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by Staff 12.02.2015 73 days ago
 
 
todo_bourbon&bacon_lauracox

This Week's Food and Dining Events

WEDNESDAY 02
CityBeat’s Bourbon & Bacon — If you like eating divine swine products or drinking high-quality brown liquor, head to New Riff Distillery for CityBeat’s annual Bourbon & Bacon party. Guests will enjoy samples of bacon-inspired dishes from local restaurants like Holtman’s Donuts, Pompilios, Cuban Pete, BrewRiver GastroPub and more. Wash the pork down with whiskey from Buffalo Trace, OYO, Woodford, Old Forrester and more — or just grab a beer. Tickets include 10 drink samples and all-you-can-snack food. 6-9 p.m. The event is currently sold-out. New Riff Distillery, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., citybeat.com.

You Won’t Miss Gluten — Whether eliminating gluten from your diet by choice or necessity, this class will teach you easily replace starches in your main dishes. 6-8 p.m. $70. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

THURSDAY 03
Holiday Entertaining — Get ready for the holiday season with recipes and tips to help you spend more time enjoying your guests. 6-9 p.m. $65. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.

Entertaining with Cheese — The most important hosting class you’ll ever take, whether you’re throwing a party or just eating cheese in your bed alone. Learn to make simple but sensational cheese boards. 6-8 p.m. $35. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

Warped Wing Tapping — If you’re a fan of Dayton’s Warped Wing brewery, head to BrewRiver for a special tap takeover with giveaways and live music. 6-9 p.m. Free. BrewRiver GastroPub, 2062 Riverside Drive, East End, brewrivergastropub.com.

Cincinnati E.A.T.S. — Do you like dining and mingling? Cincinnati E.A.T.S. takes over Cricket Lounge with cocktails and appetizers, followed by a seated dinner and dessert. The organization — Epicureans About Town Society — is dedicated to supporting great, local restaurants and charities. Bring two canned goods to donate to the Freestore Foodbank. 6:30 p.m. $46.50. Palace Restaurant, 601 Vine St., Downtown, cincinnati.com/cincinnatieats/index.shtml.

FRIDAY 04
Date Night: Spiced Crusted Pork —  Bring a date and create a main dish of smoked paprika-crusted pork and Swiss chard with quinoa. 6-8 p.m. $160 per couple. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

SATURDAY 05
Dad Day at Rhinegeist
Photo: Rhinegeist
Dad Day at Rhinegeist — Party in plaid with dad at Rhinegeist. The brewery celebrates the release of its seasonal brew Dad — a hoppy holiday ale — with a party featuring commemorative glassware and posters for the first 100 guests. The event is BYOD and BYOP (bring your own dad and bring your own plaid), with a special #DadPlaid photobooth and cozy holiday setting. BTW: Dad comes in a plaid can, which is why Dad Day has a patterned theme, not just because tartan is incredibly Christmasy. Noon-5 p.m. Saturday. Free. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, rhinegeist.com.

Cincy Brew Bus: Bourbon, Brews and a Winery Too — The bus stops at New Riff, The Littlefield, Henke Winery and Rhinegeist. Noon-5 p.m. $70-$75. Leaves from New Riff, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., cincybrewbus.com.

Kids and Teens in the Kitchen: Holiday Cookies — Kids ages 8 and older can learn to make cut-out cookies, royal icing and various decorating techniques. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $50. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.

A New Holiday Brunch — Prepare an easy brunch for a winter holiday or lazy Sunday. 10 a.m.-noon. $65. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

Sushi Rolling and Dining — Learn to roll three kids of sushi. BYOB. 6 p.m. $25. Sushi Cincinnati, 130 W. Pike St., Covington, Ky., sushicinti.com.

Braxton Block Party — Braxton Brewing Co. hosts a Cov block party with live music from the likes of Tracy Walker, Pete Dressman, Motherfolk and more. They’ll also be releasing the first beer in their Heritage Series: Dark Charge. Tappings throughout the day. Food trucks available. Noon-1 a.m. Free admission. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., braxtonbrewing.com.

Drink Local for Christmas — Test locally crafted wine and spirits for gift giving. Choose from 17 wines and 10 boozes. 2-7 p.m. $15. Woodstone Creek Winery & Distillery, 4712 Vine St., Saint Bernard, woodstonecreek.com.

Holly Jolly Roger Lunch Cruise — Christmas plus pirates! This lunch cruise features a family-friendly pirate crew, game, activities, turkey and a special appearance by Santa. Noon-2 p.m. Saturdays. Through Dec. $40 adults; $24 children. BB Riverboats, 101 Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky., bbriverboats.com.

