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by Staff 06.11.2015 77 days ago
at 03:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_soakcitykingsisland

Weekenders: What We're Doing This Weekend

Kings Island, Miss Fame at Play Louisville, 'Jurassic World' and BONNAROOOO!!!!

Emily Begley: Since it’s supposed to stay in the high 80s all weekend (!!!), my boyfriend Mark and I are heading up to Soak City at Kings Island. Other than a potential trip down the lazy river, we’re planning on bringing towels and setting up camp beside the wave pool to read. (I just started Game of Thrones and am completely addicted.) On Saturday, I’m thinking about checking out a new park with the dogs, preferably one with a creek so they can swim.  

Jesse Fox: BONNAROOOOOOOOOO!

David Watkins: This weekend I'm going to see RuPaul's Drag Race Season 7 contestant Miss Fame at Play Louisville! She'll be performing songs from her new album, Beauty Marked, available now on iTunes and Amazon.

Jac Kern: Lately my weekends have been resembling childhood summers in that I'm constantly checking out a new movie or two every week. Friday will definitely be another blast from the past as I see the new Jurassic World movie (in "Real D 3D"). One of my favorite area restaurants and West Side gem Vitor's Bistro has a five-course dinner for two special Saturday, so I might need to gorge myself there. Vitor's chef's choice dinners are always a win for my fiancé and me — especially as a couple of reformed picky eaters. Not knowing what dish you're about to receive (other than the fact that it's definitely going to be delish) is half the fun! If it's not too hot or rainy I'd love to take my dog Wonton to Mt. Airy Dog Park. If it is too hot or rainy, we'll stay home, maybe binge on some Orange Is the New Black, which goes live on Netflix at midnight (PST; 3 a.m. here), and await the Game of Thrones finale Sunday.

 
 
by Colleen McCroskey 06.11.2015 77 days ago
Posted In: fundraising at 02:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ride cincinnati

Local Chefs Cycling Against Cancer

Chef Drew Vogel's Ride Cincinnati team raises money to fight breast cancer, and you can ride too

Drew Vogel is one of those people who is immediately endearing without even trying. He is gregarious and enthusiastic, and after just five minutes of speaking with him, even a cold-hearted nihilist will be wholly enthralled and passionate about whatever it is he’s talking about. An adjunct instructor at the Midwest Culinary Institute and a cook at Jean-Robert’s Table, Vogel’s current passion project is the result of his wife Wendy’s breast cancer diagnosis in November 2011: A cycling team he started last year called Chefs Against Cancer that that raises money for breast cancer research by participating in the annual Ride Cincinnati charity bike race. 

He’s enlisted an army of local chefs, including Jean-Robert de Cavel and the Precinct’s executive chef, Arik Messerschmidt, to ride with him for the cause, and this year they’ve managed to raise more than $2,500. At last year’s race — the team’s first — some participants rode as few as 8.2 miles (“The Commis Chef”) or 18.4 (“The Potscrubber”). More experienced cyclers, like Jean-Philippe Solnom of the French Crust Café, rode the full 62.8 miles (“The Executive Chef”) and will being doing so again this year. “I’m a bigger boy,” laughs Vogel, “you know, not your typical bike-riding looking guy, and last year I rode 28 miles, which sucked, but it sucks way less than cancer.”

Wendy, thankfully, has been cancer-free for three and a half years. But even though their family has made it through the worst, Vogel says they’re still committed to raising money for research for a cure. “People helped us,” he says. “And we gotta give back.” 

This year’s race takes place on Sunday, June 14 — rides start at 6:30 a.m. at Sawyer Point — and if you want to pledge money or join the team you can visit http://tinyurl.com/chefride2015. Don’t worry if all you can cook is Ramen — you don't have to be a chef to ride with Chefs Against Cancer. Your registration fee ($45 adult; $20 child) gets you a T-shirt and a backpack. And if you don't have your own bike, Ride Cincinnati has partnered with Red Bike; email britt.glenn@cincyredbike.org, let them know you're participating in the ride and the overage fee will be removed from your account.

If you don't want to ride, you can still pledge money. Go to http://tinyurl.com/chefride2015 and click "Donate Now," then type "Andrew Vogel" or "Wendy Vogel." Click the black "Donate Now" button to begin the donation process.
 
 
by Sarah Urmston 06.11.2015 77 days ago
Posted In: Playlist at 11:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
rdplaylist1

Your Weekend Playlist: Rehearsal Dinner

Wedding season has officially arrived, and that means parties, dinners, showers and more parties. Yikes! It’s the perfect blend between terrifying and awesome.

This past weekend I had the opportunity to host a dear friend’s rehearsal dinner at a creative space called The Living Room. The bride and groom are in their early 20s, so the theme we chose was more of a modern, rustic feel, decorated with a collection of various plants, aged white windowpanes, flowers in vintage beer bottles and a handmade chalk drawing of the Cincinnati skyline across the blackboard wall in the café.

I created a playlist for the occasion that would fit both their personalities and the central theme of the dinner, avoiding the expected Whitney Houston or Michael Bolton tracks. This soundtrack consists of Indie, Folk and Alternative music old and new that almost everyone in the wedding party would recognize as they poured through the speakers. Hearing them sing along as they picked at the hors d'oeuvres was just the icing on the cake. (Well, the cake didn’t come until after dinner). 

Check it out and see if these (not overly-cheesy) love songs will fit well in your upcoming rehearsal dinner playlist!

“Sweet Disposition” – Temper Trap

This song is strong and delicate altogether. “…A dream, a laugh, a kiss, a cry,” are all pieces of love and what we feel when we’re in it. The rapid, spacey beat is not only gorgeous, but the lyrics are no less than short and powerful. 

“Mess Is Mine” – Vance Joy

What’s mine is yours — for better and for worse. It’s the concept that when you’re with someone, they are a part of you. Their problems become your problems, and this upbeat, warm song with an honest message truly says it best.

“Grow Old With Me” – Tom Odell

This song is so stinkin’ sweet. It’s heartwarming, dreaming about a future with the one you love the most.  Starting slow and fading into a quick tempo, Odell’s voice gradually expresses how intense it is to feel this way toward someone for the rest of your life. Oh, and how wonderful it is.

Ends of the Earth” – Lord Huron

When you’re in a car, driving off into the unknown with your favorite human by your side holding your hand so lightly, this is the song you want to have playing. “To the ends of the earth, would you follow me?” If marriage is an adventure, would you?

“Ho Hey” – The Lumineers

This lovely little song (already known by most) is the simplest way of saying you and your “sweetheart” belong together. It’s catchy, it’s happy and it’s even a sweet song to dance along to. The clapping alongside the rustic instruments will be enough to you get you on your feet with your partner, spinning around and loving how much you love them.

She (For Liz)” – Parachute

I had to throw this song on here simply because the name of the bride is — you guessed it — Elizabeth. It’s that “she, she, she, story-of-a-girl” song that describes the uniqueness of one woman that makes a man love her over anyone else. Although Parachute doesn’t exactly say the name “Liz”, it was an opportunity I couldn’t pass up.

Budapest” – George Ezra

This semi-recent song by George Ezra (whose baby face does NOT match his soothingly-deep voice) describes the passion one human has for another, so strong they would leave even the greatest things in their life. Those materialistic things have no place over that person.

“XO” – John Mayer

Almost any John Mayer on your rehearsal dinner playlist is pretty much a necessity, considering the guy’s voice practically has love embedded in it. Recreating an acoustic cover of Beyoncé’s single ‘XO’, Mayer easily gives an already beautifully written song a slower, more soothing twist for listeners looking to feed their love-struck minds. 

“Like Real People Do” – Hozier

This one is a bit different. My interpretation is that the past is in the past — and however scary the future is, they should let it be. When you’re in love with someone so deeply, sometimes it’s easier to put the pain of the past away and focus on the beauty of what’s to come. Hozier did a heavenly job of putting it, pairing it with its light and angelic melody.

“Home” – Edward Sharpe & The Magnetic Zeros

“Home is wherever I’m with you.” YES. We love this one because that Southern-Folk sound and those sweeter-than-apple-pie lyrics can make a person feel so freaking giddy inside. It’s meant to make you feel like you really are home anywhere you go, but the reality is, it’s because of whose by your side.


 
 
by Staff 06.11.2015 77 days ago
at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_newportitalianfest

This Week's Dining Events

Clambake, Lebanese festival, Urban Wine Festival, Italianfest — basically a bunch of food fests all weekend

THURSDAY 11
Newport Italianfest — Celebrate the history of Italian families that settled in Newport at the 24th annual Newport Italianfest. Spend your evening surrounded by authentic Italian food from local restaurants including Pompilios, Roma’s and Bella Luna, with live music featuring performers from all over the nation and the “old country,” including the Italian harmony trio Tre Bella. And if that’s not enough, the festival will have other activities such as a cooking contest, a pizza-eating contest, games, Rozzi’s fireworks and even rides to keep the little ones busy. 5-11 p.m. Thursday; 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. Festival Park, 101 Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky., newportky.gov

Izzy’s Craft Beer Dinner — A paired dinner featuring Izzy’s classic dishes and Widmer Brothers craft beer. 7 p.m. $25. Izzy’s, 1965 Highland Pike, Fort Wright, Ky., 859-331-4999.

Igby’s Cin City Cigar & Flight Night — Features Four Roses bourbon and Johnnie Walker Scotch paired with cigars from Straus Tobacconist. 5:30-8 p.m. Prices vary. Igby’s, 122 E. Sixth St., Downtown, igbysbar.com.

Mike Czech Pilsner Party — For every beer sold at Ei8ht Ball, 50 cents will go to the Amann Family Benefit Fund. 6 p.m. Free. Ei8ht Ball Brewing outdoor patio, 18 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., ei8htballbrewing.com.


 
A Taste of Duveneck — 
One of Cincinnati Art Museum’s most popular fundraisers, A Taste of Duveneck, celebrates its 25th anniversary Thursday in the museum’s courtyard and Great Hall. Sponsored by Dewey’s Pizza, it will feature more than 20 food vendors, including BonBonerie, Brio, Eddie Merlot’s Steakhouse and Seasons 52, plus craft beer and premium and sparkling wine. The band Soul Pocket will perform. 6-9 p.m. Thursday. $80; $55 young professional. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, 513-639-2962, cincinnatiartmuseum.org.

FRIDAY 12
'Calorie Accounting' author Mandy Levy
Photo: Provided
Mandy Levy Book Release Party — “Buy a thing of arugula from the store. Dump it in a bowl.” This is the beginning of Mandy Levy’s Buffauxlo Chicken Salad recipe from her new book Calorie Accounting: The Foolproof Diet-by-Numbers Plan for a Skinnier New You, a humorous and self-deprecating weight-loss book that feels more like your best friend telling you about her new meal plan than your typical holier-than-thou diet tome. Levy consciously nudges the concept toward something more lighthearted. “It takes itself so seriously, the dieting world,” she says. “And I just wanted everybody to lighten up.” CityBeat recently caught up with Levy via phone as she was driving from Austin to Phoenix on her current Calorie Accounting book tour, which makes two stops in the Queen City this week. Read the interview here. Mandy Levy’s Calorie Accounting tour makes a stop 5:30 p.m. Friday at Kaze in Over-the-Rhine and 2 p.m. Sunday at Barnes & Noble West Chester. More info: calorieaccounting.com.

St. James Mediterranean Food Fest — A church festival featuring the flavors and culture of the Mediterranean … without having to cross the ocean. 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; 4-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. St. James Orthodox Christian Church, 6577 Branch Hill, Loveland, stjamesloveland.org.

Lobstapalooza — Lobster soups, salads, sandwiches, appetizers, cocktails, quesadillas, curries and more. Through July 3. Prices vary. Washington Platform, 1000 Elm St., Downtown, washingtonplatform.com.

