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by Staff 11.05.2015 99 days ago
Posted In: Beer, grilled cheese, Cocktails at 11:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_cincinnaticheesefestival

This Week's Dining Events

Holiday Beer Extravaganza, Cincinnati Cheese Festival, Holler Festival and more

FRIDAY 06
Cincinnati Cheese Festival — Get ready to get cheesy. Imbibe unlimited samples of more than 300 cheeses from international artisan producers at the Cincinnati Cheese Festival, which takes over the Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. on Friday. Things heat up during the Grilled Cheese Meltdown, when local eateries like C’est Cheese, Taste of Belgium and CRAVE compete to whip up the most imaginative (and tasty) grilled-cheese sandwich — fest-goers vote for their favorites. General admission includes two drink tickets, and local band Blue Caboose performs Americana and Bluegrass music throughout the evening. 6-11 p.m. Friday. $40. 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnaticheesefestival.com.


Demystifying French Wines — Advanced sommelier Laura Landoll leads this class in which you can learn about major and minor French wines. Small bites accompany the tasting. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $85. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.


Stew-topia at 21c Museum Hotel — Justin Hoover and Chris Treggiari, the artists behind the ongoing project War Gastronomy — “a dual-industrial tricycle system that unfolds into a pop-up food cart and cultural archive of personal stories of relocation, dislocation and overcoming struggle” — present Stew-topia, another community food- and story-sharing event at 21c Museum Hotel in conjunction with their participation in Wave Pool Gallery’s current exhibition, Holding Ground. Hoover and Treggiari will perform in Gano Alley (directly adjacent to 21c) on Friday and will hold a discussion of their work inside the Museum Hotel on Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, facebook.com/wavepoolgallery.


SATURDAY 07
The Great Ohio Brew N’ Que — Fifty West Brewing Company hosts the Great Ohio Brew N’ Que with Great Lakes Brewing Company. Chefs John Tomain of Fifty West and Rock Finley of Great Lakes will create a barbecue buffet (with a vegetarian option), paired with 10 craft beers from each of the breweries, including their collaboration beer Walking Sticke. 4 p.m.-midnight. $40. 7668 Wooster Pike, Mariemont, fiftywestbrew.com.

Free! Thanksgiving 101 — This free class will teach you how to prepare, bring, roast and carve a turkey and make fluffy mashed potatoes. Also get a chance to buy a Thanksgiving 101 supply kit. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

Holler Festival
Photo: New Riff Distilling 
Holler Festival — Nearly 5 million barrels of bourbon are aging in the Bluegrass State, and you get to enjoy the best of them at the first-ever Holler Festival. Join Kentucky breweries and distilleries as they showcase their signature craft beers and whiskeys. Learn the secrets of the trade, sample drinks and heavy appetizers, grab your special-edition glass and hang out with the best bourbon producers in Kentucky. Participating breweries and distilleries include Ei8ht Ball, Copper & Kings American Brandy, Blue Stallion Brewing, Old Pogue Distillery and The Gentleman Distillery. All proceeds benefit Renaissance Covington. 6-10 p.m. $50. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., hollerfestival.com.

Homemade Pasta 101 — Learn the basics of kneading, rolling and cutting fresh pasta by hand, plus a recipe for homemade tomato sauce. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Evendale, gormanfarm.org.

Kids and Teens in the Kitchen: Mexican Fiesta! — A cooking class for ages 8 and up. Learn how to make fajita quesadillas, churros and more. This is a kids-only class. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $50. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.

Holiday Cookie Decorating — In this hands-on class, learn to make the perfect sugar cookie, plus tips for expert decorating. Noon-2:30 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Holiday Beer Extravaganza — Every Cincinnatian knows that the Christian Moerlein Lager House is one of the premier spots to down a cold one. But this Saturday Christian Moerlein is taking things to festive levels of fun with its Holiday Beer Extravaganza. The extravaganza will boast more than 20 different selections of imported and craft beers — just what you need to jump-start your holiday cheer. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown, moerleinlagerhouse.com.

TUESDAY 10
Cold Weather Comfort Soups — Ilene Ross hosts this class on making cold-weather staple soups. Noon-1:30 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Fresh Tortilla Workshop — Learn to make corn tortillas at home. 6-8 p.m. $75. Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.
 
 
by Natalie Krebs 11.05.2015 99 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
weed

Morning News and Stuff

Group launches plan to get Cincy kids in preschool; Cranley and ResponsibleOhio march forward after defeat; Covington launches investigation into city's drug problem

Hi Cincy! Think you're finally done with election stuff? Think again! Results may be in for this year, but they've just started gearing up for election day 2016. Here are your morning headlines. 

• So you're tired of thinking about parks and marijuana? Well, how about shifting those thoughts to preschool? Just a day after polls closed, the Strive Partnership, a group focused on education in the Greater Cincinnati area, kicked off Preschool Promise, their campaign to place a measure on next year's ballot. Their initiative would guarantee every child in Cincinnati, regardless of family income, receives two years of preschool through the use of tuition credits. Strive suggests universal preschool education allows all children a fair start and better prepares them to graduate from high school and prepare for college and careers. The event attracted around 150 people, including Vice Mayor David Mann, to hear about the initiative at Rhinegeist Brewery in OTR and also featured sushi, banh mi, free beer, tokens, a raffle and a DJ. 

The initiative, if it manages to get on the ballot and approved by voters in next year's election, will be the first of its kind in the country and could be a big deal because 44 percent of Cincinnati's children live in poverty and may not have access to preschool. 

"We will level the playing field for thousands and thousands of children. We will break the cycle of poverty for thousands and thousands of children," says Greg Landsman, executive director of the Strive Partnership. "We will make it a lot easier for middle class families to pay for quality preschool, which is a huge, huge deal." 

