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by Maija Zummo 10.03.2013
Posted In: News, local restaurant at 01:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (5)
 
 
mayday

Mayday's Menu Goes Gastropub

Northside bar expands its food offerings to include table service, a new head chef and expanded menu

Mayday in Northside has long been known for their gourmet hot dogs and sausages, nestled in a delicious pretzel bun, but after four years of business, the owners — Vanessa Barber and Kim Maurer — are ready to kick their menu up a notch. 

Starting on Monday, Oct. 7, Mayday will have a new, expanded menu developed with head chef Julz Lucas, a graduate of the Midwest Culinary Institute whose previous experience includes Honey, Mayberry and La Poste. With a goal of being a restaurant versus just a bar that serves food, they will add gourmet burgers, homemade oven fries, roasted chicken and seasonal sides, soups and sandwiches to their menu — all of which will still maintain their original focus of using local purveyors and making items in-house, including their bread. There will also still be the customer-favorite late-night dog and snack menu served after 10 p.m. 

“Now that we have a new head chef, we want to take those traditions and expand them to a more diversified menu,” co-owner Kim Maurer says. 

“We have always paid close attention to the details when it comes to our food, but we are finally able to move beyond our signature dogs and add more exciting menu options," adds co-owner Vanessa Barber. "We don’t want to be hemmed into the same identity we started with over four years ago. Mayday is dynamic — just like the neighborhood [Northside] we are so proud to call home." 

The menu expansion will also include table service, a rarity in the bar-food world, again elevating Mayday's status from pub to gastropub. They've also added a new, outdoor biergarten to their two-tiered patio and will be adding more cozy indoor seating as the weather turns colder. 

The new menu will be available daily starting at 11:30 a.m. (beginning Oct. 7) and remain in the $5-$15 price range. 

And Mayday will also still host weekly trivia, dance nights and live music regularly in addition to the food, making them a food and entertainment destination. 

Mayday is located at 4227-4231 Spring Grove Ave., in Northside. Starting next week, their hours will be 11:30 a.m.-2:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday and 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Sunday. More info at maydaynorthside.com.  

 
 
by Kenneth McNulty 06.06.2013
Posted In: local restaurant at 11:08 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Myra's Dionysus: Healthy, Fresh and It's All Greek to Us

Strange how many times in my life I have started toward something and then found myself at a very different destination. I ate Greek food in Chicago, gyros to be specific, and asked, ‘How come you can't get these in Cincinnati?’ Seemed like the next great thing to me.”

This is what guided Myra Griffin of Myra’s Dionysus as she ventured to open her own restaurant near the University of Cincinnati campus in 1977. She wanted create a unique eating experience in the Cincinnati area. Kicking off the next big thing isn’t easy, though, and to keep it fresh, Myra saw to it the menu has an array of ethnic food.

“…I realized how little meat other cultures used and how much better it was for you,” she says. “Thus I became a much more vegetarian restaurant.”

When most people think of food in a college town, greasy quick meals and sandwiches from McDonald's come to mind. Myra didn’t want that. In fact, one of her main criteria for a location was a college town, for open-minded individuals who would enjoy her healthy, vegetarian alternative to standard college cuisine. “Healthy does not mean it can't taste good,” she says. That’s what she strives to deliver for every meal.

Myra’s other point in opening Dionysus was to craft an atmosphere where people could bring their families and enjoy themselves, again a notion not widely thought of in a college town. One would think more of fun drinking locations or places to get a quick bite but not somewhere you’d bring a child.

Myra’s Dionysus is a place where one family in particular has created a tradition — four generations have enjoyed Myra's cooking. That is service that’s hard to compete with. Dionysus is a kinetic place as well. It’s always moving forward, adapting new dishes to the proverbial arsenal. Myra enjoys the challenge of coming up with new dishes. She draws on cultures around the world, relishing in diversity.

“It has been a case of trying things, if they work, keep them; if not, change,” she says. At Myra’s Dionysus, the goal for the restaurant is to entertain people through atmosphere, customer service and good conversation. Myra has her degree in education, so teaching her employees was simply second nature. Seeing workers solve issues together and have a great time doing it is what helps drive the business ahead of the rest.

Myra’s Dionysus is an interesting establishment. It’s healthy, odd, has history but plays on contemporary trends. Myra makes sure all of these aspects and more show off to the outside world to bring in anyone willing to give one of her dishes a try. All Myra wants at the end of the day is a good experience for people involved.

