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by German Lopez 02.20.2014 58 days ago
Posted In: News, Parking, Economy, Voting at 10:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news parking

Morning News and Stuff

Parking debate continues, mayors work to bring manufacturing, voting bills pass legislature

City Council watered down Mayor John Cranley’s parking plan to just two proposals: upgrading parking meters and increased enforcement. Council and public opposition ultimately proved too much for increasing neighborhood rates and expanded evening hours at major hubs. The changes mean less revenue for the city but reduced parking costs for residents. Still, with the parking plan changing almost daily, it’s unclear whether the current iteration will be the final proposal that the Neighborhood Committee and City Council ultimately pass.

Compare: Cranley’s original parking plan versus the parking privatization plan.

Meanwhile, Xerox, the private operator that took over Cincinnati’s parking meters in the parking privatization plan, proposed its own version of a parking plan in which the company manages parking meters while City Council retains control over setting hours, rates and enforcement. Xerox says its plan will generate more revenue. But Cranley rejected Xerox’s plan weeks ago.

Commentary: “County Should Accept Responsible Bidder Law.”

Cranley yesterday announced he’s partnering with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley to get a share of $1.3 billion in federal funds that would help attract manufacturing. The two cities will compete as one community for the federal Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership. The competition’s 12 winners will each receive part of the $1.3 billion pot. Even if Cincinnati and Dayton don’t win, Cranley said the competition will at least get them thinking about working together as a community for manufacturing jobs.

The Republican-controlled Ohio legislature yesterday approved controversial election bills that reduce the state’s early voting period by one week and restrict counties’ abilities to mail out unsolicited absentee ballot applications. Democrats say the measures are meant to suppress voters, but Republicans argue the changes are supposed to set uniform standards across the state. At least one top Ohio Republican previously admitted the measures were supposed to suppress voters, particularly “the urban — read African-American — voter-turnout machine.” Gov. John Kasich is now the only person that stands between the bill becoming law.

The city plans to undertake a pothole-fixing blitz in March.

The Greater Cincinnati Port Authority will begin its 14-neighborhood rehabilitation plan in Evanston, where the agency will target about 100 properties.

With a “virtual online menu” and access to vocational education in the seventh grade, Gov. Kasich says he wants to get Ohio students planning their careers much earlier.

The Ohio House approved a plan that will give schools four more calamity days — more popularly known as “snow days” — for the current school year. The bill now heads to the Ohio Senate and Kasich.

U.S. Sen Sherrod Brown wants to close a loophole in Medicare that costs seniors thousands of dollars in unexpected medical bills.

Quinnipiac University’s most recent poll found Ohioans would choose Hillary Clinton over Kasich and other Republicans for president.

Whooping cough appears to be evolving in response to its vaccine.

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by Maija Zummo 02.19.2014 59 days ago
Posted In: Events, News, fundraising at 03:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
harkins_family

Coffee Scene Unites to Help Injured Barista

Coffee scene continues to raise funds for friend/Red River Gorge fall survivor

In January, Deeper Roots Coffee Roasters held a fundraising event for BLOC Coffee Company manager Rhett Harkins, who fell 60 feet while hiking in Red River Gorge in December. It took 20 men and eight hours to get Harkins out alive. He has since undergone multiple surgeries and is recovering well, but he can't work and his medical bills are mounting. Which is why Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky's speciality coffee shops are rallying around Harkins to raise money to offset his medical costs. 

Deeper Roots' December Latte Art Throwdown fundraiser pulled together 16 baristi from 16 different shops in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus and Northern Kentucky. Harkins judged the event, which raised $1,700 to help cover the costs of his ambulance transportation, from his wheelchair.