Midsummer Smorgasbord — An all-you-can-eat Swedish buffet. 5 p.m. $16.99; $4.99 kids. IKEA, 9500 IKEA Way, West Chester, 513-779-7100.

Dress Bright to Finish the Fight Wine Tasting — Wear bright colors to support cancer and get rewarded with red and white wine tastings, hors d’oeuvres and raffles. 7-10 p.m. $35. Taft Center at Fountain Square, 425 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-365-2694.

SATURDAY 13
Urban Wine Festival — Wine isn’t for snobs anywhere. At least that’s the concept behind Over-the-Rhine’s first Urban Wine Festival, which is presented by 1215 Wine Bar & Coffee Lab and takes place in their adjacent parking lot. Whether your palate prefers red or rosé, all styles of vino will be represented via 24 selections from local distributors. In addition to a public tasting, the fest includes live music, food and a noon seminar featuring regional winemaking professionals. The philosophy behind it all is that wine should be social, and for everyone. And we should all drink to that. Noon-10 p.m. Saturday; tastings start at 2 p.m. $6 glass pours; $48 to taste all 24. 1215 Wine Bar & Coffee Lab, 1215 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, 1215vine.com/urban-wine-festival.

A Moveable Feast — Think beyond sandwiches for summertime meals on the go. Make these dishes that can be served cold or at room-temperature for picnics: chilled tomato and red pepper soup, salmon terrine, summer corn and grain salad and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Blues, Brews and BBQ — Five drinks, seven courses and live music. 4-7 p.m. $30; $35 door. The Art of Entertaining, 2019 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, cincyartofentertaining.com.

Sayler Park Sustains — In an effort to foster neighborhood engagement and to educate residents in sustainable earth-first practices, Sayler Park Sustains invites everyone to witness the green initiatives of local community members. In addition to eco, there will be plenty of food trucks, local beer, vendors and raffles, along with music by The Tillers, Mamadrones, The Part-Time Gentlemen and many more. Anticipate music demos with the Rabbit Hash String Band, as well as info on soil composting, how to green your home and DIY personal care products. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday. Free. Nelson Sayler Memorial Park, 6600 Gracely Drive, Sayler Park, saylerparksustains.org.

SUNDAY 14

Clambake in the Park — Get your grub on, Louisiana style! This beach-themed party in the park will not only be serving up steamy bowlfuls of seafood goodness from Washington Platform, but also feature games and live music from Cajun rockers Robin Lacy & DeZydeco. For only $12 a bowl, you can dig into a dish full of clams, shrimp, mussels and potatoes, along with corn on the cob and a dinner roll on the side. Other options are available, offering steamed Maine lobster and chicken with waffles fries. Laissez les bon temps rouler! Noon-6 p.m. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org

Mahrajan Lebanese Festival — The bounty of the Mediterranean comes to St. Anthony of Padua Church in Walnut Hills. Mahrajan features all sorts of Mediterranean eats, from fresh kibbee and hummus to grape leaves, falafel and baklava. Gorge yourself while belly dancers and Arabic bands take the stage, or watch a Middle Eastern Abaye fashion shows and modern Dabke folk dancing. Noon-8 p.m. Sunday. Free. St. Anthony of Padua Church, 2530 Victory Parkway, Walnut Hills, stanthonyofpaduachurch.com.


Second Sunday on Main — Everyone’s favorite Over-the-Rhine block party returns. Every second Sunday, Main Street turns into a themed fiesta with a beer garden, kids area, tons of vendors, food trucks, live music, specials at OTR shops and restaurants and, this month, doggie friendly activities. It’s the “Dog Days” of summer Sunday, with a contest, dog parade and more, including live chef demos at Mr. Pitiful’s, an appearance by Clifford the Big Red Dog, adoptable dogs from Save the Animals, Cincinnati Pit Crew and VITAS Paw-Pals, and a grand opening celebration for GOODS, a thematic retail store celebrating “adventure.” Noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Free. Main Street between 12th and Liberty, Over-the-Rhine, secondsundayonmain.org

WEDNESDAY 17
Margarita Madness — Do you take your tequila, lime and triple sec frozen or on the rocks? Either way, celebrate summer’s official cocktail — the margarita — at Newport on the Levee with CityBeat’s annual Margarita Madness party. Local bars and restaurants, including El Rancho Grande, Django Western Taco, Redondo Taqueria and Longworth’s, compete in a booze throw-down to win best margarita, as voted by the public and a panel of special guest judges. There will also be a guac-off, so you aren’t drinking on an empty stomach. Must be at least 21. Rain or shine. Proceeds benefit Cincinnati Opera Pride Night. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $40.; $125 VIP includes complimentary valet, early entry, an exclusive Milagro Tequila tasting, covered patio seating and more. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., citybeat.com
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 06.11.2015 77 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:39 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news_cincypolice

Morning News and Stuff

QuanDavier Hicks shooting: what we know; classes offer bicycle/streetcar safety tips; state Senate budget would cut child protective funds, shift affordable housing funding

Good morning, all. Here's the news today.

Cincinnati Police, including Chief Jeffrey Blackwell, yesterday held a press conference about the shooting death of 22-year-old QuanDavier Hicks by CPD officer Doris Scott. Hicks died on the scene of the shooting in Northside. Police officials say that Scott and fellow officer Justin Moore, who was on his third day with the Cincinnati Police Department, were on a second-floor landing of Hicks’ apartment building at Chase Avenue knocking on a door looking for him when Hicks opened up an adjacent door and immediately pointed a rifle at the officers. Moore then grabbed the rifle barrel and Scott shot Hicks in the chest.

The official police version of events says that a 911 call from an address on Colerain Avenue caused officers to be dispatched to Hicks’ address.

“Hicks is known to both the 911 caller and the caller’s boyfriend,” Blackwell said during the news conference. The caller said Hicks had a key to her house and had entered without her permission.

“He’s talking about coming to kill me and all this other stuff,” the woman said in the call, which police played for the press. A dispatcher asked if Hicks carried weapon, and the caller responded, “he probably do,” saying others have told her he had a weapon, though she admitted she had never seen him with one. Officers then went to Hicks’ address at 1751 Chase Avenue to try and find him, leading to the shooting.

Hicks has a few minor drug possession violations in Hamilton County, according to clerk of courts records. Police officials say he has a criminal charge in his former home of Atlanta, but did not provide details about that history, saying they were still waiting for more information.

Meanwhile, another side of Hicks’ life has come out from neighbors and family members, who describe him as a kind man who they have a hard time imagining brandishing a rifle, the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. Family members are demanding to know more details about the incident, as are community members and police accountability activists.

Dozens lingered at the scene of the shooting afterward, where rumors circulated that the police kicked down Hicks' door. Two men were arrested and charged with disorderly conduct after police say they tore down caution tape around the scene. We'll update with their names when we have them. Some, including members of activist group Cincinnati Black Lives Matter, question that and other police assertions, however.

The group released a statement yesterday demanding a full, transparent investigation, the release of any audio or video evidence and the release of the two people arrested for disorderly conduct after the incident. The group is holding a rally at Hoffner Park in Northside at 6 p.m. today.

"Black Lives Matter Cincinnati (BLMC), offers condolences to the family and friends of 22 year old Quandavier Hicks," the group said in the statement. "Conflicting information has circulated regarding whether Hicks was armed, yet we stand with Quandavier Hicks’ family in this challenging moment and call for an immediate release of all details of police conduct in this shooting. This incident has fueled righteous suspicion of the police and heightened existing tensions resulting in the arrest of two individuals at the crime scene. Aaron Roco, BLMC organizer witnessed the two arrests at the crime scene stated, 'At no point did either of the arrestees cross the police lines, they were vocally criticizing the police killing of their neighbor and the cops just grabbed them out of the crowd.' "

About the officers: Moore previously served with the University of Cincinnati Medical Center Police, and before that, was a long-time officer in Clermont County. Scott is an eight-year veteran of the Cincinnati Police Department. Her record with the Citizen’s Complaint Authority shows four minor complaints about discourtesy and lack of service. She was exonerated on two of those. Both officers are on a seven-day leave from the department. Meanwhile, investigations continue into the shooting. Blackwell says at this early point that officers seem to be justified in the incident, but cautioned that the investigation is far from over.

Here is audio of Blackwell’s press conference, including the 911 recording (I don't have my audio editing software here, so the chief's remarks begin at 1:58, the 911 call at 2:40) and the police incident report CityBeat has obtained through an open records request. 

• Are you a cyclist who could use some pointers on riding around the city's coming streetcar? Queen City Bike and Cincinnati Red Bike are offering free workshops on cycling safety around the streetcar every second Saturday of the month. Those workshops will offer tips on how to ride safely alongside the streetcar, how to cross tracks without taking a spill and other things you need to know. The classes will run until October.

• I gave you a lot of local news yesterday, so I'm going to finish this thing off today with a bunch of state news you should know about. The first is about the Republican-led state Senate's budget proposal, which could cut funding for county child protective services agencies by $17 million next year through the phasing out of tax reimbursements. The budget would give $600,000 less than even the House's bare-bones budget to child protective agencies at a time when Ohio already ranks last in spending on such services and Hamilton County's Job and Family Services faces large-scale changes after tragic deaths of children who needed protective services.

* Also in the Senate's budget: a measure that could cost affordable housing efforts and aid to the homeless millions. The measure would take half of the money currently received by the state's Housing Trust Fund, which is compiled from county recorder fees and used for affordable housing projects and homelessness prevention efforts, and distribute it back to Ohio's 88 individual counties to spend how they see fit. Given that county governments generally tack conservative in Ohio, it's not hard to see how that could lessen the pot of money available for affordable housing here and in many Ohio counties. Advocates are trying to convince lawmakers to strip that measure from the budget before the General Assembly passes it on to Gov. John Kasich for his signature. Also on the potential chopping block: state historic tax credits, which could seriously slow redevelopment efforts in neighborhoods like OTR.

• Have you been wondering what's new with Kasich's campaign for president? Let's spend a few minutes finding out what's up with John these days. The big news is that his super PAC has hired Fred Davis, creator of some of the most... um... creative political ads of the last few years. Davis' ads, like the so-called "Demon Sheep" ad (just click the link and watch) are, by my subjective aesthetic and narrative standards, totally awful. A few samples of dialogue from these videos: "He's not in it for the balloons." Also: "I'm not a witch." Can you picture Kasich saying either of those things? Hilarious. But they do stick out from the crowd of boring political TV spots, which I guess is kind of the point.

• Finally, I just wanna say I'm bummed that Ornette Coleman died. One of my all time favorite jazz musicians.

That's it for me. Email, tweet, you know the drill.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 06.10.2015 78 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Police shoot 22-year-old in Northside; streetcar stalemate looms; CPD chief, city manager unveil anti-violence plan

Hello all, there are a couple big stories happening this morning so let’s get right to them.

• First, a Cincinnati Police officer shot a man last night in Northside. Police say the man, 22-year-old Quan Davier-Hicks, pulled a rifle on officers after they entered a home on the 1700 block of Chase Ave. around 11 p.m. last night. A struggle ensued and an officer, whose name has not been released, fired one shot and killed the man. Officers were looking for a suspect in a nearby report of aggravated menacing at the time, according to police officials. Some community members gathered near the scene after the shooting, and two men at the scene were arrested. They have been charged with disorderly conduct after police say they tore down police tape around the scene. This isn’t the first time an officer-involved shooting has happened in the area. In April 2011, police officer Andrew Mitchell shot David “Bones” Herbert on the same street. In 1999, another man, Michael Carpenter, was shot by police nearby. That shooting led to federal lawsuits against CPD. CityBeat has filed public records requests to find out more about the incident and subsequent arrests and will update as information becomes available.

