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The Morning After
 
by Eli Johnson 12.09.2011
at 04:02 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
american-psycho-christian-bale

Music, Movies and the Not So Mundane

David Fincher’s protégé Noble Jones is working on a low-budget remake of American Psycho. Originally a novel by Bret Easton Ellis (Rules of Attraction), American Psycho tells the tale of a yuppie serial killer by the name of Patrick Bateman running amok in the streets of New York City. The 2000 release, directed by Mary Harron, starred an excellent Christian Bale. Jones hopes to strip down the original to a more raw film, updating the scenery so to see how Bateman would fare in a modernized New York.

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by Eli Johnson 12.16.2011
at 03:47 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
christian-bale-being-roughed-up-when-attempting-visit-blind-chinese-activist

Music, Movies and the Not So Mundane

Christian Bale was attacked by Chinese police while trying to visit blind lawyer and activist Chen Guangcheng, who has been living under house arrest since his release from prison last year. Footage shot by CNN, which was invited on the journey by Bale, shows police telling Bale to leave and trying to grab the video camera he was carrying. When Bale said, “But I’m the goddamn Batman,” he was roughed up a bit.

Bale was in Beijing to promote his new partially state-funded movie, The Flowers of War. Oops. "What I really wanted to do was to meet the man, shake his hand and say what an inspiration he is," Bale said.

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by Andy Brownfield 11.07.2012
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 01:27 PM | Permalink | Comments (10)
 
 
willie

Don't Quit, Willie!

Bill Cunningham to seek advice on retirement because of Obama re-election

Voice of the common man, conscience of the American people, shepherd of men and 700WLW staple Bill Cunningham made an impassioned plea to his radio audience Nov. 2, saying if Mitt Romney lost the election, he would end his 30-plus year career in radio.

“For nearly 30 years I’ve been the voice of the common man and conscience of the American people. I have led you and you’ve allowed me to lead you through thick and thin, through good times and bad, through recessions, depressions, wars, feasts and famines, through hurricanes, tornadoes and more,” Cunningham said.

“If Mitt Romney does not win the election, I, Bill Cunningham, your shepherd, will quit radio on Wednesday Nov. 7. I’ll give it up. Continue my great television career and practicing law, but if my credibility means anything between you and me it means that you will listen to what I have to say.”

Now, in the morning after, a time when we ourselves have often felt that “oh God, what have I done” feeling, we at CityBeat want to make our own impassioned plea: Don’t quit, Willie. Cincinnati needs you.

You’ve always been a source of inspiration and wisdom to budding journalists and truth-seekers at CityBeat. Were it not for your Aug. 28, 2009 interview with Cincinnati Profile, we would never have known what “my baby daddy” was. We might forget what Barack Hussein Obama’s full name is were it not for your show.

Without your faithful shepherding we’d go on believing the lie that things like assistance to the disabled and payments to workers who are injured on the job were good things!

We’re glad to hear that you are backtracking on your Nov. 2 pledge planning to go on an intervention with Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, Gov. John Kasich and Sen. Rob Portman to determine your future in radio.

As you said on your show today, “every herd of sheep needs a shepherd,” and you’ve been our shepherd for more than 30 years. Please don’t “take [your] staff, crash in [your] skull and kill [yourself].” We, the bleating masses of Cincinnati, still need you.

 
 
by Kenneth McNulty 06.06.2013
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 02:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
bio-robert-irvine_al

'Restaurant Impossible' to Take Over Mason Eatery

Food Network show will renovate Aponte's Pizzeria

Food Network's Restaurant: Impossible is returning to the Cincinnati area after shooting an episode in town last year. The king of biceps himself, host Robert Irvine, helped renovate Rohrer’s Tavern in North Bend in 2012 and must have fallen in love with the area because on June 12 and 13 he’s back with his crew to help out Aponte’s Pizzeria in Mason.

