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by Nick Swartsell 04.06.2015 52 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:10 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
reds

Morning News and Stuff

Opening day then and now; Strickland tops Portman in U.S. Senate poll; Rand Paul may announce presidential campaign soon

Hey all! Today is Opening Day. You already know this. What you don’t know is that it’s my first Opening Day back in Cincinnati after a few years of missing them. So let’s resign ourselves to the fact that half of the news blog today will be dominated by stuff around this most momentous of holidays.

All kinds of stuff is going on in connection with the game. Here are the highlights: Cincy’s opening day parade has been happening for oh, 96 years now and will kick off at noon at Findlay Market, heading down Race Street through downtown. Taft’s Ale House in Over-the-Rhine right off the parade route has its grand opening today, and from what I’ve heard, it’s already packed. There are also big screens and food vendors in Washington Park so you can enjoy the game there as well.  

The Reds are playing the Pittsburgh Pirates, a pretty common foe on our first game of the year. We’ve played them 27 times in our season opener, and the Reds' first Opening Day in 1882 was played against their predecessors, the Pittsburgh Alleghenys (we lost). I hate to tell you this, but we have a pretty bad record against our rivals to the east. They’ve won 19 times when the teams go head to head on opening day. Take a look at the full history of Reds opening day here, including records of our losses against the terrifyingly named Cleveland Spiders in 1891 and the tragic Chicago Orphans in 1900.

In case you’re wondering, here’s what the ballpark is looking like heading up to the game. Oh, wait, my bad, that was the Reds/Pirates Opening Day game from 110 years ago. The reds lost 4-9, bee tee dubs. But we’ll win this time, right? Also btw, more than 18,000 people attended that game. Incredible.

• On to non-baseball related news. Cincinnati ranks among the country’s most affordable cities for housing, according to a study by real estate website Zillow.com. I’m usually pretty wary of these kinds of website-conducted studies, but this one does have some interesting data points. According to the Zillow study, Cincinnati has the seventh-most affordable mortgages of the cities it measured across the country, and the sixth-lowest amount of income spent on rent of cities across the country. Keep in mind these are relative rankings, and that Cincinnati ranks rather well comparatively because it’s not growing as fast as some other cities.

However, the country as a whole is in the middle of an affordable housing conundrum. As the report says, “Rental affordability is as bad as it's ever been across the U.S., in part because there are not enough new, affordable units to meet demand.”

On related note: Though it may not be booming the way Austin or San Francisco are, Cincinnati is again growing, rather than shrinking, in terms of population size. The city saw a slight bump in population over the past couple years, and is projected to top 300,000 people again sometime around 2020.

• This is kind of shocking to me: Former Ohio Governor Ted Strickland, a Democrat, is currently out-polling incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Rob Portman by nine points in a Quinnipiac University poll on the 2016 Senate race released today. Portman is running for his second term in the Senate representing Ohio. He’s raised boatloads of money, has the backing of much of the GOP and is unbothered (thus far) with a primary challenger. The only issue that could keep conservatives away is his embrace of marriage equality, but I can’t imagine dyed in the wool Republicans swinging over to a liberal Democrat or staying home because of that. Still, Strickland leads Portman 47 percent to 38 percent among likely Ohio voters. Strickland announced his campaign last month. He’s facing Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld in the Democratic primary.

• Here’s a less-shocking poll: a slim majority of Ohioans favor marijuana legalization. Another Quinnipiac poll released recently found 52 percent of Ohioans say they favor legalizing marijuana for recreational use. Forty-four percent opposed legalization, and four percent were undecided. That’s almost identical to a poll by Quinnipiac last year. However, that doesn’t mean ballot initiatives like those put forward by legalization group ResponsibleOhio would pass if presented to voters in November. The poll measures general sentiment, not the sentiment of those likely to vote. Off-year elections are notoriously thin when it comes to voter turnout, and that could derail legalization efforts. Also complicating the picture is ResponsibleOhio’s particular proposal, which would limit commercial growing to 10 sites around the state. That’s been a controversial provision, with both conservative critics and other legalization advocates saying it amounts to a monopoly on the crop.

• Let’s do a really brief presidential campaign roundup before I bid you adieu for the day. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, who many hold as a frontrunner in the GOP 2016 presidential nomination contest, described himself as Hispanic on his voter registration in 2009, the New York Times reports today. While Bush speaks fluent Spanish and his wife was born in Mexico, he himself does not have Hispanic roots. Bush has built his platform in part on his appeal to Hispanic voters, whom the GOP desperately need as they attempt to expand their base beyond old, male white people. But uh, nominating yourself as a member of a minority group on official documents may not endear you to that group. A spokesman for his campaign could not explain the error, but Bush has shrugged about the revelation on Twitter, laughing it off as a slip of the pen.

• Meanwhile, U.S. Senator Rand Paul of Kentucky has been getting a lot of press lately, and there are reports he may announce his presidential campaign tomorrow. Paul’s walking a tightrope between the deeply Libertarian politics of his father, Ron Paul, and the kinds of proposals needed to cuddle up to establishment Republican donors. Paul’s been working to reach out to crowds outside the traditional GOP power base, talking about justice system and drug law reform and other issues that have become hot points with minority and traditionally progressive voters. Meanwhile, he’s also been trying a less isolationist tack on foreign affairs issues, calling for increased funding to America's military, among other proposals. As Paul dances, the press has tried to pin him down. He’s alternately described as a radical seeking revolution in the GOP and a candidate going moderate as he seeks the party’s nomination. Is he turning into just another Republican suit, or a fed-abolishing Libertarian constantly asking himself “What Would Ayn Do?” My guess is he’s not sure yet himself. Love him or hate him, Paul will make the race interesting in the coming year.

Tweet at me, email me, comment: get at me with your news tips and best opening day celebratory revelry ideas.

 
 
by David Watkins 04.06.2015 52 days ago
at 09:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Taft's Ale House

Taft's Ale House Opens Today

The 19th-century Protestant church is now a three-level bar and restaurant

Over-the-Rhine's new three-level bar and restaurant, Taft’s Ale House — named for William Howard Taft, the 27th president of the United States, former Supreme Court Justice and native Cincinnatian — opens on Monday, Red’s Opening Day, and will feature a variety of specialty beers, as well as an emphasis on tri-tip beef (cut from the bottom sirloin). Helmed by Cincinnati local Kevin Moreland, former brewer at Listermann/Triple Digit, and partners Dave Kassling, a New York restauranteur, and Dave Williams, a UC grad, the bar, which is located at 1429 Race St., inhabits a building that formerly housed the 19th-century St. Paul’s German Evangelical Protestant Church.