• The day after Mayor John Cranley's park tax levy was shot down by voters, he told The Enquirer that he wished that their series of stories on the mismanagement of the Park Board had come out a year ago and not two weeks before the election. The stories pointed out questionable bonuses, car allowances and exclusive club memberships for some of the top executives on the Park Board, which has lead to an audit of the board by the city. Like one does after a bad breakup, Cranley says he won't dwell on his loss, and that it's time to move on from the failed levy, which 59 percent of voters voted against. 

• ResponsibleOhio's constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana also failed, but at least one of the super PAC's investors say they might be back next year. Investor Suresh Gupta, a Dayton anesthesiologist, said the group might try another initiative for next year's ballot but would probably leave the whole monopoly thing behind, which many are saying is the factor that killed the issue for voters. Meanwhile, House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) says the legislature hopes to release a series of bills in the next few weeks to test the plant further for its potential medical benefits and urge Congress to drop the drug to a lower classification.  

• Covington Police Chief Bryan Carter announced yesterday that the city has launched a six-month drug trafficking investigation to fight its growing drug problem. Carter is pushing hard to arrest dealers who are contributing to the city's heroin, meth, cocaine and even marijuana problems. According to Carter, they're not concentrated in one area but are situated in pockets throughout the city. The city has arrested 10 people so far accused of dealing drugs in the area, and the city's narcotics officers are assisted by the Kentucky State Police, the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. 

• Cincinnati-native Charles Clark II is suing the federal government to get his money back after officers seized thousand of dollars off of him at the Cincinnati airport last February. Clark was flying back to Florida, where he attends college, when he was stopped by officers who said his luggage smelled strongly of marijuana. A search did not find any drugs in Clark's suitcase, but he was carrying $11,000 in his pocket because he said he did not trust banks. His attorney Renee Flaherty, says Clark should get his money back as he was never charged with a crime and there was no evidence of drug trafficking.  

• Japan issued its first same-sex "partnership" certificate today. The certificates are not actually legally binding but are more symbolic. They are an attempt to encourage employers and landlords to give same-sex partnerships the same treatment as they do married heterosexual couples. Japan currently does not offer legal protection for same-sex couples, but is culturally tolerant of the relationships. 

Contact me at nkrebs@citybeat.com or on Twitter at @natalie_krebs. 
 
 
by Ilene Ross 11.05.2015 99 days ago
Posted In: Brunch, local restaurant, News, Openings at 10:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
josh campbell

New Chef to Take Ownership of Django Western Taco

Chef Josh Campbell takes over the popular Northside taqueria at the start of the year

There’s a new chef at Django Western Taco, and as of the beginning of the year, he’ll also own the joint.

After stints in both The British Virgin Islands and New York City, chef Josh Campbell, formerly of Cincinnati restaurant Mayberry, has returned to town and has found a home at the popular Northside “Cowboy Cuisine” restaurant. For now he’s running the kitchen, but he’s also made a deal with long-time restaurateur Jens Rosenkrantz to buy the place. 

“I think it’s a great fit,” Rosenkrantz says. “I’ve been looking to have someone take it over for a while, and having known Josh for years, going to Mayberry all the time, and his style of cuisine, and his style, I cannot think of a better fit for this place.”

With the recent departure of Django executive chef Andrew Mersmann to Oakley’s Red Feather, the timing for the move was perfect for both Campbell and Rosenkrantz. "I came back from NYC and was just figuring out what I wanted to do, I didn’t know if I really wanted to run another restaurant, and I found out that there was gonna be a transition and I got a hold of Jens," Campbell says. "He closed down Mayberry with me, was there on the last day with me, so I did my due diligence to see if this was something I wanted to get into.”

There will be some immediate updates to the décor, including a larger bar area, and Campbell is working on his new, more seasonally driven menu, although he promises that the most popular items like shrimp tacos will stay.

The restaurant will also be bringing back Sunday brunch and will now be open for lunch on Monday and dinner on Sunday.

 

 
 
by Steve Rosen 11.04.2015 100 days ago
Posted In: Literary, Music at 12:09 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
lewisohnmarkbig

Beatles Historian and Author to Speak at Main Library

Mark Lewisohn discusses book Nov. 10

Mark Lewisohn, the internationally recognized Beatles historian who is working on his epic All These Years biography of the Fab Four’s story, will discuss the first book completed and published in the planned trilogy — Tune In — at 7 p.m. next Tuesday in the Main Library's Reading Garden Lounge, 800 Vine St., Downtown Cincinnati.

Lewisohn’s talk is free. No registration is required, and a book signing will follow his appearance. Books will be available for purchase courtesy of Joseph-Beth Booksellers.

Ten years in the making and consisting of hundreds of new interviews and information learned from access to archives, Tune In follows the Beatles from their childhoods through 1962 when their first hit record, “Love Me Do,” gives indication of the greatness ahead.

The English author began writing about the Beatles in 1983, and had previously published The Beatles Live!, The Complete Beatles Recording Sessions, The Beatles Day by Day and the Complete Beatles Chronicle before turning to this project.

He is now busily at work on the second volume and has come to Cincinnati to do research at the Main Library.

 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.04.2015 100 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news_voting_em

What Happened Here in Hamilton County?

Voting was bumpy and in a few cases very difficult. Should we be worried?

One of the most important questions to come out of last night’s election isn’t about the results of any specific ballot issue, but instead about the process by which voters cast, or, in some cases, had a hard time casting, their ballots.

Many are wondering why voting was so arduous in Hamilton County yesterday, with technical glitches forcing some voters to cast provisional ballots and imprecise information given by poll workers sending other voters scrambling.

While the entire state of Ohio, and really, much of the country, waited to see if voters would legalize marijuana here, Hamilton County fumbled with errors. Now, some are wondering whether these stumbles are related to a new electronic voting system, and if the difficulties could spell trouble during next year’s sure-to-be-contentious presidential election, where Ohio will play a central role.

Voters reported problems with the county’s new voting system in the West End, Madisonville, Evanston, Northside, Clifton, Coryville, Mount Lookout, Roselawn, Hyde Park, Northside and other areas. The system, which relies on tablet computers to scan IDs and check in voters, hasn’t been used before.

