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by Nick Swartsell 08.05.2014 78 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
music hall

Morning News and Stuff

Commissioners, city wrangle over icon tax; court to hear gay marriage arguments; grandmas with guns

Sometimes, all the forces of the universe conspire to make every important thing possible happen on the same day, at the same time. That day is tomorrow, when City Council will meet for the first time since its summer recess, Hamilton County Commissioners will vote on the icon tax and the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals here in Cincinnati will hear challenges to gay marriage bans in four states. To make sure you're ready, let's review a couple big upcoming news events, shall we?

• Time is ticking down for a possible tax hike deal to renovate Music Hall and Union Terminal. County Commissioners have until tomorrow to decide whether or not a proposed .25 percent sales tax will end up on the November ballot, and there’s no indication that two of the three commissioners are leaning toward voting for the tax as-is. At issue is the city’s contribution and the age-old city vs. county dynamic. Commissioners Chris Monzel and Greg Hartmann, both Republican, say they want a bigger financial commitment from the city, a sign of long-term buy-in. Monzel has floated the idea of cutting Music Hall out of the deal, since he says that building is the city’s responsibility and Union Terminal has more history county-wide. He’s said an alternative sales tax proposal could be ready for tomorrow’s meeting if a deal for both buildings can’t be reached. Another alternate idea involves ticket fees for those attending events at the buildings.

The city has pledged to continue the $200,000 a year it pays toward upkeep for each building and has committed an additional $10 million for Music Hall. Commissioners have said that isn’t enough. They’ll vote at their weekly meeting tomorrow on whether to put the issue on the ballot for voters to weigh.

• Tomorrow is a big day for other reasons. The 6th Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati will hear challenges to gay marriage bans in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan and Tennessee. It will be a decisive moment for the marriage equality movement, which has been on a winning streak in the courts lately. The Supreme Court last June struck down a federal law defining marriage as between a man and a woman, and since then many courts have ruled against gay marriage bans and other laws restricting recognition of same-sex marriages. But two of the three judges on the appellate board here are appointees from former President George W. Bush’s time in office and have a record of rulings supporting conservative values. Both opponents and supporters of the bans have rallies planned during the 1 p.m. hearings. Religious groups in the area, including the Catholic Archdiocese of Cincinnati, are urging followers to pray for the judges. The church has voiced strong support for Ohio’s gay marriage ban, passed in 2004.

• An effort to open a cooperative grocery store in Clifton is coming down to the wire, an Enquirer report says. The proposed market has met a quarter of its $1.65 million fundraising goal, officials with the group say. That money comes from shares anyone can buy to become a part owner of the store and would go toward buying the former Keller’s IGA building on Ludlow Avenue. The Clifton Cooperative Market group is under contract to buy the building, but that contract expires Oct. 11. The group envisions an “upmarket” grocery that provides both staple goods and specialty items. If the group can get half the money, officials say, it will become easier to secure financing for the rest through bank loans.

Miami University is tops! The local university ranks high on a few just-released Princeton Review lists, though not necessarily all positive ones. Miami is the nation’s 11th best party school, the review finds. It’s rocketed up five spots from last year, passing rival Ohio University. As an alum, I can tell you the recognition is long overdue. However, the school is also ranked fifth on the “little race and class interaction” list. So if you like partying with 16,000 friends who look a whole lot like you (assuming you look like an extra from a Brooks Brothers casual wear catalogue shoot) I’ve got the school for you. The school also ranked high for Greek life (sixth) and its entrepreneurial program (12th).

Finally, a story about grandmothers in Aurora, Indiana who have taken up a new hobby — firearms. Two senior women there started a gun education group in May after being robbed. Women Armed and Ready, or WAR, trains women on proper use of handguns for self-defense, firearm laws and target shooting.

“My gun is the answer to anybody who thinks I'm an old lady living alone,” says WAR member Barb Marness. Enough said.