Moreland describes his first experience in the building as walking into complete disarray. He had to use the side doors on Fifth Street to get in and, after entering, he walked into “straight dirt” and looked up to see holes the size of office spaces in the ceiling. To save the church, which was on the verge of destruction, he contacted 3CDC. Through their partnership — 3CDC helped stabilize the building, which had been abandoned for almost 50 years — they were able to restore the building, emphasizing it's historical appeal and architecture. The structure still retains it's dramatically high 40-plus-foot ceilings, large, Gothic-style arch windows and former bell tower. But now, instead of parishioners, it can hold more than 200 patrons.


“Part of what’s going on in OTR is saving something that used to be there,” says Taft’s Ale House General Manager Keith Maloy. “It would have been easier for us to start from scratch and build a new place. It would have been easier to construct and less expensive, but we would have lost a lot of the charm that’s in this building.”


The building’s three levels essentially create three different environments depending on an individual’s mood. There is the main beer hall level, with picnic tables, bar games and TVs; a mezzanine level for casual dining; and then Nellie’s Tap Room on the lower level. Nellie's, named after William Howard Taft's wife, is more of a cocktail bar than a beer hall, though the drink menu is still beer-centric; Nellie's serves Taft brews with eight guest taps from local and regional brewers, plus wine and cocktails. 


The entirety of the building's décor, with Rookwood tiles and assorted antique ephemera, is inspired by the William Howard Taft National Historic Site in Mount Auburn, Taft's boyhood home. 


“As soon as you walk in Taft’s home, you see this kind of laid-out pattern of multiple colors," Moreland says. "I wanted that to be something as a key feature in our place, so we did it. We had some hand-cut tile made to match that pattern. … A lot of the furniture matches and the color of the wood as well.”


Moreland considers Taft’s Ale House to be a gift to the city, specifically to OTR.  “I wanted to keep things here in the heart of OTR and try to work with our neighbors because they’re going to be our patrons as much as we’re going to be their patrons,” he says. And in terms of patronage, Moreland started by working with other local vendors, linking local products and businesses to his passion for creating unique and innovative craft beers. 


Taft’s partnered with Maverick Chocolate in Findlay Market to create their Maverick Chocolate Porter, featuring Maverick's cacao nibs and roasted cacao husks. Moreland also incorporated Findlay vendor Dean’s Mediterranean's products into the Culebra Cut Coconut Brown, an American brown ale infused with toasted coconuts. And Taft’s Mooly Wooly Coffee Milk Stout is made with oatmeal, lactose and coffee that comes straight from Coffee Emporium. 


“You can classify it however you want, but I classify beer by what it is," Moreland says. "There are these style guidelines that people like to follow, but I’m not that person. You can only brew so much IPA that tastes like everyone else’s IPA, so we have that but we wanted to spin it around.”


Other favorite brews include a Caribbean style ale — Nellie's Keylime Caribbean Ale —that focuses on key lime and coriander, and an IPA called Rookwood Mosaic, with mosaic hops. 


With creative beer, comes a creative menu, so don't expect pizza or burgers at Taft’s Ale House. During his time studying breweries and pubs around the country, Moreland saw different variations of the same menu time and time again, but his discovery of tri-tip beef changed the game. And General Manager Maloy could not agree more. The restaurant trims and ages the steak for 21 days, massages it with a dry rub, chars it, smokes it over hickory chips and then bakes it. 


“The tri-tip beef is great," Maloy says. "It’s a great cut of beef — we char it, smoke it. You can slice it thin and make a sandwich or cut it bigger like a traditional steak. We have interesting sides too: roasted vegetables, tater tots instead of french fries and sweet potato fries.”


Moreland and Maloy’s main focus is “marrying the [tri-tip] beef with the beer” while still making it affordable. They understand the importance of serving customers at a rate where it's cost-effective to come back. Sandwiches, like the Alehouse (tri-tip steak, onions, blue cheese and red ranch sauce) run between $7.50 and $10, while platters, which are served with mashed potatoes, gravy, roasted veggies and cornbread, are $17 (for grilled chicken breast) to $20 (for 12-ounces of tri-tip steak). A small kids menu features little steak and chicken sandwiches and chicken wings, served with tots. For vegetarians, there's a large selection of salads with housemade dressing. 


The experience of the customer is an ongoing theme in the vision of Taft’s Ale House. Many restaurants could say the same, but Taft’s physical setup lends itself to attaining customer satisfaction. Quality, an experience, and being passionate about what you do is how Moreland describes their mentality.


“Sometimes I have to pinch myself," he says. "I don’t feel like it’s real yet. I’ve learned a lot. I can tell you it’s been an awesome experience. Passion breeds success. The passion we’re putting into crafting great beers is incredible.”


Taft’s Ale House opens Monday, on Moreland’s birthday. The first 100 people to arrive receive a free Red’s-Cincy-W.H.Taft-inspired T-shirt along with a glass of First Pitch Pale Ale. As for the future, Moreland is already thinking about taking the brand national, hoping to bring “big dollars” back to the city’s hotels, bars, eateries and more. “That is my focus: putting Cincinnati on the map for great craft beers,” he says.


Taft's Ale House is located at 1429 Race St., Over-the-Rhine. More info at taftsalehouse.comfacebook.com/taftsalehouse, @taftsalehouse on Instagram and @bigbillytaft on twitter.


 

 
 
by Staff 04.06.2015 52 days ago
Posted In: baseball at 09:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
joeyvotto_thecincinnatireds

Opening Day: Parties and Pre-Games

Places to get drunk and watch the Reds game during Cincinnati's annual "sick day"

Nobody does Opening Day like Cincinnati. And, let's be real, since no one's going to work, here are some parties and bars (and some other associated events) where you can pregame before the Reds take on the Pirates at 4:10 p.m. April 6. 

Arnold's Bar & Grill: Arnold's continues its Opening Day tradition with breakfast starting at 9 a.m., with nine tappings of sought-after beers including Three Floyd's Zombie Dust, Triple Digit's Coconut Chickow!, Blank Slate's BonBonerie Opera Cream Stout, 50 West's Wire to Wire Wheat and more. The bottom of random beer cups will be marked with a one-in-four chance to win autographed baseball cards and game memorabilia from Pete Rose, Joey Votto, Ken Griffey Jr., Aroldis Chapman, Brandon Phillips, George Foster, Billy Hamilton, Jay Bruce, Adam Dunn and more. Todd Hepburn will be on the piano from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. playing baseball classics, and Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's Jeremy Dubin and Justin McCombs will be performing Casey at the Bat and Who's on First. A special appearance by Jim Tarbell dressed as Peanut Jim Shelton. 9 a.m. April 6. Arnold's Bar & Grill, 210 E. Eighth St., Downtown, arnoldsbarandgrill.com. 

