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by Jason Gargano 12.07.2011
at 11:47 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Know Theatre Screens Sundance Documentary Tonight

'Miss Representation' looks at how woman are protrayed in mainstream media

There's been a lot chatter in the vast, ever-opinionated movie blogosphere about the 2012 Sundance Film Festival's recently unveiled slate of films. Locally, the inclusion of Cincinnati native Todd Louiso's third directorial feature, Hello I Must Be Going, in the U.S. Dramatic competition is the most intriguing development.

But there's also another noteworthy local Sundance connection this week: Know Theatre is giving a 2011 Sundance film its Cincinnati premiere with a one-time screening 7 p.m. tonight (Dec. 7) in its space at 1120 Jackson St. in Over-the-Rhine. (Tickets are $10.)

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by Mike Breen 12.12.2011
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 09:23 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
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WATCH: 30-Minute Southgate House Documentary

In the summer of 2009, several student filmmakers from Northern Kentucky University decided to make a documentary about Newport music venue the Southgate House. With a soundtrack loaded with local music (Mack West, The Tillers and many others), the movie features some great historical information about the old mansion, lovely footage of the interior and exterior of the building and lots of interviews with area musicians, music lovers, Southgate employees and longtime operator Ross Raleigh, all discussing the uniqueness of the club and what it means to the local music community. There are some prescient comments towards the end about what losing the Southgate would mean to the music scene. Click below to watch the full shebang.

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by James McNair 07.31.2013
Posted In: Government at 10:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (8)
 
 
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Is Ohio's New License Plate the Worst or Just Bad?

Bye, bye “Beautiful Ohio” plate, hello word scramble

In case you haven’t noticed, Ohio has gained a new distinction among the 50 states — that with the ugliest license plate.

Gone, after just three-and-a-half years, is the “Beautiful Ohio” plate, a bucolic affair that managed to combine green rolling hills, a red barn, a city skyline, trees, a yellow sunburst, the Wright Brothers’ plane and the year of statehood. The Automobile License Plate Collectors Association gave it second place in its Best New License Plate contest in 2009.

The new standard-issue plate, which went on sale April 15, is called “Ohio Pride” (no, not that pride). The word Ohio appears on a wide, red isosceles triangle bleeding from the top of the plate. And behind the plate number is a background of 46 slogans, identifiers and products “describing what makes Ohio a great state.” Such as: “State of Perfect Balance,” “The Heart of it All,” “Newark Earthworks,” “Serpent Mound,” “Polymer Capital of the World,” “Steel City” and “Walleye.” It is devoid of images.

Pity the passing driver who tries to make out any of the 46 words and phrases. Because they are jammed together in light gray lettering, they blur into a hazy backdrop. Don’t take CityBeat’s word for it. Pull up behind a car with one of the new plates. Maybe you’ll be able to make out two of the larger-print items, “Birthplace of Aviation” and “DiscoverOhio.com.”

The cacophony of slogans and products gives the new Ohio plate an edge over the regular plates of many states, said Greg Gibson, president of the ALPCA. But he, too, was confounded by their legibility. “I doubt that the slogans can be read at any distance,” he says.

Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles spokesman Dustyn Fox said no one in the Kasich administration objected to the Beautiful Ohio plate, which was designed with the help of former First Lady Frances Strickland.

“Traditionally, each new administration redesigns the Ohio plate,” Fox says. “A selection committee made up from BMV officials, Ohio Department of Public Safety officials and representatives from the governor’s office choose final designs. The governor and first lady make the final decision.”

The review panel considered five or six designs before settling on one submitted by students at the Columbus College of Art and Design. The selection, however, represents an act of artistic regression in a milieu that has gone wild for visual elements in the past decade. Wyoming, for instance, has a bucking bronco, Oklahoma a Native American archer, Utah a skier and South Dakota, Mt. Rushmore. Elsewhere, we see trees, mountain ranges, peaches, oranges, a cactus, a pelican and a buffalo.

Closer to home, Indiana has a blue license plate depicting the state seal, but which looks like a clock face in traffic. Kentucky plates bear the slogan “Unbridled Spirit” and the head of a hurtling race horse. Cleverly, they also show the vehicle owner’s home county, which allows police officers to snag out-of-county drivers for traffic violations.

The following are the four license plate designs that were considered by the state BMV:

 

 

 

 


 
 
by Blake Hammond 09.24.2012
Posted In: Music Commentary at 09:43 AM | Permalink | Comments (19)
 
 
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What Is A Radiohead Anyway?

Believe it or not, there are music critics who do not enjoy a certain musical sacred cow

I don’t like Radiohead.

Just like that, my budding career as a music journalist is destroyed by one, four-word sentence. I’m sure the pretentious Pitchfork police are on their way to my house right now to take me away.

I can imagine most of you yelling at me through the monitors on your Mac Book Pros, passing judgment on me through the lenses of your dark-rimmed Woody Allen-esque glasses. 


