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by Maria Seda-Reeder 04.25.2014 95 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 08:36 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Celebrations Honoring Lily Mulberry's Legacy

Remembering the longtime OTR gallery owner and all around arts advocate

A diverse group of friends, family and various artist-types who knew and loved 1305 Gallery owner Lily Mulberry will gather together at several different events this coming weekend to celebrate the life of the longtime OTR resident/gallery owner. 

Mulberry was diagnosed more than two years ago with Hodgkin's lymphoma, a cancer that affects the immune system, but she kept the gallery on Main Street open and running long after many neighboring galleries closed. The longtime OTR resident and arts advocate died at Jewish Hospital April 16 at the age of just 31 and is survived by her husband of almost seven years, Richard Applin. She is also survived by mother Jackie Mulberry of Woodlawn, Ky.; father Rick Faigle of Covington, Ky.; two sisters, Jesse Mulberry-Faigle of Covington and Johnna Mulberry of Ohio; and stepsister Danna Faigle of Michigan.

The first exhibition at 1305 Gallery featured Mulberry’s own work, and nine years later — almost to the day — friends and loved ones will host an opening reception for Thank You Lily: Part I, an exhibition featuring the artist’s own work juxtaposed with pieces from her own collection, including but not limited to artists who’ve shown at the gallery. Lily’s friends Michael Stillion and Melanie Derrick are curating the show and all proceeds will go to the family. A donation can also be made to the Lily Mulberry Memorial Fund at any U.S. Bank branch. Thank You Lily opens 6-9 p.m. Friday at 1305 Main Street, OTR. More information here.

Another celebration of Lily Mulberry’s life will happen this Saturday at her alma mater, Covington Latin School. Also hosted by friends (of which, Miss Mulberry had many), this gathering will include music, food and speeches of remembrance as well as a collaborative memorial art project. Celebrate Lily runs 4:30-7 p.m. Saturday at 21 E. 11th St., Covington, Ky. Details here.

Both events are free and open to the public.

 
 
by Rick Pender 04.25.2014 95 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:12 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 4-25 - venus in fur @ cincinnati playhouse - greta wohlrabe & pj sosko - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Options Abound

There's ample evidence at the Cincinnati Playhouse as to why David Ives' Tony-nominated play Venus in Fur is the most produced script in America this season. I saw the opening performance last evening, and it's an entertaining attention-grabber. Inspired by an erotic Victorian novel, it's the story of a playwright who's adapted it for the stage but despairing of finding the right actress — until Vanda appears. Despite the initial impression she makes, she proves to be almost too good to be true. Greta Wohlrabe is a marvel in this role, flipping between being an ambitious, over-enthused wannabe and a commanding, demanding, sophisticated paramour who knows the character she wants to play and how to get what she wants. It's sexy and funny — and a great evening for grown-ups. Through May 17. Tickets ($30-$75): 513-421-3888.

Want to try something new this weekend? A new theater company, Women in Theatre (WIT) is staging Joe Calarco's Walter Cronkite Is Dead at St. John United Church of Christ in Bellevue, Ky. Two women stuck in an airport together end up sharing a table: One, from Washington, D.C., is reserved and educated, yearning for peace and quiet; the other is a chatty Southerner who can't stop talking. Their conversation, according to the show's publicity, is "funny, difficult, deeply revealing and astonishingly frank." Through May 3. Tickets: 859-441-6882.

Stacy Sims, my CityBeat colleague, thought that New Edgecliff Theatre's production of Other People's Money was pretty good. (CityBeat review here.) Jerry Sterner's 1989 play remains timely, the story of a rapacious business guy who stands to destroy a small town when he buys a company that is pretty much the sole livelihood of the residents of a small Rhode Island town. Stacy called the show "good entertainment" and added, "it just might provoke you to consider whom you are listening to today." It's onstage at the Aronoff's Fifth Third Bank Theater through Saturday evening. 

Stacy liked Know Theatre's production of The Twentieth-Century Way enough to give it a Critic's Pick in her CityBeat review here. It's two actors playing two actors in 1914 who are hired to play gay men in Long Beach and entrap "social vagrants" — that is, gay men. It's a multi-leveled script, playing with concepts of what's real and what's "enacted." Heady but fascinating, and it features two excellent actors, Jens Rasmussen and Michael McKeough. You won't be bored if you go to see this one. Through May 3. Tickets ($15 in advance; $20 at the door): 513-300-5669.