Secretary of State Jon Husted put the entire state’s election results on hold so the county could extend voting times until 9 pm. The order for polls to stay open an extra two hours came from a Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Robert P. Ruehlman in response to injunctions from Issue 3-backers ResponsibleOhio and former State Sen. Eric Kerney, who cited long lines at some polling stations.

The appeals to the court came after voters in a number of precincts throughout the county reported that, though they had registered to vote months prior, the new electronic voting system employed by the county did not recognize their names and would not allow them to cast electronic ballots, even if their registration was confirmed by written voter logs. Some were asked to cast provisional ballots, or to head to the Hamilton County Board of Elections office downtown.

Jane Pendergrast of Delhi Township reported on Twitter that she had to cast a provisional ballot after her name didn’t show up in the e-poll books. Pendergrast said a poll worker told her the same difficulties had happened to about 50 other voters at the polling location.

Meanwhile, other poll workers were confused by ID requirements and asked voters to cast provisional ballots unnecessarily, some voters say.

The provisional ballots are only counted if elections are close, leading some voters to feel like their votes didn’t matter.

Kevin LeMasters voted at one of the county’s largest polling locations, the Coryville Recreation Center. That voting location serves more than 1,700 voters. He says poll workers there were requiring voters to fill out provisional ballots if the address on their IDs did not match information in the Board of Election’s electronic system, despite the fact that’s not what BOE rules stipulate.

“What concerns me is the following, this particular location is the 2nd largest polling location out of 557 in Hamilton and should be staffed appropriately,” LeMasters said in an e-mail. “It is situated close to UC's campus where the large majority of students do not have an ID with the same address considering the fluid nature of their housing. Was this an accident, something nefarious? Whether malice or ignorance, it is unacceptable either way.”

Secretary of State Husted visited Hamilton County polling locations earlier in the day, when difficulties voting were already being reported. Husted blamed poll worker error for the problems, despite the fact many seemed to be technical in nature and had much to do with the new electronic system used to gather votes.

“"By and large, it's working great," Husted said yesterday. "Any time you have a massive technology change, you're going to have some problems."

Cincinnati City Councilwoman Yvette Simpson pushed back at Husted’s assertion via social media, saying constituents were reporting that tablets used in vote gathering were freezing or not connecting to the internet; technical problems that aren’t necessarily due to poll worker error.

Meanwhile, other, non-technical difficulties popped up. In Northside, some voters found themselves locked out of a polling location around 7:30 pm, even though it was ordered to stay open until 9. Eventually, voters there were able to gain entry to the location, which poll workers said had been locked by school staff.

The voting difficulties are the latest chapter in Ohio's fraught struggle over voting access. Voting rights advocates have fought state efforts to reduce voting hours in recent elections, especially in urban areas.

Hamilton County Board of Elections members said no voters appear to have lost the opportunity to vote due to the difficulties and that they don't represent any sort of disenfranchisement, either accidental or purposeful.

But the rocky questions linger about the electronic system, which is set to go state-wide next year, just as the country focuses on Ohio and its pivotal role in deciding an especially heated presidential election.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.04.2015 100 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
to do_smale riverfront park-courtesy cincinnati parks

Election News and Stuff

You voted on stuff. Here's how that turned out.

Good morning all. I hope you’re shaking off your post-election-party and/or Twitter binge hangovers. Now that the dust has cleared on a pretty intense election night, let’s check out the results, shall we? I’ll summarize in case you fell asleep early and then we’ll talk about the big ones in depth.

Statewide stuff:

Issue 1: The Ohio state representative redistricting reform measure passed overwhelmingly, getting 71 percent of the vote.

Issue 2: The constitutional amendment designed by lawmakers to limit proposed amendments like Issue 3 granting special oligopolies or monopolies passed with about 52 percent of the vote.

Issue 3: ResponsibleOhio’s proposal to legalize marijuana for Ohio residents age 21 and up while creating 10 legal grow sites throughout the state failed, getting 36 percent of the vote.

In Kentucky, Republican Matt Bevin delivered a surprise trouncing of Democrat Jack Conway, besting him with 53 percent of the vote to Conway’s 44 percent.

Local issues:

Issue 22: The controversial charter amendment creating a 1 mill property tax increase to fund a number of proposed park projects failed. It got about 41 percent of the vote.

Issues 23 and 24: These cleaned up charter language and moved the mayoral primary. Both passed with about 62 percent of the vote. 

• The whole country was watching as Ohio voters wrestled with Issues 2 and 3 last night, with any number of big national media outlets recycling reporting from the past months and turning in lukewarm takes about the proposed amendment.

ResponsibleOhio’s bid was a pretty gutsy gambit — wagering more than $20 million that Ohio voters would legalize medicinal and recreational marijuana even as their proposal lacked support from key national and statewide legalization advocates, who balked at the proposal’s structure.

Pro-legalization groups who otherwise might have been supporters expressed squeamishness about the fact that the amendment would have awarded a group of about 50 investors, including a New York fashion designer and the former Pop star Nick Lachey, the only 10 legal grow sites in the state. That hesitancy, combined with the older, more conservative electorate that turns out in non-presidential election years, sank the amendment decisively.

The main question is whether the rout was about legalization itself or simply the so-called “oligopoly” the amendment would have created. Polling in Ohio shows that voters here favor legalization by a slim margin, suggesting it may not be a lost cause in the future, given a more attractive structure.

Some groups are working on campaigns to get legalization on next year’s ballot, but they face a huge hurdle: the overwhelming expense of mounting such a ballot initiative in Ohio, a politically diverse swing state and the country’s seventh most populous. ResponsibleOhio collected more than 800,000 signatures to net the 300,000 valid ones needed to land the amendment on the ballot. That’ll be a big obstacle for any group, though if they can get a measure in front of voters, it may benefit from high presidential election year turnout and increased interest raised in this year’s campaign.