Now, Justin Carabello, owner of Carabello Coffee of Newport, Ky., has coordinated an effort with six local shops to serve and sell a special roast called “Restore Coffee” that will benefit the Harkins family through the month of February. The roast is a Sumatra Natural Wahana and is available at Collective Espresso, Rohs Street CaféBLOC Coffee Company, Hilltop Cafe, Velocity Bike & Bean, Missio Dei Church and Carabello

“I am amazed at how quick the other shop owners have been willing to jump on board with this idea," Carabello says. "Let's face it, we are all using different roasters in our shops, so, doing this is far from normal. But we all love Rhett, and the idea here is a simple one: Our friend is hurt and we want to do something to help him. This is what communities do, and I believe that the silver lining in all of this is that Rhett’s suffering has helped us all take a step toward unifying this community.”   

Through February, you can walk into any of the aforementioned coffee shops and buy a cup or a bag of Restore Coffee to benefit the family. The blend is also available on Carabello Coffee's website


 
 
by Jac Kern 02.19.2014 59 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Culture at 03:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-3

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Miley Cyrus kicked off her Bangerz tour in expected fashion: with a mini-Britney, a gigantic phallic hot dog, the return of the infamous foam finger and Miley entering the stage via a giant Miley head, sliding down a giant Miley tongue. Here’s a look at this recent performance of “Party in the USA,” basically a children’s patriotic school play, if said children drank a bathtub full of molly-laced Kool-Aid first.

Side note: This is what U.S. History class will look like in 2064.


We’re more than halfway through the Olympics and the U.S. is currently in third place for medal standings with 23 medals —the most decorated country at this point.

There have been some ups and downs: Superstars Shaun White and Shani Davis failed to attain medals and other U.S. favorites scored much lower than expected. But history was made with Charlie White and Meryl Davis winning the first U.S. gold in Olympic ice dancing; bobsledder Steven Holcomb again broke a 62-year losing streak for the States (he and Steve Langton won bronze in the two-man race, medaling for the first time since 1952; Holcomb in 2010 also led his four-man sled team to the country’s first medal in that event in 62 years); and the U.S. commanded the podium for men’s ski slopestyle as Americans Joss Christensen, Gus Kenworthy and Nick Goepper took home the gold, silver and bronze, respectively.

The best spectacle came on the ice rink, though. Is that any surprise? With music, dancing and sparkly costumes, the other sports just don’t compete when it comes to entertainment. Retired ice princess Johnny Weir hasn’t missed a step with his flawless looks while providing figure skating commentary for NBC — Gawker has been on Weir Watch, documenting his sassiest ensembles and accessories.

Is anyone else kicking themselves for having just discovered Russian skating god Evgeni Plushenko? The highly decorated figure skater embarked on his fourth Olympics in Sochi this year after undergoing surgery on his spine in early 2013. Plush won Russia’s first gold at the games, competing in two team events before kicking off the figure skating short program. Sadly — and right after NBC aired an amazing reel on Plush and his very interesting history — the skater injured himself during practice, just before he was about to compete. Plush withdrew from the event, retiring from his sport effective immediately.

So this kind of thing happens all the time with athletes who push their bodies to the limit. But Plushenko is more than just a talented skater. He was a presence — with “top three in Russian woman” wife — as this now-viral showcase (aka not a competition) performance proves.

And finally we have The Faces of Figure Skating, which pretty much speaks for itself.

This dude is a dead-ringer for David Wain seeing a pair of boobs for the first time.

You know that Crystal Head vodka that comes in a cool glass skull? Well, fun fact, Dan Aykroyd founded the company, and some scientists created a face based on the “skull’s” dimension. Here’s what it would look like if the Crystal Head was a real guy:

Jimmy Fallon took over The Tonight Show hosting duties Monday and it’s already clear fans of his Late Night jokes, skits and recurring bits can expect just about the same from his new show and time slot. A cavalcade of celebrities welcomed Fallon on Monday, with Lindsay Lohan, Rudy Giuliani, Lady Gaga and other famous New Yorkers paying up as if they lost a bet that he’d never take over Tonight. Fallon’s first guest was Will Smith who, along with Jimmy, schooled us on the Evolution of Hip-Hop Dancing. I also finally discovered that The Roots, when introducing Fallon, aren’t just yelling random numbers (I thought they were area code shout outs?), which became clear when ?uestlove enthusiastically shouted, “One!” at the start of the first show.

