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by Natalie Krebs, Nick Swartsell 02.20.2016 95 days ago
Posted In: News at 04:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Hundreds Turn Out for Sanders Rally Downtown

Contender in Democratic presidential primary draws big crowds angry at political system

A crowd of hundreds gathered at Cincinnati City Hall today to show support for Democratic presidential primary candidate Bernie Sanders.

The rally, organized by local supporters, featured speeches from several labor leaders, activists and political candidates followed by a brief march through downtown.

"The political revolution is coming to Cincinnati now,” said Jordan Angelo Opst, a University of Cincinnati student and organizer with the group Cincinnati for Bernie Sanders, which helped set up the rally. “We're ready to stand up in unity against injustice, unfairness and corruption. You'll notice that we've got white people. We've got black people. We have brown people. We have Christians. We have atheists. We have Muslims.”

Sadie Hughes, registered nurse and local director of National Nurses United, told the crowd the group was endorsing Sanders “because he cares for the same things we care about."

"He is leading the fight for Medicare for all,” she said. “Too many Americans, even with the Affordable Care Act, remain priced out of access to necessary health care. Too many of our seniors are still working at McDonalds and Wendy's and places like that. Bernie believes that everyone should be able to earn a living wage."

Sanders, currently a U.S. Senator for Vermont, identifies as a democratic socialist and was, until his primary campaign, an independent who caucused with Democrats. His candidacy began as a long shot against Democratic favorite and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, mostly due to the perceived baggage of his self-professed socialism and his low name recognition outside his home state.

Over the past few months, however, Sanders’ growing national popularity has many political pundits taking him more seriously as primary voters expressing fatigue over an increasingly divided political system line up to support him. He came in a close second behind Clinton in the Iowa caucus earlier this month and outright beat her in the New Hampshire primary by a large margin.

As he's run, Sanders has shifted policy debates with Clinton to the left. In recent debates, the two largely agree on broad-based policy ideas, instead debating on the feasibility of their respective progressive plans. Clinton has hit Sanders on statements from liberal (often Democratic Party-affiliated) economists saying that his proposals for a single-payer health care system don't add up, and by bringing up his past record voting against certain gun control measures, a big issue for many Democrats. Other progressives, though, have leaped to Sanders' defense. The Vermont Senator, meanwhile, has hit Clinton for the large financial institutions that have given her campaign and PACs millions, and from which she has taken large, six-figure speaking fees.

Now, his supporters are looking to South Carolina and Nevada, the next two states to weigh in on the primary race. Democrats caucus today in Nevada, where Sanders has been chipping away at a large Clinton lead. The most recent polls out of South Carolina, where Democrats will have primary voting next week, show Clinton with a commanding 18-point lead, however.

Here in Cincinnati, things are heating up ahead of Ohio’s March 15 primary. Last week, former president Bill Clinton spoke at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center to a capacity crowd of 200. There, he touted his wife’s ability to be “a change maker.”

But some Cincinnatians see Sanders as a better fit for that role.

Some attendees at today’s rally expressed frustration with the current political system and say they see Sanders, with his calls for campaign finance and financial industry reform, as a catalyst for bigger changes.

“It’s not just Democrats, it’s not just Republicans. It’s institutional politics on both sides,” said rally-goer Jim Applebee, who lives in the Cincinnati area. But electing Sanders could be a tipping point, he says. “I don’t think he can change things, but we can. We need a leader for that movement. It can’t be one person. But it can happen. And if it doesn’t, we see the trend that we’re on.”

Some cited Sanders’ populist proposals around cost-free college education, expanding Medicare to the entire U.S. population, and other issues as the way to systemic change, and as signs of his principles.

“He has a concise platform about what he believes in, and he comes across as the most honest and ethical candidate,” Lou Ebstein of Cincinnati said. “My kids both have college loans, and they’re paying them back, and it’s an increasing burden. We’re not going to get anywhere if that continues to be the case for people.

Ebstein didn’t have negative words about Sanders’ primary opponent Hillary Clinton, but said he saw Sanders as a candidate more likely to proactively push progress beyond the Obama era.

“There are so many things that need to get done, and we need to go about them in a different way. Sanders really put a big challenge out there. He came out of nowhere, and now we’re going to see what Nevada does.”

 
 
by Jac Kern 02.19.2016 96 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 01:24 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sara clark as saint joan (diogenes) - photo lindsey augusta mercer

Stage Door

Saints and sinners on Cincinnati stages this weekend

British playwright George Bernard Shaw was one of the great writers for the stage a century ago, and his most popular play, Saint Joan, is a choice available for theatergoers this weekend, thanks to the Diogenes Theatre Company. It’s the story of the rise and fall of one of history’s most fascinating characters, a young country girl in the early 15th century who claimed that God told her to drive the invading English army out of France. Of course, her fate turns and she’s burned at the stake before her 20th birthday. Cincinnati Shakespeare veteran Sara Clark is taking on the title role, and Lindsey August Mercer, who has assisted with many Cincy Shakes productions, is the director. She says, “The beautiful effect of Shaw’s account is the way his language encapsulates Joan’s strength, conviction and unshakable positivity.” Three actors — Billy Chace and Geoffrey Barnes from the Shakespeare company and Patrick Phillips, a regular with Ensemble Theatre —portray a large cast of additional characters. Diogenes is presenting Saint Joan at the Aronoff’s Fifth Third Bank Theater through March 5. Tickets: cincinnatiarts.org

The smart-alecky Avenue Q just opened at Cincinnati Landmark Productions’ Incline Theater in Price Hill. A Tony winner in 2004, the show is a darkly funny knock-off from Sesame Street, Muppet-like puppets and all, with a strong off-color dose of contemporary sarcasm. Kids who watched the educational PBS show were told they could do anything if they tried hard; Avenue Q turns that notion inside out, working from the premise that life sucks. (The song “It Sucks to Be Me” takes most of the air out of any optimist’s balloon.) The production, staged by local state veteran Elizabeth Harris, has a cast of able singers and actors who have learned they way around making puppets laugh-out-loud funny, especially Allyson Snyder as nice girl Kate Monster and neighborhood bad girl Lucy the Slut. A fine and varied singer, Snyder ably flips the switch between Kate’s naïve innocence and Lucy’s lascivious come-hither ways, often in the same scene. It’s an evening of giggles and guffaws, but not for the kids. Through March 6.

