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by Kerry Skiff 11.10.2015 89 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Literary at 04:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Beyond the Books

Pottery Demonstration at the Kenton County Public Library's Covington Branch

Every piece of art has a story, but what we don’t often remember is that the story of the artist can be even more enthralling. Donna King of River’s Edge Pottery Studio shared not only her trade but her history with a group during a pottery demonstration at the Covington branch of the Kenton County Public Library. The demonstration, which was scheduled for only two hours, stretched out as King engaged her audience in a series of stories.

She begian by slamming the clay on the wheel, making a large thump. “You’ve gotta get really really tough with it,” she explained. After centering the blob of clay on the wheel, King went to work on what she tells us is going to be a bowl. “With my students, the first thing I have them do is make a bowl,” she said.

As we watched, King masterfully poked a hole in the middle of the clay lump, eventually widening it out to form a discernable bowl shape. Once she was finished with it, King set it aside and grabbed a larger lump of clay, which she again threw on the wheel. This one was to become a vase, and King eagerly shared her technique for designing her pieces, which includes using a variety of objects to create patterns. Leaves, feathers and lace are a few of her standard tools, but she’s also used Hot Wheels cars, plastic placemats and pages from adult coloring books. “Sometimes I use a feather, sometimes I use sugar, and one time I actually used cat’s whiskers,” she said, laughing.

The library demonstration was King’s second at the Kenton County Public Library. The artist, who has been creating pottery for nine years, originally asked to display pottery for the Clay Alliance of Cincinnati, but when the library reached out requesting her to come give a presentation last fall, she gladly accepted.  “It’s just fun,” she said. “It’s just been an adventure.” The artist says she’s traveled all over the community doing demonstrations and classes and has worked with several Girl Scout troops and taught classes at Christian schools in the area, as well as teaching private or group classes. “I’ve had them as young as two years old, and up to 86 years old,” she said “People who say, ‘You know, I’ve always wanted to try that,’ and I say, ‘Well, now’s your chance.’ ”

Find this interesting? Check out similar events at the Kenton County Public Library:

Nov. 12: Scarf It Up: Learn to knit from a local hobbyist. (Durr Branch)
Nov. 17: Coloring for Adults: Unwind at the Erlanger branch with this creative past time. (Erlanger Branch)
Nov. 19: Holiday Sewing: Machines and fabric are available for you to come make a holiday gift. (Covington Branch)

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.10.2015 90 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:52 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Chamber hosts discussions on transit; workers rally for minimum wage increase; streetcar zipping around OTR

Hey Cincy. There’s a ton of interesting stuff going on today. Let’s talk about some of it.

• The Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce this morning is hosting a series of discussions about transit in the region, and the event has drawn a packed house. The event comes on the heels of a less-than-stellar report about Greater Cincinnati’s transit options. According to that report, only 22 percent of jobs in the city are easily accessible by public transit, and only 58 percent across the region are within a 90-minute transit ride.

The Chamber’s event today features a panel discussion involving local transit officials and experts and a keynote address from former Zipcar head and transit expert Gabe Klein. Among the highlights: Republican Cincinnati City Councilwoman and chair of the Council’s transportation and regional cooperation subcommittee Amy Murray advocating for an expansion of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s Metro system via a county-wide tax increase. That ask may appear on the ballot next November. Democrat Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune, also speaking on the panel, pointed to the fact that the region is dead last among peer cities in terms of transit connectivity, and that this weakness could hamper economic growth.

Klein’s talk focused on the way transit can increase a city’s economic competitiveness, and how high emphasis on highways and lack of transit options can hamper a city’s walkability and its ability to attract young people. Klein also argued in favor of a return to density in city centers, especially density focused on eliminating the need to rely on cars to get to necessities.

“Making cities dense again, a place where people want to be, just makes sense,” Klein told attendees, arguing that increased density with less reliance on cars (and need for parking, for example) changes the equation for developers and residents when it comes to making decisions about where to build and live.

• Speaking of transit, the streetcar is taking its first trips under its own power today around Over-the-Rhine. You may see the shiny new orange and white vehicles, which look a little like space trains or something, making a 1.6 mile loop between the southern edge of Washington Park and Henry Street just north of Findlay Market. There won’t be any street closures along the route as officials seek to test how motorists and pedestrians interact with the new addition to traffic. The cars will travel very slowly most of the time — about three miles an hour — though at times the cars will be bumped up to 10 mph and occasionally all the way up to a top speed of 25 mph. The tests could take up to three days.

• About 20 local fast food, homecare and childcare workers gathered at City Hall this morning to advocate for a boost in the minimum wage to $15 an hour. The demonstration was part of a larger group of events happening across the country today advocating for the wage boost with an eye toward the 2016 elections. According to organizers, walkouts, city hall rallies and other events are planned in more than 270 cities nationwide today. The group gathered at Cincinnati City Hall this morning will also rally in Norwood at noon. In addition to wage increases, the groups, part of the Fight for 15 movement, are also protesting for increased union rights in industries that aren’t friendly to collective bargaining. Organizers say today’s rallies are just the start of a year-long effort to put pressure on candidates and officials to take steps to expand collective bargaining rights and wages for low-income workers. More than 2 million Ohioans make less than $15 an hour.

• What’s the difference between jail and a cozy stay in a place you found on Air B&B? Here’s a hint: it’s not the price. Jail stays in some parts of the state can cost you an average of more than $70 a day, a report from the American Civil Liberties Union found recently. Those fees can add up. One man who has been booked multiple times on non-violent drug charges now owes the state more than $21,000 for his time in county jails. Not all jails charge booking or daily fees, but at least 16 in the state do. Generally, county commissioners decide whether or not to charge the one-time booking fees (which Hamilton and Butler Counties do) and the recurring daily fees (which they do not). The ACLU is asking the state legislature to create rules against those charges.