Fallon’s gonna kill it. So it’s definitely appropriate that his original Saturday Night Live audition tape is making its rounds. Spoiler Alert: Jimmy is a baby and auditioning for SNL appears to be the most terrifying experience ever.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.19.2014 59 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 12:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_jungle-jims-cooking-school-hands-on-class_photo-provided

Upcoming Dining Events & Cooking Classes

Foodie fun around the Tristate

Here are some upcoming cooking classes and dining events in the Queen City. 

We're now publishing them in the paper and online, so you can see what's happening and have time to register. Cooking classes frequently sell-out, so this list doesn't guarantee space is still open BUT you can see what area institutions are offering. Find a longer list of events and classes hereFoodie fun for everyone!



WEDNESDAY FEB. 19

Oskar Blues Brewing Company Wine Dinner — The Moerlein Lager House hosts a beer dinner with Colorado’s Oskar Blues Brewing Company. Try six beers alongside specially prepared dishes. 6 p.m. 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, The Banks, Downtown, RSVP to privatedining@moerleinLH.com.

 

Cooking with Beer — Chef Ilene Ross and MadTree Brewing Company guide you through cooking with beer. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Mongtomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.

 

WineStation Wednesdays — Eight different premium wines in the wine station are half-off. Complimentary cheese and baguettes included in tasting. 4-7 p.m. Wednesdays. Free. Wine Merchant Cincinnati, 3972 Edwards Road, Hyde Park, 513-731-1515, winemerchantcincinnati.com.

 

How to Properly Cook a Steak — Learn how to cook steak at home with different cooking techniques and temperatures. 6-8 p.m. $70. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

Taste of the World Food Tour — Take a guided foodie tour of Ohio’s oldest public market, Findlay Market. Includes stops and tastings at six specialty merchants. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market at Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodtours.com.

 

THURSDAY FEB. 20

Soup and Sandwich Night — Learn to make warm soup and sandwiches. 6 p.m. $48. The Glendalia Boutique Hotel & Culinary Studio, 11 Village Square, Glendale, theglendalia.com.

 

An Italian Restaurant Meal at Home — Enjoy a taste of Italy you can make at home: Italian cup cocktail, baked ricotta, antipasto crostada, penne with roasted tomato vodka sauce, pancetta-wrapped mustard-rosemary pork and more. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

An Egg Education — Learn the difference between cage-free, organic, free-range and more. Chef Vogel will then demonstrate some basic egg preparations. 6-8 p.m. $60. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

FRIDAY FEB. 21

La Petite France 30th Anniversary Dinner — The restaurant celebrates its third decade in style with a special dinner and wine tasting. Courses will include tarte flambee with mache salad, mushroom soup with truffle oil, cassoulet de Toulouse, lemon taste with creme fraiche, a champagne toast and more. 6:30 p.m. $75. Reservations required. 3177 Glendale-Milford Road, Evendale, 513-733-8383, lapetitefrance.biz.


Yum, BACON! — Chef Jaime will show you some of her favorites: bacon cheddar biscuits with bacon maple jam, cheese-stuffed chicken wrapped in bacon, bacon and mushroom risotto, bacon asparagus tips and bacon popcorn with chocolate drizzle. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $65. Creations Community Cooking Classes, Midwest Culinary Institute, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, 513-569-5800, midwestculinary.com.

 

Bourbon and Bluegrass — Molly Wellmann hosts an evening of Bluegrass music, bourbon tasting, line dancing and culinary delights by Bakersfield OTR and Delish Dish. 8 p.m. $40. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatimemorialhall.com.