The Reds Community Fund: The Reds Community Fund hosts the Reds Community Fund Charity Block Party on Opening Day. Proceeds benefit the P&G Cincinnati MLB Urban Youth Academy. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. April 6. Joe Nuxhall and Freedom ways, Downtown, thebankscincy.com. 

Cincinnati Reds vs. The Pirates: Game kicks off at 4:10 p.m. April 6. Tickets start at $5. Great American Ball Park, 100 Joe Nuxhall Way, The Banks, Downtown, cincinnati.reds.mlb.com

Findlay Market Opening Day Parade: The 96th Opening Day Parade kicks off at Findlay Market. 2015's Grand Marshals include The Nasty Boys (Norm Charlton, Rob Dibble and Randy Myers), plus honorary dignitaries drummer Phillip Paul and former Bengal Anthony Munoz. The parade travels from Findlay Market to Race Street, then to Liberty, Elm and Central Parkway, and back to Race and Fifth. Also making an appearance will be the Anheuser-Busch Clydesdales. Noon April 6. Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, findlaymarketparade.com.

Fountain Square: Post-Opening Day Parade, head to Fountain Square for concessions and a live broadcast of the game on the square's widescreen TV. Game 4:10 p.m. April 6. Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, myfountainsquare.com.  

Holy Grail at The Banks: Featuring a live broadcast from 700 WLW all day. 8:30 a.m. April 6. Holy Grail, 161 Joe Nuxhall Way, The Banks, Downtown, holygrailcincy.com

Igby's: Opening Day at Igby's features swag and giveaways, including a chance to win Reds tickets. Includes a ballpark menu with grilled metts, brats and burgers, plus Tito's vodka and Red Bull specials and DJs from 1-4 p.m. Doors open noon April 6. Igby's, 122 E. Sixth St., Downtown, igbysbar.com.

Knockback Nat’s smoked chicken wings
Photo: Jesse Fox
Knockback Nat's: Opens at 10 a.m., with Reds giveaways, beer, booze and food — including their famous smoked chicken wings — all day. More than a dozen bars around the bar so interested sports fans can watch the game. 10 a.m. April 6. Knockback Nat's, 10 W. Seventh St., Downtown, 513-621-1000. 

Lachey's: Opens at 11 a.m. for "nine innings of winnings." Raffle prizes will be given away at the start of each inning of the game. Prior to that, enjoy domestic can specials and a DJ until 4 p.m., then happy hour specials during the game itself. 11 a.m. April 6. Lachey's, 56 E. 12th St., Downtown, facebook.com/lacheysbar.

Moerlein Lager House: The Lager House kicks off Opening Day with a pre-game starting at 10 a.m. The party is both inside and out, featuring a festival tent on the lawn, DJ ETrayn and special guests Holly and Jon Jon from Q102. 10 a.m. April 6. Moerlein Lager House, 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, The Banks, Downtown, moerleinlagerhouse.com

Neons: Celebrates its fifth anniversary with an Opening Day party. Party kicks off at noon with stadium-style food from Taste 513, and Reds-themed drink specials like Baseball Punch. The staff will blow out candles on a birthday cake when the first pitch is thrown, kicking off patio season and baseball season. Taps include special releases from Fat Head and Three Floyd's. Noon-close April 6. Neons, 1208 E. 12th St., Downtown, facebook.com/neonsunplugged. 

O'Malley's in the Alley: Featuring food and drink specials ($10 Miller Lite and Coors Light buckets) all day. Opens at 11 a.m. April 6. 25 O'Malley's in the Alley, Ogden Place, Downtown, omalleysinthealley.com.

Rhinegeist Hustle Rye Pale Ale Launch: Not exactly an event, but Rhinegeist is releasing a new pale ale in celebration of Opening Day. Hustle is a rye pale ale at 5.4 percent alcohol by volume with 35 IBUs, apricot aromatics, a bit of spice and black pepper. Open 4-11 p.m. April 6. Rhinegeist, 1910 Elm St., Downtown, rhinegeist.com.

Taft's Ale House: Celebrates Opening Day by ... opening. Celebrate the grand opening of Taft's Ale House, the three-level brewery/bar/restaurant in the old Saint Paul German Evangelical Protestant church, with beer, including their First Pitch Pale Ale, and food, like the Alehouse Sandwich with steak, onion, blue cheese and ranch. Opens April 6. Taft's Ale House, 1429 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, taftsalehouse.com. 

Via Vite: Grab some $5 grilled Italian sausage and $10 buckets of domestic beer on the restaurant's open-air piazza bar. 10 a.m. April 6. Via Vite, 520 Vine St., Downtown, viaviterestaurant.com.

Washington Park: Opening Day at Washington Park features beverage sales, games and live music. The Opening Day Parade will pass by the park in front of Music Hall. Bleacher seating available in the park's Music Hall Plaza. After the procession will be family-friendly activities, food, wine, beer, soft drinks and more. The game will be broadcast on a giant LED screen in the park. 11 a.m. April 6. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.03.2015 55 days ago
Posted In: baseball at 11:48 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pg2_g_redsmascot_576

New Food, Drink and Retail Options at Great American Ballpark

Just in time for Opening Day … and the All-Star Game

Reds season kicks off Monday at Great American Ball Park, which means Cincinnatians will be spending a varying amount of time in the stadium, depending on their fan level. Whether you go once a season or to every Reds game, GABP has added a few new features for everyone in 2015, and just in time for the 86th MLB All-Star Game in July.

“Many of the new ballpark features include historic elements and streetscape façades that pay homage to the Queen City’s cultural heritage,” said Phil Castellini, Reds COO, in a recent press release. “Reds baseball is an intrinsic part of our past, and we are excited to have the ballpark reflect the vibrancy happening throughout our downtown. These ballpark features are a great opportunity to showcase Cincinnati’s history to the thousands of guests visiting the region during All-Star Summer.” 

Bootleggers Bar 
Bootleggers is a beer and booze addition to existing offerings like the "Reds Brewery District" — the 60-tap, 85-foot craft beer bar between sections 117 and 118. Bootleggers, located on the Terrace Level by first base, features a historically inspired design, reminiscent of Over-the-Rhine's 1900s Wielert's Biergarten. The walk-in bar will serve beer and liquor. 