 
 
by Amy Harris 08.04.2014 79 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Interview at 04:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
hendrix_ericjohnson d3a5163e website

Q&A with Eric Johnson

Renowned guitarist plays the Ballroom at Taft Theatre Tuesday night

Eric Johnson is one of America’s great guitar players. A natural guitarists of sorts, he has been touring since his late teen years in the ’70s and has worked with many great acts from a variety of genres — including Rock, Folk, Alt Country and Jazz — over that time. His Grammy Award-winning pedigree makes him still a very in-demand session musician and his own new takes on classic songs has made him a favorite on the festival circuit. 

Johnson brings his unique stylings to the Ballroom at the Taft Theatre in Cincinnati on Tuesday night. (Find tickets/more info here.) This is a can’t-miss show, for guitar fans in particular.


CityBeat: Do you have a favorite guitar that you play?


Eric Johnson: Yes, I have an old Fender Stratocaster that I play a whole lot. It’s probably my favorite guitar.


CB: Is it always with you?


EJ: It is pretty much. Sometimes I’ll tour without it and use other stuff. Also I worked with Fender and designed my own signature guitar so I use that a lot too.


CB: What’s the longest you have ever gone without playing guitar?


EJ: I don’t know, maybe a couple weeks.


CB: What do you think the best guitar solo of all time?


EJ: That would be really tough to say. Probably something musical and interesting to listen to over and over. Maybe something by Jimi Hendrix like “May This Be Love.” I wouldn’t say it’s the best guitar solo ever, but it comes to mind as a really wonderful solo.


CB: Johnny Winter, your fellow Texan, just passed away. Do you have any thoughts about him or fond memories?


EJ: I got to meet him when I was a teenager and he was always really nice and complimentary to me. I was really surprised to hear that he had passed away because I had heard that he was doing a lot better and (was) healthy and on the upswing. It came as a sad surprise.


CB: I had just seen him at JazzFest in New Orleans in May. He played great and looked healthy. I was shocked as well.


EJ: Yeah I didn’t expect it at all because he was doing so well. 


CB: Is there a group of people or person that was most influential to you or helpful to you during your early career days?


EJ: Well, when I started in my very early career, Johnny Winter said some nice things about me and that helped me a lot. Steve Morse from the Dixie Dregs helped me out. Christopher Cross kind of helped get things going, and getting to play with Carole King and Cat Stevens — that was a real and official help to me.


CB: It’s so different now for bands trying to make it. Do you have any thoughts on if it’s easier or tougher now for bands that want to play music?


EJ: I think it’s a lot tougher. People are reluctant to pay for music and there are so many bands out now. With the use of the internet and YouTube, anybody can be creative, which is good in a way. If you want to have a career, you have to have something pretty dynamic and unique that is captivating to people. 


CB: Last time I saw you perform was on the Experience Hendrix Tour. I have seen that show a couple times. What was the highlight of the tour for you?


EJ: Different ones. I remember the first ones I did, it was playing with Billy Cox and Mitch Mitchell. Then Mitch passed away. Getting to hang out with Billy Cox is really a great thing. I liked Doyle Bramhall’s set, and getting to play with all those musicians is a treat.


CB: What do you do with your down time when you are out on the road?


EJ: I just chill out or practice or take hikes and explore the city. I hang out with friends or family if they happen to be in the town I am in.


CB: Do you have any Cincinnati stories from the past when you have played here?


EJ: I have always enjoyed playing there. I have a couple close friends from Ohio. I have gone and hung out around the rivers and stuff. Cincinnati has some really great music shops there as well.


CB: What can fans expect from your show here at the Taft?


EJ: We are doing a couple re-workings of tunes I like to play. We change them up so much they are kind of their own deal. I have this live record that just came out, Live in Europe, and I will do some of those songs, but I will do some new tunes and some re-workings of old tunes and tunes by other people. It will kind of be a cross-section of different stuff.


CB: Are you constantly working on new music or do you take breaks?


EJ: I try to constantly work on it, some kind of thing, whether collaboration with somebody else or playing on somebody else’s recording or something on my own.


CB: I know you started out doing a lot of sessions early in your career. Do you do any sessions now or work with any other artists?