SUNDAY 06
Repeal Day Celebration
Photo: Provided
Repeal Day Celebration — On Dec. 5, 1933, the United States passed the 21st Amendment, effectively repealing Prohibition. Celebrate by getting drunk on Sidecars and Mary Pickfords in Jazz Age costumes at the Metropole at 21c. The restaurant and bar’s Repeal Day party honors the end of Prohibition with 1920s tunes, a burlesque show and classic speakeasy cocktails. Period-inspired costumes encouraged; mustaches provided by Metropole. Special room rates apply for those who don’t want to tipple and drive. 7-11 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, metropoleonwalnut.com.  

MONDAY 07
Dinner Amongst the Stars — Local celebrities serve a meal to benefit the Still Strong Foundation and the Carlos Dunlap Foundation. 6 p.m. $250. Prime 47, 580 Walnut St., Downtown, 513-579-0720.

A Do-Ahead Brunch Celebration — Entertain with ease during the holidays with this make-ahead brunch menu, including savory goat cheese and artichoke frittata, baked crab benedict and a sparkling bellini. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $70. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

TUESDAY 08
A Trip to Vietnam — Learn classic skills such as seasoning and using spring roll wrappers. Create your own meal of pho and learn to roll your own spring rolls with rice noodles and veggies. 6-8 p.m. $70. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

Cookies Uncorked — Grab some friends for a night of cookie making and wine. The class includes naked cookies, icing, equipment and instruction. 7-9 p.m. $45. New Riff, 24 Distillery Way, Newport, Ky., newriffdistilling.com.

 

 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.02.2015 73 days ago
Posted In: Film at 01:41 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
carol movie 2015 the weinstein company

'Carol' Wins Major Best Film Prize

The Cincinnati-filmed Carol has just won the first big critics poll of the year — the New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Film of 2015. The announcement was made this afternoon, following voting by the group.

Directed by Todd Haynes from the novel The Price of Salt by Patricia Highsmith, it concerns a lesbian relationship in the New York of the early 1950s. It stars Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara.

Besides the film’s award, Haynes received a Best Director nod; Phyllis Nagy got Best Screenplay and Edward Lachman got Best Cinematography.

Because the two actresses both have leading parts, they may have split the vote — Saoirse Ronan received Best Actress for her part in the film Brooklyn.

Carol is in four theaters in New York and L.A. and is getting a very slow national release to build word-of-mouth, hopefully through awards and nominations.

Here is the Variety story on today’s awards.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 12.02.2015 73 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

City plans to ask state for Wasson Way funding; more liquor licenses could come to OTR; House Republicans shoot down Obama's climate change initiatives

Good morning, Cincinnati! I'm back from Thanksgiving in Texas where the weather was actually colder and wetter than here. That's a definite win for the north. Here are your headlines:  

Ever since Mayor John Cranley's park tax levy failed, the city has been looking for other ways to fund the highly anticipated Wasson Way bike trail — and it might be through the state of Ohio. Cranley and City Manager Harry Black sent a letter to the Cincinnati Business Committee asking it to ask the state for money to fund three segments of the trail between Montgomery Road and Eastern Hills Lane at Hyde Park Plaza. The four initial phases are estimated to cost $17.5 million, but the city is only asking the state to kick in $4.5 million, the cost of construction. The cost of the total project is still unknown, but some estimates put it around $23 million. The city estimates that with help from Ohio, the first three segments could be ready for biking in 12 months.   

Speaking of bike trails, the city of Toledo presented a $32 million plan for 13 bike paths across the city. The project would disrupt some traffic by cutting a few four lane roads down to two lanes, which upset some Toledo residents, but was seen as necessary by the Toledo Department of Engineering to keep up with the times. One city administrator said bike lanes would help Toledo keep up with the competition between modern cities to offer residents a high quality of life. 

Leaders from the Corporation for Findlay Market and Over-the-Rhine Brewery District say creating a second Over-The-Rhine entertainment district could be good for business. The plan would split the neighborhood in half and double the amount of liquor licenses for business owners. City Council's Neighborhoods Committee will hear the plan on Dec. 16, but it already has the support of Vice Mayor David Mann and OTR Community Council, which voted in favor of it earlier this year. Liquor licenses in Cincinnati are handed out by geographic area. The current OTR entertainment district has a cap of 15 liquor licenses for its 179-acre area, and there's currently a long waiting list for businesses to obtain one.  

The number of Arabic speakers have shot up this year for Mason City Schools. This year, 38 percent of its English as a Second Language (ESL) students are native Arabic speakers, up from 8 percent last school year. Most families have come from Saudi Arabia for a program called Destination Excellence at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center that recruits out-of-area patients to the hospital as a way to attract more talent to the medical center. But the program has created a conflict for the school district. The majority of these families hold B-1/B-2 business and tourist visitor visas, which actually prohibits them from enrolling their children in public schools. That law clashes with the federal law that prohibits schools from asking their students their immigration status. The school has followed advice from various state government officials to allow the students to attend, but it is also scrambling to accommodate the cost alongside the influx of Arabic speakers.  