“The fun is in seeing others enjoy what we have to offer,” she says.

Myra's Dionysus is located at 121 Calhoun St., Clifton Heights. Go here for menu, hours and more information.

 
 
by Staff 02.09.2015 75 days ago
 
 
quan hapa congee

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Dried pork congee from Quan Hapa, Eli's BBQ, Cancun, plantains and LaRosa's

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food.  

Ilene Ross: It wasn't exactly cold this weekend, but most frigid winter days find me jonesing for a body-warming bowl of congee, a type of rice porridge popular in many Asian countries. On Saturday, I enjoyed a tasty bowl of dried pork congee at Quan Hapa in OTR. It's filled with chicken, and there's a poached egg hiding in there. On top is yummy fried pork, five-spice oil and green onions. Deeply satisfying, no matter what the thermometer says. 

Rebecca Sylvester: LaRosa's! Did you know LaRosa's garlic butter dipping sauce contains no actual dairy, so it's vegan/lactose-intolerant friendly? If you think about it too much it's super creepy, but if you just don't think about it then it is a delicious option to dunk your cheese-less veggie pizza. #thestruggleisreal 

Jac Kern: Yesterday I had fajitas and margs at Cancun, my home away from home. The Western Bowl-adjacent cantina is a great brunch alternative for lazy/antisocial people: fast service, standard but consistent Mexican grub, dim lights and crack-like frozen margaritas. Come hungry; leave stuffed, tipsy and with a frost-bitten tongue. That's basically how all of my (frequent) Cancun adventures go.  

Samantha Gellin: I ate at Eli's BBQ for the first time. The inside was packed so we ate at a picnic table inside one of their big white outdoor tents. It was like 30 degrees outside, so thankfully I was able to nab a spot right by a working heater, but it was still pretty chilly. But now I know what all the fuss over Eli's has been about: It's freakin' delicious. And seriously cheap. A meat-stuffed sandwich and two generous sides will run you eight bucks. That's it. There's not many other restaurants in Cincy (at least not that I know of) that are so generous with their portion size and yet so easy on your wallet. And it's BYOB. I mean, what else could you ask for?!

I got a pulled pork sandwich with a side of baked beans and macaroni and cheese. The deliciousness of everything made me forget I was cold. The macaroni is to die for; it's everything you want a side of macaroni to be with a barbecue dinner — super rich, creamy and calorie-laden. The baked beans were also delicious: savory, with hints of bacon and brown sugar and something more complex that I can't put my finger on. And the pulled pork was pretty much everything you've heard Eli's pulled pork to be: savory, tender and with just the right amount of sweet. Will I go again? Most definitely, but I'll wait until it's warm out. 

Jesse Fox: On Saturday I did a freelance photo job for Ena's Jerkmania and fell in love with their fried plantains. I had never even had a regular plantain before so I wasn't sure what to expect. The texture reminded me kind of of like a thinner version of French toast, a little crunchy on the outside but soft in the middle. They were great on their own but would have been really good with some agave nectar on, too — but that's probably the sugar addict in me talking. 

Garin Pirnia: I’ve been nursing a cold, so I decided to stay in this weekend and make a few things. First up was homemade chai tea. You just throw a lot of spices — crushed cardamom, pepper, vanilla bean, star anise, ginger, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves — into boiling water and then add black tea and brown sugar. When I bought the spices at Findlay Market a couple of weeks ago, the guy was like, “Do you work at a restaurant or something?” I don't.

Next, inspired by The Comet’s housemade ginger ale, I took it upon myself to make my own. A caveat: If you hate ginger you will not like this; it’s super strong. You chop up a few ounces of fresh ginger and let it simmer in water for 45 minutes, and then dissolve sugar into it, which makes a simple syrup. Just add carbonated water and you have ginger ale that tastes better than Vernors and anything else on the market.

Finally, I made bagels. Yes, bagels. It’s so easy! You mix bread flour, yeast, a pinch of sugar and salt and malt syrup (I use honey) in a mixer or food processor. Form the dough into a ball and wait for it to rise. Then you shape the dough into the semblance of bagels and flash boil them. The hardest part is forming the dough, but the most fun part is sticking toppings like sesame seeds and poppy seeds onto the bagels. You can get a little crazy and creative — anything goes. Bake 'em in the oven for about 20 minutes and, voila, bagels without weird stuff like yoga mat component/flour whitening agent azodicarbonamide. You can freeze the bagels to make them last longer. Damn, I should open a café.