• If you thought anything around the streetcar was going to get any easier or simpler any time soon, welcome to Cincinnati. You’ve obviously only lived here a few days. Sit down, because you’ve got a lot to learn. Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority officials yesterday presented to Cincinnati City Council’s transportation committee, and the proceedings very much resembled the streetcar itself: a slow-moving circular trip it seemed would run well into the evening. Some very interesting information did come out of the meeting, however, including details on the cost differences between the management bid, which would use SORTA’s union employees and cost about $4.7 million in the first year, and the turnkey option, which would allow a management company to hire its own workers. That option costs about $4 million, or about $200,000 under the city’s maximum budget for the transit project’s first year. If you do the math, you’ll see that the union bid is about $500,000 over that budget. But Council’s five Democrats say they’ll vote for the management scenario, saying they would like public employees to operate the streetcar and using SORTA employees will make it easier to them to hold operators accountable for performance.  

Mayor John Cranley also supports the management option, but here’s the snag, and it’s a big one: Cranley is opposed to using city money to shore up streetcar spending. He wants to respond to the union-related operating bid’s cost overruns by cutting the streetcar’s operation frequency. SORTA President Dwight Ferrell said the streetcar would have to reduce operations by 30 percent to meet the spending limit under the management scenario. That, he said, would lead to a “death spiral” for the project, since most rail operations costs are fixed, no matter how many or few riders use a system. Democrats on council say they won’t let that happen, but Cranley has vowed to veto any attempt to spend more city money on the project. That looks likely to produce a stalemate, which could lead SORTA to pick the turnkey option by default. They’ve given an end of June deadline for a decision on the bids, and will have to pick the less-expensive option if no directive is handed down. SORTA by law can’t choose a bid for which money is not allocated, its officials say. Phew.

• City Manager Harry Black, Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell and Mayor John Cranley announced the city’s 90-day anti-violence initiative at a news conference today. That plan includes tweaks to off-duty time to make more officers available, two crews of walking officers in every district, added protection in parks and areas where kids play, and a curfew program — two churches will be curfew drop off centers for juveniles caught out after 10:00 pm (or midnight for 16 and 17 year olds) curfew.

“We will not sit on our hands waiting to take action,” City Manager Harry Black said of the plan. “When the weather turns warm, there’s usually a spike in crime. Unfortunately for us, this year’s spike was bigger than usual.” Black said that spike seems to be stabilizing now, however.

In delivering the plan, Blackwell cited the five goals of the city’s post-2001 collaborative agreement: police community partnership, trust between community and police, oversight of police department, equitable treatment for all, and engagement and transparency with the community.

“This was a collaborative effort with our clergy and our communities. We’re not going to be overly aggressive in our policing this summer. We’re not going to diminish other units,” Blackwell said. He stressed especially that the curfew element was not meant to be punitive. “It’s not our intent to criminalize curfew aggressively, but rather to take children and take them to a safe spot.”

According to Blackwell, much of the violence of late has revolved around “beefs,” or turf wars between a small group of people. It also has to do with illegal guns streaming into the city, he said.

“Criminal street guns are out of control. Not just in this city, but in every city.” CPD is partnering with feds to investigate gun crimes, find out where guns are coming from and eliminate them, according to Blackwell.

Mayor John Cranley said he’s pleased with the plan, but noted that if it doesn’t work, the administration will “try something else.”

“We’re here to support the chief and the police department. Shootings are unacceptably high, and while it’s true that’s a national trend, that’s no comfort to the families of the victims. Something’s in the air and we have to do something about it. They key is to keep trying to do new things until we get a result.”

Reverend Ennis Tait of the Church of the Living God in Avondale touched on the police-involved shooting in Northside before expressing support for CPD.

 “It’s unfortunate we have to come on the heels of a tragedy last night, but it’s still good we’re here,” he said. “Today we stand with our city manager, our mayor and our police chief.”

Ok. So that’s a lot of big local news. I’ll leave my state and national updates for tomorrow. Tweet at me or e-mail me with news tips or anything else, really.

 
 
by Mike Breen 06.10.2015 78 days ago
Posted In: MidPoint Music Festival, Local Music at 07:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
mpmf

MidPoint Music Fest Announces More Bookings

September fest to feature Iron & Wine, Patrick Waston, Lydia Loveless and more

The second round of acts booked for this year's MidPoint Music Festival have been announced. The popular Indie Folk fave Iron & Wine heads up the announcement, adding to a lineup that includes previous-released names like Purity Ring, Ride and Sylvan Esso.

Here is the full list of artists announced so far:

Aero Flynn

All Them Witches
American Wrestlers
Beach Slang

Betty Who

Bully

Caspian

Cathedrals
Diet Cig

The Donkeys

Howard
Huntertones

Iron & Wine

K.Flay

Low Cut Connie
Lydia Loveless
Matthew E. White
Mikhael Paskalev
Mild High Club

Moon Duo

NE-HI

Patrick Watson
Pokey LaFarge

Pure Bathing Culture
Purity Ring

Ride

Ryley Walker

Sarah Jaffe

Strand Of Oaks
Sylvan Esso


Truly

tUnE-yArDs

Vinyl Williams

White Reaper
Yumi Zouma

Zola Jesus

The 2015 MidPoint Music Festival returns to venues around Over-the-Rhine and Downtown Sept. 25-27 (the festival is now running Friday through Sunday, instead of Thursday through Saturday). The first-round weekend passes for $69 have sold out, but if you attend this Friday's MidPoint Indie Summer show on Fountain Square (featuring Kopecky, Broncho, Coconut Milk and Near Earth Objects) you can still purchase them at that price. Otherwise, weekend passes are now $79. (Prices increase again after Labor Day.)

Visit mpmf.com for the latest info and ticket links.
 
 
by CityBeat Staff 06.09.2015 79 days ago
at 03:41 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_newportitalianfest

This Week's Dining Events

Most classes and events require registration; classes frequently sell out.

This week's dining events and cooking classes: Italianfest, Lobstapalooza and more.

WEDNESDAY 10

Taste the World Food Tour — Makes stops at six specialty merchants for tastings, market history and more. 11 a.m. $20; $5 optional wine tasting add on. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market, Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, findlaymarket.org.

Dinner and Dancing: Rockin’ American Swing! with Ilene Ross — The first 30 minutes will be spent learning swing dance. Then learn to make an American menu: deviled eggs with a twist, classic meatloaf, Salazar Brussels sprouts and homemade ice cream sundaes. 6-9 p.m. $140 per couple. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Rock Out Cancer Tap Party — A tap party with live music, drink and appetizer specials, silent auctions and more to benefit GiveHope Pancreatic Cancer Fund and the UC Cancer Institute. 5-9 p.m. Free. Rock Bottom Brewery, 10 Fountain Square, Downtown, 513-621-1588.

THURSDAY 11

Italianfest — Celebrate Italian history with Italian food, music and fun, including a cooking contest. Thursday-Sunday. Free. Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky., newportky.gov/blogs/events.

It’s All About the (Pie) Crust — In a combo demo and hands-on class, learn to make different pies and crusts. Bring a rolling pin, apron and medium-sized bowl. 6:30-9 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

A Taste of Duveneck — The Cincinnati Art Museum’s Taste of Duveneck features great food, exceptional wine and beer, upbeat music and 25th-anniversary surprises. 6-9 p.m. $80. Cincinnati Art Museum, 953 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatiartmuseum.org.

What Can I Bring? — The classic question for any dinner party or potluck. Learn to make delicious meals that travel well, like roasted shrimp with lemon Parmesan sauce, white chocolate brownies, red wine sangria and more. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Izzy’s Craft Beer Dinner — A paired dinner featuring Izzy’s classic dishes and Widmer Brothers craft beer. 7 p.m. $25. Izzy’s, 1965 Highland Pike, Fort Wright, Ky., 859-331-4999.

Igby’s Cin City Cigar & Flight Night — Features Four Roses bourbon and Johnnie Walker Scotch paired with cigars from Straus Tobacconist. 5:30-8 p.m. Prices vary. Igby’s, 122 E. Sixth St., Downtown, igbysbar.com.

Mike Czech Pilsner Party — For every beer sold at Ei8ht Ball, 50 cents will go to the Amann Family Benefit Fund. 6 p.m. Free. Ei8ht Ball Brewing outdoor patio, 18 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., ei8htballbrewing.com.

FRIDAY 12

Vine and Dine — Wine, food and live music from Tickled Pink. 5:30-9:30 p.m. $30; $35 door. The Art of Entertaining, 2019 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, cincyartofentertaining.com.

St. James Mediterranean Food Fest — A church festival featuring the flavors and culture of the Mediterranean without having to cross the ocean. 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; 2-9 p.m. Sunday. Free. St. James Orthodox Christian Church, 6577 Branch Hill, Loveland, stjamesloveland.org.

Lobstapalooza — Lobster soups, salads, sandwiches, appetizers, cocktails, quesadillas, curries and more. Through July 3. Prices vary. Washington Platform, 1000 Elm St., Downtown, washingtonplatform.com.

Midsummer Smorgasbord — An all-you-can-eat Swedish buffet. 5 p.m. $16.99; $4.99 kids. IKEA, 9500 IKEA Way, West Chester, 513-779-7100.

Dress Bright to Finish the Fight Wine Tasting — Wear bright colors to support the fight against cancer and get rewarded with red and white wine tastings, hors d’oeuvres and raffles. 7-10 p.m. $35. Taft Center at Fountain Square, 425 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-365-2694.

SATURDAY 13

A Moveable Feast — Think beyond sandwiches for summertime meals on the go. Make these dishes that can be served cold or at room-temperature for picnics: chilled tomato and red pepper soup, salmon terrine, summer corn-and-grain salad and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Urban Wine Festival — Twenty-four wine tastings, live music, food. Wine seminar starts at noon. Benefits Over the Rhine Community Housing and the Recovery Hotel. Noon-10 p.m. $6 per pour;$48 all tastings; seminar extra. 1215 Wine Bar and Coffee Lab, 1215 Vine St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/1215winecoffee.

Blues, Brews and BBQ — Five drinks, seven courses and live music. 4-7 p.m. $30; $35 door. The Art of Entertaining, 2019 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, cincyartofentertaining.com.

SUNDAY 14

Clambake in the Park — A summer seafood boil from Washington Platform in Washington Park. Features clams, mussels and assorted seafood by the bowlful, with live Cajun music from Robin Lacy & DeZydeco. Noon-6 p.m. $12 per bowl. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org. 

Mahrajan Lebanese Festival — Taste authentic Lebanese cuisine and ethnic pastries, with live entertainment, children’s games and raffles. Noon-8 p.m. Free. St. Anthony of Padua Church, 2530 Victory Parkway, Walnut Hills, 513-961-0120.

TUESDAY 16

Grilling with Ellen: A Sensational Summer Grill — A crowd-pleasing grill menu that comes together easily. Features tropical sparkling sangria, grilled chicken skewers, pasta salad and more. 6-8:30 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday. $65. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

WEDNESDAY 17

Margarita Madness — Head to Newport on the Levee for CityBeat’s annual Margarita Madness party. Local restaurants compete to win best margarita, as voted by the public and a panel of special guest judges. There will also be a guac-off. Must be at least 21. Rain or shine. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $40. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., citybeat.com.

Taste of the NFL — The Cincinnati Bengal’s 13th annual Taste of the NFL features dinner-by-the-bite from more than 40 of the Tristate’s favorite restaurants, with Bengal’s players, coaches and alumni. Includes silent auction and more to benefit the Freestore Foodbank. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $150. Paul Brown Stadium, Downtown, 513-482-7539.