Two productions that will appeal to audiences who like old-fashioned theater remain onstage. With its final performance on Sunday, Mary Chase's gentle comedy, Harvey, at the Carnegie in Covington, is about Elwood, a guy who's a little off-kilter — who sees a six-foot-tall white rabbit that no one else believes is real (except the audience). Tickets ($17-$24); 859-957-1940. The classic musical Gypsy — full of great show tunes — continues at the Covedale through May 4; it's about Rose, the pushy stage mother who launched her rather unwilling daughter into a burlesque career as Gypsy Rose Lee. (CityBeat review here.) Tickets ($21-$24): 513-241-6550.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.24.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Cincinnati, Events at 03:47 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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New Riff Distillery Hosts Bourbon and Game Tasting

The new distillery hosts a tasting event with chef David Cook

New Riff Distilling, the new distillery near the Party Source (24 Distillery Way, Bellevue, newriffdistilling.com), is hosting a tasting dinner with chef David Cook of Daveed's NEXT.

The Spirits for Wild Game tasting event features craft beer from Ei8ght Ball Brewing, bourbon and wine selections paired with wild game hors d'oeuvres. Chef David Cook will prepare wild-caught fish and game, including rarely available woodcock and doves, that fishers and hunters from the Gilbert Symons Chapter of the Ruffled Grouse Society have donated. 

New Riff urban distillery focuses on continuing the long tradition of bourbon excellence in Kentucky. In a press release, oner Ken Lewis says, “The new distillery will allow us to celebrate our state’s heritage, while producing a world-class product and visitor experience that will only enhance the Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky region as a travel destination. We’ve done everything possible to ensure that our distillery will be top-notch; we like to call it Kentucky URBAN Whiskey, a new taste on the long standing tradition of bourbon.”   

Although the first batch of New Riff bourbon won't be available for years, the distillery hosts daily tours, events and more; it's also an official stop on the Craft Bourbon Trail.

Tickets for the evening are $75 per person and include tastings and hors d'oeuvres. 6-9 p.m. newriffdistilling.com.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.24.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: Beer, Alcohol, Events at 03:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Tap That Brew Tour

CityBeat to host a bussed brewery tour this Sunday

CityBeat hosts an afternoon of drinking and not driving. Start at one of the participating breweries — Rhinegeist, Listermann Brewing Company, Ei8ht Ball Brewing, Christian Moerlein or MadTree — and then hop on a shuttle to the next one. After you’ve visited each, hop back on the shuttle to be driven to your starting location. Tickets include beer at each brewery, a custom CityBeat Tap That growler, lunch from Tom+Chee and shuttle rides. 


Noon-6 p.m. $40. citybeat.com
 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.24.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: Food news at 10:15 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
maurys tiny cove

Maury's Tiny Cove Celebrates 65 Years

House party and auction at the West Side staple

Maury's Tiny Cove, everyone's favorite (and the oldest) steakhouse on the West Side, celebrates 65 years Sunday with an open house party and auction.

Founded in 1949 by Maurice Bibent, the steakhouse maintains it's mid-century vibe: low lights, deep red booths, dark wood and great martinis. The menu focuses on hand-cut steaks, baby back ribs and fish plus pastas and more.

Doors open at 2 p.m. for complimentary appetizers and full drink service, plus opening bidding until 5:30 p.m. during a silent auction of Maury's memorabilia that will no longer be on display. The open house continues until 9 p.m. and all money goes to future improvements and renovations to the Cincinnati landmark.

(If you haven't been to Maury's, now is the time to go — especially because Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara recently filmed scenes from the upcoming movie Carol at the restaurant.)

3908 Harrison Ave., Cheviot, maurys-steakhouse.com.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.24.2014 96 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 10:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dining out for life

Dining Out for Life 2014

Fight AIDS by dining out at your favorite restaurants on April 24

Dining Out For Life is an annual event to raise funds for licensed AIDS service agencies in 60 cities across the nation. Started in 1991 by ActionAIDS in Philadelphia, today more than 3,000 restaurants donate a portion of their proceeds from one day to the aforementioned service agencies; more than $4 million is raised each year which goes directly to the agencies (except for a $1,150 licensing fee). 


Cincinnati's Dining Out For Life event benefits Caracole, a nonprofit that provides housing and supportive services to individuals and families living with HIV/AIDS in eight counties across Southwest Ohio. Caracole currently serves more than 1,400 clients and their families.


Area restaurants participating include Arnold's Bar & Grill (donating 25 percent); Below Zero Lounge (donating 100 percent); Blue Jay Restaurant (donating 25 percent); Green Dog Cafe (donating 25 percent); Kitchen 452 (donating 25 percent); Tom+Chee (donating 25 percent); and more. Find a full list of participating restaurants and how much they're donating here.