• Locally, Issue 22 was the focus of attention. The plan to fund some 17 park projects by raising property taxes 1 mill was the subject of an intense political firefight over the past few months. Detractors of the parks plan put forward a number of objections to the measure ranging from assertions that it gave the mayor and the park board he selects too much power to fears that the proposed projects would lead to increased commercialization of parks.

The anti-Issue 22 victory here is interesting due to the truly David and Goliath nature of spending on the campaigns. The pro-Issue 22 camp, backed by major corporate donors such as Kroger, Western & Southern and others, spent an estimated $1 million on television ads, mailers and other slick campaign materials. Amendment opponents, however, spent about $7,500, with only a single radio ad buy. The list of opponents was formidable and diverse, however, including a majority of Cincinnati City Council, local civil rights icon and former amendment supporter Marian Spencer, both streetcar advocates such as Over-the-Rhine activist Derek Bauman and streetcar opponents COAST and environmental group the Audubon Society.

While some city precincts, mostly on the East Side, passed the measure, many, including Cranley’s West Side home precinct, said no thanks. The bigger question now is what this means for Cranley as mayor. Two years into his term, the mayor has lost two big, hard-fought political showdowns, first over the streetcar and now over his parks proposal. While he’s had plenty of policy victories as well, these dramatic fights may signal an opening for a primary challenger to take a run at the 2017 mayoral election. The campaign over the parks tax was particularly heated, and even some supporters seem to have come away disillusioned by the effort. Cranley has sounded a conciliatory note in post-election statements, saying he's proud to have stood up for the idea but will take the results as the will of Cincinnati voters and seek to serve their wishes.

If you already miss the excitement of following local ballot issues, there are a couple that look likely for next year. Supporters of the Preschool Promise, an initiative that looks to extend preschool to more Cincinnati children, are holding an introductory event tonight at Rhinegeist brewery from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. With 44 percent of the city's children living in poverty, that initiative looks to be a big one for 2016.

• Meanwhile, in Kentucky, Republicans handed Democrats a beating. Bevin's election as governor is something of an upset, as polls had Conway up by as much as five points heading into voting. Bevin is only the second GOP governor in the last 40 years in Kentucky. The race was also a walloping down-ticket, with Republicans taking most major statewide offices except attorney general, won by Democrat Andy Beshear, and secretary of state, which Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes hung onto. Not good news for Democrats.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.03.2015 101 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:14 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news_voting_cbarchives

Morning News and Stuff

Go vote; go vote; go vote

Hey all! Did you play the lottery… err, I mean, uh, engage in the completely unproblematic and entirely functional democratic process today? There’s still time! And if you need some perspective on the issues from your friendly, cynical but also well-read alt weekly editorial board, we’ve got it right here. Really quickly, we suggest voting yes on Issue 1, no on both Issues 2 and 3, no on Issue 22 and yes on Issues 23 and 24. If you're in Northern Kentucky, we've endorsed gubernatorial candidate Jack Conway, so consider throwing a vote his way. Want to know more? Click away.

Speaking of elections, there were problems reported at some Cincinnati voting precincts this morning. Some reported technical difficulties with electronic voting equipment in Madisonville, Evanston, Anderson Township, Mount Lookout, Colerain Township and other locations where new electronic voting devices were in use. Did you experience difficulties voting? Let us know in the comments or via e-mail. We’re on it.

• One interesting thing that’s come up around voting: Photos of pro-Issue 22 signage at polling places are popping up on social media. Election rules state that signage endorsing candidates isn’t allowed at polling places, and it would seem to follow that similar prohibitions exist for issues. Councilman Chris Seelbach, a vocal opponent of the parks tax proposed by Mayor John Cranley, posted to Facebook photos of posters promoting the amendment to Cincinnati’s charter tacked up behind poll workers at a voting precinct in Mount Adams. Reports of other polling locations with similar signage have been floating around the social media realm as well.

• Also speaking of elections, did you catch this pro-Issue 3 ad featuring former 98 Degrees singer and hometown reality TV star Nick Lachey? He’s hyped on the weed legalization amendment currently before voters, and he wants to tell you all about it in the 30-second TV spot. Well, maybe not ALL about it. Issue 3 critics point out that the commercial fails to mention the fact that Lachey is an investor in the amendment effort, and as such, is part-owner in one of the 10 grow sites that would be exclusively allowed to grow commercial weed if the amendment passes. And while Lachey starts off the ad by saying Ohio is his home, the ad also neglects to mention that he isn’t registered to vote for the amendment in Ohio because he lists California as his primary state of residence. Issue 3 creators ResponsibleOhio say those omissions aren’t a big deal, and that the point of the ad is that the amendment would reform unjust drug laws, create millions in tax revenues and more than 1,000 jobs.

• Here’s a final election note: If you’re the type who loves the horse-race aspect of election day and want to spend all day on the edge of your seat about whether voters have given you the green light to spend your green on some green (wow that’s obnoxious sorry), here are some handy tips for forecasting whether that’s in the cards. Mostly, it’s common sense stuff: watch districts that have demographics that generally skew heavily pro- and anti-marijuana legalization and see how the balance is tipping out.

• Onward to other issues. Former Mahogany’s owner Liz Rogers made her first $800 payment to the city today. That payment was part of a settlement after Rogers’ restaurant at The Banks folded last fall. In 2012, Rogers was given a $684,000 grant and a $300,000 loan by the city, which actively recruited her to open her restaurant at the riverfront development in order to increase diversity there. Mahogany’s was the only minority-owned business at The Banks, and Rogers has said that other promised amenities there, including a large hotel that would have increased customer base, never materialized. Rogers eventually fell behind on her loan payments, as well as state taxes, forcing the closure of the restaurant amid a firestorm of controversy. Rogers is now working on paying back the city $100,000. Other businesses at The Banks and elsewhere have received similar grants and loans, Rogers’ supporters point out. Other businesses have also faltered at The Banks, including Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar, which abruptly closed up shop recently.