Peruvian Cooking Class — Chef Julie Francis and Sous Chef Amanda Bowman teach participants how to prepare traditional fish and vegetable ceviche and tiradito. 6-9 p.m. Wednesday and June 24. $75. Nectar, 1000 Delta Ave., Mount Lookout, 513-929-0525, dineatnectar.com.

THURSDAY 18

Summit Wine Dinner — A fabulous multi-coursed paired dinner, prepared by Midwest Culinary Institute students, with wine selections from Italy. 6:30 p.m. $60. The Summit at The Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, 513-569-4980.

FRIDAY 19

Jungle Jim’s International Beer Festival — The 10th annual beer festival features two nights of cold beer and barbecue. Features more than 400 beers from more than 100 different breweries, rarities, obscurities and brewery exclusives. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. $50; $20 non-drinker. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Gifts from the Summer Kitchen — Share summer gifts all season long. Make and share bread and butter pickles, espresso-balsamic barbecue sauce, raspberry lemon biscotti and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com. 

SATURDAY 20

The Porkopolis Pig & Whiskey Festival — A fun-filled day of barbecue, whiskey sampling and live Americana and Bluegrass music. Sample food from Cincinnati’s best barbecue restaurants and more than 30 varities of bourbon, scotch and whiskey. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Free; prices vary for food and drink. The Shoe at Horseshoe Casino, 1000 Broadway, Pendleton, citybeat.com.

Gifts from the Summer Kitchen — Share summer gifts all season. Make and share bread-and-butter pickles, espresso-balsamic barbecue sauce, raspberry lemon biscotti and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com. 

TUESDAY 23

Summer Favorites from My Assyrian, Armenian, Persian and Turkish Family — A menu featuring chef David Warda’s family’s blend of Near East cuisines. Learn to make Persian cold buttermilk-yogurt soup, grilled Assyrian lamb patties, Turkish stuffed eggplant and more. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

The Korean Table: Discovering Korean Cuisine — With a doctorate in molecular biology, Kiwon Lee has taught college-level classes in nutritional education classes for more than 10 years. This class menu includes Bimbimbap, Bulgogi (Korean beef) and more. 6:30-9 p.m. $45. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

WEDNESDAY 24

Food Truckin’ for Josh Cares — This annual fundraiser features 15 local food trucks serving lunch for $3-$4, with a tasting contest, music and more to benefit Josh Cares. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 06.09.2015 79 days ago
Posted In: News at 09:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
to do 2-8 iconic market house photo, courtesy the corporation for findlay market

Morning News and Stuff

Council Democrats release budget proposal; imagine a pedestrian walkway between Findlay Market and Washington Park; Alms Apartments fails HUD inspection

Hey Cincy. Here’s your news this morning.

The battle over the city budget continues. Council’s five Democrats yesterday afternoon released their own suggestions for the city’s fiscal year 2016-2017 spending plan, and they’ve made some key changes. Their operating budget proposal would increase human services funding by $1.5 million, bringing it up to the level council unanimously requested back in November, according to a news release sent out yesterday.

The proposal also restores money to streetcar operating funds and programs that help start-up companies, provides a $275,000 boost to the Cincinnati Health Department, $250,000 to Cradle Cincinnati and money to a number of other programs in the operating budget. Democrats’ proposal for the capital improvement budget would provide a $400,000 grant to the Clifton Market, $200,000 each for the Shakespeare and Ensemble Theaters, $1 million for parks and $150,000 for bike projects. The proposal pays for these boosts by eliminating a pay raise for high-level city employees and instituting a one-month hiring freeze for some positions, cutting funding for financial literacy and Cincinnati Business Committee studies, pulling $100,000 from the city’s contingency fund and by moving around money for the city’s share of the 4th and Race garage project, among other changes. Mayor John Cranley is currently reviewing the budget. If no other council members vote for the changes, Cranley has the power to veto the proposals, which would put him on the opposite side of his fellow Democrats again. Council is expected to pass the budget by June 17 so it can go into effect July 1.

• So this is a interesting idea. Findlay Market is working with the University of Cincinnati on a concept that would link the market with Washington Park via a more walker-friendly pathway. The groups held a party in the neighborhood last week to gather input from Over-the-Rhine residents about what they’d like on the path, and feedback included improved lighting, places to sit and hang out, food trucks or more permanent places for vendors and other ideas. A big priority: Make it easier to cross Liberty Street, which runs between the park and market. The proposed pathway would most likely run down Pleasant Street, which currently sees little automotive traffic. The pedestrian walkway could mean that street would be closed to cars, at least during certain hours. UC’s Research Institute and Metro Lab are involved in the process, with the latter devoting a number of graduate students to design and execute some of the suggestions. Right now, the bigger path is just an idea, but another input-gathering party is planned for June 26.

• The Alms Hill apartment building in Walnut Hills, which we told you about in this story a few months back, failed an inspection by the Department of Housing and Urban Development earlier this spring. The building scored 45 out of 100 points on the inspection, which requires 60 points for a passing score. The city is mulling what to do about the building, which houses 200 residents and has fallen into a state of disrepair many say is dangerous. Cincinnati City Councilman Christopher Smitherman, who chairs council’s Law and Public Safety Committee, suggested the city sue HUD, which pays the Alms’ owners subsidized rents for its tenants. The building’s owners have made changes, including replacing most of the management staff there and undertaking some repairs, but city officials say the building is far still far from fit for occupancy. 


• If you see Vice Mayor David Mann or former City Council member Jim Tarbell dangling off the side of a building downtown Friday, don’t worry, they’re supposed to be there. The two and others will be rappelling down the YMCA building on Central Parkway to help raise money for the building’s new construction, which will provide 65 units of affordable housing for seniors. The event, called Over the Edge 4 Elders, is hosted by Episcopal Retirement Homes, which is undertaking the building’s $11.8 million renovation with Cincinnati’s Model Group. The public can register for a VIP party to watch folks rappel, or you can raise $1,000 to rappel down yourself Saturday.

• Because budgets are so, so fun and everyone loves them, let’s talk about the Ohio State Senate’s budget proposal, which it released yesterday. That Republican budget doesn’t include Gov. John Kasich’s proposed 23-percent income tax cut, but it does take a big bite of the state’s income taxes, especially for small businesses, which wouldn’t pay taxes on the first $250,000 in income they bring in. The budget also institutes an across-the-board 6.3 percent income tax cut for individuals. There are few sales tax hikes in the budget proposal, save a tobacco tax hike, which has many anxious to see the details of the plan: Social service advocates, for instance, are worried that proposed income tax cuts will be paid for with cuts to programs that help the poor.

Republican leaders in the Senate have acknowledged there are cuts to some programs, but have yet to release details about which ones will find themselves on the chopping block. The budget does provide more funding for K-12 and higher education than the one proposed by Kasich, however, giving them $935 million and $240 million, respectively. The Senate's proposal wouldn't result in cuts for any school district in the state, unlike Kasich's, which relied on a formula designed to even out funding disparities between high- and low-income schools. Next, the General Assembly will hear testimony on the budget and vote to pass it, potentially next week. Afterward, it will go to Kasich’s desk for a final signature.

That’s it for me. Find me on Twitter or drop me a line with news tips or just to say hey.

 
 
by Staff 06.08.2015 80 days ago
Posted In: Leftovers at 11:20 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
summer guide behind the scenes

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Everyone was really into tacos.

Each week CityBeat staffers, dining writers and the occasional intern tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food. 

Ilene Ross: Some days, the job of being a dining writer has more perks than others. On Friday morning I picked up the makings of a lobster boil from Lobsta Bakes of Maine in Newtown and delivered them to photographer Jesse Fox’s studio for a CityBeat photoshoot. Since both Jesse and our Artistic Director Rebecca Sylvester are vegetarians, they had no use for the lobsters post-shoot, so I watched my little crustacean friends pose for their close-up, while also volunteering my hands for a shot, and then took them home so the BF and I could enjoy them for dinner. Score!
Friday was also National Donut Day, and the lovely Katie Willing of Holtman’s Donuts asked me to participate in Cincy National Donut Day to benefit The Salvation Army on Fountain Square. All I had to do was partake in a donut stacking contest and I would get to eat all the donuts I could. Bad news, I lost the contest. Good news, I got to take home a huge box of Holtman’s. So all I ate all day was donuts and lobster. No complaints.
On Saturday night while it seems the whole world was down at Bunbury, the BF and I did our own little musical tour de Northside. We started out on the patio at Django Western Taco with absolutely fabulous strawberry basil margaritas, shrimp ceviche with avocado and corn chips, and beef, al pastor and chicken tacos. Next, it was on to Northside Tavern for drinks and music from Biloxi to Brooklyn, then Urban Artifact for beer and Don’t Fear the Satellites Jack Steiner Quartet. We finished the night with snacks outside at The Littlefield.

Katie Holocher: I treated myself to a fully-loaded turtle from Gomez Salsa on Friday after dropping off my friends at Bunbury, but it was this pregnant girl's perfect Friday night. The only downside? My addiction has been reopened. I now anticipate multiple drive bys a week. And because the taco craving continued, I had to have Nada on Saturday night. My usual is just the vegetarian tacos, but this time I went with just one veggie, one shrimp, and one Baja fish. The shrimp was such a good call because it was on the lighter, fresher end. The fish was a good call because it was on the indulgent, richer end. I also got a side corn tamal, which will probably become a must-have side order, much like the guacamole, because it hits the spot with the sweetness of the corn, and the spicy of the jalapeño. Actually, it all hit the spot. 

Jesse Fox: I spent a large portion of my weekend at Bunbury so most of my food came from the vendors there. The best was my veggie dog from Wurst Bar. I typically don't like hot foods when I'm already sitting in the sun, but it was both good and sustaining for the next few hours of work I had to do. I also enjoyed a strawberry popscicle from streetpops, a really good tofu dish with lots of carrots in the artist catering area and probably one too many Red Bulls.  Although I really, really wanted to try the Island Noodles everyone was carrying around with them, I couldn't justify waiting 30-plus minutes in their never-ending line to get them.

Maija Zummo: Saturday afternoon I was out running errands and made a pit stop at Mazunte for tacos. I've never been in the actual restaurant before — I've only had their tacos via their pop-up at Neons on weekends — and it was very cute. You wait in line to order from the cashier, and then take a sign to your table; the signs all say things like Cozumel, Oxaca, etc. I ordered vegetarian tacos to go (while vegetarian and vegan options are not listed on the menu board, they are available). The three veggie tacos came with zucchini and mushroom, guacamole and some type of red sauce on little tortillas with a side of lime. They were great; I ate them in my car. And while I waited for my order — the place was super packed for 2 p.m. — I had a red sangria. It was REALLY good. It tasted like a mix between normal sangria and like gluhwein, there was something cinnamony about it.

Zack Hatfield: At Findlay Market on Saturday, I found Pho Lang Thang, a Vietnamese restaurant that specializes in pho, a noodle soup with delectable broth and herbs. But you really have to try the Báhn Xá Xíu, an unapologetically unpronounceable Chinese barbecue pork sandwich that stole my heart forever. Sunday at high noon, I went to Barrio Tequileria in Northside and ordered a vegetarian burrito.
 
 

 

 

Latest Blogs
 
by Jac Kern 08.27.2015 4 hours ago
Posted In: Movies, TV/Celebrity, Humor at 02:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-2

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Serena Williams and Drake made out at Sotto. What did you do this weekend?

Serena was in town competing in the Western & Southern Open; Drake came to watch. The two celebrated Serena’s finals win with dinner at Sotto downtown and, apparently, a little mouth-on-mouth action. Drake also supported Serena at Wimbledon earlier this summer. NORMAL.