Dining Out For Life is easy. Just follow three steps:

  1. Choose a participating restaurant.
  2. Gather a group of friends and call ahead to make a reservation. Be sure to mention you're with Dining Out For Life®.
  3. Dine out on Thursday, April 24th and enter for a chance to win fabulous prizes. Restaurants will list what time of day they're participating in fundraising.

If you would like to participate or would like more information, please contact Megan Green, Caracole Community Investment Coordinator, at 513-619-1483 or at mgreen@caracole.org.

 
 
by Mike Breen 04.23.2014 97 days ago
Posted In: Music News, Local Music, New Releases at 01:27 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Musicians’ Desk Reference Switches Format, Offers Free Trial

Locally-created music industry e-guidebook goes the monthly subscription route

After launching last year locally at the MidPoint Music Festival and nationally at New York’s CMJ conference, the intuitive and comprehensive music industry e-book Musicians’ Desk Reference has relaunched with a new format. Created in Cincinnati by longtime local musician and promoter Brian Penick (also the founder of The Counter Rhythm Group, which has helped numerous local acts garner national attention and work), MDR is moving from its original, one-time-purchase approach to a monthly (or annual) subscription plan. 

(Penick wrote guest blogs for CityBeat as he put the project together. For a more comprehensive MDR overview, click here and here. Billboard magazine has also given the project lots of love.)

For those who may have been cautious about its upfront cost, Musicians’ Desk Reference, which is customizable to the user’s needs (no matter where they are in their career) and features information, templates and advice relating to everything from touring, promoting and recording to radio and press campaigns and well beyond, is now available to test-drive for free. The no-cost 30-day trial doesn’t even require a credit card; click here to get started

Artists serious about pursuing a career in music will likely become more interested in MDR as they dive in and look at all it has to offer. After the 30-day trial, MDR can be accessed for $10 a month or $100 for the year. 

Visit musiciansdeskreference.com for complete info. 

 
 
by Jac Kern 04.23.2014 97 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Humor, Movies at 11:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

I’m a huge fan of locally-produced commercials-gone-viral. Cincinnati’s Fick Chiropractic Centers current ad might not be up there with Jamie Casino, but it does feature a killer beat that deserves some attention.

Is anyone else just tickled by the concept of a local doctor employing a beatmaker for a commercial? It totally caught me off guard while watching Fox 19 Morning News (aka the Jacki Jing Variety Hour — bitch has more devoted fans than Lady Gaga, just peep their posts on her Facebook page. Locals — including my boyfriend — are totally enamored by her beautiful glamour shots, bubbly attitude and penchant for cosplay. How are the rest of us supposed to compete, Jacki?!).

Are you sick of Beyoncé yet? Trick question: If you answered “Yes,” please get out of here immediately. NO ONE is sick of Beyoncé ever, in fact, parody videos and choreographed routines to her songs are still pouring out of the woodwork four months after the release of her self-titled album. The latest tribute of note comes from self-proclaimed “star on the rise” Chanel Carroll, who’s serving up student loan realness in her take on “Partition” called “Tuition.” ‘Cause we all just want live that debt-free life.

Everything about this is flawless, from her JLo-circa-2000 vibe to the clip art to the cameo by Ashley from Sallie Mae. I would crown her as winner of the Internet for the week, but she shares the title with this dude who’s been reviewing fast food and other grub from his car since 2012. Check out one of Daym Drops’ most popular videos, featuring Five Guys Burgers and Fries.

I want this guy to narrate my life or at least read my eulogy because dude describes a plain drive-thru burger with the eloquence of a poetic preacher. And of course there’s a musical remix. OH MY DAYUM!

Avril Lavigne continues her assault on our earholes with the confusing, excruciating “Hello Kitty.” The Canadian singer responsible for 80 percent of ties bought by young women in 2002 apparently has a massive Asian following, but the Japanime-style video is more of a cringe-worthy misstep than cultural tribute. Hey white pop stars, stop using Asian women (or any women for that matter) as props!

Lily Allen, another 2000s pop relic, is also coming out with new music and a record that automatically gets my support by taking a dig at Kanye West. Sheezus drops next month; the album’s titular new single is a total lady anthem with praise for the Lorde and rhymes about…periods. Whatever, I’m digging it.

This week in movie remake fuckery: A Mrs. Doubtfire sequel is in the works, because nothing from your childhood is sacred! Mara Wilson, who starred as the youngest child in the film (as well as Matilda in the ‘90s Roald Dahl film adaptation) revealed on social media that she wouldn’t be a part of it, as she’s been out of the acting game for several years — which, according to over-each headlines, translated into Wilson “slamming” the sequel, making the private former child actor a trending topic. While we may never see a grown-up Natalie Hillard or Matilda 2 (thank sheezus), you can enjoy Wilson’s musings on her blog. And just because: Mrs. Doubtfire as a horror film.