• Finally, is a dynamic duo of U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio and Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the cards for the 2016 presidential election? Pundits have been opining on the possible dream team (or nightmare scenario/comedic and bumbling buddy movie in the making, depending on your political leanings) after noticing the two contenders for the GOP presidential nomination have been notably less than hostile to each other during debates and in the press. Kasich brings experience and well, one of the nation’s biggest swing states. Rubio brings youth and… one of the other big swing states. Of course, neither one wants to play Robin to the other’s Batman just yet and take the VP spot, but time could change that, especially if Kasich doesn’t take a big upswing in the polls in places like New Hampshire, the early primary state where the Ohio gov has said he must do well to continue his campaign. 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.09.2015 91 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:23 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brent spence bridge

Morning News and Stuff

New agreement between UC police, city coming next spring; Wasson Way gets state grant; Cincy will be among first to get new Whole Foods concept

Good morning Cincy. Let’s talk about what’s been going on in the news the past few days.

The University of Cincinnati and city officials continue to work on a revised memorandum of understanding in regard to the university’s police force, officials for both organizations told Cincinnati City Council’s Law and Public Safety Committee today. Following the July 19 shooting death of unarmed black motorist Samuel DuBose by UC police officer Ray Tensing, the city is working to fold UC’s police officers into Cincinnati’s collaborative agreement. That agreement, which establishes guidelines for training, community engagement and accountability for Cincinnati police officers, sprang up in the wake of civil unrest following the 2001 police shooting death of unarmed 19-year-old Timothy Thomas. Officials with UC and the city have said they hope to have a renewed 
memorandum of understanding by spring 2016. Until that time, UC officers are limited in their off-campus patrolling abilities. Following the DuBose shooting, campus activists have called for further actions to ensure racial equity within the university’s police force and the UC campus as a whole, many of which go beyond the city’s work to establish a new set of working agreements with the UC police department.

• It’s been a rough couple weeks for Wasson Way, the proposed bike path that would stretch 7.6 miles from Xavier University to Newtown, but there’s some good news ahead in the form of a state grant. Late last month, the federal government announced the project wouldn’t be receiving millions in Transit Infrastructure Generating Economic Recovery, or TIGER, grants that could have gone a long way toward funding the $7 million to $11 million effort. Bike path advocates got more bad news last week when voters passed on Issue 22, a property tax increase charter amendment that Mayor John Cranley proposed to fund Wasson Way and a number of other projects. But late last week, the Ohio Department of Natural Resources approved a $500,000 grant to fund a portion of the path stretching two-thirds of a mile between Madison Road and Dana Avenue on the city’s East Side. Both Cincinnati City Council and private philanthropy groups are working to find additional funding for the path, which boosters tout as a way to spur economic development in the area.

• One project that won’t feel a negative impact from the Issue 22’s ballot failure is a proposed Ziegler Park redevelopment. That project passed another hurdle Friday when the Cincinnati Planning Commission approved plans for the park, which include a new pool, an extensive green space, a water feature and updates to basketball courts.  Officials with 3CDC and the city say efforts to change up the park, located on Sycamore Street in Over-the-Rhine across from the former SCPA building, are going forward with federal tax credits and other funds and weren’t dependent on a possible $5 million windfall had the parks tax increase passed.

• City of Cincinnati officials have asked a county judge to declare vacant buildings owned by an out-of-town developer public nuisances and to hand control over the crumbling structures to a group who can fix them. Washington, D.C.-based 2414 Morgan Development, LLC owns 10 buildings in OTR and another in Avondale, all of which have significant code violations. The development group says it is working on the buildings and could have them up to code in as little as a month and a half. But the city says it’s been pressuring the group for months to fix the properties and that the buildings are serious hazards to the public and could mean injury or death for firefighters should one burst into flames.

• If you’re a fan of natural grocer and hipster joke punch line Whole Foods but you’re not a fan of spending half your paycheck on organic kale and a $50 juice cleanse kit, you’re gonna love this. According to Whole Foods financial reports, Cincinnati will be one of the first cities in the country to get a new, more value-priced concept called 365 by Whole Foods Market. The store, which will occupy an as-yet-unannounced location, will be smaller than the sprawling market at Rookwood Commons and will have lower-priced organic produce and other items. Other cities getting the new stores include Los Angeles, Austin, Houston, San Francisco, Portland, Ore., Bellevue, Wash., and Santa Monica, Calif. Cincinnati’s location is expected to open in 2017.

• Finally, we’re still talking about the Brent Spence Bridge and probably will be for some time. A proposed alternative to the antiquated bridge’s needed $2.6 billion revamp has been shrugged off as unrealistic by many officials, but it might still be on the table with the election of tea party Republican Matt Bevin as Kentucky governor. Basically, some Northern Kentucky business leaders opposed to the possibility of tolling on the Brent Spence to fund the multi-billion project have proposed… uh, another multi-billion-dollar project, the construction of a 68-mile bypass highway leaving I-75 in Springboro, Ohio and returning to the highway in Grant County, Kentucky. That project would require its own $100 million bridge over the Ohio River in addition to the high costs of building the highway itself. 