 

SATURDAY FEB. 22

Stories from the Street 2.0: Mojo Tago is Back in the Jungle — Brian Reed is the founder, owner and manager of Mojo Tago, one of the first mobile food trucks in Columbus, Ohio. Prepare to be entertained and educated as Brian shares his journey as a food truck owner and operator. On the menu is shredded roasted-chicken tacos, breakfast tacos with chorizo and eggs, a simple queso dip and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

Kids Favorites from Mexico — Kid-friendly Mexican dishes. Class for ages 9 and up. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $45. Creations Community Cooking Classes, Midwest Culinary Institute, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, 513-569-5800, midwestculinary.com.

 

Date Night, Pizza Workshop — Learn to make your own pizza at home. 5-7 p.m. $150 per couple. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474.

 

Cellar Dweller Two Year Anniversary — Celebrate their second birthday with a beer buffet, music by Bibs and Barefeet and dollar-off pints and glasses. 6-11 p.m. Free. Valley Vineyards, 2276 E. US 22 and 3, Morrow, valleyvineyards.com.

 

Beer and Wine Tasting — The Donauschwaben Society presents a tasting with 10 different beers and four wines. Full cash bar, hors d'oeuvres, games and beer barrell raffle. Sausage sandwiches available for purchase. 7-11 p.m. $30. Donauschwaben Haus, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Colerain, cincydonau.com.

 

Chocolate, Champagne and Candlelight — Spend a romantic evening sampling chocolate desserts, champagne, wine and more to benefit the Heritage Village. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $25 members; $45 members couples; $30 or $55 non-members. Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville, heritagevillagecincinnati.org.

 

SUNDAY FEB. 23

Sample Ohio’s Largest King Cake — The Greater Cincinnati Retail Bakers Association will construct, ice and decorate Ohio’s largest King Cake. They start at noon, with cake cutting at 1:30 p.m. Samples while supplies last. Noon-3 p.m. Free. Tri-County Mall, in front of Dillard’s, 11700 Princeton Road, Springdale, tricountymall.com.

 

MONDAY FEB. 24

Brown Dog on a Winter Night — Brown Dog Café’s chef shares his family’s favorite cold weather recipes. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Mongtomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.

 

TUESDAY FEB. 25

Fusion Food in the Vegan Kitchen Book Signing — Meet cookbook author Joni Marie Newman, who will sign copies of her vegan cookbook. She’ll also demonstrate how to make fusion tacos and some sauces. 6-7 p.m. Free. Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, parkandvine.com.

 

All About Risotto — The culinary studio takes the myth out of making risotto. Learn to make Risotto ala Milanese; vegetable risotto; grilled shrimp, bacon and fennel risotto. 6 p.m. $48. The Glendalia Boutique Hotel & Culinary Studio, 11 Village Square, Glendale, theglendalia.com.

 

Chianti with Friends — Terri Berman makes an Italian menu to enjoy with a glass of chianti. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

Pork: Season, Sear & Sauce — Learn how to cook pork three ways. 6-8 p.m. $75. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

WEDNESDAY FEB. 26

Bourbon 101 — Ginny Tonic presents five different bourbons that tell the story of this classic American spirit. The class includes a discussion on the history of bourbon, how it’s made, how to taste it and a look at trends. 6-8 p.m. $30. The Symphony Hotel, 210 W. 14th St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-721-3353, symphonyhotel@gmail.com.


WineStation Wednesdays — Eight different premium wines in the wine station are half-off. Complimentary cheese and baguettes included in tasting. 4-7 p.m. Wednesdays. Free. Wine Merchant Cincinnati, 3972 Edwards Road, Hyde Park, 513-731-1515, winemerchantcincinnati.com.


Cooks’ Wares Creates: Comfort Food — Cooks’ Wares instructors share their favorite comfort food dishes. 6:30-9 p.m. $40. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Montgomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.


Taste of the World Food Tour — Take a guided foodie tour of Ohio’s oldest public market, Findlay Market. Includes stops and tastings at six specialty merchants. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market at Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodtours.com.


Culinary Vacation — Enjoy learning about cuisine from regional America. 5-7 p.m. $12. Manor House Restaurant, 600 Maple Trace Drive, Springdale, 513-782-4300.


Easy, Delicious and Healthy — Learn to create two low-calorie meals full of deep flavors. 6-8 p.m. $65. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.