Some good things happening starting this weekend on campus at Xavier and Northern Kentucky universities. At XU’s Gallagher Student Center Theater you’ll find three shows in repertory — a classic by August Strindberg, Miss Julie; a heady drama by Harold Pinter, Betrayal; and Begotten, a world premiere by senior theater major Tatum Hunter. They’ll be in a rotating schedule through Feb. 28. Tickets: 513-745-3939 … At NKU, it’s a classic comedy, Kaufman and Hart’s Once in a Lifetime, a wickedly funny script from 1929 about some vaudeville troupers trying to make a comeback in Hollywood. Tickets: 859-572-5464 … Want to know a bit more about local university theater programs? Read my Curtain Call column from Feb. 17.

Once you make it past the weekend it will be time for the second installment of Serials! at Know Theatre, the “episodic theater party” offering 15-minutes from five works in progress — three that began on Feb. 8, and two new works starting this week. Audience members get to vote for their favorites to keep them alive for the next session on March 7. Watch theater being made on the fly. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.19.2016 96 days ago
Posted In: Holiday, fish at 12:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
izzys codfather

Friday Fish Fry Guide

Don't have to be religious to enjoy some beer-battered cod

For those of the Christian faith, Lent is the time between Ash Wednesday and Easter spent in religious observance preparing for the resurrection of Christ. It's a time to reflect, repent, fast and engage in some Americanized self-denial — like giving up Coke products or chocolate. It's also a time when people abstain from eating meat on Fridays — fish good; red meat bad — so in Cincinnati there's a flurry of end-of-week activity at local churches and parishes, who are all serving up fried fish dinners and raising money in the process. 

The competition is stiff, so if you're looking to indulge in some down-home, damn-good weekly beer-battered cod and hearty mac and cheese through March, here's where to dine. Some churches even offer adult beverages and parishioner-baked desserts, along with catchy themes and specialty items. Here's a list of local favorites — those offering unique twists or with "best of" votes from area media outlets. 

For a full list of local fish fry events, visit thecatholictelegraph.com/fish-fry-guide.

All Saints
Two words: fish tacos. Why wait in line in OTR when you can pop on out to Kenwood for some fan favorite fried fish, nestled in a lovely tortilla. Menu also features grilled salmon, tilapia, fried cod, sweet potato fries and pizza. And local beer. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 8939 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, allsaints.cc.

Beechwood High School Fish Fry Drive-Thru
One of the more popular local drive-thru fries. Head to the high school's concession stand to pick up your order — email in advance so it will be ready. Meal includes choices like a baked salmon dinner, fried fish dinner with two sides, fried fish sandwich, pizza, chicken nuggets and sides. 4-7 p.m. Fridays through March 25. 54 Beechwood Road, Fort Mitchell, Ky., 859-620-6317.

Bridgetown Finer Meats
Ok. So this deli is not a church. They still do Fabulous Fish Fridays. Every Friday through Easter, you can grab a fish sandwich as big as a house (with cheese, lettuce and homemade tartar sauce on two slices of giant bread), a shrimp boat, lobster mac and cheese and other fancy specialties. They also have a contest on their Facebook page where if you guess the closest to how many fish sandwiches they serve that day, you win a free sandwich. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fridays through Easter. 6135 Bridgetown Road, 513-574-3100, bridgetownfinermeats.com. 

Hartzell United Methodist Church
All-you-can-eat fish fry, featuring hand-cut and hand-breaded cod. Menu also includes chicken breast, shrimp, cheese pizza and sides including mac and cheese, cole slaw, applesauce, bread, dessert and drinks. Also available for carry out. $10 adults; $5 children 6-11; free under 5. 4-7 p.m. Fridays through March 11. 8999 Applewood Drive, Blue Ash, 513-891-8527, hartzellumc.com.

Immaculate Heart of Mary
Offers standard fish fry fare — shrimp, crab cakes, pizza, mac and cheese, french fries — but is also home of the famous Tommy Boy, a piece of fried fish nestled inside of a grilled cheese. Also available at the drive-thru. 5-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 5876 Veterans Way, Burlington, Ky., ihm-ky.org.

Mary, Queen of Heaven
Home of the Codfather, aka the alter ego of John Geisen of Izzy's dressed in mafia-wear and carrying a stuffed cod (photo ops welcome). Offers dine-in, carry-out and drive-thru options so you can get a Holy Haddock sandwich on a hoagie bun, Icelandic beer-battered cod cooked in vegetable shortening, mac and cheese, green beans and more. Menu also features homemade desserts, pizza, grilled cheese and BEER, which you can imbibe waiting in line to get in. 4-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 1150 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-2622, mqhparish.com/#!fish-fry/rhwto.
  • All Izzy's restaurant locations are also offering the Codfather special through March 24: North Atlantic cod filet, battered with Izzy's special blend of 17 spices, served on a kaiser bun with lettuce and tartar sauce. izzys.com.