EJ: Yeah, pretty much all the time. I do one a month at least.


CB: Are there any current bands that you would like to collaborate with or work with from a live music standpoint?


EJ: I’ll tell you a lot of different things I like. I dig that band Explosions in the Sky. I like Grizzly Bear. I think they are great. Tallest Man on Earth is a great Folk singer as well.



 
 
by Benjamin Kitchen 08.04.2014 79 days ago
Posted In: Food news, local restaurant, Events at 02:09 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ryan talking at table

Look Who's Eating: Ryan Santos

Talking to Ryan Santos about local food

CityBeat is resurrecting our popular "Look Who's Eating" column, where we ask local chefs and food industry insiders where they've been dining and what is exciting them about Cincinnati's current culinary culture. This month, we talk to Ryan Santos. 

Chef Ryan Santos has already built a reputation as the man behind Please, a mobile dining pop-up. Having recently returned from an internship in Denmark, Santos plans to wow taste buds again with a new dinner series — and soon, Please’s very own space. 

On a remote island in the middle of the Baltic Sea, Santos learned how to utilize and preserve ingredients. He toured the Nordic Food Lab, tasting their latest experiments — everything from bee larvae and grasshopper soy sauce to six-year-old quince vinegar. 

Santos will put his food expertise to work with a dinner series at Cheapside Cafe one weekend per month. To prepare, he picks chanterelle mushrooms a few times a week, and plans to use summer produce like blackberries, blueberries, corn and summer squash.

Using commercial cooking equipment for the first time, in addition to the communal seating and four walk-in spots offered each night, Please will be accessible to more Cincinnatians than ever before — and it’s only just getting started.  

CityBeat: What was the last great meal that you ate and where did you eat it?
Ryan Santos: I spent a week dining around Copenhagen before my internship and had some amazing meals. My meals at Kadeau, Relae and Amass were all fantastic. Copenhagen is also a big supporter of natural, organic and biodynamic wines. I had some eye–opening glasses (and bottles) of wine at wine bars. 

CityBeat: Locally?
RS: I'm happy any time my meal is in the hands of Jose Salazar.

CB: What's in the future for Ryan Santos and Please? 
RS: Right now I'm helping chef John Shields do dinners at Riverstead, in Chillhowie, Virginia, one week a month, doing our Cheapside Dinners one weekend a month, and we are in the process of getting the pieces together for a place of our own open. I think the time is finally right for us to have our home base!


To learn more about RYAN SANTOS and Please or sign up for a dinner at Cheapside, visit at pleasecincinnati.com. Wanna hear what your favorite chef's favorite meal is? Email suggestions to eats@citybeat.com.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 08.04.2014 79 days ago
 
 
off the vine cold press

New Cold-Press Juice Bar Coming to OTR

Off the Vine will feature cold-press juice made from fresh produce and herbs

Big news for local juice fans. Cold-press juice bars are a new staple in most big cities — follow any model, actress or fashion blogger on instagram and you'll see oodles of the stuff from places like Venice Beach's juice bar Moon Juice. 

Now, locals Annie McKinney, Cydney Rabe and Steve Vickers are bringing the trend to Cincinnati with their new OTR juice bar Off the Vine (1218 Vine St., OTR, facebook.com/otvcincy).

"Cydney, Steve, and myself firmly believe that healthy eating is vital to a healthy and happy life," says McKinney. "Juicing is such a fantastic way to easily absorb important nutrients — nutrients that the vast majority of Americans lack from their diet." 

Off The Vine will offer cold-press juices made from fresh produce and herbs. Cold-pressing is a form of juicing that basically uses extreme pressure to juice produce, without adding heat. Heat possibly denatures the enzymes, vitamins and minerals in the vegetables; cold pressing preserves the health benefits while also squeezing out more juice than traditional methods. Off the Vine juices will range from $8-$11, a pretty standard price for cold-press. They'll also be making their own vanilla cashew milk.

"We have three different 'levels' of green juice," McKinney says, "from a basic spinach and apple to a hardcore, all-vegetable juice. Something to please the person who has never tried a green juice before to those who are looking for an intense blend of greens."  