That’s OK.

I assure you, I can’t hear a damn thing you’re saying. So just save your breath and read.

I know why people like Radiohead. They are talented musicians who are constantly expanding their sound. Not to mention, Thom Yorke’s (even though he doesn’t know how to spell his name) vocal range goes for miles, making him one of the most impressive singers in Rock & Roll today. They are like the indie rock version of The Beatles, except The Beatles don’t take an eighth of magical mushrooms to appreciate. (Although I’m sure it makes it better, I wouldn’t dare know about such devilish things.)

Upon numerous occasions during my 23 years, I’ve tried desperately to enjoy this band.

At 16, I would peruse through cute “indie” girl’s MySpace pages, listening to “Karma Police” among various other cuts off of OK Computer. I would force-feed my metalhead mind to try and wrap itself around the ambient tones coming from my speakers. No matter how hard I tried (believe me, I tried; I needed something to trick these girls into liking me) it just never stuck.

A few years later, I made my second attempt. In Rainbows had just been released and it was a hot topic of conversation between my more “hip” friends. They would play the record on an endless loop and, eventually, I really did begin to dig it. Then I had a revelation.

While I was driving to work one day, I put the album on and quickly realized that I had never listened to this while I was sober. I mean, I know 2007-2008 had pretty much become a blur of various substances, but as the docile sounds of “House of Cards” rang through my car stereo, I said to myself, “Blake, put down the bottle and get your shit together! Also, take off that ridiculous v-neck shirt and skinny jeans. No one wants to see your Teen Wolf-covered man-boobs or your ‘
Basilisk’!” (That’s right, my junk is nicknamed after the giant snake in  Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets; get over it.)

It was as if the smoke had finally cleared (literally and metaphorically) and I came out of this catatonic state of intoxication a new man. That man just still happened to dislike Radiohead.

My final attempt was no more than four months ago. My lovely girlfriend bought me a record player for my birthday and I decided I would give In Rainbows one more shot.

I had grown up quite a bit since the last time I heard this record. Not only was I knee-deep in my journey to becoming a music journalist, but also I wasn’t totally sloshed all the time either.

Plus, if it doesn’t resonate with me on vinyl, it never will.

This last go-around, however, was a futile one.

I always thought, “Maybe I was just too young to get it?” Or “Maybe, I was just too fucked up to understand?”

But as I put the record on, more questions came up, like “Am I too old to get it?” or “Jesus, what’s that drug dealer’s number again?”

As I racked my mind trying to figure out why I’m the only music journalist who isn’t a part of this worldwide circle-jerk over Radiohead, I finally came up with a simple, yet honest explanation.

Radiohead fans can be broken down into two factions. You’re either a Radiohead guy or a “Creep” guy. I’m obviously a member of the latter group.

“Creep” is the anthem for every broken-hearted loser too cowardly to talk to the girl he dreams about every night. It’s the anthem for every outcast kid that roamed their hallways aimlessly; unable to find their place in the proverbial hell that was high school. It’s the anthem for every overweight, underachieving, late-blooming, weirdo band kid that the band chicks didn’t even want to associate with. It’s pretty much my 7-12 grade experience told in three minutes and 56 seconds.

“Creep” just always spoke to me in a way that no other Radiohead song ever had. It was effortless and truthful, yet, real and depressing. I made a connection with that song, a connection which I tried ever so earnestly to do with the rest of their catalog, but failed miserably.  

So to the Radiohead fans out there, keep listening to them.

Do whatever makes you happy, whatever you want. Because truly, you’re so fucking special.

I just wish Radiohead was special, too.

Radiohead then …

Radiohead lately …


 
 
by mbreen 04.28.2011
Posted In: Local Music, Music Commentary at 03:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Walk the Moon Is Exploding!

The accelerated speed of tech developments over the past decade has changed the world in innumerable ways. The impact it has had on music is glaring, completely readjusting how the worldwide music industry operates and affecting everything from the way the sounds are created, recorded and distributed to the way they are experienced by listeners. Cincinnati’s Walk the Moon is currently in the midst of a quick rise in the music world that is a perfect example of how the career plans of aspiring young artists can today play out over an amazingly short period of time. It’s why you might want to catch Walk the Moon’s concert tonight at Oakley’s 20th Century Theater.

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by Rick Pender 11.20.2012
Posted In: Arts community at 12:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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CCM Grad's 'Stanley Steemer Variations' Video Goes Viral

Mia Gentile's voiceover demo gets love from company, Huffpo

If you grew up in the Midwest you’ve probably heard the catchy jingle for “Stanley Steemer, the Carpet Cleaner.” But I bet you’ve never heard it sung operatically, or with some bebop or thrash. Now you can do that — all in one three-minute video featuring University of Cincinnati musical theater grad Mia Gentile, a 2011 grad of the College-Conservatory of Music. Local audiences know her for several amusing turns in incarnations of The Marvelous Wonderettes at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati and the sold-out (and revived) production of next to normal, but trust me, this girl is bound for glory.

