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by Kevin Osborne 09.21.2011
Posted In: Streetcar, Public Transit, NAACP, COAST at 12:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 
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Does NAACP Approve of COAST Hijinks? (UPDATED)

(** UPDATE FOLLOWS AT BOTTOM.)

Mark Miller isn't a subtle guy.

Miller, treasurer of the Coalition Opposed to Additional Spending and Taxes (COAST), recently apologized publicly after using the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks to tweet a comment comparing the attacks to a political battle about the planned Cincinnati streetcar system.

Now Miller has posted an altered photograph on his Facebook page that some people believe is racist. The photo depicts a streetcar filled with young African-American males brandishing weapons. The streetcar has a sign that reads, “Banks & Freedom Center Only.”

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by 05.08.2009
Posted In: Television at 10:08 AM | Permalink | Comments (5)
 
 

Taking the Stage ... Anywhere But Cincinnati

You know that friend who gets sweaty and angry and tense whenever someone says something bad about Cincinnati? The friend who will defend it like King Arthur defended Camelot, not only the city itself but the idea of it? I'm that guy. 

I will Wiki whatever city you grew up in and show you point by point why Cincinnati is better. "But adult internet star Raven Riley is from Middletown and did you know that the Cincinnati Public Library is arguably the largest public library in the country?" I say, scrambling for anything that might appeal to the Cincinnati-hater.

Last night was the season finale of Taking the Stage, the Cincinnati-based docu-drama about students at the School for Creative and Performing Arts. I've officially watched two episodes of the show (the first and last) and am therefore unqualified to comment on the quality and/or relevance of the content.

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by 01.27.2009
Posted In: Government, Media, 2010 Election at 11:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (4)
 
 
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Known by the Company We Keep?

Republicans made a lot of fuss about Barack Obama’s associations during last year’s presidential campaign. Now that same standard might come back to haunt them.

Because Obama attended church where the Rev. Jeremiah Wright preached, the GOP told us it must mean that Obama shared all of Wright’s incendiary beliefs about the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the origin of the AIDS virus. Because Obama lived near ex-‘60s radical William Ayers and attended some of the same events, they breathlessly added that it must mean Obama approves of blowing up public buildings.

What, then, does that say about Rob Portman, the former GOP congressman who is the odds-on favorite to run for George Voinovich’s seat in the U.S. Senate in 2010?

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by Rick Pender 05.11.2010
Posted In: Theater, Arts community at 04:29 PM | Permalink | Comments (5)
 
 

Local Theater Awards: How Much Is Enough?

Greater Cincinnati has two awards programs that recognize our excellent theater scene. Perhaps that’s good news, but you might wonder if this kind of competition between competitions is the best way to go.

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by Jason Gargano 04.17.2009
at 01:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Friday Movie Roundup: Movieline: Part Deux and Robot Love

Movieline is back. Sort of.

Launched in 1989, the magazine was — like the beat it covered — a glossy, gossipy, A-list-laden Hollywood wank-fest full sometimes vapid, usually smart, almost always entertaining content. (I still have a copy of the issue with Wild at Heart’s Nicolas Cage and Laura Dern on the cover.

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by Jason Gargano 06.10.2011
at 07:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

'Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' Trailer Unveiled

David Fincher is a busy man. After giving us only one film (2002's Panic Room) in the eight years following 1999's gleefully subversive, zeitgeist-capturing Fight Club, the notoriously meticulous filmmaker delivered one of 2010’s best films, The Social Network, which was his third effort in four years following 2007's excellent Zodiac and 2008's out-of-character — it's essentially a straight-up love story — The Curious Case of Benjamin Button.

And he's not done yet: Fincher's American version of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is currently in production and has a release date of Dec. 20. How’s that for an early Christmas present?

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by James McNair 07.31.2013
Posted In: Government at 10:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (8)
 
 
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Is Ohio's New License Plate the Worst or Just Bad?

Bye, bye “Beautiful Ohio” plate, hello word scramble

In case you haven’t noticed, Ohio has gained a new distinction among the 50 states — that with the ugliest license plate.

Gone, after just three-and-a-half years, is the “Beautiful Ohio” plate, a bucolic affair that managed to combine green rolling hills, a red barn, a city skyline, trees, a yellow sunburst, the Wright Brothers’ plane and the year of statehood. The Automobile License Plate Collectors Association gave it second place in its Best New License Plate contest in 2009.

