greater Cincinnati’s fantastic music scene, were announced Wednesday and now it’s your turn to weigh in. 


Click here to go to the CEA ballot and vote now.


The 18th annual Cincinnati Entertainment Awards ceremony/party, where the winners for each category will be announced and several acts will perform, returns to Covington’s Madison Theater on Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. So far, Young Heirlooms, Injecting Strangers, Mad Anthony, The Cliftones and Buggs tha Rocka are confirmed to play the CEAs this year. Stay tuned for further info; tickets are available here.


An educated voter is the best kind of voter, so why not actually check out some or all of the artists for whom you are voting? Below you will find links to the artists’ pages on the excellent local music site cincymusic.com (thanks, CIncyMusic!) featuring links, music, bios and more. (The final three “Critical Achievement” categories are not voted on by the public but rather the CEA nominating committee, but you should still totally check all of those acts out, too.) 


Happy voting!


Bluegrass:

Comet Bluegrass Allstars

Rumpke Mountain Boys

My Brother’s Keeper

Rattlesnakin’ Daddies

The Missy Werner Band

Mamadrones 


Country: 

Dallas Moore

Bulletville

Jeremy Pinnell

Noah Smith

90 Proof Twang

Pure Grain


Folk/Americana: 

Young Heirlooms

Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound

Buffalo Wabs & The Price Hill Hustle

Elk Creek

The Tillers

Shiny and the Spoon


World Music/Reggae: 

The Cliftones

Junya Be

Lagniappe

Baoku Moses & the Image Afro-beat Band

Elementree Livity Project

Keshvar Project


Rock: 

Honeyspiders

Mad Anthony

Wussy

Buffalo Killers

Pop Goes the Evil

Frontier Folk Nebraska 


Metal/Hard Rock: 

Electric Citizen

Winterhymn

Chakras

Valley of the Sun

Zebras in Public

Close to Home


Singer/Songwriter: 

Arlo McKinley

Noah Smith

Jody Stapleton

Jeremy Pinnell

Rob Fetters

Molly Sullivan 


Indie/Alternative: 

DAAP Girls

The Yugos

PUBLIC

The Hiders

State Song

Injecting Strangers


Punk: 

Tweens

Subsets

Kill City

The Dopamines

Black Planet

Vacation


Blues: 

Ricky Nye

The Whiskey Shambles

Kelly Richey

Noah Wotherspoon

Sonny Moorman Group

John Ford


R&B/Funk/Soul: 

The Almighty Get Down

The Perfect Children

Under New Order

Ingrid Woode

Freekbass & The Bump Assembly

The Cincy Brass


Jazz: 

The Faux Frenchmen

Phil DeGreg and Brasilia

The Hot Magnolias

Art & Science

Blue Wisp Big Band

Animal Mother


Hip Hop: 

Eugenius

Eclipse

Buggs tha Rocka

Valley High

Trademark Aaron

Counterfeit Money Machine


Electronic: 

Ethosine

Dream Tiger

Playfully Yours

Black Signal

Dark Colour

umin


Best Live Act: 

The Almighty Get Down

Wussy

Tweens

Mad Anthony

Young Heirlooms

Injecting Strangers


Best Music Video: 

Wussy – “North Sea Girls”

Rob Fetters – “Desire”

Mad Anthony – “Sank for Days”

Injecting Strangers – “Detroit”

Sleep – “I Shot Lincoln”

Tweens - “Forever”

The Tillers – “Willy Dear”

Trademark Aaron – “Gold”


Critical Achievement Awards Album of the Year: 

Tweens – Tweens
Pop Goes the Evil – Love Stained Heart
500 Miles to Memphis – Stand There and Bleed
Wussy – Attica!
Rob Fetters – Saint Ain’t
Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound – Arlo McKinley and the Lonesome Sound
The Almighty Get Down – People, This Is …
Buffalo Killers – Heavy Reverie


New Artist of the Year: 

Dream Tiger

Honeyspiders

PRIM

Elk Creek

Leggy

Noah Smith


Artist of the Year: 

Electric Citizen

Tweens

Mad Anthony

Wussy

The Tillers

Buffalo Killers


 
 

 

 

 
Close
Close
Close