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by Natalie Krebs 08.03.2015 119 days ago
at 10:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
jeffrey blackwell

Morning News and Stuff

Police Chief Blackwell addresses city council on police body cameras; Cranley opposes changes to the city's charter; Kasich's smug run for president?

Hey everyone! Hope you all had a great weekend! I know I tried to spend as much time outside as possible, but now it's back to work, and here are your morning headlines.  

Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell spoke to City Council today about his plan to bring body cameras to the University of Cincinnati police department. The program is estimated to cost $1.5 million dollars and the department would like to obtain 60 cameras. The push for body cameras for the Cincinnati police comes in the wake of the release of University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing's body camera footage, which shows the fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose during a July 19 traffic stop in Mount Auburn. Chief Blackwell stated in a press conference following the release of the footage and announcement of the indictment of the officer that body cameras were on the way for Cincinnati police, but he did not give a time frame for when the program could begin.

• Details of a settlement between the estate of David "Bones" Hebert and the City of Cincinnati were released over the weekend. We first told you about the settlement Friday after the Cincinnati Enquirer reported a portion of that settlement. Hebert's estate will get $187,000 from the city, but more important, say his advocates, is a city acknowledgement that police acted improperly in his shooting death. Hebert was killed by Cincinnati police in Northside in 2011
after officers responded to a 911 call alleging an intoxicated man was robbed by Hebert and assaulted with a pirate sword. Hebert was located sitting on a sidewalk on Chase Avenue in Northside about 10 minutes later. During subsequent questioning, officers said Hebert drew a knife and moved toward an investigating officer, causing Mitchell to believe the officer’s life was in danger. Mitchell shot Hebert twice, killing him. Initial investigations cleared Mitchell of wrongdoing, but other reviews found he acted outside of police protocol, getting too close to Hebert and not formulating a plan for engaging him. Friends of Hebert have since made efforts to clear his name, saying he was a non-violent person caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. His advocates have set up a website, friendsofbones.org, to present evidence in the case.

"On July 30, the City of Cincinnati, four of its police officers and the Estate of David “Bones” Hebert agreed to settle the civil rights action pending in federal court," the city said in a statement. "Initial reports issued regarding the incident in 2011 declared that Mr. Hebert attacked a police officer with an opened knife or sword.  There was no sword. Furthermore, while an opened knife was recovered at the scene, the evidence that Mr. Hebert intended to attack or swipe at a police officer was not conclusive. Instead, Mr. Hebert’s actions, as well as actions taken by the officers on scene, contributed to the use of deadly force.  The City regrets this unfortunate loss of life and again expresses its condolences to the family and those who cared for Mr. Hebert.  This lawsuit, and now its resolution, should provide confidence that the matter was fully investigated and that a fair resolution was reached to this tragic event."

• Six people were arrested during a march remembering Samuel Dubose, who was shot July 18 by University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing. You can read our coverage of the vigil and march here.

• Mayor John Cranley opposes a measure that would weaken his power as mayor. Four amendments to the city's charter proposed by the City Council-appointed Charter Review Task Force would include one that would stop Cranley's ability to kill ordinances without a city council hearing or vote. Another would give the city council majority power to initiate the firing of the city manager, which only the mayor can do now, and kill the use of a pocket veto, which Cranley used to veto certain items in the 2016 budget. Cranley has to approve and send the ordinances to City Council, which could vote to put them on the ballot as early as next week, but the mayor has such strong opposition to the amendments that the committee many reconsider them altogether after a year of putting them together. Cranley has stated that he'd like a little more in return for losing some of his power and declined to forward the ordinances to the Rules and Audit Committee this week.   

• School districts in Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties are uniting against state-mandated testing. Forty-one districts part of the Greater Cincinnati School Advocacy Network want more local control and less "burdensome" mandates. Mason City Schools spokeswoman Tracey Carson said not all school districts are equal and needs vary between rural, suburban and rural school districts. The most recent state budget will cut $78 million from Ohio's education budget. 

• Two weeks after Gov. John Kasich's announcement that he's running for president, Newsweek has published an article on the GOP presidential hopeful's smugness. The article points out several issues so far with Kasich's big run for Washington D.C., including his reported short fuse, questionable claims of a 2014 "landslide" victory for governor and the fact that, well, most Americans don't even know who Kasich is and many Ohioans don't even like him. According to a recent poll, Kasich is number eight in line for the GOP nomination with Donald Trump leading the poll.

by Nick Swartsell 08.03.2015 120 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Hundreds Gather for Vigil, March Remembering Sam DuBose

Six arrested at subsequent march through downtown

Hundreds gathered at the Hamilton County Courthouse on Friday night for a candlelight vigil in remembrance of Samuel DuBose, who was shot July 19 by University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing. The vigil and subsequent march were peaceful, though Cincinnati police arrested six after the march moved through a concert on Fountain Square.