A New Day for America, the super PAC behind Gov. John Kasich's presidential run, is taking aim at fellow GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump. The super PAC recently aired a series of ads against Trump and mailed out fliers to New Hampshire voters criticizing Trump's comments on immigration. Kasich's campaign has been focusing on New Hampshire to get ahead, and a spokeswoman for the super PAC said they're working on targeting "soft" Trump supporters in the state. 

While President Obama hangs out with world leaders in Paris to discuss combating climate change, the Republican-lead House of Representatives is busy shooting down the President's anti-climate change proposals. The House passed two resolutions that would prohibit the Environmental Protection Agency from implementing rules from the Obama administration to regulate greenhouse gases. The resolutions passed mostly along party lines. House Speaker Paul Ryan said that the costs and benefits of the measures just don't add up, while Democrats mocked Republicans on the floor for being "climate change deniers."

Story tips go to nkrebs@citybeat.com.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.01.2015 74 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:53 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Moeller cancels basketball game over Black Lives Matter rally; Cintas settles gender discrimination suit; Ohio's Planned Parenthood defunding law could have unintended consequences

Good morning Cincy. Here’s a quick rundown of some big news stories today.

Ah, high school athletics. A place where we can lay aside our differences and come together in mutual appreciation of sport in all its unifying glory. Or not. Last Friday, Moeller High School in Montgomery cancelled its season-opener basketball game at Taft High School, which is located in the West End, because of a scheduled Black Lives Matter rally downtown. Moeller officials cited concern for the safety of their students and say the decision was made collaboratively between the two schools. But representatives from Taft say that’s not true, and that Moeller made the decision unilaterally and at the last minute. What’s worse, Taft’s athletic program counts on proceeds from games like the one against Moeller, and at least for now is out the money it would have made from ticket sales. A spokesperson for Moeller said the game will be rescheduled. Some fans even showed up at Taft for the game, unaware it had been cancelled. Channel 9 reported that Moeller took the game off its calendar Saturday morning.

• Mason-based work wear and janitorial supply giant Cintas Corporation has settled for $1.5 million a decade-old gender discrimination lawsuit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The suit alleges that Cintas refused to hire qualified female workers in its sales department in Michigan between 1999 and 2005. The EEOC checked the number of female employees the company hired against the number of applications it received and found that a significant number were denied employment despite their qualifications. In addition to paying the monetary damages for missed wages to those women, Cintas will also undergo an independent review of its hiring practices.

• Which public school systems in Ohio provide the greatest value when you consider housing costs vs. school performance? Here’s a hint: they’re not around here. Finance website Nerdwallet.com crunched school performance, property value and property tax numbers to come up with a ranking of all the school districts in the state. That list shows that most of the best-value schools are around Toledo, which has relatively low housing costs and comparatively higher-performing school districts. Meanwhile, Cincinnati Public Schools came in at 605 in the ranking of 608 schools.

• A federal court has ordered the state of Ohio to commute the death sentence of a Hamilton County man convicted of murdering his neighbor in 1997, or to hold a new trial on the punishment phase of that conviction. Rayshawn Johnson was found guilty of murdering Shannon Marks with a baseball bat, and a jury decided on the death sentence for the crime. But Johnson did not get adequate legal representation during a phase of the trial that considered mitigating factors in his actions, including childhood abuse. A number of those factors make the death penalty inappropriate for Johnson, according to a 4-3 vote by the federal appeals court, which overturns an earlier Ohio Supreme Court decision upholding the death penalty ruling for Johnson. The state can hold the mitigation phase of the trial again or commute Johnson’s sentence to life in prison.

• Ohio is only days away from stripping more than $1 million in funding for health services that has in the past been given to the state’s Planned Parenthood clinics thanks to a law passed by both the state House and Senate. But the wording of that law could create a number of unintended consequences, including removing the funding from non-Planned Parenthood related entities such as the Columbus Public Health Department.

The law works by barring any organization affiliated with abortion providers from certain state and federal grants. But the wording of the law is tricky, and could mean that some programs designed to address STD prevention, infant mortality and other major, non-abortion-related concerns could lose out. Currently, Planned Parenthood wins the money in question in a competitive, state-administered process. Other providers that participate in that process, including Columbus Public Health, say they will not be able to accommodate a rush of new patients that could come from Planned Parenthood ceasing its health care services. None of the programs targeted by the funding cut are abortion related. State lawmakers say they’re simply making sure that taxpayers don’t contribute funds to abortion providers. The House and Senate bills must be reconciled, after which the legislation will go to Gov. John Kasich's desk to be signed into law.