The brothers Hanson, the objects of my adolescent affection after my JTT phase ended, are now in the beer business. The still-dreamy-to-me trio of Zac, Isaac and Taylor have produced a pale ale appropriately called Mmmhops. It’s not available in Ohio, but you should be able to buy some online next month.

If you’re still following the Fat Jew on Instagram or Twitter, here are some reasons why you should consider cutting that shit off.

Play Cincinnati I-Spy as you watch the trailer for Carol:

I spotted Maury’s Tiny Cove (the restaurant in the very first scene) and various Downtown streets, and those Christmas shop scenes were filmed in Eden Park. The movie is expected to be released Nov. 20.

Do you ever wake up in the middle of the night with pressing questions, like “What ever happened to Rayanne from My So-Called Life?” Well, don’t worry, because A.J. Langer is doing fine — much better than how her iconic ‘90s character probably would have fared (All that sex! Drugs! Wild hair!). In fact, she’s a damn countess. Step aside, LuAnn.

A.J. met British Lord Charles Courtenay in 2002 and they married in 2005. They have two kids. Real-life Rayanne swapped her title of a Lady for that of a Countess when Charles’ father passed away last week, making her husband an Earl. In other words, boring, boring, boring, Rayanne now has a castle. The title includes a 14th-century estate in Exeter, England. Get it, Rayanne!

Wanna attend the Gloss book release party that Marc Jacobs is hosting next month during New York Fashion Week? Well, first you have to be fabulous enough to get an invite — but that’s not all. The invite features a lengthy, descriptive dress code that includes "fur coats over lingerie," "Grace Jones butch realness," "riding in on a white horse" (literally?) and sequins — three times. Read my wedding dress code the full description here

Highly specific talent: This woman sounds exactly like Beyoncé. If Beyoncé did commercial voiceovers.

Rumors about a Sons of Anarchy spinoff were circulating before the seven-season show even concluded last year. The idea was a prequel focusing on SAMCRO’s origins with Jax’s dad John Teller and the rest of the Redwood Original. But FX is instead moving forward with a spinoff about the Mayans, a rival motorcycle club.

If you can’t wait for another Kurt Sutter series, tune into The Bastard Executioner, premiering on FX Sept. 15. The medieval war drama stars Sons’ Gemma (Katey Sagal, Sutter’s wife), True Blood’s Bill (Stephen Moyer) and, naturally, the multihyphenate Sutter as a prosthetic-covered character called “The Dark Mute.”

And speaking of spinoffs, Fear the Walking Dead, a companion series to the similarly-titled The Walking Dead, is now on AMC. See this week’s TV column to read more about the new series and other shows to watch this week.

If you find yourself in the Chicago area and need a new gig, this Craigslist gem is searching for a tour assistant for a cat circus. MUST LOVE CATS!
 
 
by Natalie Krebs 08.27.2015 9 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cranley veto

Morning News and Stuff

Cranley vetoes secret council meetings; The city racks up late fees; Charter school suddenly closes; Pakistan extradites former Ohio state deputy treasurer

Happy Thursday, Cincy! Better yet, tomorrow's Friday. So here's today's headlines to make the week pass a little quicker. 

• Mayor John Cranley vetoed a Nov. 3 ballot-bound charter yesterday that would allow city council to meet in secret about certain topics, including property sales, the city manager's performance and some economic development deals. The charter amendment ballot initiative was passed by council on Monday with a vote of 6-3, with Councilmembers P.G. Sittenfeld, Charlie Winburn and Christopher Smitherman voting against it. Despite Cranley's veto, the amendment isn't dead. The mayor admits it could very well end up back on the ballot as council appears to have the six votes needed to override his veto. The mayor said he vetoed the amendment allowing Council to use executive session for transparency reasons. The special executive sessions would have been restricted to items like assessing the city manager's performance, buying or selling property, disputes possibly ending up in court, security arrangements and items required to be kept secret by law.  

• Have trouble paying your bills on time? So does the city of Cincinnati! A city audit from January 2014 through July of this year found that taxpayers spent an additional $130,000 from late fees on the city's electrical bills. Taxpayers have been shelling out just under $7,000 on average per month for late fees for the first half of 2015. The city previously escaped Duke Energy's late fees as the company didn't charge them to the the government until a crackdown in 2014. City Manager Harry Black says a fix has reportedly come out of the City's Innovation Lab, but Councilman Kevin Flynn has expressed anger over the fees saying it shouldn't have taken a year to catch. 

Ian James, executive director of ResponsibleOhio, the political action committee trying to legalize marijuana, has accused Secretary of State Jon Husted of intentionally putting confusing language on its Nov. 3 ballot initiative. James accused Husted, who opposes the legalization, of using the word "monopoly," which he calls a "loaded term" on the ballot to confuse voters. The term has been floating around the group's initiative a lot, which would enact a constitutional amendment to legalize the plant, but restrict its growth to just 10 commercial farms in the state owned by the PAC's investors. State initiative 3 as of now will read, “Grants a monopoly for the commercial production and sale of marijuana for recreational and medicinal purposes.” ResponsibleOhio says it's actually unfair to call it a monopoly when the amendment would allow for 1,150 retail stores that are not operated by investors.

In other weed news, gazing upon ResponsibleOhio's new mascot, Buddie, might make you feel like you've already smoked a couple Js. He has a marijuana bud for a head. Just gonna leave it right here for you to check out. The mascot has caused controversy because critics say he/she/it is too cartoonish and could be viewed as an attempt to entice kids to smoke weed.

• A Columbus charter school has abruptly closed its doors just after the start of the school year leaving 300 students stranded. FCI Academy was suspended by its Toledo sponsor, Education Service Center of Lake Erie West, for mismanagement, but apparently things had been going downhill for the charter school for awhile. The Columbus Dispatch reports that it found the school was keeping afloat for so long by deferring debt, borrowing money and not paying federal withholding and Medicare taxes. The school also received Fs from the state report card on things like graduation rates, gap closing and overall value-added. But despite these setbacks, the school is still determined to keep fighting, according to a note left on the school's locked door in front of its deserted parking lot on Wednesday. In the summer of 2014, FCI Academy laid off 17 employees, and a 2013 state audit showed a $700,000 operating deficit.  

• Former Ohio state deputy treasurer Amer Ahmed has been extradited by Pakistan to the U.S. to begin serving a 15 year sentence for bribery, wire fraud and money laundering. Amer was sentenced to prison by U.S. District Judge Michael H. Watson of Columbus late last year. He and three co-conspirators were ordered to pay $3.2 million to the feds. He plead guilty to federal charges in 2013 then fled to Pakistan using fake travel documents. Ahmed served under Democratic state Treasurer Kevin L. Boyce until his defeat in 2010. During his tenure, he devised a plan to direct Ohio state brokerage business to a Canton securities broker. 

• One thing I noticed when I moved to Cincinnati is that people here love their chili.  Cincinnatians flock to the nearest Skyline after a long night of drinking the way the rest of the country flocks to IHOP. So with that, I am truly sorry to report the passing of the final surviving founder of Skyline, William Nicholas “Bill” Lambrinides on Tuesday at the age of 87. Lambrinides worked with his father, Nicolas, a Greek immigrant, and his two brothers, Lambert, Jim, Christie and John to open the first restaurant in 1949. The store has since grown to 110 locations to bring late-night happiness to folks in four states.

That's it for today! Email me with story tips!

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.26.2015 32 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:30 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Naming rights for streetcar up for grabs; activists demand more community involvement in UC reforms; Columbus Dispatch demands charter school public records

Hey all. Here’s a brief rundown of the news this morning.

So, do you want to see your name written really big on something attention-grabbing and controversial that will zoom around downtown most of the day and night? Do you have hundreds of thousands of dollars you’re not quite sure what to do with? Here’s an idea: buy some naming rights to the streetcar. Officials with the newly-created Cincinnati Street Railway, a nonprofit promoting the streetcar, are reaching out to marketing firms to help design advertising packages for corporate sponsors for the project. Similar marketing pushes in other cities with streetcars have netted millions in advertising revenues to go toward operation of the transit systems. Locally, some officials say the naming rights could net as much as $250,000 a year, though others say the project’s controversial nature makes it uncertain if big local corporations will want to put their names on it. A suggestion: maybe reach out to deep-pocketed, eccentric megalomaniacs? Perhaps Donald Trump will want to raise his profile here in town next year? What could be better than seeing The Donald’s giant face careening toward you on the front of a streetcar as you spend time in OTR just before the election? Though, hm, come to think of it, streetcar supporters may not be his target demographic.

• I’m not sure this is much news to anyone, but I’m going to say it anyway. We have an amazing library system here in Hamilton County. From its Maker Space to its innovative programming and events to the sheer amount of material available to check out, we have a rare thing here. And the numbers show it. Last year, The Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County was the fifth-busiest library in the country, checking out more than 18 million items, according to data from the Public Library Association. Now, granted, at least a couple hundred of these check-outs were me borrowing the library’s DVD copies of the Bill and Ted movies, but still. Pretty impressive. The library moved up a spot on the ranking from 2013, when it was the sixth-busiest in the country. More than 600,000 people have library cards with the system. Not bad for the country’s 28th-biggest metropolitan area.

• Local faith leaders and activists are demanding more community involvement in changes the University of Cincinnati is undertaking in the wake of the Samuel DuBose shooting. Dubose was killed last month by UC police officer Ray Tensing after a routine traffic stop. Since that time, the university has vowed reform of its police department, including adjustments to off-campus patrols and joining in on the city’s collaborative agreement, which Cincinnati Police Department already abides by. That agreement was drawn up after the police shooting death of Timothy Thomas in 2001 caused days of civil unrest in Cincinnati. Activists and faith leaders are asking that UC compensate the DuBose family for his death, as well as submit to an external investigation into the school’s policing practices. A group including community activist Iris Roley, University of Cincinnati activist Alexander Shelton, Bishop Bobby Hilton, Pastor KZ Smith and others met with UC officials yesterday in a private meeting later described by Shelton as “tense” at times. UC President Santa Ono and newly-hired Vice President of Safety and Reform Robin Engel were among representatives for the university.

• Damn. Here’s the Columbus Dispatch throwing down about charter school transparency. In an editorial published today, the paper slams state officials for not releasing documents about the Ohio Board of Education’s omission of some data on poor-performing online charter schools in the state. The failure to include that data in reports about charter school performance led to an inflated evaluation for at least one organization that sponsors charters in the state. ODE official David Hansen was responsible for that data collection. He resigned following revelations of the omissions. His wife, incidentally, heads Gov. John Kasich’s presidential campaign. He’s a big, big supporter of charters in the state. The Dispatch, along with a number of other publications, has filed numerous public records requests for documents about the decision to withhold the less-than-flattering charter data, according to the editorial. And now they’re getting tired of waiting, it seems.

“If state Superintendent of Education Richard Ross is not covering up something embarrassing or illegal at the Ohio Department of Education, his recent actions aren’t helping his credibility,” the piece begins.

• Let’s circle back around to Donald Trump, since he’s leading national GOP presidential primary polls, and it seems like the whole world is kinda revolving around his circus of a campaign at the moment. The Donald  may well have taken it upon himself to offend Spanish-speaking Americans as much as possible lately, which is a questionable campaign strategy at best. In the past, Trump hasn’t done himself any favors with this large portion of the American population, describing Mexicans immigrants as "rapists" and criminals. But in true Trump fashion, he’s taken it a step further. Yesterday, he had Spanish-language news station Univision's lead anchor Jorge Ramos physically removed from a news conference for asking a question out of turn. He eventually let Ramos back in, but the exchange was heated, awkward and really just a bad idea all around. The National Association of Hispanic Journalists fired off a statement last night condemning Trump for the confrontation. Spanish-language media has covered Trump more extensively than mainstream media because the leading GOP contender keeps talking about his immigrant plan, which includes building a wall along the southern border and ending birthright citizenship.

