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by 03.23.2009
Posted In: CPS, Community, Environment at 11:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Have You Hugged Your School Today?

What happens when tree-huggers go to school? You get “Green & Healthy Schools.”

ALLY: Alliance for Leadership and Interconnection is a “citizen’s group providing leadership coaching and strategic guidance for policy development and implementation of environmental sustainability programs.” According to their Web site. And their first significant action in 2004 was to begin the Growing Green and Healthy Schools Network.

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by 01.13.2010
Posted In: News, Community, Family at 01:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

YPs Promote Mentoring

Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory and Cincinnati Public Schools Superintendent Mary Ronan are slated to attend an event this evening aimed at encouraging young professionals to become mentors for local youth.

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by 12.23.2008
Posted In: Community at 08:17 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Let's All NOT Kill Each Other on the Roads

So you're going to be driving over the next few days.  As I write the roads are getting icy, but it will be 53 degrees on Christmas Day.  If I don't start a riot due to the stupid weather, I will also be driving.  I would appreciate it if you wouldn't kill me while I drive by doing something stupid.

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by 04.22.2009
 
 

Re-Integrating Millions

Considering that the United States has incarcerated more of its citizens than any other country in the world, we’ve created a problem we can’t avoid – re-integrating millions of people into mainstream society. With restrictions on employment that bar former felons from even submitting an application for an open position, we’re creating conditions that, at best, force former offenders into lying to get jobs or returning to crime in order to survive.

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by Kevin Osborne 09.13.2011
Posted In: Media, Business, Community at 05:41 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
circulation 2005-2010

Enquirer Drops by 16 Percent

For once, executives at The Enquirer probably are happy to have the newspaper deemed average.

Jim Hopkins, who operates The Gannett Blog, recently tallied the circulation losses during the last five years at the media giant's 10 largest newspapers. Hopkins compiled the data from Gannett's annual reports to shareholders.

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by 01.05.2009
Posted In: Community at 10:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

School Finance Discussion

“Why do my schools keep coming back for levies? How do they use the tax dollars they receive? What’s the state contributing to my district?” These are just some of the questions to be discussed at the League of Women Voters meeting 7-9 p.m. Jan. 7 at Mt. Auburn Presbyterian Church (103 Wm. Howard Taft) in the Geier Room. For more information, call 513-281-8683.

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by 04.30.2009
Posted In: News, Community, Environment at 02:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Talkin' Trash

Not long before Earth Day, Arbor Day and other green-focused days there’s a vast call for volunteers to do all kinds of thing from trash pick up to planting more green stuff. But after it’s all done, there’s little information provided about what was accomplished.

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by 02.09.2009
 
 

Shafting the Poor: It's What We Do

Cincinnati is once again planning to reduce, limit and even eliminate services for the most vulnerable in our community as a time when people with money are struggling. Those people who called “less fortunate” at religious services are supposedly preventing downtown from developing to its full potential.

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by 03.25.2009
Posted In: Community, Government, Environment at 08:25 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

And Toto, Too?

A few rainy days hardly constitute “severe weather,” but this is Ohio’s Severe Weather Awareness Week (March 22-28) ala Governor Ted Strickland. The Ohio Committee for Severe Weather Awareness (yes, we have one of those) does have some practical and helpful information to offer on how to deal with tornadoes that can be part of our Spring experience.

In a press release, the group explains, among other things, the difference between a tornado watch and warning. Any grade school child knows this, but the rest of us could use a refresher, so …..

A TORNADO is a violently rotating column of air that extends from the base of a thunderstorm. A condensation funnel does not need to reach the ground for a tornado to be present. A debris cloud beneath a thunderstorm is all that is needed to confirm the presence of a tornado.

A TORNADO WATCH is issued by the National Weather Service when conditions are favorable for the development of tornadoes in and close to the watch area. Watches are usually issued for four to eight hours. During the tornado watch, people should review tornado safety rules and be prepared to move to a place of safety if threatening weather approaches. Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio or local TV or radio newscasts for up-to-date weather information.