• Finally, $1.3 million can buy a lot of things. We’re talking multiple Maybachs. Healthcare for a year for a bunch of folks. Probably about a mile of highway repairs or something. Or, if you’re Ohio, it buys you a couple years of stubborn obstinacy against the tides of history. Yep, that’s right. Ohio owes that amount in legal fees related to Attorney General Mike DeWine’s fight to uphold Ohio’s same-sex marriage ban, which the Supreme Court struck down in a historic decision this summer. The truly crazy part? That $1.3 million is just the amount courts say the state owes attorneys who fought on behalf of the same-sex couples to whom the state was denying marriage licenses. It doesn’t include the state’s own legal expenses. Your tax dollars at work. To be fair, the AG is charged with upholding the state's laws, even when they're under fire in federal courts. But on the other hand, Kentucky's AG declined to fight a similar legal battle on behalf of his state's anti-same-sex marriage laws.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.02.2015 102 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Emails reveal city, Western & Southern Lytle Park collaboration; election set for Boehner's replacement; Kasich signs charter school oversight law

Good morning all. Hope your Halloween was really rad. I spent mine dancing like an idiot while marginally dressed up like Waldo of Where’s Waldo fame. That’s right. I chose a literary themed costume because I’m classy. Some friends and I also had a pretty great picnic in Spring Grove Cemetery, which I highly recommend.

Anyway. News. You already knew this, but Cincinnati’s first streetcar showed up on Friday, accompanied by the kind of hoopla usually reserved for astronauts who have been to the moon or people who have saved a bunch of puppies from burning buildings or puppy-saving astronauts, even. A local TV news station broke out the news copter and gave real-time updates of the car’s progress down I-71 and Reading Road into Over-the-Rhine. Every blogger in the city blogged about the blog-worthiest event in the local blogosphere. (Btw, Microsoft Word recognizes “blogosphere” as a legitimate word because we live in the worst era ever). My Instagram account was damn near unusable for hours afterward because it was just pictures of a single streetcar not on its tracks and a bunch of people looking at it. Yes, yes. It was a historic day and streetcars haven’t run in this city since the 1950s. Personally, I’ll start partying the minute I can step on a streetcar in Mount Auburn, feel it glide down the old tracks I walk past every day poking up out of Highland Ave., and step off at work. That’d be the day. Until then, woo hoo.

• Meanwhile, OTR is getting more $500,000-plus homes, all right along the streetcar route. Recently-founded Cincinnati based development company Karvoto has announced plans for nine townhomes in the neighborhood, all with three bedrooms and between 2,000 and 2,700 square feet of space. The $4 million development will renovate four buildings along Wade Street and Kemp Alley and also construct five new buildings in the same area.

• A series of e-mails between city officials and Cincinnati-based corporation Western & Southern reveal the two have been collaborating on plans for the overhaul of Lytle Park downtown near W&S headquarters and the conversion of a nearby former women’s shelter, the Anna Louise Inn, into a luxury hotel. That renovation has been controversial; the building’s former occupant, Cincinnati Union Bethel, had used the building for its women’s shelter for more than a century before a legal battle eventually forced it to sell to W&S. The e-mails also show that the city is mulling the sale or lease of two streets near those locations to Eagle Realty, the real estate arm of W&S. In addition to collaboration, the messages reveal conflict between the city’s Park Board and Eagle over the sale of the streets, dumpsters associated with the Anna Louise Inn renovation and other issues. Critics of charter amendment Issue 22, a park-oriented tax increase on tomorrow’s ballot, released the e-mails recently after gaining access to them through an open records request. Issue 22 seeks to fund a number of proposed projects, including the remake of Lytle Park, through a permanent property tax increase.

• As folks tear their hair out and obsess over a 1 mill property tax increase for the city’s parks, Hamilton County Commissioners are on the way to passing a $209 million spending package that is drawing about as much attention as Jim Webb’s presidential campaign. In what can only be described as a reverse Parks and Recreation scenario, four scheduled public hearings about the budget garnered exactly zero public attendees to give input on the plan. Part of that is because the budget doesn’t exactly depart wildly from the status quo — there are few if any dramatic cuts or spending swells. It’s not that there aren’t big issues: Hamilton County’s morgue needs a huge update, and commissioners aren’t sure how to pay for it, for example. But for now, the big money fights are elsewhere, and that’s left commissioners feeling a little lonely, calling for someone, anyone, to comment on their handiwork. Democrat Commissioner Todd Portune had an aptly spooky quote about the ghostly public.

“It’s almost like the county is the Sleepy Hollow of local government,” he said. “You typically don’t get the same kind of public involvement that you see at the city or other local municipalities.”

• Ohio will have to wait a while to vote on a replacement for former Speaker of the House John Boehner, who represented the West Chester area in Congress. It’ll be a hot day in June when his District 8 congressional seat goes up for a special election, and I for one can’t wait to see what kind of A-plus candidates run for the spot. Boehner bailed on the top spot in Congress last month after tea party Republican machinations in the House nearly brought the government to a shutdown again, this time over Planned Parenthood. Boehner, tired of trying to shepherd his unruly flock of hardcore anti-government conservatives peaced out of the fray, leaving the GOP to fumble and fidget until finally roping U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin into the leadership role. Now the House has a head again, but Ohio’s 8th District is still without representation. Thanks Boehner.

• Finally, Gov. John Kasich signed a bill today that would create more oversight for the state’s private charter schools, which have become something of a boondoggle for his administration and the Ohio Department of Education. Numerous investigations have taken place around the schools, which use public money to create private alternative to public school districts. Earlier this year, one of those investigations revealed that ODE officials neglected to include scores from particularly low-performing online charter schools in performance evaluations for charters. Other scandals have befallen charters in the recent past, including revelations of financial mismanagement, staff misbehavior and attendance irregularities at charters throughout the state, including in Cincinnati.

Annnnnd I’m out. Go vote tomorrow.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 10.30.2015 105 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cranley

Morning News and Stuff

Council members promise to fund Wasson Way bike trail; ResponsibleOhio fights off attacks from drug dealers; Boehner says farewell to the House

Happy (almost) Halloween Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines. 