Tensing has been indicted on murder charges for DuBose’s killing and was fired by the UC police department. He has pleaded not guilty and was released on $1 million bond last week. He’s also suing UC for his job back.

Members of the DuBose family, including Samuel’s mother Audrey DuBose, and members of organizing group Cincinnati Black Lives Matter led the Friday event. Attendees held candles as peaceful music played and chants of “We are Sam DuBose” echoed around the plaza in front of the courthouse. Some wept or prayed and embraced each other.

“Tonight, we are here to honor the family, the legacy, the memory, the beautiful spirit of Sam DuBose,” said organizer Christina Brown. “We are here because we love each other. We are here because we want justice. We are here because we are powerful together.”

Crowds remember Sam DuBose at a candlelight vigil July 31.
Nick Swartsell

“We’re here to reclaim our humanity,” said attendee Emmanuel Gray. “Not just black people, but white people, in recognizing that black people are human and part of this great family.”

DuBose and other family members spoke about their faith and called for peace from the crowd and justice for her son.

“Y’all got to stand up and continue to believe,” one family member said. “Keep the peace. Thank you for coming out and standing up with us. If we can all stand for something, they will see us. They will never forget Sam and all the others. They will never forget these days that we’ve been out here.”

Protesters at a July 31 march remembering Samuel DuBose
Natalie Krebs

Following the vigil, about 200 people marched through Over-the-Rhine and downtown. That march was mostly uneventful, though a CityBeat reporter witnessed a man exit a red Ford Explorer on Walnut Street during the march and briefly brandish a knife, threatening marchers, before re-entering the vehicle. The march ended just off of Fountain Square when police confronted people who had marched through a concert there.

Attendees at a march for Samuel DuBose enter Fountain Square July 31
Nick Swartsell
Members of the DuBose family asked marchers to disperse, and the crowd began to thin. Before that happened, however, six people were arrested. CityBeat reporters were at the scene of those arrests, some of which seemed to occur simply because those arrested did not move quickly enough in the direction police wished them to. Multiple officers took down and handcuffed Damon Lynch IV and Brian Simpson, for instance, when they didn’t immediately comply with police orders to relocate. Both have been charged with disorderly conduct and resisting arrest.

Police arrested six people at a July 31 march for Samuel DuBose.
Natalie Krebs
Onlookers film police making arrests during a July 31 march for Sam DuBose.
Natalie Krebs

Another marcher, Mary Condo, was arrested for being part of a “disorderly crowd,” according to charges filed in Hamilton County Courts. Others arrested include Kevin Farmer, who is charged with menacing two local businesses for reportedly threatening to damage them, and Kimberly Thomas and Darius Clay, both charged with resisting arrest. The six were arraigned on Saturday, and some have been released on bond.

by Maija Zummo 07.31.2015 122 days ago

Your Weekend To Do List (7/17-7/19)

Seinfeld, Wet Hot American Summer, a pork and whiskey festival, rescheduled Paddlefest, Wild for Pets and more



Yada, yada, yada, y’all. Jerry Seinfeld, comedy icon and everybody’s favorite sitcom star who helmed a TV show about nothing, is coming to Cincinnati to perform his signature stand-up at the Aronoff for one night only, drawing on his uncanny ability to find sharp humor in ordinary observations. Feel free to break out your urban sombrero and/or puffy pirate shirt. Due to demand, Seinfeld will be performing two back-to-back sets. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday. $49-$150. Aronoff Center, 650 Walnut St., Downtown, cincinnatiarts.org.

Bike Night
Photo: Provided

Adventure is out there, and it turns out it’s closer than you’d think. GOODS on Main, a thematic retail store currently serving up “Adventure,” is calling all bike-curious folks to come together on Final Friday and celebrate everything that runs on two wheels. Whether it’s bikes, mopeds, scooters, café racers or cruisers, GOODS digs it just as much as you do. Bites from Tiger Dumpling Co. and local beer will be provided, as well as T-shirts created exclusively for Bike Night. 5-10 p.m. Friday. Free. 1300 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/goodsonmain.

Shakespeare in the Park
Photo: Provided
Make your midsummer night a dream and experience the Bard in the great outdoors this summer as Cincinnati Shakespeare Company stages Romeo & Juliet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream throughout Tristate parks. The full-length plays shalt show at Washington Park, President’s Park, Linden Grove Cemetery and 20 others. All productions are free, beginning with Romeo & Juliet on July 31 at Seasongood Pavilion in Eden Park. Doth go — all the world’s a stage, but an actual stage is even better, especially when it’s in a park. Through Sept. 4; shows start at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Free. Various locations, cincyshakes.com.