Seasonal Keg Tapping — The Hofbrauhaus taps their seasonal doppelbock. 7 p.m. Free. 200 E. Third St., Newport, Ky., 859-491-7200, hofbrauhausnewport.com.


 
 
by German Lopez 02.19.2014 59 days ago
Posted In: News, Energy, Health, Pensions at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Local infant deaths remain high, pension fixes proposed, Seitz renews anti-efficiency efforts

Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s infant mortality rates dropped to record lows in 2013, but the city and county’s rates of infant deaths remain far above the national average. Over the past five years, the city’s infant mortality rate hit 12.4 deaths per 1,000 live births and the county’s rate reached 9.9 deaths per 1,000 live births. In comparison, the national average in 2011 was 6.1 deaths per 1,000 live births. Cradle Cincinnati, a collaborative initiative formed in 2013, pointed to three possible factors to explain the troubling rates: short time between pregnancies, maternal smoking during pregnancy and poor sleeping habits, including deaths that could be easily prevented by ensuring a baby sleeps alone, on his or her back and in a crib.

Councilman Christopher Smitherman yesterday proposed fixes for Cincinnati’s ailing pension system, and the proposal includes a hit to city retirees’ benefits. Unique to Smitherman’s plan is a new $100 million commitment to help shore up the city’s unfunded liability of $870 million, but Smitherman could not say where council would get that much money. Otherwise, the proposal would freeze cost of living increases in the system for three years and reduce future cost of living increases from a 3 percent compounded rate to a 2 percent fixed rate, among other changes. Smitherman hopes to get up-or-down votes on his plan within the next two weeks, even if it requires splitting the plan into multiple parts.

State Sen. Bill Seitz plans to renew his efforts in the Ohio legislature to dismantle the state’s renewable energy and efficiency mandates. Seitz says “devastating testimony” in support of his bill should invigorate a push for his plan. But the testimony will apparently be based off a flawed industry-financed report released yesterday. A separate study, based on an economic model from the Ohio State University, found Ohio’s energy standards will save Ohioans $3.65 billion on their electricity bills between 2014 and 2025.

Cincinnati plans to begin marketing an 18-acre plot of land in Lower Price Hill to bring 400 jobs to the struggling neighborhood. After the city finishes environmental remediation this month, it hopes to put the property on the market. CityBeat previously covered some of Lower Price Hill’s struggles with poverty in further detail here.

The gubernatorial race between Republican Gov. John Kasich and Democratic challenger Ed FitzGerald tightened from seven points in November to five points this month, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. But the survey did not include Libertarian candidate Charlie Earl as a choice — an omission that could work to Kasich’s favor in the polling results.

Gay families are being excluded from Obamacare benefits in Ohio and other states in which same-sex marriage is not recognized. That means Ohio’s gay families can’t get financial benefits going to traditional families to help them get covered. President Barack Obama’s administration says it’s aware of the issue, but it doesn’t plan a fix until next year.

Some Ohio lawmakers want an investigation into Kasich’s administration after documents showed his administration planning to work with oil and gas companies to promote fracking in state parks and forests. Fracking is a drilling technique in which millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are pumped underground to unlock oil and gas reserves. CityBeat covered fracking and the controversy surrounding it in further detail here.

Bad news: A Chinese firm won’t bring an $80 million project to the Cincinnati area after all.

An Ohio driver rescued a kitten found frozen on the road.

A parasite commonly found in cats can now be found in arctic beluga whales. Scientists say melting ice barriers — a symptom of climate change — explains the pathogen’s increased migration.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
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Got any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 
by German Lopez 02.18.2014 60 days ago
Posted In: News, Health, Poverty at 12:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
german cute

Local Infant Mortality Rates Still Far Above National Average

Cradle Cincinnati hopes to reduce infant deaths through new initiative

Cincinnati and Hamilton County saw infant mortality rates drop to the lowest on record in 2013, but the city and county’s rates for infant deaths remained far above the national average, according to a report released Tuesday by advocacy group Cradle Cincinnati.