Transportation policy experts say the construction of that bypass could take decades and cost billions, but Bevin has signaled he’s open to considering it as an option to reduce stress on the overcrowded and somewhat crumbling Brent Spence. That bridge was built in 1963 and, as a vital link in one of the country’s busiest shipping routes, currently carries double the daily traffic it was designed to accommodate.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 11.06.2015 94 days ago
at 11:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
berniespeaking

Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar begins tests Sunday; Cincy State gets generous gift; Bernie Sanders wants feds to stop classifying weed as dangerous

Good morning Cincy! Here are your morning headlines. 

• A new study released Thursday by the University of Cincinnati Economics Center found that 75,000 Cincinnati jobs are unreachable by public transit. The study found that while 70 percent of businesses are within a quarter mile of a bus stop, Metro's services sometimes isn't good enough for commuters. Metro is considering asking Hamilton County voters to approve a hike in sales tax to raise $25 million for the bus system. And SORTA points out that the good news from this study is that it found Cincinnati it's second lowest in commuter costs per person in the U.S. So at least it's efficient!

• The newly arrived streetcar will undergo its first test this Sunday. The car will be parading down the entire 3.6 mile route in Over-The-Rhine and the Banks from 8:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and will be escorted by the police. As it will still be a long time before the streetcar will make it's debut to the general public, if you so fancy, you can pick and spot and wait to see it slowly pass by. The car will be going south on Race Street to Central Parkway to Walnut in the Central Business District to Second Street at the Banks then up Main to 12th then Elm then finally to Henry Street. 


• Cincinnati State Technical and Community College's interim president has named an interim provost. President Monica Posey, the school's former provost, named Robbin Hoopes as temporary provost. Hoopes has been the dean of humanities and sciences since 2012, and previously worked at Sinclair Community College. Cincinnati State is currently looking for a permanent president after the resignation of O'dell Owens in September. 


• Cincy State also announced yesterday an anonymous donor has given the school its biggest gift ever, $2.2 million. The school says it plans to use the money toward scholarships in the Business Technologies division starting fall 2016, and it will hand out $110,000 in scholarships yearly. Many Cincinnati State students are the first in their families to attend college, and the average student age is 28. 


• Voters shot down ResponsibleOhio's attempt at legalizing marijuana on Tuesday, but what will happen to the campaign's mascot Buddie? The mascot was an attempt to appeal to college students, but was criticized by opponents for potentially appealing to younger kids and trivializing a serious issue for some. Ian James, president of ReponsibleOhio, said he's not sure what will happen to the costume yet, but as some ResponsibleOhio investors have hinted at making another attempt at legalization next November, we may not have seen the last of Buddie.

 

• Meanwhile in Washington, Vermont Senator and Democratic presidential nominee Bernie Sanders has introduced legislation that would take the plant off the federal government's list of the "most dangerous" substances lists. Sanders' plan would not legalize the drug, but instead would make it easier for states to decide on their own whether they wanted to legalize it. Currently federal law clashes with state laws in Colorado, Washington, Oregon and Alaska that have legalized marijuana for recreational use. In response to this, the Obama administration has basically just stopped enforcing the federal law in those states. 


• Do you think your commute to work is hard? Well, next time you're stuck in traffic on I-71, be grateful that the only border you're possibly crossing is the Kentucky-Ohio one. Public Radio International reported on a story of a 19-year-old Juarez, Mexico, woman who crosses the complicated U.S.-Mexico border nearly every day to go to high school in El Paso. You can check out her full day here.


I'm off to enjoy the last of the wonderful weather! Email me story tips at nkrebs@citybeat.com! 

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.06.2015 94 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Stage Door: Playing House

“Florala.” That’s where you are when you head down the ramp to see Know Theatre’s production of Andy’s House of [Blank]. It’s set on the state line between Florida and Alabama, but it’s recreated in two-dimensional cardboard props (telephones and ice cream cones) and decorations (comically taxidermied animals, including the backside of a dog) imaginatively designed and executed by Sarah Beth Hall. The tale is filtered through the often-divergent memories of two guys who were 16 in 1998, holding down their first jobs in roadside oddity shop and museum of “unmailed love letters.” The “guys” are Paul Strickland and Trey Tatum (truly from Florida and Alabama). They serve as the narrators — or perhaps the “recollectors” — of the oddball musical tale of Andy (Christopher Michael Richardson), the proprietor, and Sadie (Erika Kate MacDonald), the girl he had a crush on as a kid. The show was a well-received entry in Know’s “Serials” earlier this year, a story told in five 15-minute episodes. Strickland and Tatum have stitched those pieces together, and director Bridget Leak has given the piece continuity and flow. Their ebullient enthusiasm is obvious from start to finish — Tatum pounds away on an electric keyboard, Strickland (who composed the 20 or so songs) plays guitar and sings almost operatically, and Richardson and MacDonald (both with gorgeous voices) affectingly play two people caught in a looping time warp. In fact, all four characters are living out the theme repeatedly spoken and sung: “Every day is just a variation on a theme.” The music is great, and there are lots of laughs along the way, but the story is a serious, poignant rumination about love, longing and how to move forward by looking back. At two-plus hours (including an intermission) it feels a tad long, but every moment is a treat to watch. Onstage through Nov. 14. Tickets: 513-300-5669

Opening this week: Anthony Schaffer’s Sleuth, a humorous but taut murder mystery is at The Carnegie in Covington. It’s a two-man show about a famous mystery writer who’s out to murder a man having an affair with his wife. There are a lot of twists and turns in this tale, so it’s fun to watch if you pay close attention. Through Nov. 14. Tickets: 859-957-1840 … Playwright Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa fascinated Cincinnati Playhouse audiences back in 2013 with his “sequel” to The Crucible, Abigail/1702. Falcon Theatre is offering two related one-acts by him, The Mystery Plays, inspired by the tradition of medieval theater that dealt with the imponderables of death, the afterlife, religion, faith and forgiveness — but from a thoroughly American perspective. In the first piece, a horror film director survives a train wreck only to be haunted by someone who didn’t make it; in the second, a woman travels to a rural Oregon town to make peace with the man who murdered her parents and her sister: He’s her older brother. Through Nov. 21 at the Monmouth Theatre in Newport. Tickets: 513-479-6783