Off the Vine will also be offering juices cleanses with a daily series of five juices and one meal-replacement nut milk as a "kick start for people looking to rid their bodies of the toxins that build up from poor eating habits," McKinney says. The group will also offer support for those looking to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

They plan to open this fall, possibly in September. Follow their progress at facebook.com/otvcincy.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.04.2014 79 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
an_lumenocity_365cincinnati

Morning News and Stuff

CPD says barriers worked, mostly; Freedom Center celebrates 10 years; a horrifying eggnog explosion

Hey all. As we all collectively recover from sitting in Washington Park for hours camped out for LumenoCity, let’s talk about what’s going on in the wide world, shall we?

The Cincinnati Police Department has released a report (scroll down to page four in that agenda) about the effectiveness of the anti-prostitution barriers on McMicken, which the city put up in May and took down last week. According to the report, the barricades did reduce prostitution, though some activity simply shifted to nearby blocks in Over-the-Rhine.

• The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center celebrated its 10th anniversary Sunday. After contention about its creation and financial struggles early in its existence, the museum and conference center looks to be on a very positive trajectory. Despite debt and a $1 million-plus operating deficit as recently as 2011, the Freedom Center has proven resilient. A July 2012 merger with the Museum Center has helped, as well as contributions from donors and the Center’s continually nationally recognized exhibitions and events. Attendance revenue is up 35 percent at the Center, a Cincinnati Enquirer article says, and the Center’s endowment is growing. On a personal note, this is one of my favorite places in the city, and the news that it’s doing well is great to hear indeed.

• The big story this morning is in Toledo, which is now in its third day without water due to contamination from algae. Four-hundred-thousand residents woke up Saturday morning to a warning from the city instructing them not to use tap water for drinking, showering or cleaning. Making matters worse, boiling the water only increases the concentration of toxins, so the water is completely unusable. Toledo’s Mayor D. Michael Collins announced Monday that tests of the water supply showed it was getting safer after clean-up efforts, but wanted more time to ensure it is completely safe. Residents Sunday night were told it would probably be safe to shower quickly or do laundry. Meanwhile, Gov. John Kasich declared a state of emergency Saturday, the National Guard began shipping in vats of water and grocery stores were picked clean of bottled water.

Experts say the current situation has been building for a decade, as sewage, farm and industrial runoff builds in Lake Erie. That’s supported the explosive growth of algae, which produces toxins that can cause liver problems and general illness, including nausea and dizziness. The toxins can also kill pets.

Hamilton County Commissioners at their staff meeting this morning will discuss whether to put the so-called icon tax on the November ballot. As of Friday, none of the three commissioners were completely on board with any of the scenarios for a proposed tax hike to pay for renovations to Union Terminal and Music Hall, though the commissioners have expressed interest in finding a proposal that works for everyone. Probably the hardest to sway will be Commissioner Todd Portune, who said he doesn’t feel “any pressure at all” to vote in favor of a tax plan. At issue: how much the city should chip in for the renovations and whether it would be more appropriate to pay for at least some of the renovations with fees added to tickets to events at the facilities. The commissioners must make a decision by Aug. 6.

• LumenoCity wrapped up last night, and by all accounts it was a big success. The three-day event, which combined a light show projected onto Music Hall with a Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra performance, drew 37,500 people who reserved tickets online in order to enter the park. This year, festivities included LumenoCity village, where folks could shop and hang out whether they had a ticket or not. I went Sunday, and it was great to see so many people mingling. Plus the Charley Harper tribute was especially amazing. But a thought: Who was left out by the ticketing system, which was predominantly administered online? Also, it’s interesting to think about spending $1 million on an hour-and-a-half-long light show in a historically low-income neighborhood when that’s the same amount of money the city has budgeted for social service agencies for the whole year. Just a thought.