On the show, Irvine and his team come to help a struggling restaurant with new recipes, business advice and $10,000 to spend on renovations. They only have two days to find out just what the establishment is lacking and fix it in time for the public relaunch. The grand reopening of Aponte’s takes place on June 13 at 7 p.m., but here’s the kicker — the restaurant's already booked for the grand re-opening. So if you had a hankerin’ for some good old Aponte’s pizza and have been a loyal customer for years, you may be out of luck. 

If you do see a Food Network crew and a British fella with large pectorals running in the area, at least you know what’s going on now.

Go here see how Rohrer's Tavern is doing post-Irvine.


 
 
by Eli Johnson 12.12.2011
at 02:09 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
obama5

Music, Movies and the Not So Mundane

Barack Obama set off metal detectors Friday on his way back into the White House. "I just wanted to see what it was like getting in here," Obama said. "I think I beeped a couple of times." Obama shook hands with the gatehouse guards and talked football as he set off the metal detectors. The guard told the president it was probably just his cellphone and then asked if he was going to put Aaron Rogers in his starting lineup for his fantasy team. Obama replied, “Oh, Jeff. You know I can’t tell you that. I will tell you, Rogers will throw 17 for 30 for 281 yards and two touchdowns.” But Obama declined to predict the future regarding the latest Republican tax cut bill.

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by Maija Zummo 02.16.2009
Posted In: Dating, Life at 05:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 

I Bang the Worst Dudes

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Ever had a bad one-night stand? Sure, we all have. But I mean like really, really bad? Like the kind of bad where the guy called out his own name or tried to pee on you or wanted you to dress up like Hannah Montana?

Out the dude and warn other women here.

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by 11.20.2009
Posted In: Northside, Aileen, Culture at 10:56 AM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 

Q&A With the Ladies of Fabricate

Despite the fact that three businesses have called it quits in Northside in the past month or so (Ali’s Boutique, Shoe-topia and the Northside Art Gallery), two ladies are trying their hand at opening something. Aileen McGrath and Chris Salley are celebrating the opening of their new gallery/boutique/supply store, Fabricate, tonight with an exhibition of Salley’s small, self-portrait paintings and music by PROJECTMILL (along with hors d’oeuvres and beverages).

Danny Cross wrote a To Do pick about the party here. And I e-mailed some questions to McGrath and Salley to learn more about their vision for the gallery/shop. See their answers below:

CityBeat: What is the name of your gallery?

Fabricate: fabricate

CB: What does the name mean?

F: It means “to make by art or skill and labor; construct.” We’d kinda been butting heads on a name that we both liked and we’d both had that same word on our lists to describe the kinds of things we are going to be doing in there. We liked that it describes working with hard things, like metal or wood, and soft things, like textiles. It also means: “to devise or invent something.”

CB: Do you have a mission statement?

F: A store and gallery hybrid where artists, crafters and designers can be inspired, supplied and showcased.

CB: Who is responsible for the gallery? What did you two do before this?

F: We both are equally responsible for everything. We will both pick what art will show each month and work to constantly be filling the store with consigner’s merchandise. We will also both be working in the store. We will still continue to work our other jobs as well. (Chris as a Program Manager for Girl Scouts of Western Ohio and Aileen as a bartender at Northside Tavern.)

CB: There aren’t generally many galleries in Northside, save for Feralmade, which is now Raymond Thunder-Sky, inc. and Prairie. How do you think the neighborhood will respond to your presence?

F: We’ve already gotten a really positive response. We both know a lot of people in Northside and Cincinnati and it seems like everyone is coming out for the opening. We are kinda intimated actually with how many people have said they are coming. … We think the community will embrace it. There isn’t anything like what we are doing in Northside already. Everyone we talk to is really fired up to have an art show in there and create other things to sell as well.

CB: With the recent closing of businesses like shoe-topia and Ali’s Boutique, how are you two planning to ensure your vitality?