Continuing: Cincinnati Shakespeare’s excellent production of Arthur Miller’s classic drama Death of a Salesman has its final performance on Saturday evening. It’s worth seeing, but tickets might be scarce. Tickets: 513-381-2273 … Mad River Rising at the Cincinnati Playhouse is a compelling study of place and aging, an old man trying to forestall the sale of his family farm. It continues through Nov. 14. Tickets: 513-421-3888 … Covedale Center’s staging of the comedy Fox on the Fairway, a tribute to cinematic farces from the 1930s and 1940s, is onstage until Nov. 15. Tickets: 513-241-6550

Tune in to WVXU (FM 91.7) on Saturday evening at 8 p.m. to catch LA Theater Works’ production of Matthew Lopez’s The Whipping Man. This show, about a young Jewish Confederate soldier marking Passover 1865 with his family’s newly freed slaves in a crumbling mansion in Richmond, Va., at the end of the Civil War, is a powerful work. Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati staged this show very effectively in 2012.

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Staff 11.06.2015 94 days ago
Posted In: Drinking, Eats, Events, Arts, Benefits, Comedy, Concerts, Culture, Fun, Food, Music at 12:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Weekend To Do List (11/6-11/8)

Art, music, cheese, ice skating

FRIDAY

ART: AFTER THE MOMENT: REFLECTIONS ON ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE OPENING CELEBRATION

As the Contemporary Arts Center prepares to open After the Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe this Friday, the show — especially the opening itself — is taking on a much more historical dimension than first planned. The primary thrust of the show remains: Seven regional curators have each chosen five new works by local artists that reflect how Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment influences today’s artistic landscape. When the CAC presented that show in 1990, law-enforcement officials infamously and unsuccessfully prosecuted it on obscenity charges. But one new and key element will be a 7 p.m. Friday lecture, for CAC members only, by photographer Andres Serrano. His 1987 “Piss Christ,” an eerily beautiful color image of a plastic crucifix inside a glass of urine, was as much a part of the era’s “culture wars” as anything in Mapplethorpe’s The Perfect Moment. After the Moment: Reflections on Robert Mapplethorpe opens at the Contemporary Arts Center Friday and runs through March 13. More info: contemporaryartscenter.org.

ART: STEW-TOPIA AT THE 21C MUSEUM HOTEL
Justin Hoover and Chris Treggiari, the artists behind the ongoing project War Gastronomy — “a dual-industrial tricycle system that unfolds into a pop-up food cart and cultural archive of personal stories of relocation, dislocation and overcoming struggle” — present Stew-topia, another community food- and story-sharing event at 21c Museum Hotel in conjunction with their participation in Wave Pool Gallery’s current exhibition, Holding Ground. Hoover and Treggiari will perform in Gano Alley (directly adjacent to 21c) on Friday and will hold a discussion of their work inside the Museum Hotel on Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, facebook.com/wavepoolgallery

Cincinnati Cheese Festival
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCINNATI CHEESE FESTIVAL
Get ready to get cheesy. Imbibe unlimited samples of more than 300 cheeses from international artisan producers at the Cincinnati Cheese Festival, which takes over the Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. on Friday. Things heat up during the Grilled Cheese Meltdown, when local eateries like C’est Cheese, Taste of Belgium and CRAVE compete to whip up the most imaginative (and tasty) grilled-cheese sandwich — fest-goers vote for their favorites. General admission includes two drink tickets, and local band Blue Caboose performs Americana and Bluegrass music throughout the evening. 6-11 p.m. Friday. $40. 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnaticheesefestival.com. 

Megan Hilty
Photo: Provided
ONSTAGE: MEGAN HILTY: ROSEMARY CLOONEY'S SONGBOOK
Broadway songstress and vocal diva Megan Hilty (you may know her from her turn as Glinda in Wicked or from the TV-series Smash) takes the stage to perform Tristate sweetheart Rosemary Clooney’s classic songs, including “Come Rain or Come Shine,” “April in Paris,” “Tenderly” and more, in a moving tribute with accompaniment from the Cincinnati Pops. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. $20-$110. Music Hall, 1241 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatisymphony.org

Ass Ponys
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: ASS PONYS
One of the more renowned Cincinnati bands of the past few decades, Ass Ponys, reunites this weekend for a pair of shows at Woodward Theater (1404 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, woodwardtheater.com). Tickets for the 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday shows are available through cincyticket.com for $25 (or $40 for both nights). The band will be playing songs from throughout its career, with 35-40 rehearsed tunes to choose from each night (the set lists will differ). These are the first Ass Ponys shows in more than a decade. Read more about the band, including an interview with frontman Chuck Cleaver, in this week's Spill It. Ass Ponys perform Friday and Saturday at Woodward Theater. More info/tickets: woodwardtheater.com.

MUSIC: EVERCLEAR
Wanna feel old? Everclear is currently celebrating the 20th anniversary of its breakout album, Sparkle and Fade. The album gave us the depressingly optimistic single “Santa Monica” and seemed to perfectly sum up the feelings of a generation at the time.  Like Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” or Soundgarden’s “Black Hole Sun,” “Santa Monica” never seems to go away and remains the defining song for Everclear, despite other successful singles. Read more about the band in this week's Sound Advice. Everclear plays Friday with Hydra Melody at Bogart's. More info/tickets: bogarts.com.