I’m out. Later all!

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.30.2015 75 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_cincinnatibeerweek

Morning News and Stuff

Mount Auburn clinic clear to stay open until May; tensions on City Council; more liquor licenses for OTR?

Good morning all. Hope you had a great holiday weekend. Here’s the news today.

Cincinnati’s last remaining women’s clinic that provides abortions will remain open until at least May following a last-minute decision by the Ohio Department of Health to grant it a license. Back in September, the ODH denied Planned Parenthood’s Elizabeth Campbell Medical Center in Mount Auburn its first request for a variance to state laws requiring clinics to have transfer agreements with local hospitals. That move could have shut the clinic down, but an ensuing court injunction kept it open. Now, the ODH has approved the clinic’s second request for a variance on the last day of a 60-day deadline stipulated by new state laws. That request listed four doctors with individual admitting privileges at local hospitals. The clinic’s previous request listed three.

• Three of Cincinnati City Council’s most conservative members have been pretty good buds up to this point, even tapping each other to pick their successors should one of them leave council early. But the cozy coalition between council members Amy Murray and Charlie Winburn, both Republicans, and Christopher Smitherman, an independent, could change rapidly as the race for a Hamilton County commissioner seat heat up. None of the three are officially running yet, but Smitherman and Winburn have at least grabbed petitions that would enable them to appear on the ballot, and Murray  said she’s considering her options in terms of the race. If two or all three jump into the race for departing commissioner Greg Hartmann’s seat, things could get less friendly. As the Business Courier points out, party primaries can be brutal, no-holds-barred affairs.

• Meanwhile, The Cincinnati Enquirer ran a story yesterday on City Council’s accomplishments two years into its newly extended four-year terms. It also, strangely, both lauds council for getting a lot done while at the same time criticizing it for being “rife with feuding, dysfunction and for some members, missed meetings.” The piece takes a negative view of council Democrats’ disagreements with Mayor John Cranley and dings council overall for its lack of “one voting bloc” and “one agenda among members.” Which, to editorialize, seems like a very weird critique of a democratic body. Don’t we have nine council members so we can have different viewpoints and different goals? Anyway, take a look at the article, which does have some good tidbits of information in it about what council has been up to.

• About 60 protesters with Black Lives Matter Cincinnati took to the streets downtown Friday. The group says the rally through downtown and Over-the-Rhine was held in solidarity with activists in Chicago, where hundreds have decried recently released video of the Chicago Police Department shooting of Laquan McDonald. McDonald was shot 16 times by a CPD officer last year as he was walking away from police. Though McDonald was armed with a three-inch knife, the officer who shot him had arrived on the scene just seconds before and was a safe distance away from McDonald. The officer was subsequently charged with murder. The rally in Cincinnati follows a similar event last weekend to remember Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old shot by police in Cleveland last year.

• Does Over-the-Rhine need more liquor licenses? As we explored this spring in our feature on neighborhood entertainment districts, many people are pushing for ways to expand the number of licenses available in some Cincinnati neighborhoods. A new plan being proposed would do just that for OTR, doubling the number of licenses available in the neighborhood by splitting up its current neighborhood entertainment district into two parts and extending its boundaries north. While advocates of the plan say it would aid economic development in the area, especially around Findlay Market, others are asking for balance and caution, saying that too many bars could make the area less livable for residents.

• Hamilton County commissioners are set to approve the county’s upcoming budget this week. As they prepare to do that, though, there’s a hubub going on over the county sheriff’s office. The department, headed by Democrat Sheriff Jim Neil, makes up by far the largest single expenditure in the fiscal plan: $59 million of the county’s $200 million general fund expenditures go to the office. But the hard part has been that the department doesn’t stay within the lines on that budget and is expected to be about $5 million over the $54 million spending mark stipulated by the current budget. That has caused some pushback from county commissioners, who have said Neil needs to be more strategic about his spending. So what’s responsible for the overruns? Officials say lack of communication has played a role, but also needed staff increases and modernization efforts within the department have contributed to the cost overruns.

I'm out! Send me news tips.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 11.25.2015 80 days ago
at 11:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sherrod brown

Morning News and Stuff

UC President says shut down White Student Union page; Million dollar homes coming to OTR; Chicago police release dash cam footage of shooting death of 17-year-old

Good morning Cincy! With Thanksgiving nearly upon us, people are ducking out of office early today (if they even show up at all), including journalists. Here are some headlines to hold you over this holiday weekend. 

• University of Cincinnati President Santa Ono requested that the Facebook page of the supposed UC White Student Union be shut down. The page has been linked to a white supremacy group, and nearly identical Facebook pages have been popping up in universities across the country. Ono said in an email sent out to students and staff that while he supports the freedom of speech, that the group was polarizing and distracting attention away from important racial issues that need to be discussed. 