Concessions Updates
Several updates have been made to GABP concession stands. The Frisch’s, LaRosa’s, UDF Ice Cream, Penn Station, Skyline Chili, Moerlein Lager House and Taste of Belgium Terrace-level stands have all received new streetscape façades. Some of the hot dog/brat/mett stands have been rebranded as "Porkopolis," to pay tribute to our porky heritage. And the Fry Box, which is located in a repurposed shipping container, will feature fresh-cut fries with a variety of toppings. 

DraftServ Beer Stations
These self-serve beer stations (20 of them) will be installed around the ballpark and will feature Budweiser, Bud Light and Goose Island on draft. Purchase a "beer card" at retail team shops and pay for beer — which you can pour yourself — by the ounce.  

Food Ordering Kiosks
Avoid waiting in line and place an order for food at one of four touch-screen kiosks on the Terrace Level by third base. Food can be picked up at designated concession stands. 

The Handlebar at the Riverfront Club
New GABP restaurant The Handlebar features an all-inclusive buffet and open bar, 26-foot video wall, high-definition video columns and both indoor and outdoor seating. Located on the Club Level overlooking right field, fans can purchase standing room "Handlebar Access" tickets online, daily access passes for season ticket holders at a discounted rate, outdoor rail seats ($120) or luxury boxes that seat groups of 12 to 14 guests ($100 initial group deposit). For more information, visit reds.com/handlebar.

Nursing Suite
For moms, there's a new nursing suite from Pampers and Fischer Homes. It's a private area open to all breast-feeding/bottle-feeding moms, and moms with other childcare needs. It features gliders, changing stations, a private restroom, a kitchenette with a sink, ice and a fridge, lockers for storing items like diaper bags and several flat-screen TVs broadcasting the game. It's located on the Suite Level near the Champions Club elevators.

Retail Row 
This new streetscape façade inside the main gates features the Majestic Home Plate Shop, Split the Pot Booth, Season Ticket Holder Central, Game-Used Authentics and Fan Club Corner. 

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.03.2015 55 days ago
Posted In: Alcohol, Bar, Cocktails, Openings at 11:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sundry and vice_aaron conway

Apothecary-Themed Cocktail Bar Sundry and Vice Now Open

A new concept and a new place to drink in OTR

Back in the day, doctors and pharmacists used to treat everything from colds and stomach aches to fainting spells and typhoid with alcoholic elixirs and tonics — wine for the plague, absinthe for intestinal parasites, bitters for indigestion, brandy for just about everything. So it makes sense that Sundry and Vice, Over-the-Rhine's newest cocktail bar, has adopted a vintage apothecary theme. 

The bar, which held its grand opening on March 27, serves fresh cocktails with housemade spirits, syrups and other concoctions. House cocktails include Dr. Shiloh's System Vitalizer ($11), with mezcal, lime, pineapple, ginger, Peychaud bitters and soda, and pre-Prohibition classics like a Clover Club ($11), with gin, raspberry, lemon and egg white. They also have local beer, non-local beer, wine and housemade sodas dispensed through a vintage fountain soda draft arm.

The interior, which is designed to hold 55 patrons, features an era-authentic storefront with antique jars, bottles and other assorted medical ephemera, including vintage prescriptions on the wall (for classics like cocaine, a former painkiller and dandruff cure). There are seats at the bar, as well as leather booths, exposed brick, era-appropriate Jazz music and a ton of mood lighting.

4 p.m.-2 a.m. Monday-Friday; noon-2 a.m. Saturday and Sunday. Sundry and Vice, 18 W. 13th St., Over-the-Rhine, facebook.com/sundryandvice.

All photos by Aaron Conway

 
 
by Staff 04.03.2015 55 days ago
 
 
the lion king

Your Weekend To Do List (4/3-4/5)

Butterflies! Flowers! Mutualism! Beer! Spring!


FRIDAY
ONSTAGE: THE LION KING
The Lion King began as a popular Disney animated feature film in 1994, but back then no one imagined that it would become a worldwide blockbuster stage production. In fact, when it was being assembled for Broadway’s refurbished New Amsterdam Theatre, a lot of skeptics wondered what would become of a story about heroic and often cute anthropomorphic characters in the hands of Julie Taymor, a respected but avant-garde director. More than 15 million people have seen touring productions of the show in more than 70 North American cities. It has returned to Cincinnati’s Aronoff Center for a four-week stop (through April 26) presented by Disney Theatrical Productions and Broadway in Cincinnati. For 2015, The Lion King will have “only” 32 performances (four weeks is double the length of time that most tours are presented at the Aronoff), likely meaning total attendance for these three stops could top 350,000 people — more than the population of the city of Cincinnati! These are staggering numbers for a show about wild animals in Africa.
In truth, it’s a more universal parable told by people brilliantly outfitted as lions, elephants, giraffes, antelopes, hyenas and birds, as well as a comic meerkat and warthog. Taymor’s imaginative costumes and puppet designs invite audiences to see the performers within them in a way that adds drama to the story. The Lion King, presented by Broadway in Cincinnati, continues at the Aronoff Center through April 26. More info: cincinnati.broadway.com. Read more here.


ART: BLDG’S 199C OPENING DAY ART EVENT AND BLOCK PARTY
Drawing its name from the Pantone color for the Cincinnati Reds, 199C is a celebration of Major League Baseball just in time to get you ready for the official Opening Day parade. Friday evening, Covington’s art gallery/graphic design firm BLDG will host an exhibition of the work of nearly 60 artists from around the country who were asked to celebrate their home team and love of the game. BLDG has also teamed up with Covington area businesses to provide visitors with activities (a whiffle ball tournament, late night derby, photo booth and live music) to welcome the coming of baseball season. 4-11 p.m. Free. 30 W. Pike St., Covington, Ky., bldgrefuge.com.


Buzzer at the Playhouse in the Park
Photo: Sandy Underwood
ONSTAGE: BUZZER

What happens when a guy who grew up in an inner-city neighborhood returns as a successful attorney, back because it’s now the trendy place to live? That’s Jackson’s story: He’s upwardly mobile and black, moving in with Suzy, his white schoolteacher girlfriend. But she’s not so comfortable with their arrangement. Add to the mix Don, Jackson’s privileged boyhood white friend who’s had drug issues and now needs a place to crash. The apartment’s buzzer is a reminder that their world isn’t so simple. Tracey Scott Wilson’s new play isn’t set in Over-the-Rhine, but it could be. Through April 19. $30-$85. Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com.