For Main Street’s Final Friday at 1305 Gallery, photographer and installation artist Molly Donnermeyer — who also runs Live(In) Gallery in Brighton — and poet/visual artist Sidney Cherie Hilley joined forces to create an exhibition entitled Likeness, in which they investigate themes related to one’s internal relationship to their external physical realities. For Main Street’s Final Friday at 1305 Gallery, photographer and installation artist Molly Donnermeyer — who also runs Live(In) Gallery in Brighton — and poet/visual artist Sidney Cherie Hilley joined forces to create an exhibition entitled Likeness, in which they investigate themes related to one’s internal relationship to their external physical realities. 6-11 p.m. Friday. Free. 1305 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/1305Gallery.

Fasten your seat belt — here comes the 2015-2016 theater season. Know Theatre gets bragging rights for being first out of the local theater gate with Hundred Days, a Rock & Roll show it played a significant part in developing. The Folk Rock odyssey was created by and features the husband-and-wife duo of Shaun and Abigail Bengson. It premiered at Z Space in San Francisco in February 2014.Hundred Days is the story of Sarah and Will, who fall in love only to have their time together cut tragically short by a fatal illness. Their romantic, defiant response to their fate: Compress the 60 years they had envisioned together into the 100 days they have left. Kate E. Ryan assembled the script for this powerful piece, which is an unconventional musical, Indie Rock opera and tragic romance. Read more about Hundred Days here. Hundred Days runs at Know Theatre July 24 to Aug. 22. knowtheatre.com.


Contrary to earlier reports, the Wet Hot prequel series premieres this week. Tune in to discover what Coop, Katie, Andy, Beth, Gene and the rest of the Camp Firewood crew were up to before that final day of camp depicted in the 2001 original flick. Premieres on Netflix.

Swear and Shake
Photo: via Facebook
Saturday, CityBeat is partnering with Horseshoe Casino to bring all of the Queen City’s best barbecue offerings to one place for a day of pork, beer and whiskey at the inaugural Porkopolis Pig & Whiskey Festival. Restaurants, including Eli’s, Velvet Smoke, Barrio Tequileria and Huit Craft BBQ, will be featured, along with more than 40 varieties of bourbon, scotch and whiskey, with master distillers and a whiskey chatter area for education and sampling. Grub to the sounds of live Bluegrass and Americana bands playing at the top of every hour, with local and national acts including Young Heirlooms, Magnolia Mountain and headliners Swear and Shake. Proceeds benefit the Bow Tie Foundation. 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. Saturday. Free; food and liquor prices vary. 1000 Broadway St., Pendelton, citybeat.com

The Salmon Shorts of OTR is basically a Facebook page dedicated to posting photos of people in salmon-colored shorts in Over-the-Rhine, poking a bit of fun at the preppy clientele who now visit the gentrified bars and restaurants of the urban neighborhood. Salmon shorts: good for golfing as well as drinking at Rhinegeist. Saturday’s Salmon Swim features a pub crawl to Taft’s Ale House, Washington Park Platform, Lachey’s and Neons, where those with wristbands receive drink specials and other treats, like oysters on the half shell from Anchor OTR at Neons, plus live entertainment from Cincinnati songstress Jess Lamb. Proceeds benefit the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition. Obviously, you are encouraged to wear salmon shorts. 4-8 p.m. Saturday. $5 wristbands. Salmon Shorts of OTR is searchable on Facebook.

Wild About Pets Festival
Photo: Steve Ziegelmeyer
Jungle Jim’s is known by many as an amusement park for food — a well-deserved moniker — but on Saturday it will turn into an amusement park for pets during their Wild About Pets Festival. More than 20 vendors will be offering free samples and coupons for their wares, and several pet experts (like a trainer, holistic vet and groomer) will be on site to answer any questions you may have about the health and wellness of your furry friends. They’re also featuring face painting, a petting zoo, pet and people caricatures, and cat and dog toy making, in addition to dozens of animals available for adoption. Cats, dogs and birds are welcome — but maybe keep your pet Komodo dragon at home. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. $4; $1 children. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com/wildforpets.