A TORNADO WARNING is issued by the local National Weather Service when a tornado has been detected by Doppler radar or sighted by storm spotters. A tornado watch does not have to be in effect for a tornado to form. If a tornado warning is issued for your area, seek safe shelter immediately. Tornado warnings are usually issued for 30 minutes. Continue to listen to your NOAA Weather Radio or local TV or radio newscasts for up-to-date weather information.

Whether practicing a tornado drill or sheltering during a tornado warning … DUCK.

D – Go DOWN to the lowest level

U – Get UNDER something

C – COVER your head

K – KEEP in shelter until the storm has passed

  • The best defense when faced with tornado warnings or any severe weather event is preparedness. Know the weather situation. Have a disaster plan. Practice the plan. Make a supply kit. Be prepared.
  • Be prepared for severe weather before a storm watch or warning is issued. Know how to turn off the water, gas and electric at the main switches.
  • If you are a person with special needs, register your name and address with your local emergency management agency, police and/or fire departments before any natural or man-made disaster occurs.
  • The NOAA Weather Radio has alerting tools available for people who are hearing impaired. Some weather radio receivers can be connected to an existing home security system, similar as a doorbell, smoke detector or other sensor. For additional information, visit the NWS NOAA Weather Radio link.
  • The safest place to be during a tornado is a basement. If the building has no basement or cellar, go to a small, centrally located room on the lowest level of the building, such as a bathroom or closet or interior hallway.
  • If you are in a vehicle, trailer or mobile home, get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little or no protection from tornadoes.
  • If you are outside with no shelter, lie in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Do not seek shelter under a highway overpass or bridge. You will be exposed to stronger winds and flying debris.
 
 
by 12.19.2008
Posted In: Community at 10:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Winter and You

The Department of Public Safety Emergency Management Agency doesn’t want you to get caught out in the cold or in a flood or any of the other icky weather situations that arise during the winter months in Ohio. In a press release they offer a number of helpful tips that make a lot of sense.

“To stay safe, learn the difference between winter storm watches and warnings mean,” the press release says. “Prepare your home against the cold; and use caution and common sense when driving.

And this is what they have to say about that…

Winter Awareness Information:

  • A winter storm WATCH means a winter storm is possible in your area.
  • A winter storm WARNING means a winter storm is occurring or will soon occur in your area. Local National Weather Service forecast offices issue warnings on a county-by-county basis.
  • A blizzard WARNING means sustained winds or frequent gusts to 35 miles per hour or greater and considerable falling or blowing snow (reducing visibility to less than a quarter mile) are expected to prevail for a period of three hours or longer.
  • Be aware of changing weather conditions.

Winter Preparedness Information:

  • Use a NOAA Weather Radio to keep you informed of watches and warnings issued in your area
  • Keep your vehicle’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from
  • Discuss with your family what to do if a winter storm WATCH or WARNING is issued Make sure your home is properly insulated. If necessary, insulate walls and attic

Winter Driving:

  • Have your vehicles winterized before the winter storm
  • Put together a separate disaster supplies kit for your vehicle
  • Speed and Distance —The faster you’re going, the longer it will take to stop. When accelerating on snow or ice, take it slow to avoid slipping and sliding. Remember, Ice and Snow…Take it Slow
  • Brake — Brake early, brake slowly, brake correctly, and never slam on the brakes. If you have anti-lock brakes, press the pedal down firmly and hold it. If you don’t have anti-lock brakes, gently pump the pedal. Either way, give yourself plenty of room to stop
  • Control — When driving on ice and snow, do not use cruise control and avoid abrupt steering maneuvers. When merging into traffic, take it slow. Sudden movements can cause your vehicle to slide.
  • Vision — Be aware of what’s going on well ahead of you. Actions by other vehicles will alert you to problems more quickly, and give you that split-second of extra time to react safely

To check out road closures, detours and other traffic information, visit www.buckeyetraffic.org

 
 

 

 

 
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