Council members yesterday said they will find a way to fund the Wasson Way bike trail, even if Issue 22 fails next Tuesday. The proposed hike and bike trail would stretch from Avondale to Columbia Township and is one of the Mayor Cranley's projects included in his proposed permanent tax levy. Supporters of the Wasson Way trail have also been highly in favor of Issue 22. Council members Chris Seelbach, Yvette Simpson, Wendell Young and Charlie Winburn urged voters yesterday at a news conference outside City Hall to vote against the permanent tax levy and said they would find a way to fund the 7.5-mile trail that could cost anywhere between $7.5 million and $36 million. Councilman Seelbach suggested the money could come from elsewhere, like a temporary property tax increase, private endowments or scholarships or the recent sale of the Blue Ash airport. The project recently lost out on a $17 million competitive federal grant. 

• So, the streetcar didn't quite make its debut this morning, but it's definitely coming this afternoon. The latest update from the city says that it has arrived safely in Ohio and will now be unloaded at 4 p.m. this afternoon. So if you have no last-minute Halloween costume details attend to, you can come hang out at the Maintenance and Operation Facilities on the corner of Race and Henry streets in Over-the-Rhine and watch it be unloaded. 

• ResponsibleOhio, the super PAC that put Issue 3 to legalize marijuana on the ballot, says the ilegal drug trade might be after them. A thief hacked a Fifth Third bank account belonging to Strategy Network, the political consulting firm that oversees ResponsibleOhio, and stole $200,000, its organizers say. A second attempt to steal $300,000 was stopped by Parma Police. Executive Director of ResponsibleOhio and CEO of Strategy Network Ian James said law enforcement told him it was "a pretty heavy duty drug dealer." James also told FOX19 that one of ResponsibleOhio's organizers was receiving threatening phone calls from an unknown source. The pro-pot group has claimed Issue 3 would put major drug dealers out of business. 

• Mayor Cranley is clearly pushing hard for Issue 22, but how does he feel about legalizing marijuana, the other major issue on the upcoming ballot? According to WCPO, he's not saying, and neither are many other local leaders. According to University of Cincinnati Political Science Professor Dave Niven, the issue blurs party lines and is split 50-50, so most play it safe by keeping their mouths shut. 

• Former House Speaker John Boehner passed the gavel to Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin yesterday. Ryan was elected to succeed Boehner Wednesday and is the youngest Speaker since 1869. Cincinnati-native Boehner announced his resignation last month, ending his four year run as Speaker. According to the New York Times, in his brief farewell speech, he held a tissue box, as he's often prone to tears, and told the House, “If anything, I leave the way I started: just a regular guy, humbled by the chance to do a big job.” 

My email is nkrebs@citybeat.com. I prefer story tips, but may be able to offer last-minute costume guidance as well.
 
 
by Staff 10.30.2015 105 days ago
Posted In: Comedy, Concerts, Culture, Drinking, Eats, Events, Fun, Holidays at 10:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_globedeepspace_luciuslimited_amylynch

Your Weekend To Do List (10/30-11/1)

HALLOWEEEEENNNNNNNN

FRIDAY

HALLOWEEN: GLOBE IN THE DARK: DEEP SPACE

People’s Liberty’s Globe Gallery hosts an out-of-this-world opening and after party complete with music, food, booze and the main attraction — an interactive iridescent dome. 2015 globe grantee Amy Lynch and partners Joel Masters and J.D. Loughead unveil Deep Space, an “immersive multisensory infinityscape” that provides an intimate experience with colorful, abstract pieces that call reality into question. At 8 p.m., a short presentation will highlight 2015/16 Haile Fellows and Project and Globe Grantees; afterward, the Darkly Dreaming after party takes over 1706 John St. with dancing, music and more. 6-11 p.m. Friday. Free. Globe Gallery, 1805 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, peoplesliberty.org.

Art After Dark
Photo: Cincinnati Art Museum
HALLOWEEN: ART AFTER DARK: ART OF THRONES
Winter is coming…after Halloween. Head to the Cincinnati Art Museum for the latest installation of Art After Dark, a Game of Thrones-inspired installment that invites guests to show up in their most gallant medieval costumes and celebrate the current exhibit of High Renaissance art, Sublime Beauty. Snap a selfie with Ohio Renaissance Festival characters, listen to live music from Lemon Sky, take a guided ghost tour of the museum or participate in the Medieval & Mythical Creature costume contest. 5-9 p.m. Friday. Free admission; drink and appetizer prices vary. 953 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiartmuseum.org

HALLOWEEN: DESTINY AND DANTE'S INFERNO
The May Festival Chorus teams up with the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra to tackle Liszt’s Dante symphony — inspired by Dante Alighieri’s The Divine Comedy — depicting Dante’s and Virgil’s journey through hell. Australian conductor Simone Young also leads the orchestra in Brahms’ “Song of Destiny” and “Funeral Song.” 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $10-$104. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org.  

DesignBuildCincy
Photo: Provided
EVENT: DESIGNBUILDCINCY
More than 130 top-notch exhibitors share and discuss the latest design trends during Cincinnati’s only curated design showcase. Whether you’re in the middle of a project or are just getting started, DesignBuildCincy is a place to network, share and get inspired. Personally invited to participate by DesignBuild, exhibitors range from architects, contractors and fabricators to designers, retailers and suppliers. The second-annual event takes over Music Hall this weekend, kicking off Friday with a combined performance by the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra and May Festival Chorus. 5-8 p.m. Friday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $8; Free 13 and younger. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, designbuildcincy.com.  