• Finally, this story is the stuff of nightmares. Some kind of mechanical failure caused an explosion in an eggnog vat at a food lab in New Jersey. The ‘nog is one of my least favorite things in the world, and the thought of a violent explosion of the stuff is stomach-turning, to say the least. No one was killed in the blast (what a way to go that would be) but two scientists were injured and an entire back wall of the lab was blown down. One final thought about this whole thing — the establishment cooking up the beverage is called Pharmachem. Sounds delicious.

 
 
by Rick Pender 08.01.2014 82 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:35 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
shakes

Stage Door: Free Shakespeare!

The big show this weekend will be Lumenocity in Washington Park. If you were lucky enough to get a ticket, you'll be seeing some great images on Music Hall's facade with accompaniment by the Cincinnati Symphony. If you weren't so lucky, you can still enjoy the show via radio (WGUC), television, big screens (at Fountain Square and Riverbend, for free) or via live streaming at lumenocity2014.com.

If you want to check out a free show at another park, how about free performances of A Midsummer Night's Dream? Cincinnati Shakespeare kicks off its Shakespeare in the Park tour this weekend. They'll be at Seasongood Pavilion at Eden Park on Friday evening, at Harry Whiting Brown Lawn in Glendale on Saturday and the Community Park Pavilion at the Milford Historical Society in Milford on Sunday. Performances generally begin around 7 p.m. Show up earlier to get a good seat and enjoy six of Cincy Shakes actors playing a bunch of characters in a very funny comedy.

On the West Side, it's the final weekend for Footloose The Musical, presented as the 33rd annual summer show by Cincinnati Young People's Theatre at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. This is a program that gives teens from across Greater Cincinnati a chance to work onstage and backstage. During the past three decades more than 2,300 kids have participated. The show, based on a popular movie from 1984, is about a teenager and his mother who move from Chicago to a small farming town where dancing is frowned upon by the local preacher. But his rebellious daughter shakes things up and love wins out. It's a fine show for teens. Tickets ($12-$16): 513-241-6550.

If you're willing to make the drive to Dayton, you have the opportunity to check out workshops of new musical theater material at the Human Race Theatre Company. Molly Sweeney is about a young woman whose blindness becomes an obstacle for her new husband to overcome, even though she has a different perspective. (It's happening Friday night at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m.) The second work is a songwriter showcase (Saturday at 8 p.m.) by a dozen creators who are working on new shows. It's being hosted by Dayton native Susan Blackwell, creator of the clever [title of show]. Advance tickets ($15): 888-228-3630 – or $20 at the door at the Loft Theatre (126 N. Main St., Dayton).
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.01.2014 82 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news1_prostitution_jf003

Morning News and Stuff

Prostitution barriers down, prospective city manager speaks and suburban poverty continues to rise

Hey all. Did you miss me? I ditched the morning news yesterday to see if anyone noticed I was gone go find out more about Harry Black, Mayor John Cranley’s pick to be city manager. You can read all about what he’ll do if he gets the job here, but I’ll offer a brief recap. Black wants to play the long game, working on the city’s long-term financial planning and setting up something similar to the ten-year plan he worked on as the city of Baltimore’s finance head. He said he would stay away from the politics of some of the city’s more contentious projects like the streetcar, instead offering analytical and technical contributions to those undertakings.

• The barriers erected in May along McMicken Ave. in Over-the-Rhine and Fairview came down yesterday as originally scheduled. (Actually, I passed through the area on the way home from a show Wednesday night and they were already down by that point). The three blockades on various parts of the street were designed to cut down the high levels of prostitution happening in the area. The jury is out on whether or not the approach worked; some in the neighborhood say it actually made the problem worse and have filed a lawsuit to keep the city from putting them back up in the future, though others are much more positive about the outcome. Some claim the problem simply moved to other neighborhoods like Price Hill. The city is now weighing more permanent efforts to cut down prostitution in Cincinnati, including publishing the names of convicted johns.

• Ugh. Normally, I don’t roll individual crime reporting into the morning news, but this instance is just so scummy I feel like it has to be mentioned. Three men were arrested yesterday for allegedly assaulting a man named Johnny Hensley as he left the Drop-Inn Center in Over-the-Rhine, where he’d been staying. The assault happened Sunday at about 3 a.m., police say, and lasted for about 15 minutes. The three allegedly approached Hensley from behind and began punching him. Advocates for the homeless are calling it a hate crime.

