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by Rick Pender 02.21.2014 62 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 2-21 - cynthea mercado as scheherazade in arabian nights @ nku - photo provided by northern kentucky university14an press photo 3 copy

Stage Door: Options Abound

I’m not making up a story when I suggest you could be charmed by Mary Zimmerman’s Arabian Nights at Northern Kentucky University. After all, her play is about telling tales: Scheherazade, the latest bride of a cruel king who has a history of marrying and executing his wives, survives by stringing him along with stories she promises to finish the next night — for a “Thousand and One Nights.” (Read my profile of Mary Zimmerman here.) She plies him with tales of Sinbad and Ali Baba. Audiences at NKU will likely be strung along, too. Senior Cynthea Mercado plays Scheherazade, whose life, she says, “is threatened with the reality of her situation, and yet she is still able to enjoy her own tales and sometimes get lost in them.” No need to get lost. Find your way to Highland Heights and NKU’s Corbett Theatre for this production, through March 2. Tickets: 859-572-5464.

If a classic musical is to your taste, you might try Andrew Lloyd Webber’s epic musical Evita, in a touring production at the Aronoff Center through March 2. I caught a performance last evening, and it looks great — some epic scenery and excellent choreography. Josh Young as Che is charismatic and strong-voiced in his role as the show’s commentator. Unfortunately, Caroline Bowman’s Eva Perón gets too shrill way too fast and becomes a grasping harpy before there’s a chance to be won over by her Machiavellian charms. As Juan Peron, Sean MacLaughlin looks young and slimy, without the sinister gravitas that the historical figure possessed. That doesn’t leave much opportunity to convey the complex chemistry — passion and manipulation — that bonded them as a political machine. But the tale of the ambitious young woman who rose to the highest levels of power in Argentina then crashed and burned is a memorable modern tragedy, and the show’s rock-opera tunes by Andrew Lloyd Webber will stick in your head. Tickets: 513-621-ARTS.

Cincinnati Shakespeare is keeping the cast of its recent production of Shakespeare’s Hamlet intact with its current production of Tom Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. This time around, it’s the story of Hamlet’s college buddies Rosencrantz and Guildenstern, who move from Shakespeare’s sidelines to Stoppard’s center stage. In this classic 1967 script, the pawns become the central characters, while Prince Hamlet, Queen Gertrude, King Claudius, Ophelia and others wander by. The classic tragedy is turned on its head, and it becomes an existential tragedy for two guys who everyone has a hard time telling apart. Through March 9. Tickets: 513-381-2273.

The Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park’s production of Amy Herzog’s Pulitzer Prize finalist script, 4000 Miles, is onstage at the Shelterhouse Theatre. It’s about a 91-year-old grandmother and her 21-year-old grandson bridging a giant generation gap and finding that they actually have a lot in common. Through March 9. Tickets: 513-421-3888. 

It’s the final weekend for several shows that have been pleasing audiences. Nina Raine’s Tribes at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati was originally scheduled to close last Sunday, but to meet ticket demand for the show about coping with deafness — and contentious families — ETC added performances through Saturday. (CityBeat review here.) Tickets: 513-421-3555. … A block away at Know Theatre, the off-kilter script by Steve Yockey, Pluto, winds up on Saturday, too. It’s about dealing with tragedy and grief, told in an inventive, sometimes even humorous, manner. Two of Cincinnati’s finest actors — Annie Fitzpatrick and Tori Wiggins — are in this one, making it very watchable. (CityBeat review here.) Tickets: 513-300-5669 … For the younger set, this weekend offers the final public performance, Saturday at 2 p.m., of Children’s Theatre’s Pinkalicious at the Taft. It’s the story of a girl who can’s stop eating pink cupcakes. Tickets: 800-745-3000.

And here’s a tip for Monday evening: Dayton native Daniel Beaty, who pleased a lot of Playhouse patrons last season with his tour-de-force one-man show, Through the Night, will be in town for a one-night performance to promote his new book, Transforming Pain to Power. His performance (6:30 p.m. in the Marx Theatre) and the book signing afterward in the Rosenthal Plaza) are free, but you need to make a reservation with the Playhouse box office: 513-421-3888.