The new standard-issue plate, which went on sale April 15, is called “Ohio Pride” (no, not that pride). The word Ohio appears on a wide, red isosceles triangle bleeding from the top of the plate. And behind the plate number is a background of 46 slogans, identifiers and products “describing what makes Ohio a great state.” Such as: “State of Perfect Balance,” “The Heart of it All,” “Newark Earthworks,” “Serpent Mound,” “Polymer Capital of the World,” “Steel City” and “Walleye.” It is devoid of images.

Pity the passing driver who tries to make out any of the 46 words and phrases. Because they are jammed together in light gray lettering, they blur into a hazy backdrop. Don’t take CityBeat’s word for it. Pull up behind a car with one of the new plates. Maybe you’ll be able to make out two of the larger-print items, “Birthplace of Aviation” and “DiscoverOhio.com.”

The cacophony of slogans and products gives the new Ohio plate an edge over the regular plates of many states, said Greg Gibson, president of the ALPCA. But he, too, was confounded by their legibility. “I doubt that the slogans can be read at any distance,” he says.

Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles spokesman Dustyn Fox said no one in the Kasich administration objected to the Beautiful Ohio plate, which was designed with the help of former First Lady Frances Strickland.

“Traditionally, each new administration redesigns the Ohio plate,” Fox says. “A selection committee made up from BMV officials, Ohio Department of Public Safety officials and representatives from the governor’s office choose final designs. The governor and first lady make the final decision.”

The review panel considered five or six designs before settling on one submitted by students at the Columbus College of Art and Design. The selection, however, represents an act of artistic regression in a milieu that has gone wild for visual elements in the past decade. Wyoming, for instance, has a bucking bronco, Oklahoma a Native American archer, Utah a skier and South Dakota, Mt. Rushmore. Elsewhere, we see trees, mountain ranges, peaches, oranges, a cactus, a pelican and a buffalo.

Closer to home, Indiana has a blue license plate depicting the state seal, but which looks like a clock face in traffic. Kentucky plates bear the slogan “Unbridled Spirit” and the head of a hurtling race horse. Cleverly, they also show the vehicle owner’s home county, which allows police officers to snag out-of-county drivers for traffic violations.

The following are the four license plate designs that were considered by the state BMV:

 

 

 

 


 
 
by Ashley Thomas 06.22.2009
Posted In: Fashion with Ashley at 03:06 PM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 

Fashion Inspiration: The DAAP “Reject” All-Stars

Last week's blogs (here and here) were all about UC’s DAAP Fashion Design students. Today, however, I’d like to cross the river (not the Ohio) to the other side of DAAP-unrelated and fashion-based talent in Cincinnati. If you don’t already know them, chances are you soon will. Meet photographer Floyd Johnson, stylists Kelsey Wing and Shannon Yoho and make-up artist Kayla Smith, who are all twentysomething Cincinnati natives.

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by mbreen 10.09.2008
Posted In: Local Music at 12:36 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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The Last Word on The Afghan Whigs' Gentlemen

While I’m not quite a junkie, I am fairly addicted to the “33 1/3” book series from publisher Continuum. If you’ve yet to hear about the series, the books are each dedicated to one specific album that has gained some sort of notoriety in the music world. The records chosen are mostly cult favorites with a few influential blockbusters mixed in. Of the 60 books written so far (each by a different author), the series has covered Pet Sounds, Songs in the Key in Life, Exile on Main St. and Led Zeppelin II but also lower-selling but no less influential recordings by the Magnetic Fields, Belle & Sebastian, Guided By Voices, DJ Shadow and Sonic Youth. (For a great overview, pick up one of the two Greatest Hits volumes released by the publisher.)

The tomes vary in approach, with some offering strictly historical examinations, some more about the author’s personal relationship with the album and others a mix of both. Chicago-based writer and music industry vet Bob Gendron has written what will likely be the only Cincinnati-connected album in the series, telling the tale behind Gentlemen, the major-label debut and relative breakthrough album by The Afghan Whigs. I would argue that records by Over the Rhine and The Ass Ponys, among others, deserve the 33 1/3 treatment, but they’re likely not well known enough to pique the publisher’s interest. I’d also argue that my personal favorite Whigs’ album, Black Love, should get a book, but the chances of having two Whigs stories in the series are just as slim.

Gendron mostly plays historian, telling the story via research and numerous interviews with the prime players, including all of the Whigs (drummer Steve Earle included), Sub Pop employees (Gendron himself used to be one) and other friends and industry connections. He also does a fantastic job of recreating the state of the Whigs at the time, a band of tight friends on the brink of major success yet also inflicted with drug issues and internal and external squabbles.