St. Barbara 
For dine in or carry out. Menu features a cod fish dinner with three sides, the Bob Lee special (baked tilapia and four shrimp), shrimp dinner (8 shrimp with three sides), baked tilapia and a la carte options. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-3100.

St. Columban Church
Lots of choices here. Dinner choices include two sides — fish sandwich dinner, fried shrimp (five pieces), grilled salmon dinner, grilled tilapia dinner, fish taco dinner or buffalo shrimp wrap dinner, with side choices of waffle fries, green beans, baked potato, french fries, mac and cheese, coleslaw, applesauce or tossed salad. 5-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 894 Oakland Road, Loveland, 513-683-0105, stcolumban.org.

St. Francis de Sales
Fish fry featuring fried and baked fish, pizza, the famous "DeSales Slammer" and mac and cheese. 5:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 1600 Madison Road, Walnut Hills, 513-961-1945.

St. Francis Seraph
For $8, grab a meal with two sides (mac and cheese, applesauce or coleslaw). 5:30-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. Christian Moerlein Malt House Taproom, 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, stfrancisseraphschool.com.

St. Joseph Academy
Adult fried/baked fish dinner includes 12 oz. fish with three sides, drink and dessert, or adult six piece shrimp dinner for $11 (senior dinners $8). A la carte items include Cajun shrimp gumbo, fish sandwich, hush puppies and sides like scalloped potatoes, mac and cheese, french fries, salad and green beans. 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 48 Needmore St., Walton, Ky., 859-485-6444, sjawalton.com.

St. Joseph Catholic Church
Menu features hand-breaded cod and catfish, plus shrimp, crab cakes and salmon. Also includes homemade desserts. 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 6833 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs, Ky., 859-635-5652, stjosephcampspringsparish.com.

St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish
The parish's 11th-annual fish fry. Carry out and dine in available. Menu includes beer-battered and fried cod and shrimp, baked cod, grilled salmon and a seafood combo (with all three!). Dinners include two hush puppies and choice of sides (baked potato, green beans, mac and cheese and more). 4:30-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 5720 Hamilton Mason Road, Liberty Township, 513-777-4322, saint-max.org.

St. William 
Annual fish fry with drive thru or dine in. Features weekly live entertainment. Menu includes choices like Magnificod Platter (hand-breaded cod, fries, hush puppies and coleslaw), Baked Salmon Platter (baked salmon, green beans, roasted potatoes and coleslaw), Shrimp Platter (eight pieces of butterfly shrimp, sauce, fries, hush puppies and coleslaw) and other dinner platters and sides. Baked goods sold weekly. 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 4108 W. Eighth St., Price Hill, stwilliamfishfry.com.


 
 
by Staff 02.19.2016 96 days ago
Posted In: Arts, Comedy, Concerts, Life, Fun, Events, Eats, Drinking, Music at 12:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_avenue-q_photo-mikki-schaffner-photography

Your Weekend To Do List

20th Century Cincinnati, Chinese New Year, raunchy puppets and revolutionists

FRIDAY

ONSTAGE: AVENUE Q

Watching Sesame Street as a kid, you learned you could do anything. Well, Avenue Q, up next at Price Hill’s Incline Theatre, is the R-rated answer to that mantra, a musical coming-of-age tale that revels in the anxieties of growing up — using puppets who say and sing stuff you never heard on PBS, operated by visible puppeteers. With a lot of very sardonic wit and off-kilter tunes — “It Sucks to Be Me,” “Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist” and “The Internet Is for Porn” — the sassy show was the 2004 Tony winner for best musical. Leave the kids at home. Through March 6. $23-$26. Warsaw Federal Incline Theatre, 801 Matson Place, E. Price Hill, 513-241-6550, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com.

Entomology DIY Workshop
Photo: Provided
EVENT: ENTOMOLOGY DIY WORKSHOP
For those who lose sleep wondering how an insect collection is best displayed, this workshop is an answer to a prayer. Jeremy Johnson, founder of Meddling with Nature, a local taxidermy, art and education organization, will teach the basics of preserving, mounting and displaying an insect collection at home. The DIY demonstration includes a large exotic specimen for everyone to position, pin, install and take with them. The workshop also acts as a precursor to an upcoming collaborative exhibit between Meddling With Nature and the Lloyd Library, which will bring the works of Maria Sibylla Merian, one of the world’s great natural illustrators and entomologists, to life. 7-9 p.m. Friday. $46 adult; $22 child. Lloyd Library and Museum, 917 Plum St., Downtown, facebook.com/meddlingwithnature.

Tyler Bryant & The Shakedown
Photo: Union Entertainment Group
MUSIC: TYLER BRYANT & THE SHAKEDOWN
With a well-constructed, Classic Rock sound and songs that would easily slide onto the playlists of every major FM Rock station in the country, Tyler Bryant & the Shakedown seem well on their way to following fellow Nashville-area crew Kings of Leon into the mainstream spotlight. The group is signed to Republic Records and has a pair of releases under its belt so far, including the excellent EP The Wayside, which came out last year and shows the band in peak form. Given Bryant and Co.’s tight, fluid guitar riffing, impressively soulful melodies and a Blues streak, it’s no surprise that the band has landed coveted opening slots on tours with Jeff Beck, ZZ Top and AC/DC. The band’s visit to Cincinnati this week could prove to be a “see them in a small club for free before you have to pay big bucks to see them in an arena” kind of concert. 10 p.m. Friday. Free. MOTR Pub, 1345 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, motrpub.com.