That’s it for me. See ya tomorrow.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.25.2015 54 hours ago
Posted In: Film at 01:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
photo feb 05, 11 46 20 am (1)

Third Cincinnati-Related Film to Screen at New York Film Festival

The Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky Film Commission — or an enterprising arts-tourism travel agent — might want to look at organizing a charter from here to attend the New York Film Festival from Sept. 25 to Oct. 11.

Previously announced at the fest were two dramatic films shot in Cincinnati — Todd Haynes’ Carol with Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, and the closing-night world premiere of Don Cheadle’s Miles Ahead, a biopic about Miles Davis.

But another film with strong Cincinnati connections — Troublemakers: The Story of Land Art — has been named one of 12 documentaries to be showcased at the festival. Its screening dates are Oct. 1 and 4.

Its director, James Crump, was photography curator and chief curator at Cincinnati Art Museum from 2008 until resigning in 2013. And its executive producer is Ronnie Sassoon, the Cincinnati-born widow of hairstylist Vidal Sassoon. Crump in 2007 had directed Black, White + Gray, a documentary about the relationships between Robert Mapplethorpe, Sam Wagstaff and Patti Smith.

Among the 11 other documentaries in the fest are Field of Vision: New Episodic Nonfiction by Laura Poitras, whose Citzenfour won an Academy Award this year, and In Jackson Heights, the latest from Frederick Wiseman.

Who knows? There might be others with strong local connections, too.

Here are the Film Festival’s program notes for Troublemakers.

“The titular troublemakers are the New York–based Land (aka Earth) artists of the 1960s and 70s, who walked away from the reproducible and the commodifiable, migrated to the American Southwest, worked with earth and light and seemingly limitless space, and rethought the question of scale and the relationships between artist, landscape, and viewer. Director James Crump (Black White + Gray) has meticulously constructed Troublemakers from interviews (with Germano Celant, Virginia Dwan, and others), photos and footage of Walter De Maria, Michael Heizer, Robert Smithson, Nancy Holt, and Charles Ross at work on their astonishing creations: Heizer’s Double Negative, a 1,500-feet long “line” cut between two canyons on Mormon Mesa in Nevada; Holt’s concrete Sun Tunnels, through each of which the sun appears differently according to the season; De Maria’s The Lightning Field in New Mexico; and Smithson’s Spiral Jetty, built on the Great Salt Lake in Utah. A beautiful tribute to a great moment in art.”

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.25.2015 56 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Council private meeting amendment to go on November ballot; no more camping out for magnet school enrollment; former CPD captain in pro-weed ad

Good morning all. Here’s the news today.

Cincinnati City Council yesterday moved along at least one charter amendment proposal, putting it on the November ballot for voters to approve. That amendment would clarify when council can meet in executive session, away from the staring eyes of the public. Ohio state law allows some use of executive session for municipal governments, and the charter amendment proposed would specify limited times when council could get together for discussions behind closed doors. Those include discussions about certain sensitive property transactions, ongoing court cases, security measures for city facilities and personnel, certain information about development deals and some discussions about the city manager’s job.

The Charter Review Committee, a group charged with suggesting changes to the city’s governing document, had suggested four other amendments. At least one of those, a measure that would clarify how long the mayor has to refer legislation to council committees, seems to have died on the vine. While it sounds arcane, the issue has big, contentious implications. The mayor’s ability to hold on to legislation amounts to a so-called “pocket veto,” critics on council claim, or a way for the mayor to effectively kill council actions he doesn’t like. Mayor Mark Mallory used this power more than 200 times during his time as mayor. Cranley is opposed to the amendment, but he also claims that the pocket veto isn’t a real thing. Some council members agree, saying that the mayor clinging on to legislation could be challenged in court. One thing is clear, however: an amendment won’t clear up the issue. Advocates for the measure fell one short of the six council votes needed to put the amendment on the November ballot.  

Other amendments, including one that would give council the power to fire the city manager, are hanging in there and might be considered next week, just short of the deadline to get the proposals on the November ballot.

• In other council news, a new tax levy for parks improvement will also go on the upcoming ballot. The property tax boost of 1 mill would mean that owners of a $100,000 home would pay about $35 extra a year. Council’s vote is somewhat symbolic. Organizers of a petition drive collected enough signatures throughout the city to put the initiative up before voters. If voters approve the measure, it would raise about $5 million a year. About $1.25 million of that would go toward park maintenance. The rest would go to new projects decided by the mayor and the park board. Parks funding has been cut in half in the last decade and a half, Cranley has noted.

• A long-held tradition for Cincinnati parents is over, at least for now. Folks in the Cincinnati Public School district looking to get their kids into magnets like the Fairview German Language School will no longer be able to sign up on a first-come, first-served basis, but instead will be entered into a lottery system. That will eliminate the yearly camp-outs that parents undertake as they wait to sign their children up for those schools. CPS has cited fairness and safety concerns for ending the first-come, first-served practice. Last year’s camp out lasted 16 days. Enrollment for CPS’ high-demand magnet schools has several tiers. First are priority students who already have a sibling attending the school. Then a number of seats are set aside for students whose nearby schools are among the district’s lowest performers, an effort to offer those students a chance at a better education. The rest have been up for grabs. Until now, seat availability was through the first-come, first-served approach. Now, a computer will randomly choose who gets to enroll.

• City officials and business leaders yesterday launched Union Hall, a facility in Over-the-Rhine that is touted as a one stop shop for entrepreneurs looking for help in launching start-ups. The site on Vine Street houses startup incubator The Brandery, Cintrifuse and CincyTech, all of which are aimed at helping get startups off the ground. The historic building, which has been a brewery, night club and speakeasy, will house about 100 employees.

• A former Cincinnati Police captain is appearing in an ad advocating for legalized marijuana. Retired Capt. Howard Rahtz, a member of a marijuana policy task force led by Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters, is seen in the commercials supporting ResponsibleOhio’s legalization effort arguing that the state’s marijuana laws don’t work and that it’s time to reform them. Rahtz touts his time as a Cincinnati police officer, saying he learned a great deal about drug addiction during his service. Opponents of the ResponsibleOhio measure, which would legalize marijuana for anyone over the age of 21, but restrict commercial growth to 10 sites across the state, say they’ll be airing their own commercials. Groups like Ohioans Against Marijuana Monopolies say ResponsibleOhio’s plan amounts to an unfair monopoly that will only benefit the group’s rich investors.

 
 
by Tony Johnson 08.24.2015 3 days ago
at 03:57 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
compton

Spoonful of Cinema: Straight Outta Compton (Review)

When N.W.A. first arrived, the group was a revelation — a musical explosion of aggressive lyrics and explicit subject matter. When its legendary record Straight Outta Compton dropped 27 years ago, it may very well have marked the inclusion of gangsta rap in the mainstream conscious of pop culture for the first time. The rap group, comprised of Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, MC Ren and DJ Yella, became the voice of a pissed off generation of street kids who had been subjected to and paid witness to the worst of the War on Drugs, police harassment and brutality and Reaganomics.

So here we are, more than a quarter of a century later, and the story that N.W.A. was telling in 1988 sounds all too similar to the domestic issues we face as a nation today. While Straight Outta Compton the album was current, Straight Outta Compton the film is characterized by a triple balancing act of paying tribute to the godfathers of gangsta, the biopic-necessity of gritty truth-telling and exuding modern relevance.

The film begins before the group comes to exist. Before they become pieces of the world’s most dangerous Hip Hop group, Eazy-E is pocketing stacks of cash (or not, when he gets stiffed) from dope deals and ducking from the police. Ice Cube is venting mightily with a pen and pad, and doing his best not to get beat by local gangsters. Dr. Dre is begrudgingly DJing for an L.A. club that distances its image from what the club owner calls “that gangster bullshit.” Ren is just a small-time MC, and DJ Yella works the club discs with Dre. Eazy wonders how long he could survive in the drug game, Cube is full of rhymes targeted at everything he has to deal with and Dre is escaping into his G-funk production dream world at his mother’s strong disapproval.

As we watch the stories unfold — which primarily revolve around the trio of Eazy, Cube and Dre — we also witness the blossoming of three exceptional young and relatively unknown actors.  Jason Mitchell nails the loose-canon, true gangster attitude of Eazy-E and adds touches of guilt and tinges of pain. O’Shea Jackson Jr., the son of Ice Cube, is surprisingly superb in his first significant acting performance as his father. The resemblance is astoundingly striking — from Jackson Jr.’s appearance to his laugh, voice and smile, there could not have been a better or less conventional choice as to who could play Ice Cube. Corey Hawkins portrays Dr. Dre. It’s a tight race amongst the three to determine which star shines the brightest — not in dissimilar fashion to the icons they emulate — but perhaps Hawkins is the most impressive, if not the most qualified. Hawkins’ experience ranges from playing Shakespeare’s vital Tybalt role in a Broadway production of Romeo and Juliet to being recently named as the actor to take on Heath in The Walking Dead, and his experience and natural talent are both are on full display in Straight Outta Compton. If Hollywood has its head on straight, these three actors can help to close the cringe-worthy diversity gap in the movie industry.

The actors and director F. Gary Gray carry an expansive, sometimes sprawling collaborative script to impressive places in Hip Hop history that were all sparked by N.W.A. From their initial, practically overnight explosion of popularity to the subsequent contract dissatisfaction and departures of Ice Cube and Dr. Dre from the group, the movie becomes something that it may not have intended to be but is rewarding to witness — it serves as a re-telling of West Coast Hip Hop’s rise through the spectrum of N.W.A.

We get a taste of early Hip Hop dis-tracks when Ice Cube leaves for New York City to start his own rap label, Lench Mob. We witness bad contracts from Jerry Heller (Paul Giamatti) and violent intimidation from Suge Knight, which serve as opposite sides to the same coin of Eazy-E’s tragic fall from rap stardom. We watch Dre work out production kinks with Snoop Dogg, the D.O.C. and Tupac.

Straight Outta Compton is a treat for Hip Hop fans, and as a huge fan of N.W.A., Ice Cube and Dr. Dre, I can say that my expectations were easily satisfied and my highest hopes exceeded.  It’s a strange formula for a blockbuster hit. Think about it — a picture produced by the artists (Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, the Eazy-E estate) with the most to gain monetarily from its success shouldn’t be good. It should be a two-hour commercial. But it is good, even though the cast is essentially a collection of unknowns with the insertion of the producer’s son as a lead. But it does work, and it works brilliantly, and I can only hope that Ice Cube’s Cube Vision video production studios aim to make more Hip Hop and street pictures.  

The film works brilliantly on two levels. The first level is at face value — we get to re-witness one of the most —if not the most — exciting moments in Hip Hop. The second level is revealed when you peel back the layers and ask yourself why the story of these kids from Compton in the late ’80s is just as relevant as it was then. The things that they were saying on record, the journalistic qualities unique to Hip Hop (and perhaps Folk music) that showed what life was really like — I don’t think the film is trying to keep those ideas and frustrations bottled up in the era of Reagan and Bush 1. Instead, the film is really about what we face today, how things haven’t changed enough and that if artists don’t feel the responsibility to shine a light on unfortunate circumstances the way that Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Dr. Dre, MC Ren and DJ Yella did, then maybe things never will change. The film is as much a message to the future as it is a reflection of the past. And it’s a whole hell of a lot of fun, too.