Circa Survive
Photo: Jesse Fox
MUSIC: CIRCA SURVIVE
There is much wisdom that can be gleaned from the Toms. Tom Petty taught us long ago to listen to our hearts, because “it’s gonna tell (us) what to do. And Tom Cruise reminded us eloquently and succinctly, “Sometimes you’ve just gotta say, ‘What the fuck, make your move.’ ” Eleven years ago, Anthony Green heeded those philosophical nuggets and momentously left his position as frontman of Post Hardcore outfit Saosin, which was on the verge of a major-label signing, and returned home to suburban Philadelphia.Upon arrival, Green contacted guitarist Colin Frangicetto, his friend and former drummer for This Day Forward, with which Green had briefly jammed during a visit home. The pair began recording and canvassing their circle of musician friends for people to round out the group, quickly adding ex-This Day Forward guitarist Brendan Ekstrom, ex-Taken bassist Nick Beard and drummer Steve Clifford. The original lineup of Circa Survive has remained intact since its 2004 formation. Read more about the band in this week's Sound Advice. See Circa Survive with RX Bandits and Citizen Friday at Bogart's. More info/tickets: bogarts.com.

Craig Finn 
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: CRAIG FINN
Craig Finn writes songs. He can’t help it, and he isn’t stopping anytime soon. Best known as the frontman for The Hold Steady, Finn has been delivering his detailed, word-addled songs about everyday people and places for more than two decades, a tradition he continues with his recently released second solo album, the eclectic but still-cohesive Faith in the Future.  Far more restrained than the riff-happy Hold Steady records, Faith in the Future is a nuanced, often wistful collection anchored by Finn’s ever-distinctive sing/speak vocals and literate lyrics. Album-opener “Maggie I’ve Been Searching for Our Son,” an evocative tale about a Branch Davidian-like cult, is as moving and memorable as anything in Finn’s now-bursting songbook. Read a full feature on Finn here. Craig Finn performs with Esme Patterson Friday in the Taft Theatre’s Ballroom. Tickets/more info: tafttheatre.org.

Kwame Binea
Photo: Provided 
MUSIC: KWAME BINEA SHAKEDOWN
After growing up in London and Ghana, singer/songwriter/guitarist Kwame Binea spent his teen years in Cherry Hill, N.J., playing basketball, writing poetry and absorbing the output of artists who would become the foundation of his eventual musical persona — Led Zeppelin, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, Jimi Hendrix, Bob Marley and Parliament-Funkadelic, among others. Binea moved to New York City to pursue his musical dreams, and he and his Shakedown band honed their blend of Rock, Funk and Soul on the city’s club scene. This year, Kwame Binea Shakedown issued its first EP, a self-titled four-track release that nicely showcases its organic sound, running from the high-octane, horn-laden Funk explosion of “Let Go” to the folksy, slinky Soul of “Waiting.” 10 p.m. Friday. Free. The Drinkery, 1150 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, drinkeryotr.com.  

Arnold's
Photo: Jillian Tellep
HALLOWEEN: WEIRD BEER WEEKEND
Head to Arnold’s for a weekend of weird beers. The bar hunted to find the strangest and most peculiar brews they could get their hands on, including Rivertown’s Death, brewed with ghost chili peppers; Jackie O’s Pawpaw Wheat; Rhinegeist’s Vanilla Maple Squirrel; and more. All of the beers will be tapping on Friday, with live music all weekend. Friday and Saturday. Free admission. Arnold’s Bar & Grill, 210 E. Eighth St., Downtown, facebook.com/arnoldsbar.

HALLOWEEN: THE NIGHT OF THE LIVING ALES
Brass Tap hosts a costume party in conjunction with Fifty West, featuring six Fifty brews on tap. Costume contest with awards for first, second and third places. 6 p.m. Free admission. Brass Tap, 251 Calhoun Ave., Clifton Heights, facebook.com/fiftywestbrewingcompany.

HALLOWEEN: HALLOWEVE BREW BASH AT AULT PARK
Taste the best selections from more than a dozen of Cincinnati’s breweries, including Bad Tom, Blank Slate, Braxton, Cellar Dweller, Christian Moerlein and more. Tickets include 10 four-ounce tastings. Don’t forget your costume. 6-10 p.m. $25. Ault Park Pavilion, 3600 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park, aultparkac.org.

SATURDAY
Hopgeist
Photo: Provided
EVENT: HOPGEIST
Rhinegeist rings in Halloween with the second-annual Hopgeist Double IPA festival. If you’re really into IBUs, this is the fest for you. Guaranteed to deliver “hair-raising hop flavors,” the fest features beers from breweries across the country — Dogfish Head, Jackie O’s, 21st Amendment — including super-rares from locals Listermann, Blank Slate, MadTree and more. Rhinegeist will also be debuting the winner of their homebrew collaboration, Homie, a double IPA with mosaic hops. VIP tickets include early access at noon and free food from Dutch’s and Maribelle’s. Noon-6 p.m. Saturday. $35; $50 VIP. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, rhinegeist.com/hopgeist

The Malice Ball
Photo: CityBeat Archives
HALLOWEEN: THE MALICE BALL
The third-annual Malice Ball returns to OTR for a night of illusion, mystery and masquerading in the foggy underworld of the Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom. Dress in chic, dark and elegant costumes to enter the costume contest for prizes and a parade down the red carpet; a makeup artist and masks will be at the ball to enhance your look. Complement your outfit with specialty cocktails, Moerlein’s small-batch rye brown ale Malice Ball Brew, a spooky photo booth and DJs Matt Joy and Kenneth Wright (CityBeat’s event coordinator). Last year’s party was huge (800-plus guests), so get ready to mix and mingle. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Saturday. $30 at the door; admission includes a drink ticket. 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, otrchamber.com

HALLOWEEN: CINCINNATI POPS SYMPHONY SPOOKTACULAR
The Cincinnati Pops hosts a family-friendly, costumes-encouraged concert filled with songs familiar to kids and adults including the “Imperial March” from The Empire Strikes Back and “Harry’s Wondrous World” from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. A Family Fun Zone begins at 9:30 a.m. 10:30 a.m. Saturday. $4.50-$16. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org/pops