 
 
by Mike Breen 02.21.2014 62 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Festivals at 07:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Bunbury Music Festival Makes Lineup Announcement

Flaming Lips, Foxy Shazam and more announced for Cincinnati music fest this summer

Last night, music fans at venues in four cities around the region (Newport, Columbus, Indianapolis and Lexington) got a sneak peek at some of the artists slated to appear at this year’s Bunbury Music Festival, which returns to Cincinnati’s riverfront parks July 11-13. 

Last night, fans at the launch events tweeted out some of the lineup as it was announced (and some smart ass started a fast-spreading rumor that Vampire Weekend was playing; they are not). This morning, the lineup was released to the general public. It was previously announced that Fall Out Boy, Paramore and New Politics would be bringing their summer tour to Bunbury; those groups are scheduled to play the fest on July 12. 


Here are the local and national artists that will be joining them at Bunbury’s third annual event (an additional headliner will be announced soon):


The Flaming Lips

Young the Giant

Fitz and the Tantrums

Veruca Salt

ZZ Ward

Holy Ghost!

Cults

Heartless Bastards

Foxy Shazam

Andrew W.K. 

Robert DeLong 

Caspian

Mystery Skulls

Wild Cub

Morning Parade

Kishi Bashi

Bear Hands

The Orwells

Red Wanting Blue

Snowmine

Saintseneca

The Lighthouse and the Whaler

Hundred Waters

Fly Golden Eagle

Meg Myers

The Pass

Jesse Thomas

Jane Decker

Lamps and Voids

The Monument

Family and Friends

James Gilmore

psychodots

Molly Sullivan

Goldwing

Kelly Thomas

Motherfolk

Let It Happen

Black Owls

Kopecky Family Band

Syd Arthur

Bad Suns

G.Miles and the Hitmen

Brent James & the Vintage Youth

The Fanged Robot

Marc Scibilia 

The Upset Victory

Royal Teeth

The Bonesetters

J. Roddy Walston & The Business

Clairaudients

Pluto Revolts

X Ambassadors 

Lily & Madeleine

Brick + Mortar

The Yugos

Modoc

The Ceremonies

Kim Taylor

Young Heirlooms

Hunter Hunted

Miner

Yellow Paper Planes

The Easthills

Night Riots

Big Fresh

Lydia Loveless

Austin Livingood

Aaron Lee Tasjan

Eva Ross

Russell Howard

Here Among the Mountains

Crass Mammoth

Bronze Radio Return

Daniel in Stereo


Today is the last day to buy Bunbury tickets at their current rate; the prices increase at midnight. Right now, $130 gets you a three-day pass ($325 if you’d like the VIP experience) and one-day tickets are $55. 

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.20.2014 62 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 03:21 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ryan talking at table

Ryan Santos of Please to Speak at Next Creative Mornings

Santos discusses the topic of rebellion at the free monthly breakfast lecture series

CreativeMornings, the free monthly breakfast lecture series, offers cities around the world a chance to celebrate their local creative communities and create a space for like-minded individuals to gather and discuss — and have breakfast. CreativeMornings/Cincinnati is one of more than 68 chapters, spread across the globe.


"Every month, we’re challenged to pick a speaker that can address our global theme," CreativeMornings/Cincinnati organizer Jeremy Thobe says via email. "We have a wonderful team of volunteers that are always keeping an eye out for our next speaker, and since we're inherently community driven, we often get suggestions from our friends, colleagues and attendees. Our events are for people like us, so we start by looking for people we find really interesting and build our list from there. We have so many talented people in our community and there’s never a shortage of people we’d love to hear from."

Their next event on Friday, Feb. 28, will feature Ryan Santos of Please. "Those familiar with Ryan know him from Please and his pop-up dinners, which have been a huge success in Cincinnati. But this month, we'll get more of a behind-the-scenes story," Thobe says. "I don’t want to give too much away, but attendees will get to hear the path Ryan has taken to be where he is today and how he challenges himself to stay successful and stay hungry for the future."