Simone Porter
Photo: Provided
CLASSICAL MUSIC: AMERICAN MASTER WITH APPALACHIAN SPRING
Join the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra this weekend as Louis Langrée conducts a performance featuring work by four of America’s most iconic composers. The concert opens with Ives’ “The Unanswered Question,” followed by Barber’s “Violin Concerto” performed by Timothy Lees, CSO Concertmaster. Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” is the centerpiece of the night and captures the openness of the American landscape. The evening will come to a close with Bernstein’s “On the Waterfront” symphonic suite. As a bonus, members of The Comet Bluegrass All-Stars will play in the lobby before the concert. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $10-$112. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org

'The Revolutionists'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: THE REVOLUTIONISTS
A world premiere at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park (simultaneously with another, Native Gardens). In The Revolutionists, up-and-coming playwright Lauren Gunderson assembles a crowd of badass historical women, including Marie Antoinette and assassin Charlotte Corday, imprisoned during the French Revolution. She imagines how they might encourage, inspire and support one another during the horrific “Reign of Terror” as they await the guillotine. Their short-term future certainly distills their conversations about what’s important, but Gunderson leavens her irreverent fantasia with a lot of sassy humor. “The beating heart of the play,” she says, “is that stories matter, that art matters.” Through March 6. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.

Izzy's Codfather
EATS: MARY QUEEN OF HEAVEN FISH FRY
Home of the Codfather, aka the alter ego of John Geisen of Izzy's dressed in mafia-wear and carrying a stuffed cod (photo ops welcome). Offers dine-in, carry-out and drive-thru options so you can get a Holy Haddock sandwich on a hoagie bun, Icelandic beer-battered cod cooked in vegetable shortening, mac and cheese, green beans and more. Menu also features homemade desserts, pizza, grilled cheese and BEER, which you can imbibe waiting in line to get in. 4-8 p.m. Fridays through March 18. 1150 Donaldson Highway, Erlanger, Ky., 859-371-2622, mqhparish.com/#!fish-fry/rhwto.

SATURDAY
20th Century Cincinnati
Photo: Sam Wilder
EVENT: 20TH CENTURY CINCINNATI
Cincinnati’s annual retrospective of Vintage Modern design — now in its third decade — returns this weekend with more than 70 dealers. Participants will showcase classic Modernist forms, specifically those that emerged in the time period between World War I and the Information Age. Although the show is best known for its selection of lighting and furniture, guests can also purchase pop culture memorabilia, decorative objects and distinctly funky pieces. Get a head start 9 a.m. Saturday during the Java Preview, an exclusive shopping period that includes a complimentary juice bar, coffee and tea. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $8 two-day pass. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville, 20thcenturycincinnati.com. 

Daubigny's 'Sunset Near Villerville'
Taft Museum of Art
ART: DAUBIGNY, MONET, VAN GOGH: IMPRESSIONS OF LANDSCAPE
The Taft Museum of Art’s chief curator, Lynne Ambrosini, has spent 14 years organizing the Daubigny, Monet, Van Gogh: Impressions of Landscape show that opens Saturday and believes it will be one of the museum’s most important presentations. Inspired by the fact that the Taft owns three Charles-François Daubigny oil paintings, Ambrosini’s exhibition aims to prove that this 19th-century French landscape painter served as a major, unheralded harbinger of Impressionism. The exhibition, for which you must buy a timed ticket, has 40 Daubigny paintings and also 15 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist ones by Claude Monet, Vincent van Gogh and Camille Pissarro. Through May 29. $15 adult; $10 child. 316 Pike St., Downtown, taftmuseum.org

Do Ho Suh,
Courtesy the Artist and Lehman Maupin, New York
ART: PASSAGE AT THE CAC
Only a few of us can travel in space like Neil Armstrong or Yuri Gagarin, but we all travel through myriad spaces in everyday life. It’s so common, we rarely even think about it. But the South Korea-born, London-based artist Do Ho Suh thinks about it very much. He approaches public and private spaces with the same sense of exploration that an astronaut devotes to the moon. You’ll be able to see what he’s discovered when the exhibition Passage opens at the Contemporary Arts Center on Friday. It continues through Sept. 11. Using colorful fabric, he has constructed soft, allusive versions of spaces he has known in his 53 years of living and traveling throughout the world. The show features four major fabric sculptural installations, including a stand-out (and stand-up) three-story staircase called “348 W. 22nd St.” Read more about the exhibit here. 

EVENT: COMPREHENSIVE FERMENTING SEMINAR
A comprehensive fermenting seminar and workshop. Attendees will practice measuring and mixing brine, filling and
Native Gardens
Photo: Mikki Schaffner

 

 will take home a bubbling jar of probiotics. Includes seven hours of instructions, tasting samples, hands-on practice, printed resources, access to live phone support and a healthy lunch. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $299. Kingsgate Marriott Conference Center, University of Cincinnati, 151 Goodman Drive, Clifton, 907-694-2284, store.probioticjar.com. 

SUNDAY

ONSTAGE: NATIVE GARDENS
When longtime, waspy residents are proud of their formal garden and the young Hispanic couple moving in next door prefer a more natural “native garden,” the temperature goes up. And when there’s a dispute about the property line, well, then there’s outright warfare. This world premiere by Karen Zacarías will entertain audiences (her Book Club Play did the same in 2013), but they’ll also think about how we get along with people who aren’t just like us. Kudos to the Playhouse for commissioning a new play by this skilled playwright. Through Feb. 21. $30-$85. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mount Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com

Kevin Bozeman
Photo: Provided 
COMEDY: KEVIN BOZEMAN
Kevin Bozeman knew it was time to leave his day job to pursue standup comedy when he kept coming up with the same answer to his clients’ questions. “I sold insurance,” he says. “People used to ask me, ‘Why should I buy life insurance?’ And I used to tell them, ‘Because I need a commission check.’ ” He started doing standup in Madison, Wis., where he went to college. “I got ripped off,” he tells audiences about that experience. “All I got out of it was bad credit. College loans. I didn’t know they wanted you to pay those back; I thought that was only if you graduated.” The people trying to collect that debt don’t seem to be all that smart, either. “They call me at 11 o’clock in the morning, and I answer the phone. They have to know that’s a problem.” Showtimes Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com.