Anne Mitchell: I ate a fancy dinner at Covington's 200th birthday celebration gala. For giant catered-meal food, it was great — especially the bundles of green beans tied up with red and yellow peppers. Bean bondage! Seriously, there was real bacon on the salad and bourbon in the chicken sauce, so bravo COV200. I hope the next 200 years are just as tasty.

Kristen Franke: This weekend, I had a lot of things. 1. Dollar oysters at Anchor OTR. Thursday nights are the best. We were seated by the window and ordered a dozen delicious little numbers. Their granita topping — basically caramelized red onions that have been frozen into slushy-like goodness — and the fluffy fresh horseradish are dynamite. Our kickass server also brought Sriracha, which is a game changer when it comes to oysters. 


2. The volcano roll at Ichiban (half-price sushi, hell yeah!) on Friday night. The roll features a tower of crab meat on top of a deep-fried eel roll. That and a standard spicy tuna roll and I was set. No, it's nothing stellar, but when your bill comes back with $10.57 printed on the bottom, it's hard to resist doing your happy dance.


3. Homemade meatloaf, whipped potatoes and crisp green beans at my dad's house. His meatloaf is essentially a giant, baked meatball made with soaked french bread, fresh garlic, Parmesan and parsley. Dip it in those buttery potatoes and you can just feel your soul relax.


4. Late-night spoonbread at The Eagle OTR. Eagle is fantastic late night. We arrived at 10:41 p.m. and waited 30 seconds for a table for four. Their maple syrup-soaked spoonbread goes GREAT with a Kentucky Bourbon Barrel Ale, an on-tap staple at this place.


 
 
by Maija Zummo 05.28.2014
Posted In: Cincinnati, Indian, local restaurant, News, Openings at 12:42 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
swad indian

Former Dusmesh Owners Open New Indian Restaurant

Swad North Indian cuisine open six days a week, with lunch buffet

For die-hard Dusmesh fans, the former owners of Dusmesh Indian in Northside have opened a new Indian restaurant in North College Hill called Swad. 

After seven years of ownership, the family sold Dusmesh to new owners in July 2013 and have recently opened Swad — which translates to "tasty" —  a 110-seat dining establishment with 16-seat patio in the old Van Zant building. The menu focuses on North Indian cuisine with options for vegetarians, vegans and non-vegetarians alike, including their Thali, three special different curries and a creamy raita. They are currently in the process of obtaining their liquor license, so the restaurant is BYOB (with no corking fee). Free parking is available out front and in back.

The restaurant is open 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday with a lunch buffet from 11 a.m-2:30 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday-Sunday.1810 W. Galbraith Road, North College Hill, 513-522-5900.


 
 
by Maija Zummo 10.29.2013
Posted In: News, local restaurant at 09:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
local127_chef_jf68

Chef Steven Geddes to Leave Local 127

Kyle Johnson will succeed chef Geddes as executive chef on Nov. 5

Effective Nov. 5, Chef Steven Geddes will step down as executive chef of Local 127, the local New American restaurant he has spearheaded since 2009. Geddes' successor will be chef Kyle Johnson, who has a wide-breadth of experience ranging from a Michelin-starred kitchen to extensive travel.

Johnson began his career at Alize in Las Vegas under the tutelage of chefs including André Rochat and Jacques Van Staden. He then went on to be a traveling executive chef for Celebrity Cruises, assisting in menu development for sister cruise line Azamara Cruises. Johnson has staged with notable kitchens including the Picasso and Michelin-starred Guy Savoy but relocated to Cincinnati in 2009 to open Local 127. After the opening, he became executive chef at Paramour, a contemporary American fine dining restaurant in Philadelphia. 
 
"I'm happy to be back in the area and carry on the restaurant that Steve and I created together," Johnson says in a recent press release. "Steve is like a brother to me and one of my biggest mentors. I will miss him greatly and will forever thank him for asking me to embark on this journey."

Geddes, one of just more than 100 certified master sommeliers in the U.S., will remain a consulting master sommelier at Local 127, visiting occasionally, but will ultimately be heading west to continue his work in the food and wine world.


