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by 01.25.2010
Posted In: Visual Art, COMMUNITY at 01:04 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Be a Part of Shepard Fairey's Public Muralworks

The Contemporary Arts Center is looking for sites that want to be turned into public works of art in conjunction with the Shepard Fairey: Supply and Demand exhibit.

The artworks will be pasted paper projects applied with wheat paste. They are not permanent, but some have been known to be long lasting. By submitting your site for consideration, you're giving your permission for this piece of art to be visible for an unspecified amount of time.

If you want your business or house or brick wall to be transformed into a mural by Fairey, submit the following information to jarmor@contemporaryartscenter.org to be considered:

1. Image of the Structure (aka your wall, building and so on)

2. The address of the site

3. The approximate dimensions of the site

4. The name of the site owner

5. The contact information of the owner (phone number/e-mail address)

Submitting doesn't mean you'll be chosen.

Learn more about the Supply and Demand exhibit at the CAC here. View an example of a mural from Pittsburgh in conjunction with Shepard Fairey: Supply and Demand at the Warhol Museum here


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by Rick Pender 05.31.2013
Posted In: Arts community, COMMUNITY, Visual Art, Theater at 10:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
fringefestival-loon

Stage Door: Fringe Your Weekend

The 2013 Cincinnati Fringe is at its first weekend with almost two dozen shows available for you to attend over the weekend. Pick a few and take a chance — read the commentaries by CityBeat reviewers posted here, if you want the inside scoop on various productions.

This is the 10th annual event, and it's become a big-time part of our local theater scene. You owe it to yourself to see some of these creative, odd, amusing, thoughtful pieces. And stop by Know Theatre's Underground Bar after 10 p.m. any evening to meet performers and talk with others who are enjoying the Fringe. It's a great way to get more perspectives.

More 2013 Fringe coverage:

• May 22 cover story: “Navigating the Novelties

• April 18 Curtain Call column: “Fringe Has Sprung

Complete festival schedule 

Official Fringe Festival guide



 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.04.2015 65 days ago
Posted In: COMMUNITY, Culture, Music at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
who

Memorial Marker Unveiled For 1979 Who Concert Tragedy

The cold temperature Thursday night was appropriate for the solemn gathering on the plaza outside the main entrance of U.S. Bank Arena. Since the 30th anniversary of the Dec. 3, 1979 Who concert tragedy — 11 people died in the crush trying to get inside the doors of what was then Riverfront Coliseum — Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation has been having memorial observances with lighting of lanterns outside the site on that date.

At last night’s observance, which drew a sizeable crowd, the organization unveiled the two-sided memorial marker that will now permanently be at the location. It had been a long time in the works.

Before that occurred, Andy Bowes — brother of victim Peter Bowes of Wyoming — gave a speech to the crowd that included reading a statement of support for the memorial from the Who’s longtime manager, Bill Curbishley. Here it is:

“With the laying of the marker in dedication to those that lost their lives at the Riverfront Coliseum, on this day in 1979, I would like to pay tribute from myself and the two surviving members of the Who, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. I can fully understand how difficult it has been for the families who lost a loved one to go forward and attempt to regain their lives. That night will always stay with myself, Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend. It is a scar from the past and though the wound has healed, the scar is still there to be touched on occasion and felt. The band themselves were not aware of what had happened and were playing on stage when I was informed and saw the devastation on the plaza level. Nothing will erase that memory other than their soft edges.

“It’s with this in mind that I decided not to attend today because I felt it should not be turned into a Who media day or circus. There has to be dignity to this ceremony and the unfolding of the dedication of remembrance. This is not about the Who or their music but it’s about the families involved. Many people suffered as a result of that day and I am sure that many still do. If myself and the band can be of any assistance in the healing process going forward we are there for you.

Love

Bill Curbishley”

Mayor John Cranley, who promised at last year’s observance to dedicate a permanent memorial marker at this one, also gave a brief, moving address. He closed with, “Something happened a long time ago but is still with us. As your mayor, I’m proud to stand with you and say we will never forget.”

The band, itself, posted a short online comment, “Today we remember those 11 Who fans who lost their lives in the crush to enter the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, Ohio. May they rest in peace.”

Incidentally, something that seems to have gone overlooked at the time it occurred here but has continuing resonance and pertinence today can be discovered in a YouTube clip of Pearl Jam playing at U.S. Bank Arena on Oct. 1, 2014.

During that band’s 2000 appearance at a Danish festival, nine fans in the mosh pit died from suffocation. At U.S. Bank Arena, Eddie Veder reminded the crowd about the tragedy outside the arena in 1979 and how the Who “have to go on living with that event that happened 35 years ago. That became something we had to learn about, and they reached out to us when we really needed it.”

Pear Jam then played “The Real Me,” the last song the Who performed in Cincinnati at the December 3, 1979 show. Here’s the clip:


For more background on this new memorial, read my Big Picture column in this week's issue.

 
 

 

 

 
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