MUSIC: SOMEBODY'S DARLING WITH THE WHISKEY SHAMBLES

It’s hard to stand out in the crowded Blues/Roots Rock field but Dallas-based Somebody’s Darling is a stacked deck of secret weapons. The visceral ’70s-to-today guitar pyrotechnics of David Ponder, the massive keyboard groove of Michael Talley, the velvet jackhammer rhythm section of bassist Wade Cofer and drummer Nate Wedan, and the smoke-and-whiskey-cured vocals of Amber Farris combine to create a blistering Blues sound that is reassuringly familiar and yet fascinatingly singular. Although Farris, who also plays electric and acoustic guitars, generates plenty of fair comparisons to Bonnie Raitt, Susan Tedeschi and Heartless Bastards’ Erika Wennerstrom (and maybe even a little Natalie Merchant in a rare quiet moment), she and Somebody’s Darling may align closest to Grace Potter and the Nocturnals by virtue of the slinky dynamism and mesmerizing power they both effortlessly exhibit. Somebody’s Darling plays Southgate House Revival's Revival Room on Friday. Tickets/more info here.


Braxton Brewing Company
EVENT: DRINK A BEER AT COVINGTON'S BRAXTON BREWING COMPANY
It has been decades since Covingtonians have whiffed fresh malt percolating from a neighborhood brewery, but from now on when they’re near the corner of Seventh and Pike streets, this will be the norm. The family-owned and -operated Braxton Brewing Company held its grand opening on March 27, and invited the community into the 11,000-square-foot space, which features a brewhouse and taproom. The founders behind the endeavor are brothers Jake and Evan Rouse, their dad, Greg, and brewmaster Richard Dubé (formerly of Christian Moerlein). In October, Braxton secured the title of the highest-funded brewery project ever on Kickstarter (654 backers pledged a total of $71,885), which enabled the team to finish construction, purchase a 20-barrel four-vessel brewhouse, a 40-barrel fermenter and hundreds of kegs. The taproom, the epicenter of the brewery, houses two leather couches, tables with charging stations for laptops, TVs displaying social media interactions, Golden Tee and Power Putt consoles, and Cincinnati Bell-partnered gigabit Internet. (Braxton is the first craft brewery in the nation to have gigabit Internet.) The 20-seat bar area features 20 tap handles of Braxton beers like Sparky, a hoppy wheat ale; Crank Shaft, an IPA; and Storm, a golden cream ale. 4-10 p.m. Wednesday-Thursday; noon-1 a.m. Friday-Saturday; 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., braxtonbrewing.comRead more here.


Earl Sweatshirt
Photo: Brick Stowell
MUSIC: EARL SWEATSHIRT
Hip Hop artist Earl Sweatshirt’s name first came to the public’s attention when the group he was associated with, Odd Future (a collective that’s grown a bratty reputation thanks to live shows and its ridiculous Adult Swim program, Loiter Squad), became much-buzzed about, not only for its shenanigans but also its progressive musical prowess. His debut came out in 2010 as a free download through Odd Future’s website when Earl was in his mid-teens, but he disappeared from the fold, reportedly sent off to a school for “at-risk” kids by his mother. By 2012, Earl was back making music and performing, leading up to his excellent new full-length released just last month, I Don’t Like Shit, I Don’t Go Outside, a dark but smart and powerful album, showing the kind of introspection and honesty that made Kendrick Lamar’s good kid, m.A.A.d city one of the more compelling albums of this generation of Hip Hop. 7 p.m. Friday. $23. Bogart’s, 2621 Vine St., Corryville, bogarts.com.


SATURDAY
Rubblebucket
Photo: Shervin Lainez
MUSIC: RUBBLEBUCKET WITH VACATIONER
Born in Burlington, Vt., and headquartered in New York City, Rubblebucket is a perfect storm of Pop precision, Soul passion, Art Rock quirk and Ska bob-and-weave choreography. Even a cursory spin through the band’s third and best album, last summer’s brilliantly loopy Survival Sounds, reveals a talented group of musical changelings who can bounce off the satellites with the screwball quiver of The B-52s, howl with the focused lunacy of Fishbone and jerk with the rhythmic intensity of Talking Heads, while making it all seem like a peyote-fueled marionette carnival conceived and soundtracked by Dirty Projectors. Last year was really a breakout one for Rubblebucket; Survival Sounds was praised by The New York Times, Spin and Noisey, while NPR hailed the track “Carousel Ride” one of the year’s 50 best songs. Rubblebucket plays Woodward Theater this Saturday. Tickets/more info here.

ATTRACTIONS: INTERNATIONAL BUTTERFLY SHOW: BUTTERFLIES OF THE PHILIPPINES
As Cincinnati welcomes spring, the Krohn Conservatory welcomes the colorful and exotic butterflies of the Philippines. For 12 weeks, Krohn will transform into a majestic tribute to the Southeast Asian island country, capturing its stunning natural beauty and Filipino culture. The showroom will be a tropical paradise of free-flying butterflies soaring among waterfalls and bold volcanic murals. A rainforest under glass, the conservatory will be filled with more than 3,500 beautiful plant species, such as ornate orchids, brilliant bromeliads, delicate anthuriums and dramatic dracaenas, providing a backdrop close to home for the native butterflies to flutter. Through June 21. $7 adult; $4 children; free ages 4 and younger. 1501 Eden Park Drive, Mount Adams, cincinnatiparks.com.


Art by Doug Korfhagen 
ART: OBO: THE LABOR SHOW
On Saturday, the NEAR*BY curatorial collective hosts OBO: The Labor Show, a social-practice and art experiment in which selected artists and tradespersons contract with each other to exchange labor for mutually beneficial purposes. It is inspired by anarchist Josiah Warren, who practiced something similar at his Cincinnati Time Store, an experimental storefront open from 1827 to 1830, considered the first experiment in mutalism. Among those participating are Doug Korfhagen (printing/woodburning), Donna Rubin (yoga), Libby Singhoffer (kombucha brewing) and Loraine Wible (pataphysics). 6-8 p.m. Saturday. Free. 2159 Central Ave., Brighton, nearby.gallery.


International Pillow Fight Day
EVENT: INTERNATIONAL PILLOW FIGHT DAY
In honor of International Pillow Fight Day, people all over the world will be bursting the seams of their pillows in feather explosions. Locally, bring your friends and kids to Northside’s Jacob Hoffner Park for a friendly pillow fight, where pajamas and costumes are totally encouraged. Make sure to bring soft pillows, wait for the signal to begin, and prepare for lots of laughter during the friendliest epic pillow fight battle of your life. 3 p.m. Saturday. Free. 4104 Hamilton Ave., Northside, pillowfightday.com.