Grade: A-

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.24.2015 3 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pollution

Morning News and Stuff

Historic King Records site endangered; 'Nati air quality is nasty; Deez Nuts endorses Gov. Kasich

Good morning y’all. Hope your weekend was as fantastic as mine was. Yesterday I finally made it down to the Taft Museum to check out their exhibition of Edward Curtis photographs. Curtis spent 30 years in the early part of the 1900s photographing Native American tribes across the West. His work is technically stunning and in some ways, pretty problematic, contributing to some stereotypes and perceptions of Native peoples as a “vanishing race” living bygone lifestyles. The exhibit is interesting— the photographs are beautiful and the underlying questions they bring up are worth wrestling with.

Anyway, this isn’t morning art blabbering, it’s morning news. So let’s talk news, eh? The thing that caught my eye around town today is this story about the former King Records site in Evanston. I’ve been hearing buzz that part of it might be in danger, and turns out that may be true. The owner of one of the buildings at the historic site, which hosted early recording sessions by James Brown and a number of other significant musicians, has applied for a permit to demolish the structure. That’s led to an outcry from historic preservationists, music historians and general boosters for Cincinnati. The city’s planning commission Friday declared the site a local historic landmark, echoing a similar declaration by the city’s Historic Conservation Board. City Council has to give final approval to the designation, which it could do next month. In the meantime, the owner’s demolition permit application is on hold. Will the city be able to save this historic landmark, which could cost up to half a million dollars to stabilize? We’ll see.

• Stressed about pollution? Take a deep breath. Or maybe, uh, don’t. A new report says Cincinnati is among the worst cities in the country when it comes to air quality. Website 24/7 Wall St. analyzed air quality data from the American Lung Association and determined that the Greater Cincinnati metropolitan area is the eighth worst in the country for air pollution. The report compares the area to California’s central valley region, which landed seven cities in the bottom 10 of the air quality list. Like that region, Cincinnati is in a valley and has fairly high traffic volumes. But that’s not the only culprit here: coal plants play a big role in air pollution around Cincinnati, the ALA suggests. Take heart, though. We’re not the only Ohio city on the list. Cleveland came in at number 10 in the most polluted air ranking.

• So there’s a new interchange going in on I-71 into Walnut Hills and Avondale, and the State of Ohio has purchased millions in property near the future on and off ramps. Specifically, the state has spent nearly $4 million on 83 parcels of land around the project. When all is said and done, the state will have purchased 140 pieces of property, officials say. That’s part of a bigger land-buying frenzy in the historically low-income neighborhoods. The $106 million interchange looks likely to change the face of the area around Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. and Reading Road, with new development featuring a proposed tech corridor and other big developments. We first reported on the interchange last year. Stay tuned for more updates on how the development will affect Avondale, Corryville and Walnut Hills.

• Here’s your daily dose of Kasich news: does the Ohio governor and GOP presidential hopeful talk straight on the campaign trail when it comes to Ohio’s economy? Not quite, according to some fact checkers.  A recent Washington Post article dug into some of Kasich’s favorite claims about his role in Ohio’s economic recovery and issued one and two-pinocchio ratings (some shading of the facts and significant omissions/exaggerations, respectively) about his claims. Kasich’s claim that Ohio was “$8 billion in the hole” when he took office, for instance, doesn’t stand up to scrutiny, according to the Post article. The state’s actual budget for the year Kasich took office saw significant revenue increases from an economic recovery that began before Kasich’s term, leading to significantly less shortfall than Kasich’s claim.

• Speaking of Kasich, we live in a world where I can say the following and it’s not just some vulgar joke I would text to my friends but actual (debatable) news: Deez Nuts has endorsed Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the GOP presidential primary. Deez Nuts is the name assumed by a 15-year-old Iowa farm boy who somehow raked in 9 percent of the vote in a recent poll of that primary state. Mr. Nuts has also endorsed U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary. He is of course endorsing himself for the general election.

• Finally, in other GOP primary news, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush was in Ohio recently courting the tea party and the Koch Brothers at the billionaire industrialists' Americans for Prosperity Summit. Bush promised to uphold the staunch conservative values of slashing government spending and you know, making it easier for rich folks to get richer at the summit. The event in Columbus drew a big group of conservative activists as well as a large number of protesters.

That’s it for me today. E-mail me your news tips or tweet at me with, well, whatever you want.

 
 
by Sarah Urmston 08.21.2015 6 days ago
Posted In: Playlist at 02:16 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
august

Your Weekend Playlist: August Vibes

Old, new, weird or blue – I can’t get enough. 

“Thunder Clatter” – Wild Cub

This hand-clapping, shoe-tapping goodness is by far one of the best new jams I’ve came across, making it impossible to skip when it comes up in my track library. It’s upbeat, it’s joyful, and you’ll find yourself singing the final phrase, “I feel it all in the center of it all, you’re the love of my life — the love of my life” over and over again because it’s so damn catchy. (Not to mention, sweet as a peach.) Wild Club is an American Indie group that defines itself by the brand of '80s-inspired Electro-Pop, with “Thunder Clatter” becoming their most successful track. Listen for yourself and see why.

“My Wrecking Ball” – Ryan Adams

Hands down one of my favorite artists of this lifetime. I first discovered Mr. Adams when I got stranded in Arizona after Cincinnati got hit with the blizzard of the century, and I couldn’t find a flight home. (Not complaining.) I gratefully sat outside in the desert air reading Brain On Fire, in which the author talks about how her best-kept memory was hearing Ryan Adams play. And I soon learned for myself about this man — not only known as a beyond talented musician, but his approach on stage is ridiculously comedic, with a touch of thought and wisdom. “My Wrecking Ball” live at Carnegie Hall is one of my favorite tracks to play. It’s a stunning song filled with so much life, and at the very end he draws a laugh from the audience after dropping his hands onto the keyboard and saying, “I really can’t fucking play this thing at all.”

“Nocturne” – Wild Nothing

I’m starting to notice this bouncy, '80s theme in a lot of contemporary music lately, and this song is perfect example of that exact vibe. It’s a track that’s meant to fade in and out of style, with pops of a deep, deep echoing voice flowing after each verse. Not to mention, the guitar is incredible. Lead singer Jack Tatum’s unique voice and song structure creates a sound that can almost be heard in any setting. I choose Wild Nothing for drives to work, writing at my desk or even when I eat dinner on my couch. No matter what the setting, this song easily fits.

“Drag” – Day Wave

If the artist Day Wave had to go by one phrase, it would read: “I fucked up but I don’t really care.” It’s a quick beat with softly voiced lyrics, giving off the vibe where you want to dance along but also emotionally feed into what they’re saying. Day Wave’s latest track “Drag” is easily heavy on the sounds, and although the lyrics are quick, they’re so simple to catch on to. It’s repetitive without driving you crazy. And sure, it ends before you know it. But that’s all the more reason to play it over again and again and again.

“You Really Got A Hold On Me” – She & Him 

Zooey Deschanel (She) and M Ward (Him) have seen individual success within their own careers, but together they turn out to be a surprisingly perfect duo. “You Really Got A Hold On Me” is one of the best examples of how these two artists compliment one another best as Ward’s voice echoes behind Deschanel’s elegant, classic sound so delicately. This song makes it easy to get swept away into a sway with someone you care for, and them swaying you right back. It’s meant to be her unhealthy yearning for him, and the lyrics go, “You treat me badly…I love you madly.” We’ve all been there…right?

 
 
by Staff 08.21.2015 6 days ago
at 11:48 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brewhaha

Your Weekend To Do List (8/21-8/23)

Cincy Brew Ha-Ha, beer and buds with the SPCA, lots of live music and more

FRIDAY
EVENT: CINCY BREW HA-HA
If 50 comedians performing over the span of three days doesn’t get you laughing, the annual Cincy Brew Ha-Ha beer and comedy festival has just what you need to give your silly streak a pulse: beer. Lots of it. With two 100-seat beer gardens and plenty of beer booths serving up everything from locals to craft favorites, Brew Ha-Ha plans to satisfy more than 20,000 thirsty and laugh-seeking Tristaters with plenty to drink and an impressive lineup of comics: Headlining Thursday night is Adam Ferrara (Rescue Me, Paul Blart: Mall Cop), Friday night is David Koechner (Anchorman, Anchorman 2) and Saturday night is Brandon T. Jackson (Roll Bounce, Wild ‘N Out with Nick Cannon). You’ll either be laughing your way to a full belly of beer or drinking your way to a day full of laughter. Or both. 5 p.m.-midnight Thursday-Friday; 4 p.m.-midnight Saturday. Free admission; $5 for wristband; $1 beer samples; $5 full servings. Sawyer Point, 705 E. Pete Rose Way, Downtown, cincybrewhaha.com.

San Fermin
Photo: Denny Renshaw
MUSIC: SAN FERMIN
San Fermin’s second album, the recently released Jackrabbit, picks up where its debut left off, delivering lush soundscapes and boy/girl vocal tradeoffs. The Brooklyn-based band’s founder and creative driving force, Ellis Ludwig-Leone, has a thing for conceptual grandeur, and with Jackrabbit he again examines lives, whether human or animal, immersed in high-stakes situations. The jaunty, ebb-and-flow title track finds its central character encouraged to, as delivered by new singer Charlene Kaye, “run for the hills and don’t look back.” The very next song, the lilting “Astronaut,” features vocalist Allen Tate as a stark counterpoint to Kaye’s clean midrange, his deep baritone altering the mood immediately. See San Fermin with Lemon Sky, The Ridges, Sweet & The Sweet Sweets and Orchards Friday on Fountain Square as part of the MidPoint Indie Summer Series. myfountainsquare.com.

EVENT: INDIE CRAFT MARKET
Love shopping local? Love handmade goodies? Head to Fountain Square Friday night for the Indie Craft Market, featuring handmade crafts, work from independent artists and more, plus live music from local Indie bands. Love shopping local? Love handmade goodies? Head to Fountain Square Friday night for the Indie Craft Market, featuring handmade crafts, work from independent artists and more, plus live music from local Indie bands. 5-11 p.m. Friday. Free. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com.

The Magic Lightnin' Boys
Photo: Provided
MUSIC: OHMSTEAD
Ohmstead (founded by and named after late Cincy band The Four Ohms) has been providing an eclectic mix of music in the great outdoors for the past 14 years. This Friday and Saturday, Ohmstead returns at the VFW campground in Franklin, Ohio (9728 Claude-Thomas Road), about 40 miles north of Cincy. Popular local Reggae/Roots/Jam/Rock crew Elementree Livity Project plays both nights. Friday, music kicks off at 3 p.m. with Reggae/Rock band Rockstead, while Hip Hop collective YNO/Treehouse also performs. Touring acts on Friday include Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad and Jahman Brahman. On Saturday, music at Ohmstead begins at 11 a.m. Local acts include Freekbass (who doesn’t play a lot locally), Junya Be, The Magic Lightnin’ Boys, Don’t Fear the Satellites, The Ohms, Souse, Eyeris Wide and The Almighty Get Down. Glostik Willy and Tropidelic are some of the national/regional artists performing Saturday. Presale tickets are no longer available. There will be general admission tickets available at the gates starting Friday. Visit ohmstead.net for the full schedule, ticket and camping info and more. 