The theme for Friday's lecture — the organization's 12th — is "rebel." All CreativeMornings events are free and open to the public and include coffee and breakfast from sponsors. Speakers present for 20 minutes, after which the floor is opened for questions. Past speakers have included Todd Henry of Accidental Creative, Santa Ono from the University of Cincinnati, Chris Glass of Wire & Twine and, most recently, Tommy Rueff of Happen Inc. Each event is filmed, so if there's an event you want to make but can't, you can see past presentations on creativemornings.com

Feb. 28th's event will be held from 8:30-10 a.m. at POSSIBLE, 302 W. Third St., Suite 900, Downtown. Registration opens Monday, Feb. 24, at 11 a.m. Learn more at creativemornings.com/talks/ryan-santos. And read CityBeat's June 2013 profile of Santos here.


 
 
by German Lopez 02.20.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: News, Economy at 11:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
income inequality

Income Inequality Rises in Ohio

Ohio fares better than other states, national average

Income inequality vastly grew in Ohio and other states between 1979 and 2011, but Ohio actually fared better than most other states, according to a Feb. 19 report from the Economic Policy Institute and the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN).

Ohio’s top 1 percent saw their inflation-adjusted income grow by roughly 70 percent between 1979 and 2011, according to Policy Matters Ohio’s analysis of the report. During the same time period, the bottom 99 percent actually saw their income drop by nearly 8 percent.

Still, Ohio’s income gap isn’t as bad as states like New York and Connecticut, where the top 1 percent make roughly 40 times as much as the bottom 99 percent.

In Ohio, the top 1 percent’s average income in 2011 was 18.1 times greater than the 99 percent’s average income, below the U.S. average of 24.4.

The findings show a trend reversal in incomes in Ohio and the rest of the nation. Between the late 1920s and mid-1970s, the income gap generally narrowed. It wasn’t until the 1970s that the wealthiest began outpacing the rest of the country.

“The levels of inequality we are seeing across the country provide more proof that the economy is not working for the vast majority of Americans and has not for decades,” Keystone Research Center economist Mark Price said in a statement. “It is unconscionable that most of America’s families have shared in so little of the country’s prosperity over the last several decades.”

Economists on both sides of the political spectrum blame various issues for rising income inequality, including the rise of globalization, poorly structured trade treaties, the loss of manufacturing jobs, the inflation-adjusted fall of the minimum wage, the United States’ weak social safety net and the stagnant economy.

In Cincinnati, the effects of income inequality are felt on a neighborhood level. While some local neighborhoods fall below a median family income of $20,000 per year, various neighborhoods’ median family incomes top $100,000 per year.

The massive income gap correlates with the city’s 20-year disparity in neighborhood life expectancies. In impoverished neighborhoods like Lower Price Hill, residents can expect to live to their mid-60s. In wealthy neighborhoods like Mount Adams, the average life expectancy is in the mid-80s.

Given the results, some advocates say its time to adopt a new nationwide approach to the economy.

“It’s clear that policies were set to favor the one percent and those policies can, and should, be changed,” EARN Director Doug Hall said in a statement. “In order to have widespread income growth, bold policies need to be enacted to increase the minimum wage, create low levels of unemployment, and strengthen the rights of workers to organize.”

 
 
by Nick Grever 02.20.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: Music News, Live Music at 10:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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'McClainica' to Benefit Family of Late Local Musician

The Greater Cincinnati Punk Rock scene gathers for a memorial/benefit in honor of Dave McClain

In November 2013, Cincinnati’s Punk Rock scene lost one of their own when Dave McClain, a former member of several local outfits (including Martin Luther and the Kings and The Zvills), passed away. On that November night, a wife lost her husband, children lost their father and an entire music scene lost a brother. So they've rallied to raise money the best way they know how — by putting together an amazing live music and art event to honor McClain’s memory.

On Friday night, Cincy punks will take over Newport's Southgate House Revival for McClainica, a one night celebration of McClain’s life and legacy, as well as a fundraiser for McClain’s wife and children. Cincinnati Punk Rock has stepped up to stuff the lineup with performances by Martin Luther and the Kings, The Zvills, Rev. Fear and the Nightmares, The Nothing and Total Dudes. Many of McClain’s friends and former bandmates will be on the stage to honor his memory, making for performances that are sure to be intense and memorable.