People who’ve never heard of her or the carpet cleaning company are tuning in now by the thousands, thanks to a YouTube video, cleverly titled “The Stanley Steemer Variations (by Mia).” Gentile generated with local musician and producer Roger Klug. Julie Spangler, a professional pianist and musical theater instructor at CCM, introduced Klug and Gentile, who wanted to produce a voiceover demo of the various musical styles she could reproduce (which appears to be limitless). Klug convinced her to translate her vocal performances into a video, which they shot in one day over the summer. “It was a total collaboration,” Klug tells me. “We talked about what each character would look like, she did the makeup and hair, I shot and edited the thing. We completely did it for no other reason than ‘just for the fun of it.’” It was shot at the local studio Mental Giant with Klug using a Sony Handycam.


Well, that it was — it’s apparent from watching. But everyone is getting in on the fun, and the video has taken off virally on YouTube. When Klug contacted me on Monday morning, it had had 40,000 hits in just a few days. By midnight the piece had exploded, exceeding 100,000 hits. He and Gentile have created a blog site to support it: http://miavideo.wordpress.com.

Even better, the Stanley Steemer people have picked it up, hyping it on their Facebook page, which has led to a suspicion that the whole thing is a clever marketing ploy. “Another faction thinks Stanley Steemer owes us a big check,” Klug jokes, “which I'm inclined to agree with!” It’s spread to an international audience now, dare I say “picking up steam” with a mention and a link in the U.K. edition of The Huffington Post. Before this winds up, Gentile will need her own 1-800 number!

 
 
by 08.11.2009
Posted In: Protests at 12:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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PETA Takes to the Streets

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) took to downtown streets today to distribute "cruelty-free shopping guides." The pocket-sized pamphlets list more than 950 companies that have completed a statement of assurance saying they don't do product testing on animals.

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by Steven Rosen 01.12.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 10:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Where Are They Now?: Dennis Barrie

Ever wonder what happened to Dennis Barrie, director of the Contemporary Arts Center when it showed Robert Mapplethorpe's The Perfect Moment in 1990, resulting in pornography charges that a Hamilton County jury rejected in a landmark local case?

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by 10.06.2009
Posted In: Visual Art at 08:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Dhani Tackles the Art World

Cincinnati's beloved linebacker Dhani Jones will have an exhibit of his photographs on display at Country Club this Friday. Aside of crushing Steelers players, Jones is also the star of the Travel Channel series Dhani Tackles the Globe, in which he participates in the sports of local communities around the world in an attempt to immerse himself in their culture. His photography centers around his travels.

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by Chelsea Spata 06.19.2013
Posted In: Shopping, Fashion, Events at 11:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
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Truckshop Launches Cincinnati's First Mobile Fashion Boutique

Offers dresses, tops, jewelry and accessories for $65 or less

Truckshop, Cincinnati’s newest mobile vendor, launches tonight at the Columbia Center in Columbia Tusculum. The mobile fashion boutique features clothing and accessories at affordable prices and a unique experience unlike that found in brick-and-mortar stores. While mobile boutiques have become popular trends along the coasts, Truckshop is introducing shopping-on-the-go to the Midwest and Greater Cincinnati area.

Founder and Cincinnati resident Ashley Volbrecht hopes to offer consumers a different shopping perspective. “Creating a pop-up shop in my mind just represented a new way to get people to think about shopping,” Volbrecht said in a press release. “We’re here today, gone tomorrow. I want shoppers to forget they are inside of a truck when they enter.”

The truck itself is a former bread delivery truck that has been reconstructed to reflect the trendy vibe of the shop’s clothing. Former tin walls are now pink and white shelves boasting a variety of dresses and tops. A dingy floor has been converted into a pristine black and white striped pathway leading shoppers through racks of clothing and accessories. The former white exterior now stands out with bright colors and an elegant store name that lets consumers know this isn’t your run-of-the-mill mobile vendor.

Most shoppers know that entering a boutique usually entails a bit of sticker shock, but Truckshop is changing that assumption for its customers. Truckshop sells dresses, tops, jewelry and accessories, all for $65 or less. “Price point is one of the most important parts,” Volbrecht explained. “I love finding pieces I’m obsessed with and I love finding a bargain. I tried to use this same approach when choosing pieces for the boutique.”

Truckshop, opened this past Saturday, is leading the way for mobile boutiques in the Midwest. Truckshop will be at various festivals this summer including City Flea and Second Sundays on Main. And now everyone can feel like a celebrity with a store that comes to you: Truckshop is available for private parties of six or more people. Customers can also shop online through Facebook and Instagram pages.

The launch party is tonight from 6-9 p.m. at the Columbia Center, 3500 Columbia Pkwy. For more information about Truckshop, visit www.facebook.com/shopthetruck or follow Truckshop on Twitter @shopthetruck.

 
 

 

 

 
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