• What's crazier than buying a $500,000 condo in Over-The-Rhine? Well, many, many things, but one of those things may be buying a $1 million townhouse in Over-The-Rhine. Cincinnati's Historic Conservation Board approved plans Monday for the construction of nine single-family townhomes near 15th and Elm, which will include two bedrooms, a two-car garage and a covered second floor deck. The $10 million project by Daniel Homes also includes renovating an old fire station on 15th street for residential and possibly commercial use.  

The greater Cincinnati area's jobless rate continues to fall. In the 15 counties in the region, which includes Southwest Ohio, Northern Kentucky and Southeast Indiana, the percent of unemployed workers fell nearly 17 percent. Butler, Clermont, Hamilton and Warren counties all have jobless rates at 4.2 percent than the national average hangs a bit higher at 4.8 percent. The drop might not be as drastic as all those prices during those terrible Black Friday sales, but it is the area's lowest jobless rate since March 2001. 

• U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown, a Democrat representing Ohio, said last Thursday that not all terrorists are abroad--or even foreigners. While Republicans have ganged up on Syrian refugees in the past week and a half, Sherrod said that "generally white males" are responsible for terrorist attacks. He's calling the mass shootings in public areas like schools and movie theaters that the U.S. has experienced in the last decad, terror attacks as well--just by another kind of terrorist. He pointed out that a major terrorist attack hasn't happen on U.S. soil since September 11, but plenty of shooting have happened by people that "look more like me than they look like Middle Easterners"--a viewpoint that appears unlikely to be adopted by any Republicans pushing for the halt of Syrian refugees any time soon. 

• Chicago police released the dash camera footage of the shooting death of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald, who was shot 16 times by police officers while running down a street in October 2014. Officer Jason Van Dyke, who opened fire on the teen, is being held without bond for first degree murder. Hundred of protesters marched peacefully in the streets of Chicago last night after the release of the video, and with many were angry about the long delay in the release of the video to the public. 

Send me story tips. Happy Thanksgiving everyone!

 
 
by Kerry Skiff 11.24.2015 81 days ago
Posted In: Literary, Music at 01:26 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
aebersold2

Beyond the Books

Live Jazz at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s Main Branch

There’s nothing like being greeted by the bright echoes of music as you step inside from the pouring rain. On this particular day I was visiting the main branch of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County for the monthly Jazz of the Month Club performance, featuring the Jamey Aebersold Quartet. It wasn’t hard to find the musicians, since their tunes bounced all around the library atrium, and as I slipped into my seat I settled down and let the warm jazz beats warm my cold body.

The Jamey Aebersold Quartet, the third performer in the Jazz of the Month Club, featured an extremely talented group of musicians, led by an award-winning Jazz master and educator. Jamey Aebersold, who led the group on the alto sax, received the 2014 National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master Award, the highest jazz honor in America. A native of New Albany, Ind., Aebersold has been playing Jazz for more than 50 years, and has gained international recognition as a Jazz musician and educator. It was perhaps the educator in him that couldn’t resist adding tidbits of the pieces and artists they performed.

The quartet played several Jazz tunes, including “Lament” by J.J. Johnson, “Hi-Fly” by Randy Weston and “In a Sentimental Mood” by Duke Ellington, one of the most famous Jazz compositions. As I listened to the lively beats I couldn’t help but look around at the rest of the audience. While a couple people slept in the back row, most were intently focused on the performers, nodding their heads, tapping their toes or even dancing in their seats. Peeking out at passersby, I noticed a few that were even dancing as they walked, and I saw more than one librarian sneak a peek between tasks.

At one point, Aebersold pulled a Jamaican pianist into the performance and gave him a rehearsal for their next song in “be-dos,” singing the melody in gibberish. As strange as that seemed, Aebersold’s next instruction confused me further: “There’s a two-bar break on bar…something. You’ll hear it.” While we all laughed, I couldn’t help but wonder how the pianist could follow those instructions, but to my amazement he jumped right in without missing a beat, improvising as if he’d known the tune all along.

As a Jazz enthusiast, it was wonderful to hear the different styles of Jazz played in a way that drew crowds from all sections of the library. Older adults sat patiently through the program while younger audiences slipped in and out. But no matter how long they stayed, all seemed to leave with an expression of peace and pleasure at the simple but beautiful tunes wafting through the building. It was evidence of what Aebersold described by saying, “The world’s a mess. But we can make it better by playing some music.”

Did this event sound interesting? Check out similar programs at the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s Main Branch:
History of Cincinnati Music Reprise: Explore the musical history of Cincinnati with Musicologist Uncle Dave Lewis.
Jazz Jam Session: Enjoy an evening of jazz with the Blue Night Jazz Band.
Ring in the Holidays: Listen to a holiday performance by the Pyropus Hand Bell Choir.