F: Bribery via pie! But seriously, this is our passion project and we both have other incomes, so we are not sweating every dollar even though it is going to be tight. We are able to experiment because we have stability elsewhere. There will be new art exhibits once a month and a lot of our friends are creative people who make amazing things, but don’t have a place to display/sell them except for online, so we are providing them that space. We will have unique items, locally made, that you can’t find anywhere else.

CB: What else will be there besides artworks?

F: Ultimately, all sorts of handmade goods from local indie crafters: art prints, scarves, jewelry, cards, stationary, accessories, pillows, curtains, unique artist T-shirt lines and eventually bigger creations like furniture and lighting. Anything that we think is interesting and would be cool to sell. We will also have art and craft supply as well. All of this we will be building up as we go. It’s gonna start-up small and then grow from there as we acquire more merchandise and, therefore, the funds to stock more art supply.

CB: What are your plans for the future? How do you envision the gallery six months from now?

F: Haha! Hopefully we’ll not still be paying rent out o’ pocket. It’s gonna be a slow build, but we are comfortable with that. We hope the creative community sees us as a resource and an outlet, as well as a great place to see new art once a month along with the other new things that their peers create. And hopefully in turn that inspires them to keep creating more things to display and sell there.

CB: What can gallery-goers expect to see in your inaugural exhibit?

F: Chris’ paintings. The space in general. Us jumping up and down when we make out first dollar…aaaannnnnd probably making sure it’s being documented via various photographic devices. Potable beverages. Their friends! The beginnings of the boutique and us communicating with future consigners about their work. Suggestion box for art supplies to stock. High fives! My mom. Snackage generously supplied to us via Hideaway, Take the Cake and cookies from the now imfamous Mikey B!

CB: You say you enter through Red Polly. HOW? Where is the gallery?

F: We are 4012 Hamiliton Ave. in Northside, but you will enter through 4016 Hamilton Ave. You will come through Red Polly’s front door, we share the same entrance. Walk to the room on the right. Two of the walls in our space will always be dedicated to artwork that will stay up all month.

CB: Tell me bout the party.

F: Fabricate’s grand opening will be on Friday, with the inaugural art show 4 x 6 x 100: an exhibition of Chris’ paintings. What started out as sketches for larger works turned into a series of one hundred 4 x 6 paintings that are self-portrait snapshots of everyday emotions, split-second ideas and random documentation of the images that reside in her brain. There will potable beverages, hors d’oeuvres and entertainment provided by the DJ’s of PROJECTMILL, creators of award winning DANCE_MF. This is your first chance to get a glimpse of the location that will house once-a-month art exhibits and shows, preview the beginnings of the boutique and meet/talk with the owners about consigning your own handiwork in the future. It’s gonna be a lot fun and will hopefully get everyone ramped up for future exhibitions we plan on having each month accompanied by different DJ’s and bands.


 
 
by Aileen McGrath 03.20.2009
Posted In: Aileen at 03:04 PM | Permalink | Comments (4)
 
 

Bang Bang Tacos!

Can’t stop thinking about ‘em!

Yesterday, my friend Mikey B. pulled a menu out o’ his wallet that he’d snagged cuz it made him think of me. One o’ the items listed was Bang Bang Tacos!

Those who know me know I’m kinda obsessed with tacos. I don’t know why, I just am. Mostly cuz they are delish … and they like to sit next to margaritas. And the word taco is funny. And it makes me think of vaginas. Another funny word. I’m kinda obsessed with vag, too, you might have noticed.

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by Jac Kern 02.21.2012
Posted In: TV/Celebrity at 10:23 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
peggy-don-joan

Coming Distractions: 'Mad Men,' 'Game of Thrones,' 'Psych'

Upcoming shows and recent TV announcements

Mad Men’s highly anticipated fifth season returns to AMC March 25 with a 2-hour premiere. The episode is titled “A Little Kiss,” spurring plenty of speculations — will Don remarry? Get back with Betty? AMC is airing all previous seasons with an episode each Sunday at 6 a.m. So, unless you’re my grandma, set your DVR and catch up on all things Don Draper. In the past, each season factors in the elapsed time since the previous season’s finale, so Season 5 may pick up a year-and-a-half later, possibly in 1967.