Pucks and Pinot
Photo: Cincinnati Cyclones 
SPORTS: PUCKS AND PINOT
If you’re a fan of hockey and wine, head to the Cincinnati Cyclones game against the Adirondack Thunder early on Friday for a pre-game wine tasting featuring Hanover Winery. Taste eight favorite local wines and sample a selection of hors d’oeuvres. There will be music provided by local Folk/Americana band Young Heirlooms, and event tickets include a commemorative wine glass and a discounted game ticket. 6 p.m. Friday. $35. U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway St., Downtown, cycloneshockey.com

Balázs Dániel
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: BLUES & BOOGIE PIANO SUMMIT
One of the region’s most unique musical events, the Blues & Boogie Piano Summit, is not just a “Blues festival,” it’s also a two-day concert that spotlights a specific sub-genre of Blues — Boogie Woogie. The vintage and uniquely American artform still maintains an international audience of die-hard fans, as local Ambassador of Boogie Ricky Nye’s frequent trips to Europe prove. Nye hosts the 16th-annual event this weekend and once again brings in some international talent for the showcase. Joining Nye (and the house band featuring Chris Douglas, Paul Ellis and Brian Hogg) this year are French players Fabrice Eulry and Philippe LeJeune, as well as Hungary’s Balázs Dániel. 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $20-$30. Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., Newport, Ky., southgatehouse.com.

SATURDAY
EVENT: HOLIDAY BEER EXTRAVAGANZA
Every Cincinnatian knows that the Christian Moerlein Lager House is one of the premier spots to down a cold one. But this Saturday Christian Moerlein is taking things to festive levels of fun with its Holiday Beer Extravaganza. The extravaganza will boast more than 20 different selections of imported and craft beers — just what you need to jump-start your holiday cheer. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown, moerleinlagerhouse.com

Northside Record Fair
EVENT: NORTHSIDE RECORD FAIR
The third-annual Northside Record Fair returns to North Presbyterian Church for an afternoon of musical digging and discovery. Vendors from across the region will be bringing thousands of rare records covering all audio ground from Jazz and Punk to Prog and Country. Search more than 40 tables of LPs, 45s, cassettes, posters, CDs, T-shirts and other memorabilia as The Queen City Imperial Soundsystem spins deep Reggae, Dub and Dancehall cuts. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday. $5; $10 early-bird (10 a.m. entry). 4222 Hamilton Ave., Northside, facebook.com/northsiderecordfair

Holler Festival
Photo: New Riff Distilling
EVENT: HOLLER FESTIVAL
Nearly 5 million barrels of bourbon are aging in the Bluegrass State, and you get to enjoy the best of them at the first-ever Holler Festival. Join Kentucky breweries and distilleries as they showcase their signature craft beers and whiskeys. Learn the secrets of the trade, sample drinks and heavy appetizers, grab your special-edition glass and hang out with the best bourbon producers in Kentucky. Participating breweries and distilleries include Ei8ht Ball, Copper & Kings American Brandy, Blue Stallion Brewing, Old Pogue Distillery and The Gentleman Distillery. All proceeds benefit Renaissance Covington. 6-10 p.m. $50. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., hollerfestival.com

Pumpkin Chuck
Photo: Provided
EVENT: PUMPKIN CHUCK
If you find yourself in Stanbery Park this Saturday and notice trebuchets slinging pumpkins through the air, do not be alarmed. The annual Mount Washington Community Council’s Pumpkin Chuck features live local music, food and drink vendors and, of course, the high-velocity launching of massive pumpkins with medieval military equipment. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Free. Stanbery Park, 2221 Oxford Ave., Mount Washington, mwcc.org.

Mike Lupica
Photo: Taylor McKelvy Lupica 
LITERARY: MIKE LUPICA
Longtime New York Daily News sports columnist and ESPN commentator Mike Lupica began writing novels in the mid-1980s and hasn’t stopped since, dropping works of fiction — from mysteries to stories for younger audiences — every few years. Just in time for the new NBA season, Lupica’s latest novel, Fast Break, centers on a gifted basketball player who is sent across town to live with affluent foster parents following his mother’s death. Per Kirkus Review’s recent take on Fast Break: “Nothing groundbreaking here, but Lupica delivers solid action and character growth.” Lupica reads from and discusses Fast Break at Joseph-Beth. 7 p.m. Saturday. Free. 2692 Madison Road, Rookwood Pavilion, Norwood, josephbeth.com

'Sleuth'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: SLEUTH
Mystery fans have a tasty treat in store for them at The Carnegie in Covington with this 1970 award-winning play by Anthony Shaffer. It’s a two-man show about a renowned mystery writer who loves to play games, but when he discovers that his wife is about to leave him for another man, he maps out a scheme that aims at dire consequences for his romantic rival. Matters soon get out of hand, resulting in as much humor as drama as the complicated story unfolds. Be prepared for twists and turns that will keep you guessing. That’s the fun of it, after all. Through Nov. 22. $18-$25. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott St., Covington, Ky., thecarnegie.com

SUNDAY 
COMEDY: LISA LANDRY

Recently divorced, life goes on for comedian Lisa Landry. “Best thing I’ve ever done,” she says before correcting herself. “It wasn’t the best thing I’ve ever done. I should have shot him in the head. My mistake was I paid a lawyer instead of a judge.” That experience has been the source of some material of course, as has her breakup with booze. “We just broke up, tequila and I. We had a parting of ways. I told her, ‘I love you girl, but this is not healthy.’” While at Go Bananas, Landry will be recording promos for her as-yet-untitled CD, due for release this winter. Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com