Meridith Benson and Martin Roosaare in 'Giselle'
Photo: Rich Sofranko 
Aside from those who become marketable marquee stars, it’s not all that common for dancers to find a sustainable living in their art form. Or long-term romance. Or family. It’s a hard-knock life, being a dancer.  But through talent, hard work and astute planning, Meridith Benson, former Cincinnati Ballet and Joffrey Ballet of Chicago principal, and Mario de la Nuez, former Cincinnati Ballet dancer and Artistic Director of Ballet Theater of Chicago, have made a dream come true. Read more about the couple here. De la Dance Company celebrates its 10th anniversary with an open house Saturday at de la Arts Place. More info: deladancecompany.org; delaartsplace.com. 

Sometimes the cure to the summertime blues is, well, more Blues. The Lebanon Blues Festival has just the thing, offering a free event with eight Blues bands, food, a car and motorcycle show, and a deluxe beer garden at their historic downtown location. After listening to some slow-burning Blues from bands like Brown Street Breakdown and Donahoe, Sowders & Cole, you can speed it up with the Red Hot Blues Run, a 5k, 10k and 15k for kids and adults. The run isn’t free, but proceeds will go toward the city’s parks. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. Downtown Lebanon, lebanonbluesfestival.org.

Rich Robinson
Photo: Alysse Gafjken
Rich Robinson formed The Black Crowes when he was 17 with his older brother Chris, launching a group that would become a foundational band of “modern Classic Rock” radio (listen to almost any Classic Rock outlet for an hour and you will most definitely hear a Crowes song). Though the band has broken up before, Robinson announced at the start of this year that the Crowes were done for good (later statements by his longtime bandmates confirmed the assertion). But the guitarist/songwriter isn’t done with music — in 2014, he released his third solo album, the widely acclaimed The Ceaseless Sight. The album has the same rootsy swagger as some of the Crowes’ best work (and is indicative of how integral Rich was to the band’s sound), but it also showcases the artist’s lesser-known talents as a solid singer and strong lyricist. Robinson has toured previously with a full-on backing band, but his visit to our area this weekend is a part of his “(mostly) acoustic” tour. The show will be just Robinson and one of a handful of vintage guitars he’s bringing with him, performing songs from his three solo releases, as well as a few covers — maybe some Bob Dylan and definitely some vintage Folk Blues. 9 p.m. Saturday. $15; $20 day of show. Southgate House Revival (Sanctuary), 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky., southgatehouse.com. 

Global Water Dances
Photo: Provided
A safe, clean, accessible and sustainable water supply is essential for communities around the world. Global Water Dances-Cincinnati showcases the vision and choreography of legendary Fanchon Shur, an Ohio Governor's Woman of the Year, set to original World Beat music composed by event director Shari Lauter, MEd. Dancers and musicians pay homage to the Ohio River as a historic gateway to freedom from slavery, and Cincinnati's source of drinking water, with a call from children to safeguard water for future generations. Occurring amid rescheduled Paddlefest activities — canceled in June because of high water — the performance takes place along the Serpentine Wall, with a backdrop of hundreds of Paddlefest kayakers viewing from the river. The Paddle the Ohio River Paddle canoe and kayak race begins at 7:30 a.m. Sunday at Coney Island (last boat leaves at 9 a.m.). The race ends at Yeatman’s Cove with a finish-line festival until 1:30 p.m., which includes the Global Water Dances performance. Global Water Dances: 11 a.m. Sunday. Free. Serpentine Wall, Sawyer Point, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown, facebook.com/globalwaterdances-cincinnati, ohioriverpaddlefest.org/paddlefest.

MainStrasse Village Classic Car Show
Drive back in time to MainStrasse Village for their 13th-annual Classic Car Show. Hot Rods, customs and classics will be parked along the tree-lined streets and walkways of the village and Goebel Park, filling an already scenic route with even more of a historic view. Whether you’re a lover of cars or simply like a vintage product, pop into or check out the neighborhood’s eclectic shops, businesses, pubs, and eateries. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Free. MainStrasse Village, Sixth St., Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org.

Mike Stanley
Photo: Provided
“My parents were always really good about not censoring things,” says comedian Mike Stanley. “So I grew up watching a lot of stand-up comedy and I always knew it was something I could do.” Today he splits time between L.A. and his hometown of Detroit. “I would never get a hair transplant or plugs,” he tells an audience. “There’s always a recurring theme on all those hair-transplant commercials. As soon as those guys get new hair, they for some reason jump on a Jet Ski. Like you need hair to ride a Jet Ski. Like if you were balding and on vacation and tried to rent a Jet Ski the guy behind the counter would say, ‘No.’ ” Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com.

by Nick Swartsell 07.31.2015 122 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Morning News and Stuff

3CDC announces plans for former City Gospel Mission in OTR; UC officers reports contradicted by video; get ready for the GOP swarm in Ohio

Good morning all. Here’s the news today.