HBO’s Game of Thrones also returns this spring with high expectations. Season 2 of the medieval fantasy drama is back April 1 with a slew of new characters to join last season’s favorites (like Tyrion Lannister, who Peter Dinklage won an Emmy and Golden Globe for portraying). Game of Thrones is based off George R.R. Martin’s series of novels, A Song of Ice and Fire. The second season is set to cover events as portrayed in A Clash of Kings, the second book of the series. There will be dragons!

Roseanne fans, rejoice! The comedienne-turned-insane person is working on a new working-class comedy, Downwardly Mobile, about a trailer park and its outspoken owner. John Goodman (who played Roseanne’s husband on the popular sitcom) is set to co-star as one of her employees. Though the series is not in production yet, NBC has picked up the pilot.


Anyone familiar with noted psychic detective duo Shawn (James Roday) and Gus (Dulé Hill) from USA’s Psych knows that when the actors who play the series’ main characters pop in front of their computers for a dual announcement that something big is in the works. The current video offering at usanetwork.com does not disappoint: Sitting in front of a split screen, Roday dramatically announces that, with the blessing of Alan Alda, he has decided to buy a new belt. In addition, Psyche has been picked up for a seventh season, which means, according to Hill, that “Shawn, Gus, Jules, Lassie and the whole gang will be back to solve more crime in the crime capital of the world, Santa Barbara.” (“You know that’s right.”) Season 6 resumes Feb. 29.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 10.02.2008
Posted In: Interviews at 01:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 

Q&A with PROJECTMILL...

Project Mill.jpg

I've said it once, and I'll say it again: Cincinnati is a cool city. Despite popular belief, there's a whole crop of young adults out there getting involved in their community and doing creative things. One of these groups is PROJECTMILL. What is PROJECTMILL? The answer, my friend, is many things, including the host of Dance_MF, the monthly dance party at the Northside Tavern. And, it just so happens, Dance_MF is coming up this Saturday (Oct. 4). So start doing your squat thrusts, deep lunges or whatever you do to limber up for a danctastic night, and read this little Q&A with Projector Mandy Levy...

MZ: What is PROJECTMILL and who is involved? What roles do they play?

MANDY LEVY: That’s a lot of questions for the price of one! PROJECTMILL is people helping people do cool things. It is—ideally—a network of artists and creatives who are constantly “on call” and willing to lend their talent, ideas, advice, equipment, know-how, critiques, time and enthusiasm to any PROJECTMILL creation. It started at the beginning of the year with just me, Pete Ohs, and Josh Mattie, and has already branched out to a strong sampling of 15 or more “projectors” (that’s what we call ourselves) from Cincinnati, LA, New York, and Chicago, all masters of different creative domains. We have writers, video people, graphic designers, fashion designers, classic artists, animators, musicians, comedians, DJs, actors, even chefs… I think that’s the bulk of it. A nice variety to boot!

MZ: What is the goal or mission of PROJECTMILL?

MANDY LEVY: A kick in the pants, really. It’s about being productive and staying productive by surrounding yourself with productivity.

MZ: This sort of goes along with the above question, but why did you start PROJECTMILL?

MANDY LEVY: We like the idea of team creativity, and were inspired by the impressive artistic community in Cincinnati. If a rising tide lifts all boats, then an institution like PROJECTMILL could help all the awesome people involved to stay motivated and find success.

MZ: What else does PROJECTMILL do besides Dance_MF?

MANDY LEVY: Our inaugural project was going down to South by Southwest with WOXY and creating video content for all their twenty-something lounge acts for the week. We also became an Emmy Award-winning production company this summer, when American Rhapsody, a video Pete and I made, won a Midwestern Regional Emmy for the Advanced Media category. And later this month, we’re putting on a live radio play for the opening night of a spoken word exhibit at the Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center in Covington.