Easter Egg Hunt at Washington Park
Photo: 3CDC
EVENT: EASTER EGG HUNT AT WASHINGTON PARK
Following the success of last year’s fun-filled event, the quest for Easter eggs continues at Washington Park. This year, Graeter’s has upped the game by adding 2,500 more eggs into the mix for a whopping total of 7,500 hidden, candy-filled eggs. There will also be face painting, a petting zoo and photos with the Easter Bunny. For those after something a little more gourmet, Taste of Belgium will also be on site serving their signature waffles. BYOB (bring your own basket). 10 a.m.-noon Saturday. Free. 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.

EVENT: EASTER EGG HUNT AT DEVOU PARK
Here comes Peter Cottontail, hoping down to Volpenhein Pavilion at Devou Park. With spring finally deciding to show its face, what better way to celebrate Easter with your youngsters than with an Easter egg hunt? Come down to Devou Park’s annual hunt and have the young ones explore for pieces of brightly colored, egg-shaped treasure. 1 p.m. Saturday. Free for ages 3 to 12. Devou Park, Covington, Ky., 859-292-2151.


Rod Paulette
Photo: Provided
COMEDY: ROD PAULETTE
Rod Paulette set out to be an actor and majored in theater at Columbia College in Chicago but found comedy more to his liking. After a stint in advertising, he chucked the corporate world for the stand-up stage. “I like California — I just don’t like Californians,” he tells an audience. “I find them to be a little arrogant. I was talking to this lady there, a white lady, and I told her I was from Ohio and she asks, ‘Did you grow up on a farm?’ Really? When’s the last time you saw a black guy on a farm? I mean without the chain on his foot keeping his ass there? If you ever see black guy on a farm, walk up to him, tap him on the shoulder and tell him he’s free to go.” Thursday-Saturday. $10-$15. Funny Bone on the Levee, Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., funnyboneonthelevee.com.

SUNDAY
Photo: Krae Photography 
ATTRACTIONS: ZOO BLOOMS
We’ll soon be getting an eyeful of brightly colored flowers instead of gloomy winter greys at the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden’s annual floral exhibit, Zoo Blooms. Daffodils, hyacinths, flowering trees and one of the largest displays of tulips in the Midwest will take over the zoo grounds, with free after hours concerts every Thursday in April — Tunes & Blooms — featuring local musicians in the urban oasis. Through April. $18 adults; $12 children; $9 parking. 3400 Vine St., Avondale, cincinnatizoo.org.


ART: ECOSCULPT
In celebration of Earth Day, recyclables meet innovation during this three-week installation. Produced by 3CDC, EcoSculpt gives artists a chance to design and display large-scale, eco-friendly sculptures using recycled and recyclable materials in Washington Park. Judges will choose first-, second- and third-prize winners based on concept, execution and construction. All art is displayed during park hours. Awards ceremony 5 p.m. April 22 (Earth Day). Free. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, washingtonpark.org.

MONDAY 
EVENT: FINDLAY MARKET OPENING DAY PARADE
Findlay Market remains a Cincinnati institution as the state’s oldest continuously operated public market. Another old thing? Monday marks the market’s 96th annual Cincinnati Reds Opening Day Parade. The parade will include local businesses and organizations like Rozzi’s Famous Fireworks, the Cincinnati Fire Department and, of course, the Cincinnati Reds. This year also marks the 25th fifth anniversary of the World Series championship that featured one of the most dominant back-end bullpen groups of all time. “The Nasty Boys” — Norm Charlton, Rob Dibble and Randy Myers — are this year’s Grand Marshals. Noon Monday. Free. Departs from 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, findlaymarketparade.com
 
 
by Rick Pender 04.03.2015 55 days ago
at 10:34 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
king

Stage Door: The Circle of Life

I've seen The Lion King five times, on Broadway and on tour. I wrote about it in a feature this week, describing how a successful but not terribly profound animated Disney feature became a stage musical that's a worldwide phenomenon. A touring production is at the Aronoff through April 26; it's the third time the show has landed in Cincinnati.

Rather than evaluate the performers — who are highly talented and extremely polished in their presentation of the show — I decided to pay attention to the visuals this time around. It was worth it. The Lion King has the most inspiring opening of any show I've seen: A call and response between Rafiki, a nervous mandrill and two others brings together a clutch of African animals to Pride Rock where a regal pair of lions, King Mufasa and Queen Sarabi are presenting their new cub. The animals enter the theater from all directions — from the stage wings and down the Aronoff's aisles, enabling the audience to see the actors in their puppet gear up close as they sing "The Circle of Life." It's a great way to begin the show's magic.

But it's only the start: There is color and pageantry to burn in this story — from a colony of loony hyenas to a fatal stampede of antelopes. The second act opens with the chorus dressed in colorful clothes with ornate puppet birds and kites sing "One on One." I was reminded of the wonderful South African choral groups that inspired Cincinnati audiences during the World Choir games in 2012 — passionate harmonizing and heart-thumping rhythms. From start to finish, The Lion King is a remarkable experience. If you've seen it once, it's worth going again to appreciate new dimensions of this gorgeous production. Tickets: 513-621-2781.


Two good shows onstage at the Cincinnati Playhouse this weekend, and they couldn't be more different from one another. It's the final weekend for Peter and the Starcatcher (CityBeat review here) a prequel to Peter Pan that elaborates in a fanciful way about the origins of the boy who refuses to grow up, Captain Hook, the Lost Boys, Tinker Bell and more. It's driven by imaginative theater-making — instead of special effects, audiences are called upon to envision things like storms brewing and characters flying. A great show for families. … On the Shelterhouse stage it's serious drama with Tracey Scott Wilson's Buzzer (CityBeat review here), the story of three people moving into a redeveloping urban neighborhood. It feels like Cincinnati's Over-the-Rhine. Tensions spurred by changing populations provide context for this story, but it's really about the toxic dynamic between an up-and-coming black attorney, his white schoolteacher girlfriend and his white boyhood pal who's led a troubled life. A strong cast and Wilson's naturalistic dialogue make this a very watchable (but very adult) show. This one is onstage through April 19. Box office: 513-421-3888.