As far as changes, the restaurant will be extending its hours to include lunch (starting Nov. 5) and Saturday brunch (starting Dec. 7), which will feature a make-your-own bloody mary bar. Chef Johnson will also be updating the Local 127 menu to include more seafood and beef choices with seasonal preparations, plus adding a bar snack menu with pork belly bites, devils on horseback (a pub snack with a fruit like dates wrapped in bacon), fries inspired the by the In-N-Out Burger chain and more. 


And for fans of the "local" in Local 127, fear not: Chef Johnson will remain true to the restaurant's pledge of serving responsibly sourced foods, according to the press release.


Local 127 is located at 413 Vine St., Downtown. For more information visit mylocal127.com.


 

 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.20.2014
Posted In: Events, local restaurant, Openings at 01:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
packhouse meats logo

Packhouse to Open in Newport

Meatballs and more coming to Northern Kentucky

As the meatball food craze continues, another local restaurant is opening and offering a version of the hand-packed snack. 

Packhouse in Newport, Ky. will be a laid-back place to get a variety of meatballs, according to general manager Kurt Stephens. "We will be offering four staple packs (beef, chicken, pork and vegetarian), along with four to five sauces that compliment our packs," Stephens writes in an email correspondence, "packs" being the term the team uses to describe their meatballs.

"The idea all came about while sitting around one day brainstorming and someone mentioned meatballs," he writes. "We found out some similar shops were having great success in the East. We developed some strong recipes and and are excited to bring them to the people of Northern Kentucky!"

The recipes will come from chef Tom Wenke, who has 30-plus years in the food industry. 

"What's going to make us different is our culinary staff," Stephens writes. "Constant ideas of recipes, ice creams and cookies are going to make some waves for sure in the area. We will also be listening to the public, so if you have a great meatball recipe, bring it down and we can give it a try."


The menu will include freshly ground packs, fresh salad, soup, homemade ice cream, homemade cookies and floats. There will be an ever-changing supply of craft beer on tap, as well as other booze. Price points will hover around $8-$10, with full-service seating. 

Packhouse will be located on Monmouth Street in Newport. Their current projected open date is Jan. 28, so keep an eye on the restaurant and get more details here.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 03.25.2014
 
 
tob reds waffle & chicken

Taste of Belgium is the Official Waffle of the Cincinnati Reds

Grab a waffle and chicken, plain, chocolate or fruit waffle

Taste of Belgium has announced that it's partnering with the Great American Ball Park to become the "Official Waffle of the Cincinnati Reds." (Do any other teams have an official waffle? Didn't think so.) 

Starting on Opening Day, fans can now grab a Belgian waffle with toppings such as sweet cream, fruit or chocolate during a game, starting at just $5. If fans are looking for something more savory (with a bit more protein), Taste of Belgium is also offering their signature chicken and waffle combo. Add a side of twice-fried frites (Belgian french fries) for the complete experience.

“We at Taste of Belgium are honored to be counted among the Cincinnati brands supported by Great American Ballpark,” Taste of Belgium owner Jean-François Flechet said in a recent press release. “Our food has been embraced with open arms in Cincinnati, Columbus, and Friendly Market in Florence, Ky., and now we are delighted to show the best fans in baseball how to eat like a Belgian.” 


Great American Ball Park also offers local food favorites including LaRosa's pizza and Skyline chili plus beer from local brewery Rhinegeist. The Official Waffle of the Cincinnati Reds goes on sale Opening Day at Great American Ball Park in Section 130 of the Ballpark, near The Kroger Fan Zone.


Full Menu:

Waffle – $5

Chocolate & Cream Waffle – $7

Strawberry & Cream Waffle – $7

Waffle & Chicken – $10

Frites – $7


Taste of Belgium also has local locations in Over-the-Rhine, on Short Vine, in Findlay Market and in Florence, Ky.'s Friendly Market. Full-service bistro, 1133-1135 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine; Clifton, 2845 Vine St., Corryville; Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine; and Friendly Market, 10050 Norbotten Dr., Florence, Ky., authenticwaffle.com.


 
 
by Maija Zummo 10.24.2014
Posted In: News, Openings, local restaurant at 10:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
eats_jeanrobert_jf1

JRo to Open Le Bar a Boeuf in Edgecliff Building

The neo-French bistro will serve takes on classic French and American fare

Everyone's favorite French chef Jean-Robert de Cavel, owner of Table and French Crust Cafe, is opening a new destination restaurant in The Edgecliff condominium building in Walnut Hills (2200 Victory Parkway). 