Aries Spears
Photo: Provided
COMEDY: ARIES SPEARS
Aries Spears is still plugging away. As the second-longest serving member of Mad TV, he is still recognized for his work on that program. His impressions of Sean “Diddy” Combs, Shaquille O’Neal and Wayne Brady, to name just a few, are still remembered fondly by fans. And while he will still do impressions in his stand-up act, he mostly does observational material. “There’s certain shit I can’t do with white people,” he says to an audience. “Like go drinking...When you’re drunk you make that noise: ‘Wooo!’ There’s a lot of bad history behind that noise. When black people hear ‘Wooo!’ they start looking for pick-up trucks.” Friday-Sunday. $25. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., levee.funnybone.com

HALLOWEEN: IGBY'S VENETIAN MASQUERADE

Sip on Venetian-themed cocktails at this Halloween costumer party. Think Casanova, ornate masks and fire performers. Unmask yourself at midnight. Free. 122 E. Sixth St., Downtown, igbysbar.com.


HALLOWEEN: ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
Do the Time Warp twice in one night with a double screening of The Rocky Horror Picture Show at the Esquire. Dress in your best Janet nightie or Dr. Frank-n-Furter thigh-highs and pearls for an evening with the Denton Affair, a live cast who plays along with the action on screen. Bring flashlights, noisemakers and bells. No one under 17 admitted without a guardian. 9:50 and 11:55 p.m. Saturday. $9.75. 320 Ludlow Ave., Clifton, esquiretheatre.com.

ONSTAGE: ANDY'S HOUSE OF [BLANK]
Trey Tatum and Paul Strickland grew up just 45 miles apart — Tatum in southern Alabama and Strickland in Florida’s Panhandle. But they didn’t meet until their paths crossed in Cincinnati during the Fringe Festival in June 2014. When Know Theatre announced Thunderdome, the second round of its 10-week Serials program, inviting local theater artists to create and stage shows in five 15-minute segments, Strickland and Tatum decided to join forces.  Neither had previously worked on a collaborative project like this, but they had chemistry. “This was the most fun I’ve ever had making a script,” Strickland says.They populated their show, Andy’s House of [blank], with versions of themselves. As they did during Serials, they’ll perform with two other actors, in what might be called a “semi-autobiographical mystery musical.” Andy’s House of [blank] was the most popular work among the Thunderdome offerings early in 2015, and now it’s back as a full-fledged show, the third production of Know’s 18th season. Read more about the play here. Andy's House of [blank] runs through Nov. 14 at Know Theatre. More info/tickets: knowtheatre.com.

'Carousel'
Photo: Mark Lyons
ONSTAGE: CAROUSEL
Rodgers and Hammerstein were the go-to guys during musical theater’s Golden Age. Carousel was their personal favorite, a hit two years after Oklahoma. In fact, the shows were across Broadway’s 44th Street from one another from 1945 to 1947. Carousel is about Billy Bigelow, a reckless carnival barker who’s a ladies man and a gambler often on the wrong side of the law. When he meets Julie Jordan, he tries to go straight, but good behavior is tough. It takes dying and a return from the afterlife to make things right. The story is a testament to the power of love. Through Nov. 1. $31-$35. Corbett Auditorium, CCM Village, University of Cincinnati, Clifton Heights, 513-556-4183, ccm.uc.edu/boxoffice.

EVENT: ROCK THE CORE CIDER AND BEER FESTIVAL
Drink the District held this cider and beer festival in Washington, D.C. in May, and they’re bringing the event to Sawyer Point on Halloween. Sample more than 30 different ciders and 20 beers, both local and regional. There will be food from Alabama Fish Bar mobile and Cuban Pete’s. 2-6 p.m. $35-$50; $10 designated driver. Sawyer Point, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown, drinkthedistrict.com/cincinnati/rock-the-core.

HALLOWEEN: DISCO OF THE DEAD
Head to MainStrasse Village for a Halloween parade and Disco dance party at the Goose Girl Fountain. Dress in costume for a masquerade parade down Sixth Street before heading to the fountain for a Disco dance-off and consume contest. Enjoy cauldrons of cocktails by Cock & Bull, Frida 602, Gypsy's, Pachinko, Rosie's, Strasse Haus and more. 9-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. MainStrasse Village, Covington, Ky., facebook.com/mainstrassevillagehalloween.

SUNDAY
'The Art of the Brick'
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center
ATTRACTIONS: THE ART OF THE BRICK
Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000, cincymuseum.org.

Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: MAD RIVER RISING
The Cincinnati Playhouse opens Mad River Rising, a play by Dana Yeaton that artistic director Blake Robison produced two decades ago in New Hampshire. It’s about an elderly man, escaped from a retirement home and hiding out in an old barn hayloft, defending the family farm where he grew up and grew old. The script has been updated and relocated to Ohio, so it’s a new work in many ways. It drifts back and forth in time, especially to a catastrophic 1937 flood. An insight into aging, it’s also a poetic tribute to hanging onto places with meaning. Through Nov. 14. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.

'Antique Halloween'
Photo: Taft Museum of Art
HALLOWEEN: ANTIQUE HALLOWEEN
Travel back in time this October at the Taft Museum of Art. Current exhibit Antique Halloween is a one-room display of spooky antiques ranging in date from the 1900s to 1950s. The items, obtained by local collectors, include decorations, toys and games, candy cups and more. A ghostly ambiance is created by candle shades and jack-o-lanterns dispersed throughout the room. Through Nov. 1. $10 adults; $5 ages 6-17; free Sunday. Taft Museum of Art, 316 Pike St., Downtown, 513-241-0343, taftmuseum.org.

EVENT: WORLD VEGAN DAY
Celebrate World Vegan Day at Park + Vine with free N’ Eggs Benedict (Shadeau ciabatta roll, topped with tofu, vegan goetta, spinach and vegan hollandaise) and La Teraza Coffee. This marks the 71st anniversary of the term “vegan” and the establishment of The Vegan Society. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, parkandvine.com.


 
 

 

 

 
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