 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 11.24.2015 81 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
winburn

Morning News and Stuff

Thanksgiving family argument fodder galore!

Hey Cincy. Hope you’re winding down your work week. It’s T-minus two days 'til turkey time, which also happens to be my birthday this year. I’m hyped for both. Oh, and if you want to get your favorite reporter a b-day gift, I’ll take a pair of these in size 8.5 thx. Huh. Now you know my shoe size, which is kind of creepy.

But here’s something awesome: There will be tons of political fodder for you to argue awkwardly about around the dinner table with your family this Thanksgiving. Consider this news update your guide to all the best terrible conversations you’ll be having soon.

• You can start with something mild, like debating whether or not Mayor John Cranley should have gotten off the hook for his election-day outburst at a polling location in Avondale. OK, “outburst” is a little harsh. The Cran-man just got a bit over-enthusiastic about Issue 22, the parks tax proposal, and shouted out that people should vote yes on it a couple times. Who doesn’t like to see enthusiasm for the democratic process? But uh, campaigning and telling people how to vote in a polling place is pretty firmly against the rules, especially when you’re a political figure. Despite that, the Hamilton County Board of Elections yesterday announced that it will not be seeking any penalties against the mayor for his breach of the rules. Pollworker Mary Siegel argued that the BOE should start cracking down on such electioneering infractions in the future, because the rules are rarely enforced now.

• If the ensuing argument about that doesn’t heat things up while you’re waiting for the turkey to finish cooking, try talking with your conservative Uncle Jeff about the University of Cincinnati white student union that was set up on Facebook a few days ago. The group’s posts feature prognosticating on how “European Americans” face special challenges on campus and in society in general and other nonsensical claptrap designed to draw people into useless race-related Internet debates. Anyway, the page is almost certainly fake, set up in response to the Black Lives Matter movement, according to a plan hatched on a national white supremacist message board. The UC-themed page uses language almost identical to similar sites across the country, many of the likes on the page’s posts come from out of town Facebook accounts and the whole thing comes across as a reminder not to feed the trolls. So, uh, don’t feed the trolls. Meanwhile, there are more serious and terrifying anti-Black Lives Matter incidents happening of late.

• Just a couple days after Hamilton County Commissioner Greg Hartmann, a Republican, dropped a bombshell by revealing he’s decided not to run for reelection, three Cincinnati City Council members are saying they’re considering running for his seat. Republicans Amy Murray and Charlie Winburn have both expressed some interest, with Winburn saying he could switch from a planned run for county recorder to the commission race if the party wants him to. Murray has said she’ll take the Thanksgiving holiday to think it over before deciding, but is intrigued. Meanwhile, independent Christopher Smitherman has said he might run as a Republican for the seat. Whoever the Hamilton County GOP taps will face Democrat State Rep. Denise Driehaus of Clifton, who is leaving the state House due to term limits.

• The second Cincinnati streetcar arrives today and will soon be making test trips around the 3.6-mile loop through Over-the-Rhine and downtown. This argument pretty much scripts itself, so just say "streetcar" to your public transit-hating dad and watch the holiday magic unfold.

• Black leaders from across the state met yesterday at The Urban League of Greater Cincinnati headquarters in Avondale to discuss the state of black Ohio. The Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, which includes local politicians State Sen. Cecil Thomas and State Rep. Alicia Reece, held the public meeting in part to discuss the wide disparities facing the black community here and across the state. Ohio ranks second-to-last in the nation in infant mortality rates, according to the caucus. Closer to home, the group singled out continued issues at the University of Cincinnati, which has been the site of serious racial dialogue around disparities in higher education. The group also discussed efforts toward police reform, which have been slow in coming even after several high-profile police shootings of unarmed black citizens here and a task force convened by Gov. John Kasich. You can read more about how activists are continuing to fight for those reforms in this week’s news feature.

• GOP presidential primary contender Donald Trump came to Ohio yesterday. He didn’t talk as much shit about Ohio Gov. John Kasich as he has in the past. Per usual, his speech was light on policy proposals and heavy on bombast. What else really needs to be said? His remarks to a crowd of 10,000 mostly focused on how the U.S. has become “soft and weak” (despite spending more on its military than all other countries combined) and about how he’s leading in all major polls (sadly, this claim is actually true). He also gave a shout out to waterboarding, the controversial torture technique once used by the U.S. to extract intelligence from terrorism suspects. Trump’s all for bringing it back. Another thing Trump likes, according to his hour-long remarks: lists. As in, lists of people who are Muslim, which Trump thinks should be compiled by the federal government. Thanksgiving family debate difficulty level: black diamond.