In 2013, the city saw 53 babies die before their first birthday, or 9.9 deaths per 1,000 live births. Throughout the county, the deaths of 95 babies put the rate at 8.9 deaths per 1,000 live births.

But in the past five years, the city’s infant mortality rate hit 12.4 deaths per 1,000 live births and the county’s rate reached 9.9 deaths per 1,000 live births.

Even worse, black families in Hamilton County were twice as likely as white families to have a baby die before his or her first birthday.

In comparison, the national average for infant mortalities was 6.1 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2011.

To help reduce the region’s high infant mortality rates, Cradle Cincinnati points to a few potential targets:

• Short pregnancy spacing, meaning 18 months or fewer between births, can lead to premature birth. It was associated with 33 percent of the county’s infant mortalities last year.

• Maternal smoking during pregnancy can lead to premature birth and birth defects. It was associated with 15 percent of the county’s infant mortalities last year.

• The local rate of sleep-related infant deaths in Hamilton County is triple the national average. Many of these deaths could be prevented by ensuring a baby sleeps alone, on his or her back and in a crib, Cradle Cincinnati found.

Cincinnati’s high rate of infant mortalities are one of the many factors that help explain the city’s disparities in life expectancies, according to Cincinnati Health Department officials.

A CityBeat analysis of U.S. Census Bureau and Cincinnati Health Department data also tied neighborhood life expectancies to income levels. The strong correlation could suggest a connection between poverty and earlier death.

Through the Cradle Cincinnati initiative established last year, local officials hope to put an end to the disturbing trends.

“We are cautiously optimistic that these numbers are going down, but we still have a very long way to go,” said Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune, founder and co-chair of Cradle Cincinnati, in a statement. “We cannot rest until every child born in Hamilton County lives to see his or her first birthday.”

Cradle Cincinnati’s full report:

 
 
by Mike Breen 02.18.2014 60 days ago
Posted In: Music News, Music Video, Local Music at 10:51 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
whifgs

WATCH: The Afghan Whigs’ “Algiers” Video

Cincinnati music greats unveil first single from comeback album, 'Do to the Beast'

One of the Queen City’s greatest musical exports, The Afghan Whigs, have just unveiled the music video for their new single, “Algiers.” The track is taken from the band’s forthcoming Do to the Beast album, the Whigs' first all-new full-length release in 16 years. The album is due for release April 15 on Sub Pop Records, the label that first exposed the band to a worldwide audience in the early ’90s.

During the Whigs’ global reunion tour a couple of years ago, the band released a pair of singles (covers of songs by Frank Ocean and Marie Queenie Lyons), but this is the first new original tune to surface since "Magazine" and "I'm A Soldier,” both recorded for the 2007 Rhino Records retrospective, Unbreakable.


Here is the intense, spaghetti western-inspired video for the new track:

The band previously announced appearances at the Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival on April 11 and April 18. Several other tour dates on the west and east coasts have been announced; click here for the rundown (no Ohio/Midwestern dates yet). 

Pre-orders for the 10-track Do to the Beast are open at iTunes and here directly through Sub Pop. Pre-order the album on iTunes and receive an instant download of “Algiers.” Pre-order the LP on Sub Pop to receive the “Loser Edition” on colored vinyl. 

Whigs frontman Greg Dulli chatted with Entertainment Weekly about the new Whigs' happenings  for an article posted online today. Meanwhile, Rolling Stone has the details on some of the musicians on Beast and why original guitarist Rick McCollum is not on the new album.

 
 
by German Lopez 02.18.2014 60 days ago
Posted In: News, Fracking, Health care, Airport at 10:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news1_fracking

Morning News and Stuff

State plans for fracking in parks, mayor to help Obamacare, airport’s flood levee decertified

Gov. John Kasich’s administration in 2012 privately discussed a public relations campaign to help bring fracking to three state parks. The plan was apparently abandoned. But ProgressOhio, which released documents showing the discussions, says the plan highlights a trend in the Kasich administration of looking out for business interests first. Fracking is a drilling technique in which millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are pumped underground to unlock oil and gas reserves. In the past couple years, the technique has been credited with bringing about a natural gas production boom in much of the United States, including Ohio. But environmentalists worry the poorly regulated practice contaminates air and water. CityBeat covered fracking in greater detail here.