Also, Goonies 2 is also officially a go. Thanks, Spielberg.

Hey, that’s not Pit Bull, it’s Amy Poehler!

Orange Is The New Black  is back on Netflix for a second season June 6 and the new trailer is here. The whole gang’s back, with a few additions, but the lingering question remains: Where is Pennsatucky?!

It was recently reported that Laura Prepon signed on for Season Three as rumors circulate about her being the future ex-wife of Tom Cruise. This is what I like to call Scientology Sads: When you think you like someone — a famous person, obviously, because the group might as well be called Celebentology — but it turns out they’re a Scientologist. Such a shame.

 
 
by Anthony Skeens 04.22.2014 98 days ago
Posted In: Mayor, News at 04:43 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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New Bikeway Proposal Could Cost Additional $110,000

Vice Mayor Mann set to introduce motion to save parking spaces

The city’s cost of a long-planned piece of cycling infrastructure could more than double if City Council approves a motion Vice Mayor David Mann planned to introduce on April 23. 

Mayor John Cranley successfully paused the Central Parkway Bikeway Project for public discourse in response to a handful of business owners and residents taking exception to it, and a spokesman for Mann shared his suggested compromise with CityBeat today.

In response to an April 21 special Neighborhoods Committee meeting, Mann seeks to alter the bike route to appease people who don’t want to see parking spaces removed, but the updated plan will cost an additional $110,00 on top of the $82,600 the city would pay under the original plan, which would create the beginning of a cycling corridor running from Elm Street downtown to Ludlow Avenue in Clifton. The project was supposed to break ground next month and could lose $330,400 in federal money if the contract isn’t awarded by May 1. 

“We routinely spend hundreds of thousands of dollars as a city to create new jobs in our community,” Mann said in a statement. “We should not approve a new project that places 60 newly created jobs in jeopardy when such a sensible accommodation is available.”

The planned bikeway is an innovative piece of cycling infrastructure meant to better protect cyclists along a critical thoroughfare that would connect a number of inner-city neighborhoods and business districts. The lane will be protected, meaning cyclists will have their own lane with a buffer separating them from traffic; in some areas plastic bollards will separate the bike and automobile lanes. The street will not be widened, so traffic lanes will be impacted through restriping, and parking will be restricted during peak traffic hours in the morning and evening. 

Opponents of the project are concerned about losing public, on-street parking for parts of the day as well as potentially encountering traffic issues from shaving lanes from Brighton Place to Liberty Street. They also worry the bollards will become a blight issue and emergency vehicles will be impeded during one-lane hours.

Mann’s motion supports an alternative plan for a section running from Ravine Street to Brighton Place that would preserve 23 parking spaces full-time, alter 4,300 square feet of greenspace and remove 15 trees at an estimated cost of $110,000. The parking spaces would benefit a building owner and his tenants at 2145 Central Parkway. 

City Councilman Chris Seelbach and others demonstrated frustration with the administration’s interest in stepping in at the 11th hour. 

“I think we have reached a new era in Cincinnati: two steps forward, pause, lots of long meetings, two steps forward, and I’m convinced after the pause and lots of long meetings, we will continue to go two steps forward today,” Seelbach said at the April 21 meeting. 

Mayor Cranley requested City Manager Scott Stiles delay awarding a contract after meeting with local business owner Tim Haines, who purchased a vacant building located at 2145 Central Parkway in 2012 for $230,000. His building now houses 65 employees from 12 different businesses including his own, Relocation Strategies. Haines has become a mouthpiece for the opposition to the bikeway — though he adamantly states he is not against the lane; he is just against the project’s current incarnation as it affects Central Parkway near his business, which utilizes 500 feet of on-street, unmetered parking, which translates to 30 parking spaces.

“If parking wasn’t an issue, I would open up my arms and welcome the bike path,” Haines says. “Parking for my 65 tenants is in jeopardy. As a business owner I have to fight for my tenants. … Could they park and walk a quarter of a mile? They could, but that’s not what they signed up for when they moved in.”

Haines has a 16-space parking lot adjacent to his building that some of his tenants use and also owns a parking lot across the street that is in disrepair. Haines says he already cleared it of underbrush to cut down criminal activity and disposed of dozens of tires and beer bottles. He says it would cost up to $300,000 to upgrade the lot. 