The story of Gentlemen is bookended by the tale of the band’s beginnings and their breakup, all the way up through last year’s greatest hits album. There are a lot of interesting tidbits and revelations. Gendron gets singer/songwriter Greg Dulli to talk about his serious relationship with the mysterious “Kris,” the dissolution of which led to the album’s tortuous, heartbroken tone. Other fun facts: Dulli recorded several of the album’s lead vocal tracks in one night while flying on coke and trying to impress a girl; Steve Earle was booted for several reasons (alcohol abuse, meddling girlfriend, creative control issues, ego conflict); and labelmate Linda Ronstadt was allegedly furious about the album’s cover (depicting a young boy and girl lounging on a bed), apparently under the impression that it was a naked bellybutton away from being child porn. It was also interesting to read that one of the band’s main friends at Elektra Records was feeding information to the nasty, slanderous 'zine Fat Greg Dulli.

Gendron gets to about every detail of the album, from the cover art’s original inspiration and liner notes to the songs’ inspirations and recording. But he doesn’t just relay facts. He also talks about Gentlemen as an artistic statement, carefully dissecting and describing the individual songs’ and the general album’s mood, cause and effect. Not only does Gendron’s book offer the last word on Gentlemen, it also shows what a compelling story The Afghan Whigs’ entire career remains.

For Whigs fans or even just those who were around Cincinnati to witness the band’s rise from little underground touring unit to soulful, seductive Rock machine, the book is a fascinating remembrance. For those who’ve never even heard of the Afghan Whigs, the story is universal and dramatic enough to be read as a novel (save the music-critic-y song dissertations).

The story is so good, in fact, that it would be great to see Gendron expand it beyond the 113 pages of this book. As his Gentlemen proves, the Whigs are deserving of a long-form biography that tells the band’s complete story. Who knows? Maybe Gentlemen: The Movie isn’t totally out of the realm of possibility.

Too bad John Belushi isn't around to play Greg. And Jimmy Page is too old to play Rick McCollum.

— Mike Breen

 
 
by Chelsea Spata 06.19.2013
Posted In: Shopping, Fashion, Events at 11:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
truckshop

Truckshop Launches Cincinnati's First Mobile Fashion Boutique

Offers dresses, tops, jewelry and accessories for $65 or less

Truckshop, Cincinnati’s newest mobile vendor, launches tonight at the Columbia Center in Columbia Tusculum. The mobile fashion boutique features clothing and accessories at affordable prices and a unique experience unlike that found in brick-and-mortar stores. While mobile boutiques have become popular trends along the coasts, Truckshop is introducing shopping-on-the-go to the Midwest and Greater Cincinnati area.

Founder and Cincinnati resident Ashley Volbrecht hopes to offer consumers a different shopping perspective. “Creating a pop-up shop in my mind just represented a new way to get people to think about shopping,” Volbrecht said in a press release. “We’re here today, gone tomorrow. I want shoppers to forget they are inside of a truck when they enter.”

The truck itself is a former bread delivery truck that has been reconstructed to reflect the trendy vibe of the shop’s clothing. Former tin walls are now pink and white shelves boasting a variety of dresses and tops. A dingy floor has been converted into a pristine black and white striped pathway leading shoppers through racks of clothing and accessories. The former white exterior now stands out with bright colors and an elegant store name that lets consumers know this isn’t your run-of-the-mill mobile vendor.

Most shoppers know that entering a boutique usually entails a bit of sticker shock, but Truckshop is changing that assumption for its customers. Truckshop sells dresses, tops, jewelry and accessories, all for $65 or less. “Price point is one of the most important parts,” Volbrecht explained. “I love finding pieces I’m obsessed with and I love finding a bargain. I tried to use this same approach when choosing pieces for the boutique.”

Truckshop, opened this past Saturday, is leading the way for mobile boutiques in the Midwest. Truckshop will be at various festivals this summer including City Flea and Second Sundays on Main. And now everyone can feel like a celebrity with a store that comes to you: Truckshop is available for private parties of six or more people. Customers can also shop online through Facebook and Instagram pages.

The launch party is tonight from 6-9 p.m. at the Columbia Center, 3500 Columbia Pkwy. For more information about Truckshop, visit www.facebook.com/shopthetruck or follow Truckshop on Twitter @shopthetruck.

 
 

 

 

 
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