Mayor John Cranley and Enroll America today plan to announce a partnership to get people enrolled in Obamacare. The goal is to fill the insurance pool with healthier, younger enrollees, many of whom qualify for financial assistance through HealthCare.gov, to help keep costs down. CityBeat previously interviewed Trey Daly, Ohio director of Enroll America, about the outreach efforts here.

The two Republicans in charge of City Council’s Budget and Finance Committee want to know why the city decertified a flood levee surrounding Lunken Airport, instead of bringing it up to federal standards, without consulting City Council. The decertification forced property owners around the airport to buy costly flood insurance. City officials say they made the decision because the city did not have the $20-$100 million it would cost to bring the levee up to standards.

The W. Va. chemical spill cost Greater Cincinnati Water Works about $26,000 in treatment chemicals, or about 11 cents per customer.

Getting ex-prisoners enrolled in Medicaid as they are released could save Ohio nearly $18 million this year, according to state officials.

Duke Energy plans to sell 13 power plants, including 11 in Ohio. The company says the move is necessary because of the state’s increasingly unpredictable regulatory environment for electricity generators. Last week, the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio rejected Duke’s request for a $729 million rate increase.

With algorithms now capable of breaking CAPTCHA 90 percent of the time, companies might need to find other anti-spam protections.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
• Main: @CityBeatCincy
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Got any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 
by Kelsey Kennedy 02.17.2014 61 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 01:55 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
daitv

'Downton Abbey' Season Four, Episode Seven

Bringing the latest in uppity British television

Upstairs:

Upstairs is busy with rigidity and drama this week, and it’s about what it’s always about: bribery and corruption.

The big pig debacle is teaching all of the upstairs cast about life and hard work. Mr. Blake and Mr. Gillingham are in the same room with Mary, and things get heated. Mr. Blake finally exits, but not without leaving a trail of sexual tension behind him.

Nobody knows how Robert is “getting on” in America because he is slowly becoming an insignificant character on the show and in the family.

Mr. Blake handles Mary’s child (what’s his name/he’s never around) and Mary is obviously super turned on by that, as told by the widening of her eyes.

Edith and Mary have been rather nice to each other lately, but oh how I miss the rotten cattiness.

Isobel Crawley is encouraging Branson to find socialism again, but he finds Sarah Bunting instead. Bunting, the political teacher with a pretty smile, seems to be a fitting replacement for Sybil. Maybe. As always, I am still grieving over Sybil and Matthew, and it might still be too soon for me. Too. Soon.

Aunt Rosamund, who is usually an ice cold bitch, is keeping Edith’s secret baby a secret. Which is really, really hard for her. Still no word from Michael Gregson, and the Dowager Countess finds out about the secret baby because that woman doesn’t miss a beat. Rosamund reassures Edith with, “You are not happy, but at least free”.

Cousin Rose is caught with Jack Ross in public again, and Branson’s feathers seem ruffled. Remember when Matthew used to swoop in and rescue Rose (and the entire family) from insufferable embarrassment? This time, however, Rose is not just partying and making a fool of herself. She seems to truly enjoy Ross’s company (or at least the thrill of it). When Ross seems weary of the situation, she comforts him by saying, “Isn’t it time people knew there are bigger and better values than the mean spirited ones they live by?” Later, when she finally reveals she is ENGAGED, it seems she only wants to get married to a black guy to piss her mother off.