McClain was known for having a big heart and several local artists have responded in kind. The show will also feature a silent art auction with work of all mediums and the offerings are more than just fine art. If you’ve ever been in the market for a Punk Rock quilt for example, McClainica will have one up for grabs. (Here are some samples of the artwork that will be available at the show.)

McClain’s loss affected many people; he was loved by all those who knew him. But with this show, his friends and family are trying to preserve McClain’s memory and celebrate his life. And they’d like to share that with all who attend.

All proceeds from the show and art auction will go straight to McClain’s family, so the art and music will come with a side of warm and fuzzies. The show starts at 9 p.m. and tickets are $10.


 
 
by German Lopez 02.20.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: News, Parking, Economy, Voting at 10:02 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news parking

Morning News and Stuff

Parking debate continues, mayors work to bring manufacturing, voting bills pass legislature

City Council watered down Mayor John Cranley’s parking plan to just two proposals: upgrading parking meters and increased enforcement. Council and public opposition ultimately proved too much for increasing neighborhood rates and expanded evening hours at major hubs. The changes mean less revenue for the city but reduced parking costs for residents. Still, with the parking plan changing almost daily, it’s unclear whether the current iteration will be the final proposal that the Neighborhood Committee and City Council ultimately pass.

Compare: Cranley’s original parking plan versus the parking privatization plan.

Meanwhile, Xerox, the private operator that took over Cincinnati’s parking meters in the parking privatization plan, proposed its own version of a parking plan in which the company manages parking meters while City Council retains control over setting hours, rates and enforcement. Xerox says its plan will generate more revenue. But Cranley rejected Xerox’s plan weeks ago.

Commentary: “County Should Accept Responsible Bidder Law.”

Cranley yesterday announced he’s partnering with Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley to get a share of $1.3 billion in federal funds that would help attract manufacturing. The two cities will compete as one community for the federal Investing in Manufacturing Communities Partnership. The competition’s 12 winners will each receive part of the $1.3 billion pot. Even if Cincinnati and Dayton don’t win, Cranley said the competition will at least get them thinking about working together as a community for manufacturing jobs.

The Republican-controlled Ohio legislature yesterday approved controversial election bills that reduce the state’s early voting period by one week and restrict counties’ abilities to mail out unsolicited absentee ballot applications. Democrats say the measures are meant to suppress voters, but Republicans argue the changes are supposed to set uniform standards across the state. At least one top Ohio Republican previously admitted the measures were supposed to suppress voters, particularly “the urban — read African-American — voter-turnout machine.” Gov. John Kasich is now the only person that stands between the bill becoming law.

The city plans to undertake a pothole-fixing blitz in March.

The Greater Cincinnati Port Authority will begin its 14-neighborhood rehabilitation plan in Evanston, where the agency will target about 100 properties.

With a “virtual online menu” and access to vocational education in the seventh grade, Gov. Kasich says he wants to get Ohio students planning their careers much earlier.

The Ohio House approved a plan that will give schools four more calamity days — more popularly known as “snow days” — for the current school year. The bill now heads to the Ohio Senate and Kasich.

U.S. Sen Sherrod Brown wants to close a loophole in Medicare that costs seniors thousands of dollars in unexpected medical bills.

Quinnipiac University’s most recent poll found Ohioans would choose Hillary Clinton over Kasich and other Republicans for president.

Whooping cough appears to be evolving in response to its vaccine.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
• Main: @CityBeatCincy
• News: @CityBeat_News
• Music: @CityBeatMusic
• German Lopez: @germanrlopez

Got any news tips? Email them to glopez@citybeat.com.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.19.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: Events, News, fundraising at 03:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
harkins_family

Coffee Scene Unites to Help Injured Barista

Coffee scene continues to raise funds for friend/Red River Gorge fall survivor

In January, Deeper Roots Coffee Roasters held a fundraising event for BLOC Coffee Company manager Rhett Harkins, who fell 60 feet while hiking in Red River Gorge in December. It took 20 men and eight hours to get Harkins out alive. He has since undergone multiple surgeries and is recovering well, but he can't work and his medical bills are mounting. Which is why Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky's speciality coffee shops are rallying around Harkins to raise money to offset his medical costs. 