The Cincinnati Center City Development Corporation has announced its plans for the site of the former City Gospel Mission in Over-the-Rhine. The non-profit social service agency, which had occupied the spot on Elm and Magnolia Streets since 1927, recently moved to a new facility in Queensgate. That move was part of the city’s Homelessness to Homes plan, which created five new shelters in places like Queensgate and Mount Auburn. Those facilities are larger and more up-to-date than the older buildings occupied by organizations like City Gospel and the Drop Inn Center, but aren’t in Over-the-Rhine and aren’t as close to downtown. City Gospel’s historic church won’t be torn down, but another, more recent building next to it will be demolished to make room for three townhomes 3CDC wants to build. The developer purchased the property from City Gospel earlier this month for $750,000.

• The city has settled a civil wrongful death lawsuit with the estate of David "Bones" Hebert. Hebert was shot and killed by Cincinnati Police Sgt. Andrew Mitchell in 2011 after officers responded to a 911 call alleging an intoxicated man was robbed by Hebert and assaulted with a pirate sword. Hebert was located sitting on a sidewalk on Chase Avenue in Northside about 10 minutes later. During subsequent questioning, officers said Hebert drew a knife and moved toward an investigating officer, causing Mitchell to believe the officer’s life was in danger. Mitchell shot Hebert twice, killing him. Initial investigations cleared Mitchell of wrongdoing, but other reviews found he acted outside of police protocol, getting too close to Hebert and not formulating a plan for engaging him. Friends of Hebert have since made efforts to clear his name, saying he was a non-violent person caught in the wrong place at the wrong time. His advocates have set up a website, friendsofbones.org, to present evidence in the case and try and clear Hebert's name.

The settlement states that it's unclear whether an open knife found at the scene was Hebert's, and that there was no sword involved in the incident. Paul Carmack, who is administrator of Hebert's estate in Cincinnati, made a statement about the settlement on social media yesterday.

"Today the Family has reached an agreement w/ the City of Cincinnati to settle the pending lawsuit in the death of Bones. In the days to come a statement will be released on behalf of the city & the estate to clarify Bones name and show that he did not attack anyone on the night in question. This statement is why this lawsuit was undertaken. Without this statement there would be no settlement. Bones wasn't the attempted cop killer he was painted as nor did he attempt suicide by cop. Bones was in the wrong place, at the wrong time, in front of the wrong people. Today's events allow Mr. & Mrs. Hebert to bury their son as the fun loving, care free spirit we all knew and love to this day."

• More information is coming out about the other officers who responded to the University of Cincinnati police shooting death of 43-year-old Samuel Dubose. Two officers who were at the scene of that shooting and made statements supporting officer Ray Tensing, who shot Dubose, have been suspended as an investigation into their statements continues. At least one of those officers, Phillip Kidd, was also involved in the 2010 taser death of a mentally ill man named Kelly Brinson. Kidd and fellow UC officer Eric Weibel, who wrote the police report about the Dubose shooting, were defendants in a wrongful death lawsuit over Brinson’s death in UC police custody. Weibel’s police report about the Dubose shooting quotes Kidd saying that officer Tensing was dragged by Dubose’s car. But body camera footage of the incident shows that Tensing was never dragged by the car before shooting Dubose. Kidd could face criminal charges for the apparently false statements.

• Tensing has pleaded not guilty a murder charge and is out on a $1 million bond. He’s also suing to get his job back. Meanwhile, the Cincinnati Enquirer has published some, uh, interesting pieces around the Dubose shooting, including a first-person article in which a reporter who never met Dubose visits his grave and another where a baseball coach from Tensing’s teenage years vouches for the officer, saying he’s “not a monster.”

• The tragic shooting of a four-year-old in Avondale seems to have sparked renewed tensions between Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell and Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black. The unidentified girl was sitting outside when she was struck by a stray bullet from a drive by near Reading Road. She’s currently hospitalized in critical condition, and doctors say it’s unknown if she will survive. Black told media on the scene that he takes such incidents into account when judging the chief’s performance. As city manager, Black has hiring and firing power for the position. A spike in shootings earlier this summer and documents drafted by the city detailing the chief’s potential exit created speculation that Blackwell might be forced out of his position. Black said last night that while overall crime is down, he considers the level of shootings in the city unacceptable, and that he holds Blackwell accountable.

"It's ridiculous and it's not acceptable and it will not be allowed to continue," he said. "I told the chief tonight we are going after them. That is my expectation and that is how I'm going to be how I evaluate his effectiveness as chief."