 

ATTRACTIONS: ICE RINK AT FOUNTAIN SQUARE

Temperatures may be in the 70s this week, but that doesn’t mean you can’t channel some early holiday spirit. Fountain Square’s Ice Rink is officially open, offering daily skating and special events (like frozen-turkey bowling Nov. 24) all the way through February. Rent a pair of skates on-site and spend the day in the heart of downtown. Open daily. $6 admission; $4 skate rental. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com


'The Art of the Brick'
Photo: Cincinnati Museum Center

ATTRACTIONS: THE ART OF THE BRICK

Millions of LEGO bricks are taking over the Cincinnati Museum Center. Anticipated exhibit The Art of the Brick features more than 100 artworks created by contemporary artist Nathan Sawaya using nothing other than LEGOs. Explore life-size human figures, a 20-foot-long T-Rex skeleton and replicated famous paintings, including “Starry Night” and “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” plus familiar sculptures like “The Thinker” and the Sphinx. Sawaya has also created a Cincinnati-themed piece that will be revealed when the exhibit debuts. Create your own LEGO masterpieces in the interactive Brickopolis, and don’t miss special themed days revolving around Star Wars, dinosaurs, superheroes and more. Through May 1. $19.50 adults; $12.50 children 12 and under. Cincinnati Museum Center at Union Terminal, 1301 Western Ave., Queensgate, 513-287-7000, cincymuseum.org.







 
 
by Steven Rosen 11.05.2015 94 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 04:14 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
barron_mapplethorpe

FotoFocus Takes its Mapplethorpe Symposium on the Road

After a successful symposium here last month, FotoFocus is taking its Robert Mapplethorpe presentation, The Perfect Moment: 25 Years Later, on the road. (The Cincinnati symposium was called Mapplethorpe +25.)

In observance of the 25th anniversary of the unsuccessful obscenity trial in Cincinnati of the Contemporary Arts Center following the exhibition of The Perfect Moment there in 1990, FotoFocus will sponsor a panel discussion at 7 p.m. at New York’s cutting-edge New Museum, 235 Bowery.

It will be moderated by Kevin Moore, FotoFocus’ New York-based artistic director, and feature Amy Adler, law professor at New York University School of Law; Jennifer Blessing, senior photography curator at Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum; Paul Martineau, associate curator of photographs at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles; and Britt Salvesen, curator of the Wallis Annenberg Photography Department at Los Angeles County Museum. The latter three were on a panel in Cincinnati.

Further information about FotoFocus can be found at fotofocuscincinnati.org. Additional information about the Mapplethorpe + 25 symposium can be found at mapplethorpe25.org.

 

 
 
by Tony Johnson 11.05.2015 95 days ago
at 01:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
steve jobs

Spoonful of Cinema: Steve Jobs

How do you manage to pack the lifetime of a generation-defining innovator into just more than two hours of screen time? This is the challenge that Danny Boyle (director of Slumdog Millionaire and Trainspotters) faces with his latest directorial effort, Steve Jobs. With a trademark rat-a-tat screenplay from Aaron Sorkin (Moneyball, The Social Network), the latest film surrounding the late Apple founder opts out of a tame, status quo biopic format for a compact, perhaps more difficult and ultimately beautiful picture revolving around three pivotal product releases that helped define Jobs’ career. But while we are taken from the launch of the original Macintosh to Jobs’ stint at NeXT to the original iMac unveiling, a struggle to grapple with his role in a scrambled family tree persists. It is a cumulative narrative gamble intricately orchestrated by Sorkin, sharply executed by Boyle and remarkably brought to life by the film’s star, Michael Fassbender.

The accumulation of ingredients that goes into the final recipe, oddly enough, mostly reflects the biopic subject’s own tendencies as a business leader. The picture takes big chances, trusts its audience to see through the final product’s negligible flaws and eventually breaks through with something truly astounding. Occasionally, the film feels erratic — the jumps in time can feel jarring — but it is grounded in relationships revolving around a troubled but brilliant protagonist. The decision to force the life of an industry giant to be shown in miniscule slices of life — only three days with occasional flashbacks — also forces discussions that occurred (or half-occurred) at different times in Steve-Jobs-the-man’s life to occur backstage with Steve-Jobs-the-character. The decision is the mark of a filmmaking team dedicated to a narrative that does its subject justice as opposed to doing their subject a service. It sacrifices history for narrative, a worthy payment to achieve an eventual triumph. It would have been much safer to simply roll a tape that marched steadily along throughout the protagonist’s lifeline. But Sorkin’s script does for Jobs exactly what his The Social Network screenplay did for Zuckerberg — mythologize the work of the subject while humanizing them. And although it may be more fun to witness the glorification of the achievement of the iMac or “the Facebook” (do you remember the “the”?), it is much more rewarding to observe the inner workings of men mostly accessed indirectly through their inventions.

It’s hard not to compare and contrast Steve Jobs with The Social Network. Their premises and Sorkin connection make them a perfect future double-header. In 2008, David Fincher showed us a heartbroken, bitter whiz kid-version of Zuckerberg crawling through the pains of social rejection and industry success in a coming-of-age story. Now, we get Danny Boyle’s take on a Sorkin wunderkind of a more optimistic flavor. Like the Zuckerberg character we get our hands on, this re-creation of Steve Jobs’ main issue isn’t his talent. It’s his ability to accept responsibility for people who are close to them in favor of his work. But Sorkin trades in the open-ended relatively bleak conclusion of Zuckerberg’s rise to fortune for a mostly uplifting ending to Jobs’ struggles with his daughter Lisa.