Deeper Roots' December Latte Art Throwdown fundraiser pulled together 16 baristi from 16 different shops in Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus and Northern Kentucky. Harkins judged the event, which raised $1,700 to help cover the costs of his ambulance transportation, from his wheelchair.

Now, Justin Carabello, owner of Carabello Coffee of Newport, Ky., has coordinated an effort with six local shops to serve and sell a special roast called “Restore Coffee” that will benefit the Harkins family through the month of February. The roast is a Sumatra Natural Wahana and is available at Collective Espresso, Rohs Street CaféBLOC Coffee Company, Hilltop Cafe, Velocity Bike & Bean, Missio Dei Church and Carabello

“I am amazed at how quick the other shop owners have been willing to jump on board with this idea," Carabello says. "Let's face it, we are all using different roasters in our shops, so, doing this is far from normal. But we all love Rhett, and the idea here is a simple one: Our friend is hurt and we want to do something to help him. This is what communities do, and I believe that the silver lining in all of this is that Rhett’s suffering has helped us all take a step toward unifying this community.”   

Through February, you can walk into any of the aforementioned coffee shops and buy a cup or a bag of Restore Coffee to benefit the family. The blend is also available on Carabello Coffee's website


 
 
by Jac Kern 02.19.2014 63 days ago
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Culture at 03:18 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
web-blog-ijustcantgetenough-3

I Just Can't Get Enough

Jac's roundup of pop culture news and Internet findings

Miley Cyrus kicked off her Bangerz tour in expected fashion: with a mini-Britney, a gigantic phallic hot dog, the return of the infamous foam finger and Miley entering the stage via a giant Miley head, sliding down a giant Miley tongue. Here’s a look at this recent performance of “Party in the USA,” basically a children’s patriotic school play, if said children drank a bathtub full of molly-laced Kool-Aid first.

Side note: This is what U.S. History class will look like in 2064.


We’re more than halfway through the Olympics and the U.S. is currently in third place for medal standings with 23 medals —the most decorated country at this point.

There have been some ups and downs: Superstars Shaun White and Shani Davis failed to attain medals and other U.S. favorites scored much lower than expected. But history was made with Charlie White and Meryl Davis winning the first U.S. gold in Olympic ice dancing; bobsledder Steven Holcomb again broke a 62-year losing streak for the States (he and Steve Langton won bronze in the two-man race, medaling for the first time since 1952; Holcomb in 2010 also led his four-man sled team to the country’s first medal in that event in 62 years); and the U.S. commanded the podium for men’s ski slopestyle as Americans Joss Christensen, Gus Kenworthy and Nick Goepper took home the gold, silver and bronze, respectively.

The best spectacle came on the ice rink, though. Is that any surprise? With music, dancing and sparkly costumes, the other sports just don’t compete when it comes to entertainment. Retired ice princess Johnny Weir hasn’t missed a step with his flawless looks while providing figure skating commentary for NBC — Gawker has been on Weir Watch, documenting his sassiest ensembles and accessories.

Is anyone else kicking themselves for having just discovered Russian skating god Evgeni Plushenko? The highly decorated figure skater embarked on his fourth Olympics in Sochi this year after undergoing surgery on his spine in early 2013. Plush won Russia’s first gold at the games, competing in two team events before kicking off the figure skating short program. Sadly — and right after NBC aired an amazing reel on Plush and his very interesting history — the skater injured himself during practice, just before he was about to compete. Plush withdrew from the event, retiring from his sport effective immediately.

So this kind of thing happens all the time with athletes who push their bodies to the limit. But Plushenko is more than just a talented skater. He was a presence — with “top three in Russian woman” wife — as this now-viral showcase (aka not a competition) performance proves.

And finally we have The Faces of Figure Skating, which pretty much speaks for itself.

This dude is a dead-ringer for David Wain seeing a pair of boobs for the first time.