The whimsically titled Le Bar a Boeuf — literally translated to "beef bar" — will be a French neo-bistro, de Cavel says, with new takes on classic French and American dishes; more casual than the Table with the intent that everybody will be able to share (at least the appetizers).

"It's not a classic bistro, like when I did Jean Ro," de Cavel says. "This neo-bistro is something from the past you are familiar with but in a modern way." 

The menu (which is currently being finalized) will feature six or seven appetizers, from homemade pate and crab cakes ("Of course crab cakes," de Cavel says) to beef and salmon tartare, deviled eggs and lobster macaroni and cheese, along with entrees that focus on ground meat. 

"So like a burger without the bread," he says. 

The chef has always wanted to do a burger bar-type restaurant, but Le Bar a Boeuf will be something more, elevating the street food with a French twist; a burger you eat with a fork and knife. The ground meat — which includes choices like Wagyu beef, seafood and lamb — keeps entree prices down (they're currently slated to be in the $16-$28 range), while still providing quality. It also allows patrons to top their "burgers" with a variety of add-ons. 

"You can have a burger with sautéed chicken liver on it, or you can have pork belly or foie gras, confit tomatoes or roasted portobello mushrooms," de Cavel says.

Le Bar a Boeuf's Chef de Cuisine will be Mirko Ravlic with sous chef Travis Reidel, both from Table. Table's wine director Evan Abrams will be developing the moderately priced and global wine list. The bar will also serve classic cocktails, and local, import and domestic beers. And Lindsay Furia, most recently of New York's 11 Madison Park, will come aboard as general manager.

Previously home to restaurants including The Edgecliff Room, View and Coach & Four, de Cavel has made a few changes to the 70-person dining room, lounge and patio, with help from HighStreet and the designer who helped with Table, to make the atmosphere "funky" and "different."

Slated to open by mid-November, one of the former selling points of the restaurant location was the panoramic river-view (hence the former eatery "View"). 

"I never want to promote the view; the view, for me, it's an extra," de Cavel says. "It's an extra thing. I want it to be a fun restaurant; a destination restaurant. Fun for the younger generation to the older generation."

Le Bar a Boeuf will open for dinner Tuesdays-Saturdays initially, and then for lunch and brunch Wednesday-Sunday shortly after. Follow progress on Twitter and Instagram @baraboeufcincy
 
 
by Maija Zummo 11.24.2014
Posted In: Chicken, Events, Food news, local restaurant, News, Openings at 02:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
revolution rotisserie and bar

Revolution Rotisserie & Bar Goes Brick and Mortar

Findlay Market favorite finds a permanent home

Revolution Rotisserie & Bar owner Nicholas Pesola grew up in Chicago, working a variety of jobs, ranging from starting his own patio and landscaping company to bussing at a Greek restaurant. Ironically, he hated bussing and to avoid the restaurant industry, he went to the University of Dayton to study psychology and Spanish. After getting rejected from the various Ph.D. programs he applied to, he took some time out to reapply and started in management at Dewey's Pizza in the meantime.


"After a couple months, I started to realize that I liked being in the restaurant more than reading and writing scientific articles," Pesola says. "It was fast-paced, challenging and gave me an avenue to interact with people dynamically. In addition, I really enjoy how tangible the hospitality industry is."


This past summer, Pesola branched out and started selling rotisserie chicken on pita bread at Findlay Market. The resulting Revolution Rotisserie was so popular, he's opening a brick-and-mortar location on Race Street in Over-the-Rhine in early 2015. The rotisserie and bar will do dine-in, carry-out and catering, plus vegetarian options and specialty cocktails. 


We caught up with Pesola to learn more about the restaurant and his chicken technique.


CityBeat: Why chicken and how did that relationship come to pass? 

Nicholas Pesola: The concept originally had nothing to do with chicken. I wanted to introduce something unique to Cincinnati and I thought that it would be cool to reinvent gyros, one of my favorite foods from my youth. I wanted to stack marinated beef/lamb and do it like they do in Europe/Middle Eastern countries. I knew that I would have to offer other meats so I chose to stick with the rotisserie meat theme. When I put on tastings, everybody liked the rotisserie chicken sandwiches with my gourmet toppings and sauces the most. When no one offered to fund my unproven restaurant concept, I decided to start small at Findlay Market and pilot the idea. I knew I had to simplify my concept in order to be successful so I gave the people what they wanted: rotisserie chicken. I wanted to become known for rotisserie chicken sandwiches on pita bread because I thought that was the most unique. I also thought I would sell more sandwiches versus whole chickens to the Findlay Market crowd. 