The characters and settings and dialogues are not exact replicas of reality. At one point, Jobs remarks that everyone seems to confront him about personal qualms right before product releases, and we have to wonder how much that is wink to those who lived the real thing. The Beginning of 2013’s American Hustle comes to mind, when the opening frames read: “Some of this actually happened.” Of course, Steve Jobs is more honorable to the subject than O. Russell’s ABSCAM critique, which took unprecedented liberties and changed stories and names entirely for the sake of the narrative. Boyle doesn’t break the facts to pieces and create a new world to explore. Rather, he puts a spin on things, and he mashes tons of crucial life moments into 122 minutes of screen time.

The final result feels intelligent, delightful and human. These three qualities — intelligence, delight and humanity — may have been Jobs’ most endearing personal elements that he contributed to the computer industry. “It needs to say, ‘Hello!’ ” Jobs commands Apple engineer Andy Hertzfeld (Michael Stuhlbarg) before the unveiling of the Macintosh. The Steve Jobs we meet via Michael Fassbender is calculating and demanding, but still charming in his sheer passion and enthusiasm for his line of work. In this regard, Steve Jobs is a resounding success.

Throughout the three product release events, we also get a glimpse of Jobs’ struggles as a reluctant father, a challenging friend and an adopted son. There is no practical reason to like him for how he handles his out-of-wedlock daughter, Lisa, whom he initially rejects as someone else’s. “You must see that she looks like you”, Steve’s marketing executive Joanna Hoffman (Kate Winslet) tells him backstage of the Macintosh presentation. More than 10 years later, Hoffman tells Steve before the launch of the iMac, “What you make isn’t supposed to be the best part of you. When you’re a father — that’s what’s supposed to be the best part of you.” His old friend and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak confronts him about giving recognition to the team that developed the Apple II computer, Apple’s earliest commercial breakthrough. When Jobs declines time and time again, Wozniak breaks it down. “It’s not binary,” he explains. “You can be decent and gifted at the same time.” Even Steve’s business partner and eventual foe John Scully (Jeff Daniels) poses the question, “Why do people like you who were adopted feel like they were rejected instead of selected?” It all adds up to a man who is so sure of what he does, and so unsure of who he is.

Steve Jobs is a picture with a pulse — a heartbeat. It is overwhelmingly more man than machine. This humanity drives the film’s central concerns with an airtight script, clean direction and stellar acting. We are spoiled with a wonderful glimpse of an artistic interpretation of who Steve Jobs was. We see him as a tech industry giant, a flawed father and a victim of identity crisis. “It’s about control,” the silver-screen version of Jobs admits to Scully in regard to his uneasy feelings towards his status as an adopted child. “I don’t understand anyone who gives it up.” And yet what makes Jobs so intriguing as a character is his reluctance to give up any control of his life, even if it means denying responsibility as a father. Perhaps now we can begin to understand. Grade: A

 
 
by Staff 11.05.2015 95 days ago
Posted In: Beer, grilled cheese, Cocktails at 11:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_cincinnaticheesefestival

This Week's Dining Events

Holiday Beer Extravaganza, Cincinnati Cheese Festival, Holler Festival and more

FRIDAY 06
Cincinnati Cheese Festival — Get ready to get cheesy. Imbibe unlimited samples of more than 300 cheeses from international artisan producers at the Cincinnati Cheese Festival, which takes over the Christian Moerlein Brewing Co. on Friday. Things heat up during the Grilled Cheese Meltdown, when local eateries like C’est Cheese, Taste of Belgium and CRAVE compete to whip up the most imaginative (and tasty) grilled-cheese sandwich — fest-goers vote for their favorites. General admission includes two drink tickets, and local band Blue Caboose performs Americana and Bluegrass music throughout the evening. 6-11 p.m. Friday. $40. 1621 Moore St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnaticheesefestival.com.


Demystifying French Wines — Advanced sommelier Laura Landoll leads this class in which you can learn about major and minor French wines. Small bites accompany the tasting. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $85. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.


Stew-topia at 21c Museum Hotel — Justin Hoover and Chris Treggiari, the artists behind the ongoing project War Gastronomy — “a dual-industrial tricycle system that unfolds into a pop-up food cart and cultural archive of personal stories of relocation, dislocation and overcoming struggle” — present Stew-topia, another community food- and story-sharing event at 21c Museum Hotel in conjunction with their participation in Wave Pool Gallery’s current exhibition, Holding Ground. Hoover and Treggiari will perform in Gano Alley (directly adjacent to 21c) on Friday and will hold a discussion of their work inside the Museum Hotel on Sunday. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Friday; 4 p.m. Sunday. Free. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, facebook.com/wavepoolgallery.


SATURDAY 07
The Great Ohio Brew N’ Que — Fifty West Brewing Company hosts the Great Ohio Brew N’ Que with Great Lakes Brewing Company. Chefs John Tomain of Fifty West and Rock Finley of Great Lakes will create a barbecue buffet (with a vegetarian option), paired with 10 craft beers from each of the breweries, including their collaboration beer Walking Sticke. 4 p.m.-midnight. $40. 7668 Wooster Pike, Mariemont, fiftywestbrew.com.