During the April 21 presentation, Department of Transportation and Engineering (DOTE) Director Michael Moore presented the committee with an alternative recently developed with Cranley’s office that he said would appease Haines and his tenants but would cost more money. Moore pushed the notion that the alternative creates a more balanced bikeway plan.

The original plan, passed by council last year, restricts parking in front of Haines’ building from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m. Moore’s alternative, which Mann is on board with, is to ramp the bike lane over the curb adjacent to a sidewalk where there is currently a tree-lined area in front of Haines’ building and another business in order to preserve public parking full-time. 

At the meeting, council member Young took exception to the suggestion of changing the project at this point.  

“For the life of me, I don’t see where the reasonableness and the balance is with people who come so far after the fact that want us to make these changes and the dollar amount it’s going to cost the taxpayers to get it done,” Young said. “I am appalled that people can come after the fact and tie up all these people down here to simply want accommodations for them.”

Mann shared another perspective.

“There’s a gentleman who has brought 60 jobs to the city, including some folks who have Parkinson’s and use the building, and the proposal that’s being made seems to me to represent balance,” Mann said. “We spend millions of dollars, typically, to support development, to support jobs, and you’re saying that the proposal that was originally approved by this council without a hearing like this is so pristine that it cant be adjusted in any way, and if it’s adjusted that is a statement of imbalance? I just don’t follow that.”

For the past year and a half, DOTE conducted surveys, sought public input and developed plans for the bikeway. After a strong consensus, the department chose the protected bikeway plan. The bikeway is estimated to add just three seconds of motorist commute time by 2030, though some naysayers suggest that delivery trucks will clog the lanes and the turn left from Ravine Street will create an even longer lag. 

Community outreach for the design began in March of last year with eight community council meetings. Letters were mailed to residents, businesses and property owners, but Haines and several other business owners stated they didn’t receive any and weren’t aware of the project until late last year. 

A website designed for public feedback also garnered about 600 messages mainly supporting the bikeway project. DOTE held an open house last September and the Over-The-Rhine and Northside community councils, Findlay Market and Northside Business Association endorsed the project. 

Simpson expressed frustration with halting progress for a last-minute meeting.

“I don’t think that’s an appropriate process,” she said. “Really, technically you can go over everything over the past two years. The reality is we need to look forward. If we want to be less auto-focused and more focused on other types of transit, we’re going to have to ruffle a couple of feathers.”

Supporters — some who biked to the April 21 meeting and utilized a bike valet setup in front of City Hall — represented various groups of the community from health and community councils to business owners and cyclists. Their number doubled opponents — mainly business owners along Central Parkway in the West End and the West End Community Council, though some West End residents and business owners supported the original bikeway plan.

 
 
by Staff 04.22.2014 98 days ago
Posted In: Events, Food news, Contest at 02:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
todo_gorman heritage farm overview_image provided by gorman heritage farm

Savor the Season and Chef Competition at Gorman Heritage Farm

Tastings, workshops, cocktails and more

Evendale's Gorman Heritage Farm — a real, working farm — welcomes spring with their second Savor the Season: Farm to Fork Celebration

From 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, May 3, the 122-acre farm (in partnership with Slow Food Cincinnati) will be abuzz with educational and immersive opportunities to learn and taste what spring has to offer. Locavore chefs, like Julie Francis of Nectar and Ryan Santos of Please, will be offering cooking — and tasting — demos using farm-fresh ingredients highlighting the bounty of the season. There will also be workshops on caring for your own backyard chickens, beekeeping, gardening, composting and much more. (Find a full list of workshops here.)

The day wraps up with the “Raid the Garden” chef competition, judged by CityBeat’s own Anne Mitchell, among others. Competing will be Mike Florea of Maribelle's eat + drink, food stylist Mary Seguin, Jaime Carmody of Out of Thyme, Nick Marckwald of Hen of the Woods, Salomon Rabinovich of Gaijin Catering and Karol Osinski of the Hyatt Regency Cincinnati. During the competition, Rhinegeist Brewery have their brew on tap, and everyone's favorite mixologist and author Molly Wellman will be serving garden-good cocktails. You'll also find a food trucks including Dojo Gelato, Panino Food Truck, C'est Cheese and Bistro de Mohr.

And Gorman is a real working farm, that  you — and your little ones — can explore. Space is limited. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday, May 3. All-day, all-access pass (includes chef demos, workshops, vendor areas, farm tours and the Raid the Garden competition): $35 adult; $30 child/senior; $30 member adult; $25 member child/senior. Raid the Garden competition only (5-7 p.m.): $10 at the door. Prices go up after May 1.

10052 Reading Road, Glendale, 513-563-6663, gormanfarm.org.

 
 

 

 

 
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