The library's smallest books are on display.
Photo: Courtesy of Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County
ART: TINY TOMES AT THE LIBRARY
Tiny Tomes features 71 of the library’s smallest books, on display in six cases through March 13. It’s a quirky and thoroughly charming exhibit. Who knew so many miniature books of all types existed, or that their subject matter could be so unusual and their graphic design so beautiful? Read more about the exhibit here. Tiny Tomes is on display through March 13 at the main branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. More info: cincinnatilibrary.org.

 
EVENT: CHINESE NEW YEAR PARTY AT ORIENTAL WOK
Celebrate the Year of the Monkey at Oriental Wok. Party includes a nine course authentic Lucky Dinner, Chinese lion dance, firecrackers and fun information about the symbolism of the monkey. 6-9 p.m. $75; $25 children. 317 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, 859-331-3000, orientalwok.com.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.19.2016 96 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sheriff

Morning News and Stuff

Sheriff body cameras delayed; Bevin signs anti-toll bill; will Scalia replacement dustup affect Ohio's U.S. Senate race?

Hey all. Here’s the news today.

A deal to equip Hamilton County Sheriff’s deputies with body cameras will be delayed, Sheriff Jim Neil announced yesterday. Hamilton County commissioners approved a deal between the Sheriff’s office and Taser, International for $1.3 million over five years, which would have provided body cameras as well as new Tasers for the department. However, contracts that big must be opened up to public bidding, so the county’s deal with Taser is on hold until other bids are solicited. The department has been looking into body cameras at a time when many law enforcement agencies across the country, including the Cincinnati Police Department, have taken steps to adopt the technology following controversial police shootings of civilians.

• In case you missed our update yesterday, Cincinnati police released the name of the man shot by officers in Cheviot.  Officers Eric Kohler, Zachary Sterbling and Scott McManis of the Cincinnati Police Department shot Paul Gaston, 37, Wednesday, after they say he pulled a gun. Those officers fired a total of nine shots at Gaston, who they say was pulling what turned out to be a realistic-looking Airsoft bb gun from his waistband.

Video of the incident taken by bystanders shows Gaston initially complying with orders to get on his knees. The video, taken from behind, shows Gaston make a motion toward his mid-section with his right arm, but does not show a gun. He was originally reported waiving a gun in Westwood in a 911 call by his girlfriend, who was not at the scene, but who says she was receiving texts from her sister, who was. Police followed several other calls to find Gaston after he wrecked his truck and walked to neighboring Cheviot. Gatson was the second person shot by CPD this year. The first, Robert Tenbrick, was also shot while he had a toy gun.

City officials, including Mayor John Cranley, said they’re standing behind the officers, who have been placed on procedural administrative leave as the shooting is investigated. Sterbling and Kohler have been flagged for receiving multiple complaints through the Citizen’s Complaint Authority in the past, but officials say they acted appropriately Wednesday.

• This is kind of lame. MadTree will be temporarily pulling production of my favorite of theirs, Gnarly Brown, due to conflicts with a California wine maker over the use of the word “gnarly.” Delicato Vineyard has filed a complaint with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office over MadTree’s use of the word, which the vineyard uses in its Gnarly Head wine. While this seems a little ridiculous on it face — it’s beer vs. wine, after all, and it’s not even the same exact phrase — far be it from me to contest California’s ownership of the word “gnarly.” MadTree will retool the beer’s branding slightly and begin production again.

• Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin has signaled he’ll sign a controversial bill passed by the state’s legislature outlawing tolls as a way to fund the looming $2.6 billion Brent Spence Bridge project. Tolls have been forwarded as one possible way to fund the prohibitively high cost of replacing the bridge, which is functionally obsolete but structurally sound for now. The span, which carries I-75 across the Ohio River, is on one of the busiest shipping routes in the country. The bill stipulates that tolling cannot be part of any project connecting Kentucky to Ohio without the approval of the state’s legislature, which will not approve the funding method as a way to pay for the bridge.

• Will the fight over a replacement for late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia affect Ohio’s U.S. Senate race? It could. Incumbent Sen. Rob Portman, a Republican, has sided with other conservative senators who have signaled they will refuse to have confirmation hearings for President Barack Obama’s replacement nominations. They argue that Obama should wait until after the next election to let voters have a say on the pivotal placement. Currently, the court is divided evenly between four liberal and four conservative judges. Scalia was ultra-conservative, and Republicans would like nothing more than to replace him with someone ideologically similar. Portman has sided with most, but not all, Republicans in the chamber signaling they won’t give any confirmation hearings.

The question is, will that help or hurt him in a close race with Democrats, who look somewhat likely to nominate former Ohio Gov. Ted Strickland in the March 15 primary? Ohio is a purple state, but Portman could rally his staunchly conservative base with the highly partisan move. On the other hand, it may not endear him to moderates and fence-sitters, who Strickland looks able to scoop up in November.

Portman’s taken some heat for the move from the Toledo Blade, among other editorial boards. While Democrats in the Senate, including Obama during his term, have opposed Republican presidents’ judicial nominees, they have done so through more traditional means — by voting no, by filibustering to avoid procedural votes on cloture, or closing debate on a nominee so a final vote can be taken during a confirmation hearing. Republicans are proposing something different and unprecedented: refusing to hold a hearing at all.