You know that Crystal Head vodka that comes in a cool glass skull? Well, fun fact, Dan Aykroyd founded the company, and some scientists created a face based on the “skull’s” dimension. Here’s what it would look like if the Crystal Head was a real guy:

Jimmy Fallon took over The Tonight Show hosting duties Monday and it’s already clear fans of his Late Night jokes, skits and recurring bits can expect just about the same from his new show and time slot. A cavalcade of celebrities welcomed Fallon on Monday, with Lindsay Lohan, Rudy Giuliani, Lady Gaga and other famous New Yorkers paying up as if they lost a bet that he’d never take over Tonight. Fallon’s first guest was Will Smith who, along with Jimmy, schooled us on the Evolution of Hip-Hop Dancing. I also finally discovered that The Roots, when introducing Fallon, aren’t just yelling random numbers (I thought they were area code shout outs?), which became clear when ?uestlove enthusiastically shouted, “One!” at the start of the first show.

Fallon’s gonna kill it. So it’s definitely appropriate that his original Saturday Night Live audition tape is making its rounds. Spoiler Alert: Jimmy is a baby and auditioning for SNL appears to be the most terrifying experience ever.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.19.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Events at 12:05 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Upcoming Dining Events & Cooking Classes

Foodie fun around the Tristate

Here are some upcoming cooking classes and dining events in the Queen City. 

We're now publishing them in the paper and online, so you can see what's happening and have time to register. Cooking classes frequently sell-out, so this list doesn't guarantee space is still open BUT you can see what area institutions are offering. Find a longer list of events and classes hereFoodie fun for everyone!



WEDNESDAY FEB. 19

Oskar Blues Brewing Company Wine Dinner — The Moerlein Lager House hosts a beer dinner with Colorado’s Oskar Blues Brewing Company. Try six beers alongside specially prepared dishes. 6 p.m. 115 Joe Nuxhall Way, The Banks, Downtown, RSVP to privatedining@moerleinLH.com.

 

Cooking with Beer — Chef Ilene Ross and MadTree Brewing Company guide you through cooking with beer. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Mongtomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.

 

WineStation Wednesdays — Eight different premium wines in the wine station are half-off. Complimentary cheese and baguettes included in tasting. 4-7 p.m. Wednesdays. Free. Wine Merchant Cincinnati, 3972 Edwards Road, Hyde Park, 513-731-1515, winemerchantcincinnati.com.

 

How to Properly Cook a Steak — Learn how to cook steak at home with different cooking techniques and temperatures. 6-8 p.m. $70. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

Taste of the World Food Tour — Take a guided foodie tour of Ohio’s oldest public market, Findlay Market. Includes stops and tastings at six specialty merchants. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market at Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodtours.com.

 

THURSDAY FEB. 20

Soup and Sandwich Night — Learn to make warm soup and sandwiches. 6 p.m. $48. The Glendalia Boutique Hotel & Culinary Studio, 11 Village Square, Glendale, theglendalia.com.

 

An Italian Restaurant Meal at Home — Enjoy a taste of Italy you can make at home: Italian cup cocktail, baked ricotta, antipasto crostada, penne with roasted tomato vodka sauce, pancetta-wrapped mustard-rosemary pork and more. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

An Egg Education — Learn the difference between cage-free, organic, free-range and more. Chef Vogel will then demonstrate some basic egg preparations. 6-8 p.m. $60. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

FRIDAY FEB. 21

La Petite France 30th Anniversary Dinner — The restaurant celebrates its third decade in style with a special dinner and wine tasting. Courses will include tarte flambee with mache salad, mushroom soup with truffle oil, cassoulet de Toulouse, lemon taste with creme fraiche, a champagne toast and more. 6:30 p.m. $75. Reservations required. 3177 Glendale-Milford Road, Evendale, 513-733-8383, lapetitefrance.biz.


Yum, BACON! — Chef Jaime will show you some of her favorites: bacon cheddar biscuits with bacon maple jam, cheese-stuffed chicken wrapped in bacon, bacon and mushroom risotto, bacon asparagus tips and bacon popcorn with chocolate drizzle. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $65. Creations Community Cooking Classes, Midwest Culinary Institute, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, 513-569-5800, midwestculinary.com.

 

Bourbon and Bluegrass — Molly Wellmann hosts an evening of Bluegrass music, bourbon tasting, line dancing and culinary delights by Bakersfield OTR and Delish Dish. 8 p.m. $40. Memorial Hall, 1225 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatimemorialhall.com.