• Finally, Indiana Governor Mike Pence faces a lawsuit from the American Civil Liberties Union over his refusal to take in Syrian refugees. The ACLU filed the lawsuit on behalf of Exodus Refugee Immigration, the Indianapolis nonprofit that handles refugee resettlement for the state. Pence pressured that organization to turn away Syrian refugees earlier this month. The ACLU says in doing so, he violated both the Constitution and the Civil Rights Act. This would be a great topic to discuss with your cousin Tami, who has that Gadsen flag bumper sticker on her Hummer.

That’s it for me. Later!

 
 
by Brian Baker 11.23.2015 82 days ago
Posted In: Local Music, Live Music, Reviews at 04:54 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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All Jazz Hands on Deck

The Dave McDonnell Group gives its compositional/improv chops another workout on sophomore album, 'the time inside a year'

That old trope about doers doing and non-doers teaching holds no currency with saxophonist Dave McDonnell. The Chicago native relocated to Cincinnati six years ago to complete his doctorate Jazz studies at the University of Cincinnati's College-Conservatory of Music, which ultimately led to positions at UC and the University of Dayton, teaching both music and music technology.

At the same time, McDonnell never abandoned his love for performance, composition and recording. Early in his Jazz career, McDonnell divided his time between waiting tables, teaching private music lessons and playing in an impossible number of bands; he even worked with Elephant 6 icons Neutral Milk Hotel and Olivia Tremor Control (studio sessions with the former, touring with the latter).

Family life and academic rigors forced McDonnell to dial down his band participation — he currently works with Michael Columbia, Diving Bell and Herculaneum — but his reduced roles also provided him the impetus to resume exploring his own work, leading him to assemble a coterie of friends and bandmates from his Chicago experience (guitarist Chris Welcome, bassist Joshua Abrams, drummer Frank Rosaly, vibraphonist Jason Adaiewicz and cellist Tomeka Reid) and form the Dave McDonnell Group.

Utilizing a blend of crafted and precise composition and free-form improvisation, McDonnell created a masterful and acclaimed debut album, last year's the dragon and the griffin. The album was by turns contemplative and explosive, but always guided by the spirit of Ornette Coleman's similarly constructed pieces, where the tunes' purposefully written passages set the tone and established a foundation and framework for the band's circuitously invigorating spontaneity.

Just a little over a year and a half later, McDonnell and his Group (a version of which features Cincinnati players for area live shows) have returned, once again eschewing upper-case titling and stodgy tradition on the appropriately christened the time inside a year, his debut for esteemed Chicago Jazz label Delmark. While McDonnell adheres to his winning compositional-vs.-improvisational strategy on the time inside a year, he also adds a new wrinkle with a slightly older piece from his canon, namely his three-movement suite "AEpse," which grew out of his doctorate studies at CCM and which he debuted in Chicago two years ago.

"AEpse" stands in contrast to the grooves, shifting rhythms and dazzlingly intricate harmonics of the rest of the time inside a year. "AEpse," as a three-part, 11-minute piece of music, explores a chilly soundscape of electronic expanse, appointed by Reid's mesmerizing cello incantations, which drift through McDonnell's constructed atmosphere like smoke in a virtual opium den. But rather than present this sonorously beautiful piece as a whole, McDonnell chose to intersperse the three "AEpse" movements within his gyrational Bop tracklist, allowing them to serve as way stations along the album's journey.

And what an impressive journey it proves to be. Opening with the quietly propulsive "Bullitt," moving into the slinkily engaging and sensual "Vox Orion" and on to the jaunty "The Contract with Bees," McDonnell displays his considerable skills as both a powerful frontman and a generous bandleader, jumping to the fore with appropriately frenetic flurries of notes or delicately woven passages, or yielding the floor to Adasiewicz's fluid and enchanting vibraphone runs or Welcome's always brilliant guitar contributions, all of it made possible by the gymnastics of Abrams and Rosaly's limber and diverse rhythm section.

Nowhere is this more evident than in the swinging, shattering "Baker's Man," which begins and ends with the band in unison on the song's loping theme and fills its center with a dissonant Sun Ra/Zappa/Beefheart explosion of sounds and ideas. As atypical as it is sonically to the rest of the time inside a year, it perfectly points up McDonnell's incredible compositional skills and DMG's extraordinary ability to go completely off the map and then return to the radar in a fraction of a heartbeat.

Cincinnati has enjoyed a long and storied Jazz tradition, spawning some of the most profoundly talented and inventive players in the country, but even its most revered alumni must be sitting up and taking notice of the jaw-dropping accomplishments of Dave McDonnell and his innovative and musically curious Jazz collective. Clearly McDonnell's depth and breadth of experience informs every second of the Dave McDonnell Group's incredible output, but it is the application of that experience to his own work that is so consistently impressive. Two years and two albums in, and the anticipation of where DMG might head next is palpable and exciting.