 
 
by Cassie Lipp 02.18.2016 97 days ago
Posted In: Bar at 02:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
courtesy of urban artifact

Slice of Cincinnati: Urban Artifact

With sour beers and live music with state-of-the-art audio quality, Urban Artifact brings people together for “wild culture” — its tagline — all housed within a historic Northside church.

The craft brewery, which opened in April 2015, offers house-brewed sour beers, including seasonal flavors, as well as five signature staples. Liquor and wine are also offered for those who do not care for sours.
If you visit Urban Artifact this month, be sure to try their Abacus gose, which pairs the flavors of raspberry and chocolate for a surprisingly smooth treat. (I am not much of a beer drinker myself, but Abacus is the only beer I have ever liked.) One of Urban Artifact’s four owners, Scott Hand, boasts that it is probably the only beer of its kind in the world.

“We like to combine the activity of getting together with great beer,” Hand says. Urban Artifact beer is complemented with live music nearly every night of the week. With a different band playing each night, Urban Artifact’s crowd also changes nightly. The venue invites all different types of artists to play there, but the strongest emphasis is on local and regional acts.

The brewery’s taproom and listening lounge are located in the old church basement, unique for its high quality acoustics. Artists who play there are left remarking on how great the sound is. This excellent sound comes thanks to Hand, who used his expertise in designing theater spaces to craft the music venue.

Urban Artifact plans to move into the sanctuary part of the church after renovations are complete. Converting this space into the ideal music venue will be the most difficult part of the process, but Hand says he is ready and excited for the challenge. He is currently in the planning phase for this project.

The idea for Urban Artifact sprung from Hand’s interest in music. In fact, he started an independent music label while in college at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Art, Architecture and Planning. His label, Grayscale Records, was meant to represent all music in the indie spectrum.

After writing a plan about the future of the music business, Hand decided to focus on connecting an audience directly to musicians instead. Beer was added to the mix in order to create the Urban Artifact brand.

While Hand moved to Chicago after graduating from UC, he returned to Cincinnati almost five years ago for his family. Here, he met the right business partners to bring his vision to life. He remarks on how Cincinnati is the ideal city for a project to sprout.

“You can do everything here,” he says. “You can come here with a dream and good business plan and make it happen.”

Urban Artifact’s location within the city is also ideal. The old church was chosen because it was in the middle of a neighborhood, which Hand says has been fantastically receptive to the new venue.

“While I would love to be a tourist attraction, it’s great to be appreciated by the locals,” he says.

At first, Hand was apprehensive about housing Urban Artifact in an old church. “I thought the church thing was going to be a deal breaker, but almost everyone who comes here thinks it’s hilarious,” he says. This includes a group of 18 priests who came into Urban Artifact dressed in their full traditional garbs to drink one day.


Check artifactbeer.com for complete music listings. Visitors can also look forward to URBAN ARTIFACT’s one year anniversary party April 23 and special events housed above the bar and music space. Drinkers in Dayton and Columbus can find Urban Artifact beers at select distributors throughout the area.

 
 
by Nick Grever 02.18.2016 97 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Reviews at 11:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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REVIEW: Siegelord’s ‘Ascent of the Fallen’

Cincinnati's symphonic Death Metal band Siegelord finally unleashes its powerful, anticipated debut album

Since its formation in Feb. 2013, Siegelord has been biding its time and waiting for the right moment to strike. After several sound, image and name shifts, the Cincinnati-based Metal band finally found its footing and began building a legion of fans. The quartet (vocalist Ulfr, guitarist Therod, drummer Sieven and bassist Warg) may have taken its sweet time releasing its first full-length, Ascent of the Fallen, but spinning the 12-track debut is enough to get any listener prepped to strap on some armor and go to war, even if it is just in the mosh pit.

Fans of Ulfr, Sieven and Warg’s previous band, local Folk Metal crew Winterhymn, can definitely hear some stylistic similarities. But where Winterhymn focuses its efforts on the Folk aspects of its formula, Siegelord leans more heavily upon Black and Death Metal to craft its battle anthems. Both bands weave orchestration into their songs, but Siegelord trade in the violins and keys for powerful blasts of horn and sprawling synths to give their tracks a more tribal and feral edge. These are not odes to honorable warriors but to conquerors and bloodthirsty warlords. and the musicianship reinforces that distinction.

Each members’ individual inspirations permeate every track. Ulfr’s love of Behemoth and Gwar fills every growled and shrieked line, Sieven’s Hardcore background can be heard in his bombastic cymbal crashes and heavy-handed pounding. Therod’s thrashy riffs, reminiscent of Amon Amarth and similar acts, along with Warg’s classically constructed bass rumbles fill the rest of the bloody picture. Throughout, the synth and horns add a flourish to each song and enhance each track’s intended mood. The driving, violent call to arms of “Gatebreaker” just wouldn’t be the same without a bellow from the horn, calling the fighters to one singular purpose — in this case, a massive, track-ending breakdown.

While the music itself is suitably brutal, Ulfr’s lyrics are what sets Ascent apart. The album is autobiographical in many ways, as Ulfr weaves a tale of the four characters banished from their realm and exiled to an inhospitable desert, ultimately finding a way to make their new homeland truly theirs. Sprinkled throughout are several interludes where Ulfr expands on the story he weaves. These tracks avoid feeling like filler due to Ulfr’s savage, spoken delivery, which elicits a shiver or two from the listener. Furthermore, “Siegelord” and “Warchief of Fallen Spirits” take time to develop Ulfr, Sieven, Warg and Therod’s individual backstories.

Buried within the fantastical saga that Ulfr shares are some true-to-life revelations regarding deception, lies, love lost and overcoming exceptional odds at all costs. In many ways, Ascent of the Fallen is a literal title and the band’s material benefits from not relying simply on classical fantasy tropes or focusing too heavily on creating a concept album to construct its tale.