 

SATURDAY FEB. 22

Stories from the Street 2.0: Mojo Tago is Back in the Jungle — Brian Reed is the founder, owner and manager of Mojo Tago, one of the first mobile food trucks in Columbus, Ohio. Prepare to be entertained and educated as Brian shares his journey as a food truck owner and operator. On the menu is shredded roasted-chicken tacos, breakfast tacos with chorizo and eggs, a simple queso dip and more. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

Kids Favorites from Mexico — Kid-friendly Mexican dishes. Class for ages 9 and up. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $45. Creations Community Cooking Classes, Midwest Culinary Institute, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, 513-569-5800, midwestculinary.com.

 

Date Night, Pizza Workshop — Learn to make your own pizza at home. 5-7 p.m. $150 per couple. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474.

 

Cellar Dweller Two Year Anniversary — Celebrate their second birthday with a beer buffet, music by Bibs and Barefeet and dollar-off pints and glasses. 6-11 p.m. Free. Valley Vineyards, 2276 E. US 22 and 3, Morrow, valleyvineyards.com.

 

Beer and Wine Tasting — The Donauschwaben Society presents a tasting with 10 different beers and four wines. Full cash bar, hors d'oeuvres, games and beer barrell raffle. Sausage sandwiches available for purchase. 7-11 p.m. $30. Donauschwaben Haus, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Colerain, cincydonau.com.

 

Chocolate, Champagne and Candlelight — Spend a romantic evening sampling chocolate desserts, champagne, wine and more to benefit the Heritage Village. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $25 members; $45 members couples; $30 or $55 non-members. Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Sharonville, heritagevillagecincinnati.org.

 

SUNDAY FEB. 23

Sample Ohio’s Largest King Cake — The Greater Cincinnati Retail Bakers Association will construct, ice and decorate Ohio’s largest King Cake. They start at noon, with cake cutting at 1:30 p.m. Samples while supplies last. Noon-3 p.m. Free. Tri-County Mall, in front of Dillard’s, 11700 Princeton Road, Springdale, tricountymall.com.

 

MONDAY FEB. 24

Brown Dog on a Winter Night — Brown Dog Café’s chef shares his family’s favorite cold weather recipes. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Mongtomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.

 

TUESDAY FEB. 25

Fusion Food in the Vegan Kitchen Book Signing — Meet cookbook author Joni Marie Newman, who will sign copies of her vegan cookbook. She’ll also demonstrate how to make fusion tacos and some sauces. 6-7 p.m. Free. Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, parkandvine.com.

 

All About Risotto — The culinary studio takes the myth out of making risotto. Learn to make Risotto ala Milanese; vegetable risotto; grilled shrimp, bacon and fennel risotto. 6 p.m. $48. The Glendalia Boutique Hotel & Culinary Studio, 11 Village Square, Glendale, theglendalia.com.

 

Chianti with Friends — Terri Berman makes an Italian menu to enjoy with a glass of chianti. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s Cooking School, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, 513-674-6059, junglejims.com.

 

Pork: Season, Sear & Sauce — Learn how to cook pork three ways. 6-8 p.m. $75. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.

 

WEDNESDAY FEB. 26

Bourbon 101 — Ginny Tonic presents five different bourbons that tell the story of this classic American spirit. The class includes a discussion on the history of bourbon, how it’s made, how to taste it and a look at trends. 6-8 p.m. $30. The Symphony Hotel, 210 W. 14th St., Over-the-Rhine, 513-721-3353, symphonyhotel@gmail.com.


WineStation Wednesdays — Eight different premium wines in the wine station are half-off. Complimentary cheese and baguettes included in tasting. 4-7 p.m. Wednesdays. Free. Wine Merchant Cincinnati, 3972 Edwards Road, Hyde Park, 513-731-1515, winemerchantcincinnati.com.


Cooks’ Wares Creates: Comfort Food — Cooks’ Wares instructors share their favorite comfort food dishes. 6:30-9 p.m. $40. Cooks’ Wares, The Shops at Harper’s Point, 11344 Montgomery Road, Montgomery, 513-489-6400, cookswaresonline.com.