• In a final push, marijuana legalization effort ResponsibleOhio made its extended deadline to turn in extra signatures for a petition drive to get a state constitutional amendment making weed legal on the November ballot. The group, which missed the required 300,000 signatures last time around by about 30,000, turned in another 95,000 to the state yesterday at the buzzer. The state will now review those signatures, and if enough are valid, the measure will go before voters. ResponsibleOhio proposes legalizing marijuana and creating 10 commercial grow sites owned by the group’s investors. Small amounts of private cultivation would also be allowed under the amendment.

• Finally, prepare thyself for the swarm: As this New York Times piece details, the Republican Party is focusing in on Ohio in a big way. Next week is the first GOP 2016 presidential primary debate in Cleveland, and the party is hoping to use the event to stoke its base in a big way. And that’s just the start. Expect activists, political operatives, and many, many people in red bowties and blue blazers (sorry to my Republican friends. But you really do look dashing in the Tucker Carlson getup) descending upon the heart of it all. Can’t wait for that. One brilliant thing someone has done: a number of billboards around the debate venue in Cleveland will carry messages about unarmed black citizens killed by police, including 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was shot by police while playing with a toy pistol in a park.

That's it for me. Get out and check out that big full moon tonight, and for the love of god, have a good weekend my friends. Find something thrilling. Hang out with folks you love. It's been an intense week.

by Rick Pender 07.31.2015 123 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
stage door 7-31 - hundred days at know theatre - id - abigail bengson -  photo by daniel r. winters (1)

Stage Door

Make ’em Laugh: Midsummer Theater

On Wednesday evening I took a bunch of kids (four elementary-school-age nieces and a nephew in town for a visit) to see a bunch of kids (high schoolers, average age 16) in Hairspray, this summers’ Cincinnati Young People’s Theatre production at the Covedale Center. The verdict: “We loved it.” One of them said, “They did more singing than talking.” (A good thing, in her opinion.) And one even got the message of black and white teens breaking color barriers and just being teens. So the story from 1962 still makes some sense. The CYPT performers come from 33 schools across Greater Cincinnati. It’s a big undertaking to get that so many performers (I counted 70 in the program) working together, plus several more backstage. Tim Perrino has been doing this for 34 years, so he knows how to get the best out of teen performers, and there are some standouts in this cast — especially Julie Deye and Gabe Schenker as the ebullient but fair-minded plus-sized teen and her lumpy mom. The kids are all right! Performances continue through Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Tickets: 513-241-6550

The most dazzling show onstage right now is Hundred Days, a Folk Rock Opera, at Know Theatre. It’s 75 minutes of great music written and performed by the dynamic duo of Abigail and Shaun Bengson, backed by five talented musicians and singers. But it’s also a fine piece of theater — a love affair cut short by a fatal illness that’s met head-on with clarity and joy to celebrate what might have been 60 wonderful years in just “100 days.” Great concept, great execution. I gave it a Critic’s Pick in my CityBeat review.

You’ll get a lot of laughs out of Cincinnati Shakespeare’s performance of The Complete History of America (Abridged), largely thanks to the comic talents of actors Justin McCombs, Miranda McGee and Geoffrey Barnes. Even if the script  — by the comic trio who originated The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged) — strains a little too hard to be hilarious, playing fast and loose with America’s past, these three know how to turn every scene into a good laugh. Things occasionally fall flat and a few elements are borderline tasteless, but before you know it they’re off and running again with another gag, joke, pratfall, misunderstanding or just tossing a bucket of water. All in good fun; it’s not very profound nor is it intended to be. Here’s my CityBeat review. Through Aug. 15. Tickets: 513-381-2273

If you like your Shakespeare a bit more traditional — but perhaps just a little funny — some of Cincy Shakes' troupe begins their FREE Shakespeare in the Park tour this weekend. Throughout August they’ll be offering performances in parks across Greater Cincinnati and beyond using a handful of young actors handling multiple roles in two-hour reductions of plays by Shakespeare. This weekend you have three chances to see A Midsummer Night’s Dream — at Eden Park’s Seasongood Pavilion on Friday at 7 p.m., at the Harry Whiting Brown Lawn in Glendale on Saturday at 7 p.m. and in Washington Park on Sunday at 6 p.m.

If you haven’t tuned in yet for the third iteration of Serials! at Know Theatre, you might want to show up on Monday evening at 7:30 p.m. Each of five plays will have the third of five 15-minute installments; the trick this time out is that the playwrights trade places with each biweekly event, so stories definitely veer off in unexpected and unplanned directions. Don’t worry about catching up — there’s a quick preview as each piece starts. But even more, these are just zany stories, made all the zanier by the format. You’ll have fun watching even if you can’t quite figure out what’s going on. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

by Mike Breen 07.31.2015 123 days ago

MidPoint Music Festival Adds More Acts, Venues

The 14th annual MPMF schedule is now available

The 2015 edition of the MidPoint Music Festival (owned and operated by CityBeat) is less than two months away, returning to various venues in Over-the-Rhine and Downtown Sept. 25-27, and this morning organizers announced the release of the schedule and a few additional performers. 