Chase Public’s Mike Fleisch and Scott Holzman promote “empathy through creative practice.”
Photo: Jesse Fox
EVENT: RESPONSE PROJECT
For Response Projects, creatives prepare and share a 10-minute response to a work of art. The popular event’s third installment takes place Aug. 21 and will spotlight Cathy Wagner, Matt McAllister, Mark Mendoza, Megan Hague, Loraine Wible and Holzman, who will reflect on the poetry of Sappho.“In general, I’m an advocate for all things Chase Public and creative endeavors grounded in empathy and community,” Daniel says. “It’s been a great opportunity to share my work and my perspective, but to also hear the work of others, to be inspired by others, to meet new people and collectively share ideas and ambitions.”She says she loves these events for their “connectiveness” — they break down any sort of separation between performer and audience. They create a collective effort and exchange between everyone. Chase Public’s third Response Project takes place Friday at its space in Northside (1569 Chase Ave., Suite 4). More info: chasepublic.org

'A Hundred Minus One Day'
Photo: Provided
ONSTAGE: A HUNDRED MINUS ONE DAY
For two summers, John Leo Muething has presented Stone on a Walk, his low-budget theater company offering “short, sweet and cheap” shows. His goal is for you to walk away after an hour’s performance saying, “That was sweet.” 2015’s final production is the U.S. premiere of a touching comedy by Idgie Beau, an Edinburgh Fringe hit in 2013 about youthful innocence and living in the moment. The title — A Hundred Minus One Day — is from A.A. Milne: “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day, so I never have to live without you.”  Through Aug. 29. $10. Simple Space, 16 E. 13th St., Over-the-Rhine, stoneonarock.com.

SATURDAY
EVENT: SHAKE IT UP COCKTAIL FESTIVAL
Jungle Jim’s is a wonderland of exotic food and booze, and their new Shake It Up Cocktail Festival celebrates the end of summer with just that. Say goodbye to tan lines, pool parties and flip-flops with expertly crafted cocktails and mixed drinks, and imbibe an atmosphere full of flair bartenders, expert mixologists and more. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday. $40; $15 non-drinker. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

EVENT: BEST FRIENDS AND BREWS
A night filled with everyone’s two favorite things: furry friends and beer. This tasting event supports the SPCA of Cincinnati, featuring food from local restaurants, music by the Comet Bluegrass All-Stars and a raffle. Last year’s event sold out, so get your tickets quick. 7-11 p.m. Saturday. $25-$125. SPCA Cincinnati Sharonville Shelter, 11900 Conrey Road, scpacincinnati.org/events.  

Bonsai Show and Competition
Photo: via Facebook
EVENT: BONSAI SHOW AND COMPETITION
The Bonsai Society of Greater Cincinnati descends on Krohn Conservatory for its annual weekend-long fall bonsai show and competition, Nature in Miniature. The group, one of the oldest bonsai societies in America, aims to foster the study and appreciation of bonsai (the Japanese artform of growing miniature trees in containers) and related arts, and this juried exhibit gives viewers a chance to see hundreds of bonsai in various stages of development. In addition to the plants themselves, guests will also learn about techniques for creating and caring for bonsai. Food trucks, a beer tent and live music round out the weekend. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. $4; $2 children. Krohn Conservatory, 1501 Eden Park Drive, Eden Park, cincinnatibonsai.com, cincinnatiparks.com/krohn

BootYard Bash
Photo: Will Hoge
EVENT: BOOTYARD BASH
OTR goes Country for Washington Park’s inaugural BootYard Bash. The park transforms into a real-live honky tonk with free Country music, Western-themed games, craft beer and a variety of other family-friendly events to get your boots stomping. Bands include Jeremy Pinnell, The Black Lillies, Carter Winter and headliner Will Hoge at 8:30 p.m. 3-10 p.m. Saturday. Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.

 
EVENT: AN AFTERNOON WITH THE BEER BARONS
Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum has been the final resting place of many a famous Cincinnatian, from lawyers and politicians to our beloved beer barons. And Spring Grove celebrates our malty past with an afternoon dedicated to exploring the graves and stories of famous brewers through docent-led motor-coach cemetery tours and a party in the Rose Garden. Enjoy history with a side of beer and food as beer-brewing establishments manned by non-dead people, like representatives from Christian Moerlein, MadTree, Rhinegeist, Rivertown, Blank Slate and more, provide attendees with samples of their most popular and most unique beers. Food will be provided by Funky’s and Queen City Sisters, and Buffalo Ridge Jazz Band will put on musical entertainment. 4-7 p.m. Saturday. $40.  Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum, 4521 Spring Grove Ave., springgrove.org.  

Publicist UK
Photo: Scott Colby
MUSIC: PUBLICIST UK
The anticipated new bar/music venue Northside Yacht Club (in the space formerly occupied by Mayday) is officially open. This weekend would be the perfect time to check it out, as heavy, compelling Post Punk newcomers Publicist UK (featuring members of Revocation, Municipal Waste and many other notable bands) brings the tour for its debut album Forgive Yourself (released this Friday) to town to help break in the club. 8 p.m. Saturday. $5. Northside Yacht Club, 4227 Spring Grove Ave., Northside, facebook.com/northsideyachtclub

Comedian Tyrone Hawkins
Photo: Provided
COMEDY: TYRONE HAWKINS
Comedian Tyrone Hawkins has been bouncing back and forth between Seattle and his hometown of Cincinnati for a few years. He placed third in the 2012 Seattle International Comedy Competition, which led to a string of headlining dates throughout the West, and he’s currently working on a new hour. “I’m incorporating music now with a keyboard I have on stage,” he says. “I hit a couple of piano bars to try some of the new stuff out.” He’s also done some TV work for his old friends, the Herbert Brothers. They were the duo that created the million dollar-winning Doritos “Crash the Super Bowl” ad in 2007. Showtimes Thursday-Sunday. $8-$14. Go Bananas, 8410 Market Place Lane, Montgomery, gobananascomedy.com.  

SUNDAY
Cincy Summer Streets
Photo: via Facebook
EVENT: CINCY SUMMER STREETS
Now in its second year, Cincy Summer Streets blocks off a neighborhood’s main drag to cars and traffic for a day of biking, skateboarding, yoga, cornhole, Frisbee, chalk art, giant Jenga and much, much more. This weekend, Cincy Summer Streets is taking over Northside, blocking off Hamilton Avenue between Pullan and Spring Grove avenues, so kids and adults alike can mix, mingle and play in the street, while enjoying the last few weeks of summer. Expect surprises from local vendors. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday. Free. Hamilton Avenue, Northside, cincysummerstreets.org.

Bookworks XVI
Photo: Provided
ART: BOOKWORKS XVI ARTISTS WALK-THROUGH
In an age dominated by digital media, the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County, in conjunction with the Cincinnati Book Arts Society (CBAS), hosts an annual Bookworks exhibition in the atrium of the downtown public library featuring the work of local area book artists to remind readers of the tangible and artistic qualities of books. On Sunday, participating artists will be on hand to discuss their handmade books with visitors to the library exhibitions, the 16th-annual Bookworks and the Keith Kuhn Memorial Exhibit. Twenty-eight artists participated, including Judy Dominic, April Foster, Lou Kroner, Sally Murray and Carole Winters. The exhibition runs until Sept. 7. 2 p.m. Sunday. Free. Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County Main Branch, Main Atrium, 800 Vine St., Downtown, cincinnatibookarts.org.

'Company'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: COMPANY
The Carnegie is staging Stephen Sondheim and George Furth’s musical that broke the mold back in 1970, opening a new direction with a concept about friends advising a 35-year-old bachelor about the virtues and challenges of marriage. The show offers a series of vignettes rather than a continuous story that starts and finishes. It was a surprise hit in the day, and it continues to be a show that connects with audiences after more than four decades. Memorable tunes include “Being Alive,” “Sorry-Grateful” and “Getting Married Today.” Through Aug. 30. $18-$25. The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington, Ky., 859-957-1940, thecarnegie.com.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 08.21.2015 6 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Has CPD's crime reduction plan worked?; opposition forms to Cranley's park plan; build your own donuts

Good morning all. Here’s the news today as we gear up for what I’m sure will be a rad weekend.

How's that crime plan going so far? At the beginning of the summer, Cincinnati Police Chief Jeffrey Blackwell was asked by City Manager Harry Black to draft a 90-day plan to reduce the number of shootings in the city, which has seen a major uptick in gun crime (though not murders or other violent crime) since this time last year. The plan to deploy more officers in busy places and spots where kids play and to create curfew centers for young people, was delayed at first by the June 19 shooting of officer Sonny Kim, but parts of it were implemented July 1. So… has it been working?

Blackwell touts CPD’s efforts at keeping crime rates from rising during a complicated summer full of major events like the MLB All-Star Game, outside incidents like the UC police shooting death of Samuel DuBose and the increasing challenges associated with the region’s heroin epidemic.

Shootings this summer have been up 30 percent over last year, and other violent crimes are roughly the same as past years. But that’s not necessarily the whole story. Taking a longer look at crime data, it’s apparent that the city’s recent uptick falls in line with past crime trends. The 291 shootings that have occurred so far this year are identical to the number for this time in 2013. Looking at data over a three-year period, violent crime is down nine percent.

What’s more, many cities across the country have experience much greater upticks in crime this year, including big surges in Baltimore, New York, Chicago and Philadelphia. Mayor John Cranley has said that’s not good enough, however, and has vowed to continue reviewing data and strategies to bring crime down. Blackwell has also offered further steps, including keeping the city’s recreation centers open later so teens have places to go after they’re out of school. A $50,000 grant from private donors will help pay rec center staff during those extended hours.

Opposition is coalescing against Mayor Cranley’s recent proposal to raise property taxes to pay for a $100 million parks revamp. That measure, which will be on the November ballot, would include big changes to Mount Airy Forest on the city’s West Side and Burnet Woods in Clifton. Those changes don’t sit well with opponents, who say proposals they’ve seen so far remove far too many trees and change the character of the urban woods entirely. Mayor Cranley has said that early plans for the parks were preliminary and not final designs. One showed a restaurant in Burnet Woods, for instance, a detail that has been removed since.

Opponents of the plan, including local attorney Tim Mara, also object to the way in which the plan would go forward. Mara says he’s part of a “diverse” coalition opposed to the park plan, which will be launching a formal campaign in the coming weeks. Mara’s complaint: Should the ballot initiative pass, it would vest power over changes to the park with the mayor and the park board, giving Cincinnati City Council no say in what would be done to the parks. Cranley has vowed that any changes to the parks will go through a long public review and comment process. A number of major businesses have backed the plan, including United Dairy Farmers and Kroger.

The property tax boost would raise about $5 million a year, money that would then be used to issue bonds for the rest of the cost of the proposed projects. About a quarter of the money raised would also be banked for future park maintenance and upkeep.

• There is now a build-your-own donut bar in Cincinnati. Top This Donut Bar at University Station near Xavier allows you to just stroll in like you own the place and start dumping bacon and Andes bars and raspberry goo all over your donuts. That sounds amazing and I’m so glad it’s not on my walk to work.

• Let's head uptown, where the new Kroger they’re going to (finally, finally) build there. The Kroger on Short Vine in Coryville will be twice the size of the current store, which looks like a place your grandmother would have shopped in the 1970s when the fancy store across town wasn’t convenient. The new location will have more prepared food options, beer taps, and a number of other amenities. A replacement store at the location, near University of Cincinnati, has been in the works for a long time. Demolition on the current store will begin soon, after which the new store should be open in 12-14 months.

• We’ve all been there before, right? You’re in a shady corner of your local coffee shop or whatever and someone approaches you, looks around, and is all like, “Hey man, what do you think about some weed?” Well maybe that’s just me and I hang out in weird coffee shops. Anyway, the Cincinnati USA Regional Chamber of Commerce will be holding listening sessions around the region so representatives of some of its 4,500-member businesses can give their two cents and help the organization determine how to come down on November’s marijuana legalization ballot initiative, a state constitutional amendment proposed by ResponsibleOhio. That proposal would make marijuana legal for anyone 21 and up, but would limit commercial growth to 10 sites owned by the group’s investors. The first listening session is taking place this morning at Coffee Emporium downtown. The next three will take place on Aug. 26 from 9-11 a.m. at Panera Bread locations in Newport, Union Township and Springdale.

That’s it for me. Hit me up with any news tips here.

 
 
 
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