Free! Thanksgiving 101 — This free class will teach you how to prepare, bring, roast and carve a turkey and make fluffy mashed potatoes. Also get a chance to buy a Thanksgiving 101 supply kit. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

Holler Festival
Photo: New Riff Distilling 
Holler Festival — Nearly 5 million barrels of bourbon are aging in the Bluegrass State, and you get to enjoy the best of them at the first-ever Holler Festival. Join Kentucky breweries and distilleries as they showcase their signature craft beers and whiskeys. Learn the secrets of the trade, sample drinks and heavy appetizers, grab your special-edition glass and hang out with the best bourbon producers in Kentucky. Participating breweries and distilleries include Ei8ht Ball, Copper & Kings American Brandy, Blue Stallion Brewing, Old Pogue Distillery and The Gentleman Distillery. All proceeds benefit Renaissance Covington. 6-10 p.m. $50. New Riff Distilling, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., hollerfestival.com.

Homemade Pasta 101 — Learn the basics of kneading, rolling and cutting fresh pasta by hand, plus a recipe for homemade tomato sauce. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Gorman Heritage Farm, 10052 Reading Road, Evendale, gormanfarm.org.

Kids and Teens in the Kitchen: Mexican Fiesta! — A cooking class for ages 8 and up. Learn how to make fajita quesadillas, churros and more. This is a kids-only class. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $50. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.

Holiday Cookie Decorating — In this hands-on class, learn to make the perfect sugar cookie, plus tips for expert decorating. Noon-2:30 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Holiday Beer Extravaganza — Every Cincinnatian knows that the Christian Moerlein Lager House is one of the premier spots to down a cold one. But this Saturday Christian Moerlein is taking things to festive levels of fun with its Holiday Beer Extravaganza. The extravaganza will boast more than 20 different selections of imported and craft beers — just what you need to jump-start your holiday cheer. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday. Free. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, Downtown, moerleinlagerhouse.com.

TUESDAY 10
Cold Weather Comfort Soups — Ilene Ross hosts this class on making cold-weather staple soups. Noon-1:30 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Fresh Tortilla Workshop — Learn to make corn tortillas at home. 6-8 p.m. $75. Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.
 
 
by Natalie Krebs 11.05.2015 95 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
weed

Morning News and Stuff

Group launches plan to get Cincy kids in preschool; Cranley and ResponsibleOhio march forward after defeat; Covington launches investigation into city's drug problem

Hi Cincy! Think you're finally done with election stuff? Think again! Results may be in for this year, but they've just started gearing up for election day 2016. Here are your morning headlines. 

• So you're tired of thinking about parks and marijuana? Well, how about shifting those thoughts to preschool? Just a day after polls closed, the Strive Partnership, a group focused on education in the Greater Cincinnati area, kicked off Preschool Promise, their campaign to place a measure on next year's ballot. Their initiative would guarantee every child in Cincinnati, regardless of family income, receives two years of preschool through the use of tuition credits. Strive suggests universal preschool education allows all children a fair start and better prepares them to graduate from high school and prepare for college and careers. The event attracted around 150 people, including Vice Mayor David Mann, to hear about the initiative at Rhinegeist Brewery in OTR and also featured sushi, banh mi, free beer, tokens, a raffle and a DJ. 

The initiative, if it manages to get on the ballot and approved by voters in next year's election, will be the first of its kind in the country and could be a big deal because 44 percent of Cincinnati's children live in poverty and may not have access to preschool. 

"We will level the playing field for thousands and thousands of children. We will break the cycle of poverty for thousands and thousands of children," says Greg Landsman, executive director of the Strive Partnership. "We will make it a lot easier for middle class families to pay for quality preschool, which is a huge, huge deal." 

• The day after Mayor John Cranley's park tax levy was shot down by voters, he told The Enquirer that he wished that their series of stories on the mismanagement of the Park Board had come out a year ago and not two weeks before the election. The stories pointed out questionable bonuses, car allowances and exclusive club memberships for some of the top executives on the Park Board, which has lead to an audit of the board by the city. Like one does after a bad breakup, Cranley says he won't dwell on his loss, and that it's time to move on from the failed levy, which 59 percent of voters voted against. 

• ResponsibleOhio's constitutional amendment to legalize marijuana also failed, but at least one of the super PAC's investors say they might be back next year. Investor Suresh Gupta, a Dayton anesthesiologist, said the group might try another initiative for next year's ballot but would probably leave the whole monopoly thing behind, which many are saying is the factor that killed the issue for voters. Meanwhile, House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger (R-Clarksville) says the legislature hopes to release a series of bills in the next few weeks to test the plant further for its potential medical benefits and urge Congress to drop the drug to a lower classification.  

• Covington Police Chief Bryan Carter announced yesterday that the city has launched a six-month drug trafficking investigation to fight its growing drug problem. Carter is pushing hard to arrest dealers who are contributing to the city's heroin, meth, cocaine and even marijuana problems. According to Carter, they're not concentrated in one area but are situated in pockets throughout the city. The city has arrested 10 people so far accused of dealing drugs in the area, and the city's narcotics officers are assisted by the Kentucky State Police, the FBI and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. 

• Cincinnati-native Charles Clark II is suing the federal government to get his money back after officers seized thousand of dollars off of him at the Cincinnati airport last February. Clark was flying back to Florida, where he attends college, when he was stopped by officers who said his luggage smelled strongly of marijuana. A search did not find any drugs in Clark's suitcase, but he was carrying $11,000 in his pocket because he said he did not trust banks. His attorney Renee Flaherty, says Clark should get his money back as he was never charged with a crime and there was no evidence of drug trafficking.  

• Japan issued its first same-sex "partnership" certificate today. The certificates are not actually legally binding but are more symbolic. They are an attempt to encourage employers and landlords to give same-sex partnerships the same treatment as they do married heterosexual couples. Japan currently does not offer legal protection for same-sex couples, but is culturally tolerant of the relationships. 

Contact me at nkrebs@citybeat.com or on Twitter at @natalie_krebs. 
 
 

 

 

 
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