Siegelord’s inception was a tumultuous one, coming out of very real, personal schisms. While most of these divisions have healed with time, their memory helped fuel the creation of an album that ties together many familiar influences and mechanics, but ultimately is able to rise above them. The intelligent use of Ulfr’s commanding vocals, riffs that cut like a broadsword, drumming and bass that crashes across your chest and driving orchestration has led to an album that may have taken several years to finally complete, but was worth the wait. Local Metal fans need only to listen to the album before exclaiming, “Praise the fuckin’ Lord.”

Siegelord's new album can be purchased (digitally or on CD) here

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 02.18.2016 97 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:54 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Police-involved shooting in Cheviot; will Ziegler park host a

Hey hey Cincy. Here’s what’s happening today.

Cincinnati Police officers shot and killed a man in Cheviot yesterday after they say he pulled a gun from his waistband. Officers say they were responding to calls about a man intoxicated and waiving a gun in neighboring Westwood when an accident happened a few blocks away. They determined the driver in that accident was the same person from the initial call and followed him, ordering him to stop. He initially complied, according to officers, but then pulled a gun, at which time officers opened fire. Police have not released the person’s name, but say he is a 36-year-old black male. No dash cam or other footage of the incident, if it exists, has been released yet, but police officials say they will release more information about the shooting today. A witness named Clites Holloway saw the shooting from a nearby van and told reporters, “I barely seen him move his body, and as soon as I seen that, first cop took the shot.” All involved officers are on a seven-day paid leave of absence as the shooting is investigated.

UPDATE: Police say 37-year-old Paul Gaston pulled an Air Soft toy pistol from his waistband while he was on his knees in the street complying with officers. A video of the incident taken by a member of the public doesn't show Gaston with a gun, though he does reach briefly for his waist area.

• Improper prescriptions, dirty surgical implements and receiving extra money as a head surgeon without actually performing surgeries are accusations being leveled at the head of Cincinnati’s Veterans Administration Hospital Dr. Barbara Temeck, who is caught up in a federal investigation of the VA branch. A WCPO investigation alleges Temeck takes in more than $100,000 extra a year for a surgical role she doesn’t perform, that she prescribed prescription pain medicine to her boss’ wife, seemingly without the necessary licenses, and that she has looked the other way at dirty instruments, staffing shortages and other problems at Cincinnati’s VA hospital.

Detractors interviewed by the news organization say Temeck’s tenure has resulted in a quantifiable drop in the quality of care at the hospital. The investigation features interviews with doctors and patients, as well as public records supporting some of its findings. Supporters within the VA point out the hospital routinely gets four- and five-star reviews from the administration and that Temeck has done a good job at her post. They also say that the report doesn’t include information about whether or not the hospital has seen budget cuts from the federal government and what role those cuts may have played in quality of care.

• Cincinnati streetcar riders won’t be able to buy a specific, month-long unlimited use pass like the kind you can get for METRO buses, the Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority says. Such a pass would be very similar to the $70 METRO passes, SORTA says, and could run afoul of federal regulations about segregating ridership. Some council members have said that potential riders may not want to ride the bus, but will want to ride the streetcar, and that SORTA should look into a separate pass for them. Riders will be able to buy unlimited-use daily passes for the streetcar at $2, however, and can also use their monthly METRO passes on the cars.

• Cincinnati officials, including Mayor John Cranley and representatives from 3CDC yesterday held a groundbreaking event for upcoming renovations to Ziegler Park, which sits on Sycamore Street at the border of Over-the-Rhine and Pendleton. Those renovations will include a new pool and a 400-car underground parking lot. The renovation plan calls for at least $20 million in public money from state New Markets Tax Credits and city parks and recreation bonds. 3CDC says it still needs $12 million to finish the project and will continue fundraising from public and private sources to fill in that gap. The project comes even as the Cincinnati Parks Board has said it is running low on funds to complete needed maintenance on parks across the city, though much of the money for Ziegler is coming from other sources. Cincinnati City Council recently approved giving the parks and recreation bonds to 3CDC.

Neighborhood residents this summer took part in a three-session planning effort to garner feedback about the park. Among concerns expressed by residents, including advocates for low-income tenants in the neighborhood worried about the area’s ongoing gentrification, were preserving the park’s basketball courts and the possibility that Ziegler could become a busy “destination” park like Washington Park. Planners assured community members that those wishes would be honored. Cranley suggested hosting “a mini-LumenoCity here sometime soon” in his remarks, though park planners say the park will remain passive, or without major programming. Let's see what happens there.

• Finally, the question continues: Who owns the Western Hills Viaduct, and who will pay to repair or replace it? Right now, Cincinnati and Hamilton County officials are basically doing this about the question: ¯_(ツ)_/¯

The mile-long bridge, built by the city in 1932, needs to be replaced or seriously repaired in the next decade or so, and officials are finally getting serious about figuring that whole thing out. Sort of. The county and city are still fighting over who has ownership over the bridge and will foot the expected $80 million share of the $280 million replacement project. That conversation would be a lot easier if we as a country, you know, prioritized public infrastructure funding at the state and federal levels, but, ya know, times were different in the 1930s and we were just swimming in cash back then… oh wait. Anyway, now I’m editorializing. Maybe we can just build a giant zipline when the thing finally collapses?

 
 
by Katherine Newman 02.17.2016 98 days ago
at 01:41 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Nonprofit Spotlight: Matthew: 25 Ministries

Matthew 25: Ministries is a nonprofit organization based in Blue Ash dedicated to international humanitarian aid and disaster relief. Since its inception in 1991, the nonprofit has been able to go from carrying suitcases of medical supplies to small villages in Nicaragua to now distribution 15 million pounds of product each year that reaches 20 million people worldwide.