Downstairs:

Is anyone else getting sick of how bitter Daisy has been over Alfred? Now Alfred wants to marry Ivy, and Mrs. Patmore is tweakin’ about handling this much drama. Ivy is in the exact same situation as Daisy was with William in seasons one & two. Minus World War I and awkward family guilt trips. Mrs. Patmore has become somewhat of a guidance counselor and authority figure for the younger staff, and it’s an enjoyable dynamic. She may pretend to hate it, but on the inside she loves being that maternal figure in Daisy and Ivy’s life. After Daisy says goodbye to Alfred, Mrs. Patmore expresses her pride: “If you were my own daughter, I couldn’t be prouder than I am now.”

Anna finally confesses to Mary that Lord Gillingham’s valet Mr. Green, was her rapist. Lord Mary’s realization gave me chills, mainly because I’m not used to seeing that much of a reaction from her. After some sleuthing, Mr. Bates totally knows Mr. Green was the one who raped his wife, and he plans to do something about it. Mary Convinced Mr. Gillingham to relieve Mr. Green from his duties, but HE’S DEAD AND BATES PROBABLY KILLED HIM.

Mr. Molesley and Miss Baxter share a tender moment about feeling “fragile” and their loyalties to Thomas, the mischievous under butler.

Until next week,

“Life kicks the stuffing outta ya sometimes, doesn’t it?" – Molesley

 
 
by German Lopez 02.17.2014 61 days ago
Posted In: News, Homelessness, Poverty, Taxes, LGBT at 10:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

LGBT groups debate timing, Avondale housing project advancing, Kasich tax cuts favor rich

A coalition between Equality Ohio and other major LGBT groups on Friday officially declared it will not support a 2014 ballot initiative that would legalize same-sex marriage in the state. Instead, the coalition plans to continue education efforts and place the issue on the ballot in 2016. But FreedomOhio, the LGBT group currently leading the 2014 ballot initiative, plans to put the issue on the ballot this year with or without support from other groups. CityBeat covered the issue and conflict in further detail here.

The group heading Commons at Alaska, a permanent supportive housing project in Avondale, plans to hold monthly “good neighbor” meetings to address local concerns about the facility. The first meeting is scheduled at the Church of the Living God, located at 434 Forest Avenue, on Feb. 25 at 6 p.m. Some Avondale residents have lobbied against the facility out of fears it would weaken public safety, but a study of similar facilities in Columbus found areas with permanent supportive housing facilities saw the same or lower crime increases as demographically comparable areas. In January, a supermajority of City Council rejected Councilman Christopher Smitherman’s proposal to rescind the city’s support for the Avondale project.

Gov. John Kasich’s income tax proposal would disproportionately benefit Ohio’s wealthiest, an analysis from Policy Matters Ohio and the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy found. Specifically, the proposal would on average cut taxes by $2 for the bottom 20 percent of Ohioans, $48 for the middle 20 percent and $2,515 for the top 1 percent. The proposal is typical for Ohio Republicans: They regularly push to lower taxes for the wealthy, even though research, including from the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service, finds tax cuts for the wealthy aren’t correlated with higher economic growth.

Local policy explainers from the past week:
What Is Mayor John Cranley’s Parking Plan?
What Is Responsible Bidder?

Mayor John Cranley says he wants Catholic Health Partners to locate its planned headquarters in Bond Hill.

A new Ohio law uncovered more than 250 high-volume dog breeders that previously went unregulated in the state. The new regulations aim to weed out bad, unsafe environments for high-volume dog breeding, but some animal advocates argue the rules don’t go far enough. CityBeat covered the new law in further detail here.

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald could face a longshot primary challenger in May. But the challenger, Larry Ealy of the Dayton area, still needs his signatures confirmed by the secretary of state to officially get on the ballot.

Former Gov. Ted Strickland could run against U.S. Sen. Rob Portman in 2016, according to The Plain Dealer. Strickland cautioned it’s not an official announcement, but it’s not something he’s ruled out, either.

A bill that would make the Ohio Board of Education an all-elected body appears to have died in the Ohio legislature. Currently, the governor appoints nearly half of the board’s members. Some legislators argue the governor’s appointments make the body too political.

Science says white noise can help some people sleep.

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