Here’s some good news. Ohio students entering high school as freshmen will get the chance to take the ACT and SAT when they become juniors free of charge. The Ohio Department of Education will pick up the tab for the cost of those tests as part of an effort to boost higher education among Ohioans. The tests usually cost about $50 each, and sometimes you may have to take them a couple times each to get a decent score. Well, I did, at least.

• The concentration of poverty in America’s suburbs is accelerating, a new brief by the Brookings Institution says. The release is an update of a 2011 study that showed the poor are increasingly found in the suburbs, counter to the common perception of poverty as something that is solely an inner-city problem. The numbers, which have been updated with the latest data from the Census American Community Survey, are pretty shocking. From 2000 to 2012, populations of poor folks increased by 139 percent in the suburbs, compared to a 50 percent increase in urban areas. In the Cincinnati area, the number of people living in poverty in the suburbs jumped by 70 percent in that time, compared to a 13 percent jump in the number of people living in poverty in the city.

• As the debate of immigration continues its nauseating, repetitious drone, the GOP congressional delegation has had something of a meltdown over the past couple days. The Republican-dominated House of Representatives yesterday seemed poised to vote on and pass a border security bill that would have given at least some money, though not as much as Democrats would like, for addressing the humanitarian crisis along America’s southern border. The bill was packed with conservative-friendly provisions, including a measure that would mean immediate deportation for young, unaccompanied migrants fleeing drug-related turmoil in Central America. But even that wasn’t conservative enough, and the bill was pulled before a vote after it became clear the tea party element of Congress would not support it. Lawmakers are trying again today to get enough support for some effort to address the border crisis, though there is no indication whether they will be successful. Congress is scheduled to be in recess after today until September.

• Right now, Liberia, Sierra Leone and other areas in western Africa are experiencing a deadly flare-up of the Ebola virus. More than 700 people have died from the disease, and about a thousand more have taken ill. Now, a U.S. aid worker infected with the virus, which has a 60 to 90 percent mortality rate, is coming to an Atlanta hospital for treatment. She or he will be the first known person with Ebola in the United States, experts say, though doctors and disease specialists say there is little chance the virus will spread here. The disease is terrifying, beginning as cold-like symptoms before escalating into an all-out assault on the body that can literally melt your organs. Researchers are working on a vaccine, and may be ready to test it by September.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 07.31.2014 83 days ago
at 11:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Harry Black

Cranley's Pick for City Manager Lays Out Vision for Cincinnati

Harry Black touts his experience as a long-time public servant

Harry Black, Mayor John Cranley’s pick for the next city manager, spoke today about his ideas for keeping Cincinnati’s momentum moving forward.

At a news conference outside City Hall this morning, Black pledged that should he be selected to be city manager, his office would be transparent and accountable as it seeks to boost economic development, improve financial planning and preserve safety in the city. The city manager is arguably the second most powerful position in city government behind the mayor, hiring department heads and making day-to-day choices on the way the city runs.

Black currently serves as the finance director for the city of Baltimore, a role he says has prepared him to be Cincinnati’s city manager.

“They’re both rustbelt cities,” Black said of Baltimore and Cincinnati. “They’re both challenged in similar ways. What may vary is scale. But the issues here are issues that I’ve seen.”

Black has been involved in political dustups in some of his past jobs, but has more than 25 years of public service experience and reams of positive recommendations. In his remarks today, he pledged to guide the city to a more long-term outlook on finances while forging an analytic rather than political approach to big issues.

He also said he would “think outside the box” in working to lift up Cincinnati’s low-income neighborhoods.

“We’ll have a segment of the community that may need help it terms of being employable,” he said. “As a local government, we have to be certain that we make that a priority as well. We may have to create economic opportunity and connect that segment of the community to those opportunities.”  

Black, 51, grew up in Park Heights, a rough neighborhood in Baltimore, and describes himself as “an inner city kid who has been fortunate enough to have some breaks.” 