MZ: What inspired you guys to start Dance_MF? What do you feel the response has been?

MANDY LEVY: Last New Year’s Eve, Bad Veins played to a packed house at Northside Tavern, and afterwards they (and a bunch of other friends and future-projectors) proceeded to take over the DJ booth and curate a crazy night of dancing with abandon. It made everyone realize how much we missed Girls and Boys, and how much the cool young people of Cincinnati needed a dance night again. “Bring Dancey Back” was the title on our proposal to the Tavern. But DMF is so much more than just music and dancing. It’s an art installation. Each month boasts a different theme, expanded upon exponentially with various elements of décor, video content, dancer-interaction, and extra-added bonuses (like Razzlebear). The response has been awesome. We’ve gotten a great crowd in both nights so far, and people seem eager to dance and participate in everything that’s offered to them, whether it be following along with the giant '80s workout video projected on the wall, writing obscenities on an overhead projector, or asking Razzlebear to pose for pictures. It’s been really fun.

MZ: Why do you think it's important for young adults in Cincinnati to be more involved with what goes on in their city- creatively, entertainment-wise, etc.? How does PROJECTMILL strive to inspire others to become more involved?

MANDY LEVY: Cincinnati, first of all, is an awesome city. I’m a relative newbie here—I’m from Chicago and I lived in LA before this, and I’m telling you, this place is the best of the three. It’s so undiscovered and unappreciated outside of our little Mason-Dixon bubble, and the only way to put it on the map in the way it deserves is to build it up with our own devotion. We have to make it an outlet for awesomeness. Already this year (or maybe it was last year), Cincinnati was mentioned in Spin magazine as the next big music city—and it’s true! We have incredible music coming out of this place! So it’s the little things like that. Cincinnati needs its young adult community—which, let’s be honest, is the most important gauge for coolness and modern relevance—to produce, participate and promote like there’s no tomorrow. And like I said, PROJECTMILL is meant to be a kick in the pants. People who want to be involved are encouraged to be, and we want to encourage people to be involved. Collaboration swings both ways.

MZ: What are your plans for the future?

MANDY LEVY: We want to make a feature film. Between all of us, we can tackle every part that goes into it. We can write it, direct it, shoot it, star in it, edit it, market it… It’s a big job with a lot of moving parts, but it seems like it should be the ultimate destiny of PROJECTMILL. It makes sense. Want to help?

MZ: Who is DJing Dance_MF this time?

MANDY LEVY: This month’s lineup of DJ-projectors includes: Derek Ruch aka Indian Giver, Matt Luken, Kevin Bayer, Yusef Quotah, Josh Mattie and Bill Rich.

MZ: Your thoughts and feelings on living in Cincinnati? What's good? What's bad?

MANDY LEVY: Cincinnati, again, is awesome. Pete and I recently moved to Over-the-Rhine, and we’re obsessed with the area. It’s got so much to offer, so much potential. The history, the architecture… oh, it makes me weak in the knees! We’ve become so passionate about the Downtown Renaissance; maybe someday we can use PROJECTMILL as a political platform and speak at city council meetings! So that’s good… And the other good thing, again, is just the breed of people. There is an overwhelming wealth of talent here, and it’s so inspiring, but the best part is that these uber-cool and talented people are also Midwestern. So they’re normal. (Sorry LA). The thing that saddens me about Cincinnati, though, is the fact that not everyone has “city spirit.” People prefer to ignore OTR, rather than help it get back on its feet again. They prefer to assume ours is a lame city, rather than explore and discover all the great things it has to offer in all the neighborhoods they’ve never heard of. It’s the wrong attitude. We can’t expect anyone else to swoon for Cincinnati if we don’t love it first.

MZ: Do you guys have a slogan or like words to live by?

MANDY LEVY: “Collective Creativity.” And also, “Knee Socks or No Socks!”

 
 

 

 

 
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