Know Theatre opened it's production of the comic-book inspired Hearts Like Fists last weekend. It's a two-dimensional tale of girl crime fighters battling a dastardly villain, Doctor X, who's murdering lovers — since his own love life is in shambles. There's humor but not a lot of depth to this one, but if you like slam-bang action stories, you'll love the fight choreography and the silly posing of the characters. It's around until April 25. Tickets: 513-300-5669 … A block away from Know in Over-the-Rhine, Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati is winding down its production of Detroit ’67 (CityBeat review here), set in a tumultuous era in the Motor City as a brother and sister struggle to make a living while the world around them is burning. Although it's rooted in events from nearly a half-century ago, this one has some very prescient messages that seem like they're about more recent events in Ferguson, Missouri, and elsewhere. Final performance is 2 p.m. Sunday. Tickets: 513-421-3555.

Rick Pender’s STAGE DOOR blog appears here every Friday. Find more theater reviews and feature stories here.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 04.03.2015 55 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
Harry Black

Morning News and Stuff

Cincy City Manager courts businesses upset with Indiana's RFRA law; more streetcar headaches; public nude photog coming to Cincy, looking for "the crown jewels"

Good morning y’all. I cannot wait for this weekend so let’s get to it.

Are you a businessperson in Indiana steamed about the state’s new Religious Freedom Restoration Act? A lot of people are. In the wake of controversy around Indiana's law, which as written allows businesses to discriminate against LGBT individuals on the basis of religious beliefs, Cincinnati City Manager Harry Black is making a pitch to Indiana businesses: Come to Cincy. We’re more accepting, and that’s good for business, Black says. Black has already written to companies like Yelp who had planned to expand in Indiana but are now pulling back thanks to the new law signed by Gov. Mike Pence last week. Many businesses have balked at such RFRA laws, both in Indiana and elsewhere, saying they’re morally objectionable and bad for business. Pence and Indiana lawmakers announced a fix to the law earlier this week that they say would prohibit discrimination. But many of the law’s critics, including big business, say the fix isn’t enough. Now Cincinnati is looking poach some of that business expansion for its own.

• Another day, another embarrassing streetcar argument. At yesterday’s City Council meeting, Mayor John Cranley lashed out at the city’s streetcar team, saying it had “secretly” spent $200,000 on studies for the transit project’s potential second leg into uptown. It turns out that last February, the team, led by project executive John Deatrick, spent about $70,000 out of a fund set aside for streetcar studies in 2008. The team authorized the full $200,000 in contracts to two firms to do budget and cost benefit analyses but paused the work when it became clear focus on the current phase of the streetcar was the priority. Cranley says the 2008 City Council resolution creating the original $800,000 pot of money for studies didn’t specifically authorize the streetcar team to use the money and that the studies are an example of a “culture of secrecy” around the project. The team says it was unaware it had to ask for special permission to undertake the analyses for phase 1b. Phew. City Manager Harry Black, who has the power to discipline city personnel, says there appears to be no grounds to punish members of the streetcar team. Can we just stop the fussin’ and the feudin’, please?

• Parking rates are changing in Over-the-Rhine and downtown Tuesday. The shifts, which are tied to usage in the areas, have been planned for a year and were given final approval by Cincinnati City Council yesterday. Rates will go up or down by a quarter in various parts of the downtown/OTR area. In general, rates will go down or stay the same west of Vine Street, ranging from $2.00 an hour south of Sixth Street to $.75 an hour north of Central Parkway. East of Vine Street, rates will go up; it will now cost $2.25 an hour to park south of Central Parkway and $1.25 an hour north of it. The city has watched usage rates in various parts of downtown/OTR since January to come up with the new rates, a kind of makeshift “dynamic parking” effort. In other cities, sophisticated data crunching can change parking rates on meters according to demand on an hourly basis. That won’t happen here, but by shifting rates according to the parking market, city leaders hope to incentivize parking turnover in busy areas and encourage drivers to park in less-used locations. Some of the funds from the parking boost will go to the streetcar, and some to the general fund, City Manager Harry Black says.

• I grew up in Hamilton, where the grisly legacy of James Rupert is hard to escape. On Easter Sunday 40 years ago, Ruppert murdered 11 members of his family in a house on the corner of Minor Avenue in Hamilton’s Lindenwald neighborhood. At the time, it was the largest mass-murder in U.S. history. Yesterday, Rupert had a parole hearing. The parole board’s decision hasn’t been announced yet, but the Butler County Prosecutor’s Office is strongly objecting to his release.

• Hey, here’s a weird one. Need some new nude photos in front of Music Hall? There’s a guy who may be able to hook you up on Opening Day, when he comes to Cincinnati to shoot nude photos of folks in front of local landmarks. He’s done it in a number of big U.S. cities, sometimes with getaway drivers nearby due to the illegal nature of being naked in public. I can’t avoid comment on this quote in the Enquirer, so here it comes:

“I am looking for Americana, the history of the United States,” Harvey Drouillard says. “I am looking for the crown jewels." Crown jewels indeed.

• A few days ago, I told you about how the Ohio General Assembly floated a proposal that required college students and other somewhat transitory voters to register their car in Ohio if they wanted to vote here. Many Democrats have likened that measure to a poll tax; it would cost most students $75 to re-register their cars and if they don’t and try to vote, their current registration would become invalid. Gov. John Kasich apparently agreed with the detractors, vetoing the measure Wednesday. The provision was tucked into Ohio’s transportation budget legislation, which moves forward without the voter registration law.

• Finally, U.S. negotiations with Iran over that country’s nuclear program have made big headlines lately, with a lot of politicking going on around the fact that we’re negotiating with the country at all. But according to some sources, those negotiations have taken a fruitful and promising turn lately. Here’s the latest on where things stand with U.S. efforts to keep Iran from developing nukes. The whole process is fascinating and terrifying stuff.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 04.02.2015 56 days ago
Posted In: Cincinnati, Events, local restaurant, Food news at 10:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
carriage house farm dinner

Pop-Up Dinners Return to Carriage House Farm

The popular intimate outdoor dinner series kicks off in May

North Bend's Carriage House Farm is fully embracing the farm-to-table movement with this year's pop-up dinner series. From May through November the farm will play host to a variety of local chefs, who will be preparing more than two dozen seasonal dinners, utilizing ingredients available on the farm, like garlic, ginger, beans, heirloom tomatoes and comb honey. The intimate dinners seat 13 patrons in an open-air dining terrace, where the chefs will prepare their multi-course meals over a wood-fired oven — right in front of the guests.