THE DAVE MCDONNELL GROUP, with guitarist Brad Myers, bassist Peter Gemus and drummer Dan Dorff, plays Urban Artifact on Tuesday at 8 p.m.



 
 
by Kerry Skiff 11.23.2015 82 days ago
Posted In: Holiday at 12:56 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Thanksgiving Dinners

For those of you who want turkey, but don't want to cook it

Whether you can't make it home for Thanksgiving, you're avoiding your family or you just don't actually feel like waking up at 6 a.m. to start cooking, plenty of area eateries are making it easy to enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving feast with all the trimmings minus the time spent in the kitchen sticking your hand up a turkey's butt (and time spent getting drunk enough to ignore your Republican uncle's ramblings about how Donald Trump would make America great again).

Arnold’s Misfit Thanksgiving — This Thanksgiving meal is open to everyone. Bring a dish to share. 5 p.m. Free admission. Arnold’s Bar & Grill, 210 E. Eighth St., Downtown, facebook.com/arnoldsbar.

BB Riverboats — BB Riverboats hosts two Thanksgiving Day cruises — one lunch and one dinner — featuring a holiday feast with all the trimmings. Menu features roasted turkey, dressing, ham, green bean casserole, potatoes, cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and more. 1-3 p.m. or 5:30-7:30 p.m. $43 adults; $22 children. 101 Riverboat Row, Newport, Ky., bbriverboats.com.

Behle Street by Sheli — Featuring a traditional Thanksgiving meal, either in house or to go. Menu includes ham, turkey, mashed potatoes, stuffing, corn pudding, sweet potato, cranberries, green beans and more. 1-8 p.m. $23.99 adults; $8 children. 2220 Grandview Drive, Ft. Mitchell, Ky., behlestreetbysheli.com

Embers — Serving the restaurant’s full menu, along with a traditional holiday three-course meal including choices of turkey, stuffing and pecan pie. 4-10 p.m. $35 adult; $17 children. 8170 Montgomery Road, Kenwood, embersrestaurant.com.

Fall Feast — The 10th-annual Fall Feast from Give Back Cincinnati is all about community, love and abundant free food. Join 4,000 of your neighbors to give thanks, eat heartily and laugh cheerfully. The event also features free coats, haircuts, a health clinic, flu shots, vision screenings and pediatric dental check-ups, plus live music, a kids zone and big-screen TVs to watch the Thanksgiving Day Parade and football. Doors open 9 a.m.; dinner 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Duke Energy Convention Center, 525 Elm St., Downtown, fallfeast.org.

Four Seasons Restaurant — Buffet includes turkey, ham, shrimp, mashed potatoes, oyster dressing, fresh fruit and desserts. 10:30 a.m.-7 p.m. $24.95 adults; $13.95 children. 4609 Kellogg Ave., Anderson, fourseasonscincy.com.

La Petite France — A traditional buffet feast plus assorted French delights. Includes turkey, escargots bourguignon, quiche Loraine, smoked salmon, pumpkin soup and cocktails. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $34.95 adults; $15 children. La Petit France, 3177 Glendale-Milford Road, Evendale, lapetitefrance.biz.

Laszlo’s Iron Skillet — Menu features entrées including maple-leaf crispy roasted duck, wiener schnitzel and oven-roaster turkey. Guests will be seated every two hours, and reservations are encouraged. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Pricing à la carte. 1020 Ohio Pike, Withamsville, laszlosironskillet.com.

Metropole — This traditional meal can be served à la carte or as a four-course prix-fixe dinner. Turkey, soups and salads, stuffing and sweet potatoes are all on the menu. 2-8 p.m. $49 adults. 609 Walnut St., Downtown, metropoleonwalnut.com.

Parker’s Blue Ash Tavern — Parker’s buffet features all the trimmings of a traditional turkey dinner. Noon-7 p.m. $34.95 adults; $11.95 children. 4200 Cooper Road, Blue Ash, parkersblueash.com.

Riley’s Restaurant — This all-you-can-eat buffet offers everything from mashed potatoes and gravy to oven-roasted turkey and pecan and pumpkin pies. 11:30 a.m.-6 p.m. $19.50 adults; $8.95 children. 11568 Springfield Pike, Springdale, rileysgreatmeals.com.

Walt’s Barbecue — All-you-can-eat buffet at Walt’s. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $19.95. 6040 Colerain Ave., Colerain, waltsbarbeque.com.

Wunderland Banquet Hall — Includes turkey, ham, stuffing, macaroni and cheese, steamed vegetables, rolls and pumpkin pie. 1-4 p.m. $18.50 adults; $7 children. 7881 Colerain Ave., Colerain, wunderlandhall.com.

 

 
 

 

 

 
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