Taste of the World Food Tour — Take a guided foodie tour of Ohio’s oldest public market, Findlay Market. Includes stops and tastings at six specialty merchants. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market at Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodtours.com.


Culinary Vacation — Enjoy learning about cuisine from regional America. 5-7 p.m. $12. Manor House Restaurant, 600 Maple Trace Drive, Springdale, 513-782-4300.


Easy, Delicious and Healthy — Learn to create two low-calorie meals full of deep flavors. 6-8 p.m. $65. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, 513-847-4474, thelearningkitchen.com.


Seasonal Keg Tapping — The Hofbrauhaus taps their seasonal doppelbock. 7 p.m. Free. 200 E. Third St., Newport, Ky., 859-491-7200, hofbrauhausnewport.com.


 
 
by German Lopez 02.19.2014 64 days ago
Posted In: News, Energy, Health, Pensions at 09:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
city hall

Morning News and Stuff

Local infant deaths remain high, pension fixes proposed, Seitz renews anti-efficiency efforts

Cincinnati and Hamilton County’s infant mortality rates dropped to record lows in 2013, but the city and county’s rates of infant deaths remain far above the national average. Over the past five years, the city’s infant mortality rate hit 12.4 deaths per 1,000 live births and the county’s rate reached 9.9 deaths per 1,000 live births. In comparison, the national average in 2011 was 6.1 deaths per 1,000 live births. Cradle Cincinnati, a collaborative initiative formed in 2013, pointed to three possible factors to explain the troubling rates: short time between pregnancies, maternal smoking during pregnancy and poor sleeping habits, including deaths that could be easily prevented by ensuring a baby sleeps alone, on his or her back and in a crib.

Councilman Christopher Smitherman yesterday proposed fixes for Cincinnati’s ailing pension system, and the proposal includes a hit to city retirees’ benefits. Unique to Smitherman’s plan is a new $100 million commitment to help shore up the city’s unfunded liability of $870 million, but Smitherman could not say where council would get that much money. Otherwise, the proposal would freeze cost of living increases in the system for three years and reduce future cost of living increases from a 3 percent compounded rate to a 2 percent fixed rate, among other changes. Smitherman hopes to get up-or-down votes on his plan within the next two weeks, even if it requires splitting the plan into multiple parts.

State Sen. Bill Seitz plans to renew his efforts in the Ohio legislature to dismantle the state’s renewable energy and efficiency mandates. Seitz says “devastating testimony” in support of his bill should invigorate a push for his plan. But the testimony will apparently be based off a flawed industry-financed report released yesterday. A separate study, based on an economic model from the Ohio State University, found Ohio’s energy standards will save Ohioans $3.65 billion on their electricity bills between 2014 and 2025.

Cincinnati plans to begin marketing an 18-acre plot of land in Lower Price Hill to bring 400 jobs to the struggling neighborhood. After the city finishes environmental remediation this month, it hopes to put the property on the market. CityBeat previously covered some of Lower Price Hill’s struggles with poverty in further detail here.

The gubernatorial race between Republican Gov. John Kasich and Democratic challenger Ed FitzGerald tightened from seven points in November to five points this month, according to a new Quinnipiac University poll. But the survey did not include Libertarian candidate Charlie Earl as a choice — an omission that could work to Kasich’s favor in the polling results.

Gay families are being excluded from Obamacare benefits in Ohio and other states in which same-sex marriage is not recognized. That means Ohio’s gay families can’t get financial benefits going to traditional families to help them get covered. President Barack Obama’s administration says it’s aware of the issue, but it doesn’t plan a fix until next year.

Some Ohio lawmakers want an investigation into Kasich’s administration after documents showed his administration planning to work with oil and gas companies to promote fracking in state parks and forests. Fracking is a drilling technique in which millions of gallons of water, sand and chemicals are pumped underground to unlock oil and gas reserves. CityBeat covered fracking and the controversy surrounding it in further detail here.

Bad news: A Chinese firm won’t bring an $80 million project to the Cincinnati area after all.

An Ohio driver rescued a kitten found frozen on the road.

A parasite commonly found in cats can now be found in arctic beluga whales. Scientists say melting ice barriers — a symptom of climate change — explains the pathogen’s increased migration.

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