Mayor Cranley highlighted Black’s story when introducing his pick today. “Having grown up in the urban core, he pulled himself up, got himself educated and has had a very successful career in public service,” Cranley said.

Cincinnati City Council will choose between Black and current interim City Manager Scott Stiles, who has served since Milton Dohoney stepped down last year after Cranley’s election. Black says his experience with long-term financial planning is what makes him the right choice.

“We can’t sustain and prosper by just balancing budgets,” he said. “We have to find ways to go beyond just balancing budgets, which is what we did in Baltimore in respects to the 10-year plan that we put in place. Black said “a longer-term approach” is important “not just in terms of filling budget shortfalls but also finding ways to reinvest back into the city.”

Black says he’ll put an emphasis on data-driven decisions and accountability. In addition to shoring up long-term financial planning here, he said he would create new ways for innovation to happen in the city.

 Though Cincinnati would be his first time as a city manager, Black has served more than a quarter century in city government roles, mostly in finance, and has also worked in the private sector. While many praise his work, he’s also acquired a reputation for toughness.

Before his job in Baltimore, Black served as chief financial officer in Richmond, Virginia, where he was involved in a long fight between the mayor and city council that earned him the nickname “Mr. Pitbull.” He says that’s a misleading name and that he’s grown from the turbulent times in Richmond.

“I’m not a pitbull,” he said at the conference, “and only time will allow you to see that.”

Black said he would stay out of the politics of city government in favor of focusing on practical and technical aspects of the job, especially when it comes to controversial issues like the streetcar. Black said his job would be to provide  technical and analytical input for council’s decisions.

“In terms of the streetcar project … the legislators have legislated this initiative and this project. It’s incumbent on me and my team to make sure that it’s executed, but to make sure that it’s executed in a cost-effective and responsible way,” he said. 
“As a city manager, I would rely on the idea that the legislative process is going to yield what the people want.”

Janet Reid, a Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce and 3CDC Board Member, was part of the screening process that selected Black. She praised his abilities.

“I could recognize very early on that he has an unusual mixture of talents that would be just right mix for our city,” she said. “That includes the ability to look deeply into details as well as see the big picture.” Reid highlighted Black’s long public service career, praising what she called his proven track record.

Whether council chooses Black for city manager or not, the gig may be short-lived. Councilman Christopher Smitherman has proposed amending Cincinnati’s charter to create a so-called executive mayor. That would eliminate the city manager position and give the mayor’s office power over many elements of the current city manager’s role. Cranley has voiced support for the idea, though Smitherman has said he doesn’t think he has the votes on council to pass the measure and may need to collect voter signatures to get it on the ballot.

Smitherman, along with Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld and Vice Mayor David Mann, attended today’s news conference introducing prospective City Manager Black.

 
 
by Jake Grieco 07.31.2014 83 days ago
Posted In: MidPoint Music Festival at 10:07 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sacascsdvsbgfm

MPMF Announces Christian Moerlein Brewery as Newest Venue

Moerlein to be fest's official beer, host headliners Panda Bear, Tycho and The Raveonettes

Old and new traditions will coalesce at this year's MidPoint Music Festival as Christian Moerlein Brewing Company will host acts all weekend long, including headliners Panda Bear, Tycho and The Raveonettes. The 13th annual MPMF runs Sept. 25 -27 and continues to expand throughout downtown Cincinnati and the Over-the-Rhine area.

Not only will Moerlein be the official beer of MPMF, but the brewery is opening its OTR location as a venue for the festival. Panda Bear will perform at the outdoor Moerlein stage Thursday, with Tycho following on Friday and the Raveonettes on Saturday.

The Moerlein brewery holds Cincinnati history in its underground tunnels that were used to keep lagers cold before the invention of refrigeration. Now, as technology and the city itself have advanced, Moerlein can provide its fine beers at every single MPMF location so no festival-goer will go without a drink.

The brewery will bring out all its finest brews for the festival, including seasonal Hell Town Rye-Ot Ale, Zeppelin Bavarian Pale Ale, Over-the-Rhine Ale, Northern Liberties IPA and Lager House Helles.