“Give items, give financially, or give time. It’s not right for me to tell someone how they should serve, it’s up to them to decide how they should serve.” says CEO Tim Mettey. Basically anything someone has to offer is accepted here. Mettey stresses that there is no effort too little to make a difference to someone in need.

Volunteer

Matthew 25: Ministries is looking for volunteers of all ages with any range of abilities to help with sorting and repackaging the tons of donated items. Walking through the 168,000-square-foot facility between shifts, it’s obvioushow huge the place actually is. The warehouse organization is so efficient with pallets of donations stacked to the ceiling, it’s like walking through an altruistic Costco.

Matthew 25: Ministries could be considered low-maintenance volunteering — they just ask people to drop in when they have time; there are no commitments or an extensive training before you start. “Every thing we have we can teach anyone to do in 5 minutes.” Mettey says.

Volunteers can help by sorting through cans of latex paint for their Rainbow Paint Reblending Program. The program takes paint that would normally go to waste, opens it all up, combines like colors and repackages the paint which is then donated to housing projects around the world.

Or help build personal care kits that are sent to people in need, either living in an area without access or having lost everything in a disaster. This station is designed for younger volunteers. Shampoo, toothpaste, deodorant, mouthwash and other hygiene products are separated into bins and arranged in a circle. This makes it a simple task to grab a plastic bag and pick one product from each bin to fill it.

Donate

If you don’t have a ton of extra time in the day, think about cleaning out a closet or the pantry to find items for donation. Any consumable item you can donate is a gift to someone facing the aftermath of a disaster or living in a developing country. Medical supplies, clothing, hygiene products, non-perishable foods, cleaning supplies and toys are just some of the items that Matthew 25: Ministries is always accepting.

The organization collects empty pill bottles as part of the Recycling Program. Donated pill bottles, clean with the labels removed and the lids on, can be reused. If a lid is lost or you don't feel like cleaning the bottles, they can be shredded and turned in for cash that is put back into the organization. About a dozen giant bins of donated pill bottles, that would most likely be in a landfill otherwise, are processed every day for recycling.

Monetary donations are appreciated. “If someone writes us a check for disaster relief, 100-percent of that will go to the disaster relief.” Mettey says. Because there is only one facility, Matthew 25: Ministries is able to keep its overhead cost very low, allowing 99 percent of the cash donations to go directly into service programs.

Just by stepping foot in the facility it was evident that Matthew 25: Ministries is dedicated to what it is doing. The organization began with one man’s compassionate idea to deliver medical supplies to a small village in Central America. Today, it celebrates 25 years of providing humanitarian aid to more than 60 countries.


Donations are accepted at the Matthew 25: Ministries Warehouse: 11060 Kenwood Road, Blue Ash. To learn more about Matthew 25: Ministries, visit m25m.org.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 02.17.2016 98 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:50 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Tucker's set to reopen this summer; early voting now open in Hamilton County; UC contemplates moving some programs downtown

Tucker's Restaurant in Over-the-Rhine is set to reopen on July 25 — exactly one year after a kitchen fire badly damaged the iconic restaurant. The diner first opened its doors in 1946 and has been a staple in the neighborhood for decades. Community volunteers are hosting a brunch fundraiser for the reopening at St. Francis Seraph School in OTR this Sunday. 

• Early voting is now open for Ohio's primary on March 15. Voters can now head down to Hamilton County Board of Elections to vote, which mght be a good idea to avoid long lines or obnoxious political junkies at the polls. The Board of Elections website also lets you look up whether you're actually registered to vote and where you can go to vote, if you feel like doing so on the actual day.

• The University of Cincinnati is thinking about expanding its campus into downtown. UC President Santa Ono said the university is considering moving its law, business and music programs to a new downtown campus in order to connect better with the city. The university has long discussed moving its law school in particular. Ono says the current building on the corner of Clifton Avenue and Calhoun Street that houses the school is in need of renovations. UC officials are still considering possibilities, so there's no solid word yet on whether any programs will actually move.

• The recent spike in heroin use reported in the greater Cincinnati area has caused another outbreak: Hepatitis C. The number of infections jumped in 2015 with more than 1,000 new reported cases, The Enquirer reports, which public health officials say goes hand-in-hand with injection drugs like heroin. About 75 percent of Hepatitis C cases result in severe liver problems. Public health officials are pushing needle exchange programs to help curb the rate of infection, and on Monday the Northern Kentucky Health Department got approval to develop its own exchange program.

• Ohio has created a $20 million program to help aid the clean up of abandoned gas stations. The Ohio Development Services Agency is in charge of handing out the grant money over the next two years to city land banks. The state is currently working on a website for applicants to apply online set to launch in March. Ohio Development Services Agency Director David Goodman said the idea for the program struck him when he noticed the number of small Ohio towns with an abandoned gas station in the middle. These properties can also have issues with oil and gas leaks from leftover underground tanks.

• Apple CEO Tim Cook has vowed to fight against a court order from a federal court issued Tuesday that would require the company to build software allowing law enforcement to bypass security functions on its products. Law enforcement officials sought the order to gain access to the iPhone of Syed Rizwan Farook, one of the attackers in the December shooting at an office building in San Bernardino, Calif., that left 14 dead. Apple has long resisted building "back door" access software, saying if such technology exists it could further compromise the security of its users by making it easier for hackers to bypass security features. Cook called the court order "chilling" and claimed the government is basically asking the company for build a master key for all iPhones in order to unlock one.
 
 

 

 

 
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