New artists added to this year’s 14th annual event include The Besnard Lakes, Heaters, The Moth & The Flame, Alberta Cross, The Glazzies and Left & Right. A few more local acts — Mad Anthony, Bulletville and Culture Queer — were also added to the roster. Widely-acclaimed Cincy-area rockers Buffalo Killers will also perform at this year’s MidPoint. You can catch a preview when the group headlines a free show tonight on Fountain Square, part of the MidPoint Indie Summer series. The band is joined by Ohio Knife, Pop Goes the Evil and Go Go Buffalo for tonight’s 7 p.m. concert. 

The festival also announced new venues for this year’s fest. Woodward Theater and Maudie’s, plus an outdoor stage at the corner of 14th and Sycamore streets, join previous venues Washington Park, Taft Theatre’s Ballroom, The Drinkery, Mr. Pitiful’s, MOTR Pub, Christian Moerlein Brewery and Arnold’s to host this year’s 120-act lineup. 

Get a look at the schedule so far right here. Tickets are available here. And more info on today’s announcement can be found here. All details can be found at mpmf.com

by Steven Rosen 07.30.2015 123 days ago
Posted In: Movies, Film at 02:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Carol Release Date Moves Up

Indiewire is reporting today that the Weinstein Company, distributor of Todd Haynes’ Cincinnati-shot drama Carol, will move up its theatrical release date to Nov. 20 from the originally planned Dec. 18. It will start out in limited release and then go wider.

That means the company believes the adult-oriented film, starring Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, not only will be an Oscar contender but will also be a holiday-season hit along the lines of another film it distributed this way in 2014, The Imitation Game.

Indiewire reports Carol will face the youth-oriented The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 2 on its limited-release opening weekend, “but should benefit from an earlier start than was originally planned.”

by Sarah Urmston 07.30.2015 123 days ago
Posted In: Playlist at 02:06 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
throw it back

Your Weekend Playlist: Throwing it Back

Even if you weren’t around for Mick Jagger when he became a Rock & Roll legend, or to hear Jimi Hendrix’s “All Along the Watchtower” at Woodstock Music Festival, you still most likely know about it. The '60s and '70s were two of the most influential music decades of all time — a time we still appreciate this many years later, and will continue to during the years to come.

Much of my appreciation for music today comes from what I’ve heard from the past. (Thank you, Mom and Dad.) Knowing where you are often relies on knowing where you came from — a totally cheesy saying that is completely relevant to the development of music as much as your own life.

But seriously.

John Mayer’s biggest influence was Blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan. Kings of Leon was inspired by Neil Young, CCR and The Allman Brothers Band. Justin Vernon (Bon Iver) was fascinated with the lyrics of Bob Dylan, believing his voice paired as a good sound with his words.

Almost every great artist can root back to what inspires them, and sometimes we overlook that little detail which makes them our favorite contemporary musician.

This playlist is filled with just a handful of my favorite artists I wish I could travel back in time to see with my own eyeballs. But cranking up the volume extra loud and dancing in my kitchen will have to do for now.

Led Zeppelin because Robert Plant is the man. And for crying out loud, why NOT?

Pink Floyd because everyone needs a little dose of psychedelic. Or a lot of it.

The Rolling Stones because Mick Jagger has been kicking ass since he was 15 years old. 

Creedence Clearwater Revival because you may have seen the rain, but who will stop it?

Elton John because he’s my favorite human being that ever lived. “Tiny Dancer” makes me want to be Penny Lane from Almost Famous, singing my heart out on a bus with a band and their groupies. (But that’s just me).

Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers because they’re the perfect blend of driving in the summer and smoking weed in your basement.

*Notice there are no Beatles on here. Sure, they began the “British Invasion” after breaking into the U.S. music scene in 1963, causing one of the wildest movements in music history. However, they get enough credit almost everywhere else and don’t necessarily fit into the Rock & Roll I’ve chosen for this playlist.


by Natalie Krebs 07.30.2015 123 days ago
at 12:08 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Afternoon News and Stuff

Tensing pleads not guilty; ResponsibleOhio faces more problems; Kasich's super PAC raises more than $11 million

Hey everyone! As you probably know, there's lots going on in the city. So our morning news has morphed into the afternoon news! Here's a rundown of the today's top stories.