The Moerlein family has a deep-rooted Cincinnati history, and since its recent rebirth has continued its work to uphold Cincinnati as a brewing capital.

“Our festival has a tradition of promoting Cincinnati originals, whether that be through our music pioneers or our urban culture,” said Dan McCabe, artistic director of MPMF, in a press release. “Christian Moerlein only strengthens that tradition, as they’ve been a leader in America’s craft beer resurgence since the early '80s. Cincinnati music fans love Cincinnati beer.”

 
 
by Rachel Podnar 07.30.2014 84 days ago
Posted In: Life at 09:49 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From The Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the July 30 issue of CityBeat

It would seem like we’ve made it, folks. The short-lived tenure of this little vocab blog has reached its end; let’s not get all sentimental about all the words we’ve learned.

I’m going back to the land of Muncie, Indiana, where we don’t have cool stuff like altweeklies or rideshare competition, which you can read about in this week’s cover story. We have to like, walk home from a night out like the plebeian college students Nick ran into, because who can pay someone $24 to drive them home? That’s more money than I’m going to lose if I get jumped while walking.

Anyway, I wish the future copy of CityBeat the best of luck until there’s a new copy editor and from now on, you’ll have to rely on context clues to decipher CityBeat writers' language.

Acrimonious: caustic, stinging or bitter, adj.

If something is acrimonious, I bet it sounds like a really bad song. It’s like harmonious, but acidic. Except, not at all.

In the issue: “Hurricane Katrina forced a lengthy stay in Austin, Texas in 2005 and the following year saw the acrimonious departure of Huston,” in Brian Baker’s Sound Advice on The Iguanas. Maybe Huston just wished they had stayed in Houston instead of Austin and that’s why he left. Sounds sad. Looks like the rest of the band is still doing alright without him, playing shows and selling albums and whatnot.

Mandala: a schematized representation of the cosmos in Oriental art, n.

In my head I pictured this as a mandolin, a menorah and gondola all combined, but that’s just me. This is the first word in today’s blog under the category of Nouns You May Not Have Known and Will Never Use.

In the issue “The first and last paintings in Elvis Suite are more like multi-bordered mandalas or horoscopic charts,” in Steven Rosen’s Art Shook Up (what a clever title) about the Elvis Presley portrait exhibit currently at the Carl Solway gallery. Yes, if you haven’t read the article yet, that’s right. There’s a series of calendar art focusing on Elvis of which the first and last pieces are schematized representations of the cosmos because that has so much to do with Elvis. 

Morass: a troublesome situation difficult to get out of, n.; and "maelstrom": a disordered state of affairs, n.

These words go great together. Next time you’re really upset just run around and be like “This is a maelstrom and a morass!”

In the issue: “Maybe, in all the morass and maelstrom of confusion, violence and power play …” in Kathy Y. Wilson’s column, "Elevators," where she talked about domestic violence and briefly mentioned that elevators serve as a catalyst for it before talking about more serious things than elevators. 

Tulpa: a being that is created in the imagination through visualization techniques such as in Tibetan mysticism, n.

This is the second and final word of the day under Nouns You May Not Have Known and Will Never Use.

In the Issue: Again in "Art Shook Up," Laffoley, the artist, said he wants to “take calendar art and turn it into a meditation series in which the fans attempt to recreate Elvis’ existence as a tulpa.” You read that right. That went from calendar art to mysticism real fast.

I take back what I said earlier. You may use this word again. You may in fact use it if you take Laffoley’s advice and see these images of Elvis, he will become a choose-your-own-tulpa-Elvis: Will you pick the Christmas Album Elvis or the Aloha From Hawaii Elvis?


Rachel Podnar writes "From the Copy Desk" weekly from her desk as CityBeat's intern copy editor. Her job is to find and correct everybody else's mistakes, occasionally referencing a dictionary to check one of our more pretentious educated writers' choices of words. She rounds up and recaps the best ones here.
 
 

 

 

 
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