CB: What's been the best response you've seen from a customer? 

NP: We have had many great responses. I love when people walk by my stand, stop abruptly after seeing the sample, and say, "That looks good. But what is it?" When they find out there is rotisserie chicken under the toppings and sauce, it is usually game over. I also enjoy the skeptical customer who reluctantly orders our food and then comes back with friends 10 minutes later because they really liked it.  


CB: Can you tell me more about your chicken? Where do you source it? What separates it from other rotisserie? Is there a special technique, seasoning, butcher? A family recipe? 

NP: We use Amish chicken from Miller Farms and will be switching to FreeBird chicken which has even more strict standards when it comes to how the chickens have been raised: no hormones, no preservatives, all vegetable diet, more room to roam, etc. Our chickens are never frozen, always fresh. We brine our birds, season them with a custom blend of the best spices, cook them on a gas-fired 40-bird rotisserie to perfection. And I assure you our whole chickens will not sit around for hours and dry out like they do at the grocery store. For our sandwiches, we hand-pull the meat, white and dark, and make sure it maintains its juiciness before serving. We have arrived at our current technique after talking with chefs and experimenting with other methods, but the reality is I'm always looking for ways to make the product even better. 


CB: So you're opening a brick-and-mortar spot in OTR? What inspired you to take the jump? 

NP: Even before I started at Findlay Market, I wanted to open up a brick-and-mortar shop. I just didn't have enough money and that was a blessing in disguise because it forced me to start small. I knew the time was right to circle back with potential investors when my customers kept asking where Revolution Rotisserie was located after eating our food. 


CB: Why OTR? And why Race versus Main or Vine? 

NP: I live in OTR and it's a very exciting place to hang out and start a business. The real question should be why not OTR? I believe my concept contributes something very unique to the scene. I chose the spot at 1106 Race Street because it was the size I wanted, featured an open kitchen, and fit my budget. In my opinion, Race Street is the next logical restaurant street in OTR because of Washington Park, Zula, Anchor, and Taft Ale House all down the street. Plus I live on Race Street, you can't beat that commute. 


CB: What will be on the menu at Revolution? 

NP: Chicken! We will showcase the versatility of chicken with eight rotisserie chicken sandwiches served on grilled pita bread — all of which can be made vegetarian by substituting hummus, black beans or extra veggies. This is a bold statement, considering we are primarily a chicken restaurant, but I think our pita sandwiches and salads set us up to offer one of the best vegetarian menus in the city. Of course, we will do whole/half chickens, side salads, mashed potatoes, cinnamon applesauce and a few other sides. At the bar, we will specialize in specialty cocktail infusions and of course, craft beer.


CB: People love chicken during the holidays. With restaurant prep ahead of you, will you still be at Findlay Market or taking any orders for whole or half chickens? 

NP: Unfortunately, the cold weather prevents us from operating at Findlay Market under the tent. However, if people would like to place catering or large carryout orders, they can email revolutionrotisserie@gmail.com. The best way to do this is to visit our website revolutionrotisserie.com. 


Follow along with Revolution's progress on Facebook and Twitter @RevolutionOTR. 


 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.26.2014
 
 
mcd1

Cincinnati-Based McDonald's Franchisee Invented Filet-O-Fish

Otherwise, you'd be eating a Hula Burger (cold pineapple and cheese...)

According to an article in LA Weekly, Cincinnati-based McDonald's franchisee Lou Groen invented the Filet-O-Fish sandwich in 1962. Apparently, he was having an issue selling his burgers to our huge Catholic population during Lent.

So he called up McDonald's founder Ray Kroc and explained his dilemma, suggesting they try selling a fish sandwich instead. Kroc said OK, but only if they also tested his invention: the Hula Burger, a slab of grilled pineapple and cheese on a cold bun. Kroc and Groen had a contest to see which would sell better. The fish sandwich won and fast-food fish sandwiches were born to the happiness of pescetarians, Catholics and cows nationwide. Wonder what would have happened if the pineapple burger won?

Read the whole article here

 
 

 

 

 
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