Some dinners will also include special appearances by guest chefs, like Todd Kelly and Megan Ketover of the five-star Orchids, Jose Salazar of Salazar, Dan Wright of Abigail Street/Pontiac/Senate, Nino Loreto of food truck panino and others. To complement the bounty of Carriage House, chefs will also be working with additional artisan producers to complete the dinners, like Mudfoot Farm, Sheltowee mushroom farm, Weber Family Farm, Sixteen Bricks Bakery and more.

Here's a list of current dinners (some may be added later in the year):
  • May 17 - Chef Dana Adkins of the Eagle OTR and chef Jason Louda of Meatball Kitchen
  • May 31 - Chef Ryan Santos of Please
  • June 7 - Chef Mark Bodenstein of NuVo at Greenup
  • June 21 - Chef Mike Florea of Maribelle's eat + drink
  • June 28 - Chef Ryan Santos of Please's Kickstart Thank You dinner (sold out)
  • Aug. 16 - Chef Renee Schuler of eat well celebrations and feasts
  • Aug. 30 - Chef Stephen Williams of Bouquet Restaurant and Wine Bar (sold out)
  • Sept. 20Chef Mark Bodenstein of NuVo at Greenup
  • Sept. 27 - Chef Jared Bennett of Metropole
  • Oct. 4Chef Dana Adkins of the Eagle OTR
  • Oct. 11Chef Ryan Santos of Please
  • Nov. 1 Chef Mike Florea of Maribelle's eat + drink
Dinners start at 4, 5 or 6 p.m. (Carriage House is about a half-hour drive from downtown Cincinnati) and cost between $80 and $85. Reserve seats here

Carriage House Farm, 10252 Miamiview Road, North Bend, carriagehousefarmllc.com. 
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 04.02.2015 56 days ago
Posted In: News at 08:57 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news1_04-01_areaoverall

Morning News and Stuff

Uncertainty for King Towers residents; Cincinnati developer proposes 21 single-family homes in OTR; Portman stocks up on cash for Senate race

Hey all. I’m hyped for the season’s first thunderstorm, which is officially rolling in as I type this. As far as I’m concerned, it’s finally spring. On to the news.

Residents displaced by the King Towers fire in Madisonville last Thursday will be able to stay in their extended stay hotel in Blue Ash for another two weeks, but after that their fate is uncertain. The 20-plus residents can’t move back into the building until it is investigated and cleaned, a process that could take months. Many have lived in the building for a long time and don’t have access to cars to get around. The fire injured several and killed firefighter Daryl Gordon, whose funeral drew thousands from across the country yesterday to downtown Cincinnati.

• A proposal by Cincinnati developer North Pointe Group in Over-the-Rhine would build 21 single-family homes on some city-owned vacant lots on Main Street north of Liberty Street. It would also redevelop a vacant building there into eight so-called “workforce apartments.” North Pointe says the houses will sell for around $400,000 to $600,000 each. The apartments will all be approximately 630 square feet and cost about $800-$950. The plan has drawn some controversy, which we explore in our news feature this week. North Pointe says it will need to tear down popular basketball courts on the land. After some residents complained, the developer agreed to keep two of the six hoops standing. But some are still skeptical of the proposal, saying it could change the character of the neighborhood.

• Cincinnati-based news giant E.W. Scripps Co. is officially out of the newspaper business for the first time in its 135 year history as of Wednesday. In a merger with Journal Communications, based in Milwaukee, Scripps has traded off its remaining newspapers for 12 TV stations and 34 radio stations across the country. The company has said it’s looking to expand its presence in TV and to own radio stations in the markets where it also broadcasts TV news. That could mean Scripps could eventually acquire radio stations here in Cincinnati.

• Suspended Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter would like the Ohio Supreme Court to remove her ongoing felony trial from the county’s court system. Hunter is being retried on a felony count of misusing a court credit card after a technicality kept a jury from considering evidence for that charge when Hunter was tried late last year. A jury hung on eight of nine felony counts in that trial, convicting her of one count related to information she allegedly gave her brother, a county court employee, about an inmate.

Hunter and her attorney, Clyde Bennett II, say Hunter can’t get a fair trial in the county thanks to acrimony between her and many of the judges here. Bennett says prior decisions by Hamilton County Judge Patrick Dinkelacker, who is currently presiding over the case, were used as evidence in Hunter’s earlier trial, causing a conflict of interest. Judge Norbert Nadel presided over Hunter’s original trial, but he retired earlier this year and Dinkelacker was elected to replace him. Dinkelacker previously presided over an appeals court where he made the rulings in question about Hunter’s case.

• Another local connection to the weed-legalization efforts led by ResponsibleOhio: Cincinnati-based developer David Bastos is an investor in the ballot initiative, which aims to legalize the sale of marijuana and restrict commercial growth to 10 marijuana farms around the state. Bastos is a partner in Bridge Property LLC, which would establish one of those farms in Lucas County. ResponsibleOhio needs to collect 300,000 signatures by this summer in order to get their amendment to Ohio’s constitution on the November ballot. Should it pass, Ohioans over the age of 21 would be allowed to buy marijuana, apply for a marijuana vendor’s license (similar to a liquor license) and grow small amounts of the drug for personal use, a late concession to opponents of the measure’s limit on commercial growth.

• The Cincinnati Reds are on track to break their season ticket sales records, thanks in part to the MLB All-Star Game coming to the city July 14. The Reds’ previous record at Great American Ballpark is 15,648. Last year they sold about 14,500 and they’re on pace to reach more than 16,000 sales this year. There’s a clear incentive for baseball nuts to make the big commitment: Season ticket holders are automatically offered the opportunity to purchase All-Star Game tickets, which are a hot item. Both half-season (40 games) and full-season (80 games) ticket holders get a crack at the All-Star Game tickets.

• The 2016 Senate race in Ohio is heating up. Republican Senator Rob Portman, nearing the end of his first term in the Senate, will have to fight off either Gov. Ted Strickland or Cincinnati City Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld, both Democrats, in that contest. But he’ll have a lot of ammunition. Portman reported he’s raised $2.75 million in the last 90 days for his campaign. Portman has steeled himself for a primary challenge from the right — he angered some conservatives with his pro-marriage equality stance after his son came out as gay — but so far, no challenger has materialized and Portman has netted big cash and big endorsements. Portman could face a big challenge from Strickland, who is Ohio’s former governor and who has been endorsed by former President Bill Clinton. All this alignment of cash and big-name endorsements shows how crucial Ohio will be to the 2016 election, when the presidency and control of the Senate will both be on the line.

That’s it for me. Tweet at me, comment or email me with your news tips.

 
 

 

 

 
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