Former UC police officer Ray Tensing's has pleaded not guilty to the July 19 fatal shooting of Samuel DuBose. Tensing's bond has been set at $1 million by Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Megan Shanahan. Yesterday, Tensing was indicted by a grand jury for the murder of DuBose during a traffic stop in Mount Auburn. Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters also finally released the body camera footage of the incident at a news conference. DuBose's family and their attorney, Mark O'Mara, stated they don't believe the bond was set high enough while Tensing's attorney, Stew Mathews, said he's going to try to get his client out of jail by next Thursday if he can post the required 10 percent of the bond money. Last night, the group Black Lives Matter held a peaceful protest through the streets of the city in response to the indictment. Beginning around 6:30 p.m. several hundred people marched from the Hamilton County Courthouse down to the District 1 Police Station. The story has made national headlines as the latest incident in a recent string of police shootings. 

ResponsibleOhio is facing more problems with their petition to create a constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana on the ballot. Ohio Secretary of State John Husted announced today that he is appointing a special investigator to look into possible election fraud on the political action committee's part. The group could face felony fraud charges if differences are found between the number of petitions and signatures of registered voters ResponsibleOhio says they have collected and the number submitted to Husted's office. Lawyers for the group accused Husted of using intimidation tactics to kill the petition. They were told 10 days ago that they were nearly 30,000 signatures short of putting the measure on the Nov. 3 ballot. They have until today to collect and submit the remaining signatures. The $20 million effort would legalize the drug for those 21 and over. The group's petition has faced criticism for potentially creating a monopoly on the industry by only allowing 10 marijuana farms around the state.

Governor and presidential hopeful John Kasich's super PAC, New Day for America, has raised more than $11 million between the end of April and the end of June. According to tax filings, more than $600,000 was raised in one day in June by two donors. Kasich announced his presidential run on July 21, and while it's early in the race, Kasich seems to need the support. A recent Quinnipiac poll put Kasich in eighth place for the Republican nomination tied with Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. Leading the poll was Donald Trump, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.

In response to the body camera footage which helped to indict former UC police officer Ray Tensing, Rep. Kevin Boyce (D-Columbus) says he will continue to work on legislation to require all Ohio police officers to wear body cameras. Boyce says he hopes to have the legislation done by September or October, when the House returns to session. The Cincinnati Police Department has long had body cameras in the works, and in a press conference on the shooting yesterday, Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell said that body cameras were on the way for the department but did not say specifically when they would go into effect.

That's it for today! Email me at nkrebs@citybeat.com or tweet me for story tips!
by Nick Swartsell 07.30.2015 124 days ago
Posted In: News, Police at 08:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)

Photos: Response to Samuel Dubose Shooting Indictment

Hundreds took to the streets in peaceful remembrance of Dubose and to protest his death

Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters yesterday announced that University of Cincinnati police officer Ray Tensing has been indicted by a grand jury on murder charges for the shooting death of 43-year-old Cincinnati resident Samuel Dubose. Deters also released body camera footage of the shooting at a news conference yesterday.

Hundreds took to the steps of the Hamilton County Courthouse, and later to the streets of downtown, following the announcement. Tensing was arraigned on those charges this morning. He plead not guilty and is being held on a $1 million bond.

Audrey Dubose speaks to reporters immediately after the announcement of an indictment for officer Ray Tensing in the shooting death of her son Samuel Dubose.
Photo: Nick Swartsell
Body camera footage shown to reporters at a news conference shows Ray Tensing shooting Samuel Dubose within minutes of a routine traffic stop.

Hundreds rallied in the pouring rain at the Hamilton County Courthouse following the grand jury's decision to indict officer Ray Tensing for the murder of Samuel Dubose.
Photo: Nick Swartsell
Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell speaks with a protester outside the Hamilton County Courthouse. CPD investigated the Dubose shooting. Tensing was a University of Cincinnati officer.
Photo: Nick Swartsell
Samuel Dubose's son, Samuel Vincent Ramone Dubose, speaks to protesters outside the Hamilton County Courthouse.
Photo: Nick Swartsell

Organizer Alexander Shelton speaks to protesters during a rally remembering Samuel Dubose.
Photo: Nick Swartsell

Protesters kneel in the middle of Central Parkway during a march remembering Samuel Dubose.
Photo: Nick Swartsell

Protesters march outside the Hamilton County Courthouse
Natalie Krebs
A protester marches away from the Cincinnati District 1 police station.
Natalie Krebs
Protesters proceed down Central Parkway during a march remembering Samuel Dubose
Photo: Nick Swartsell

Marchers participate in a prayer following a rally remembering Samuel Dubose.
Photo: Nick Swartsell

Protesters hold hands in prayer outside the Hamilton County Courthouse
Natalie Krebs