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by Jake Grieco 06.04.2014
Posted In: Culture, Travel, Life, Fun at 02:44 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
to do_smale riverfront park-courtesy cincinnati parks

Cincinnati Ranked No. 3 U.S. Staycation Destination

Out of 100 of the largest U.S. cities ... not bad

Cincinnati has finally been released from its icy prison, and the citizens have thawed out and are ready to start rebuilding their relationship with the sun. Time to buy a plane ticket for California, right? Nope. Time to explore our own beautiful city. 

A study done by WalletHub, an online personal finance resource, compared the 100 largest U.S. cities using 20 key metrics based on cost expenses and public attractions to find the best place to have a “staycation.” (A staycation is a break from working, but not traveling outside of your city.) Cincinnati was ranked third, officially winning the battle of Ohio for best city; Cleveland was ranked 13th and Columbus can be found on the latter half of the list — specifically at No. 66. 

Here are just a few of the ratings that went toward our third place win (as computed by the site): 
  • 1st: Public golf courses per capita 
  • 2nd: Swimming pools per capita 
  • 5th: Tennis courts per capita 
  • 14th: Museums per capita 
  • 19th: Spas per capita 
  • 63rd: Cost of a movie ticket 
  • 53rd: Cost of a maid service 
  • 1st: Number of parks per capita 
Can’t argue with the facts, especially the fact that Cincinnati has the most public golf courses per capita in the nation. We’ve got public golf courses by airports — Reeves golf course at the Lunken Airport Playfield, where you can play 18 for less than $40 — and we even have golf courses in our amusement parks — The Golf Center at Kings Island, where $41 gets you 18 holes and a cart. 

If golf isn’t your thing — after all, Cincinnati’s summers are hot and damp (Wallethub ranked Cincinnati weather at 33rd) — not to fret, Cincinnati is second in the nation for swimming pools per capita, so staycationers should pack a bathing suit. (Cleveland received the No. 1 rank for swimming pools, a small victory … but also one that opens up a world of jokes involving the Browns and pools.)

It is not a joke, however, to say Cincinnati has myriad beautiful parks, and now we have the statistics to prove it: We’re No. 1. Ault Park, Eden Park, Bellevue Park, Washington Park, Sawyer Point & Yeatman’s Cove, Burnet Woods — wherever you are in Cincinnati there’s a park. Sit on a bench and enjoy them. 

This study serves as an embodiment of what most Cincy natives say about the city: it’s up and coming. People that don’t even live here are telling us how good we have it. Put in a time request at work today and start planning a Cincinnati staycation. 

See the results for yourself here.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.12.2009
Posted In: Life at 03:04 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

More Golden Globlog

Also, just in case you've never wasted days and days of your life/work looking at the archives of this blog, check out Go Fug Yourself for genius and snarky commentary on all things Golden Globe and celebrity-related.

 WTF, now and forever:

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by Jac Kern 03.06.2012
Posted In: TV/Celebrity, Northside, Music, Life, Fun, Events, Culture, Concerts at 12:38 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Tuesday To Do List

Happy Super Tuesday! The No. 1 item on today's To Do list is to get your tush to a voting station and participate in Ohio's primary. Those living in Hamilton County can go here to find your polling locations.

Occupy Cincinnati is hosting a primary watch party at C & D Northside from 8-11 p.m. Check out the night's results while enjoying a stiff drink — the group's Facebook invite suggests ordering a "Santorum" (though something tells me I might have to pass). Occupy has some tips for voting against corporate parties; check those out here.

And speaking of the man who turned "Santorum" into a dirty word, a bit further south down I-75 Dan Savage is speaking at the University of Kentucky. Savage is touring as a part of the It Gets Better lecture series, the movement created by Savage to give hope to LGBTQ kids who face bullying, and fight hatred and intolerance against them. Savage will give a presentation and sign books beginning at 7 p.m. in Memorial Hall on the UK campus. If you can make the trip, it's a great opportunity to meet Savage and become involved in It Gets Better — tickets are free to all attendees (just have a local direct you to the Student Center Ticket Office to pick up passes).

MOTR Pub hosts its weekly Writer's Night for original artists of many mediums: poetry, music, comedy, spoken word, etc. Sign up early, starting at 8:30 p.m. and hang out to enjoy performances 'til 12:30 a.m. Participants are all entered for a prize drawing for up to $40. Tonight's showcase is hosted by Fists of Love's Donna J. Drink specials for the night include $3 24-ounce Hudy Amber. Check out the event on Facebook for more info.

Investigative reporter, film producer and Cleveland-native James Renner debuts his first novel tonight at Joseph-Beth Booksellers in Rookwood Commons. The Man From Primrose Lane is a "mind-bending and genre-twisting" story about the murder of an elderly man in Akron. Renner will read from and sign the novel at 7 p.m. The event is free (the book is $26).

Go here to find other arts and theater events happening tonight. Find tonight's live music schedule here.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 02.21.2014
Posted In: Life, Culture at 10:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
21c5_jilliantellep

Cincinnati Featured in National Geographic Traveler

They like us

"As much of America decamped for the suburbs or the coasts, artists, craftspeople, and entrepreneurs rebuilt entire Cincinnati neighborhoods alongside impassioned longtimers," reads an article from the April 2014 issue of National Geographic Traveler.

Cincinnati is more and more getting recognition for our renaissance attitude in national media, and this article touches on everything from our breweries to the 21c and the city's vast collection of every-era architecture and food and nightlife.

Read the full article here.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.06.2014
Posted In: Life, Shopping, The Worst, Fashion at 02:39 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
s&s_scoutatomicnumber10_jf

Atomic Number Ten Closing

Good news is they're having a super sale

Over-the-Rhine vintage shop Atomic Number Ten is closing, or as owner Katie Garber puts it on the shop's twitter page, hopefully moving on to bigger and better things.

The shop, which specializes in finds for him, her and home from the '50s to the '90s, opened in fall of 2009. And with only a couple of weeks left on its Main Street lease (1306 Main St., OTR, facebook.com/AtomicNumberTen), Garber is having a crazy sale — a "last hurrah" sale. All clothing is $20 or less (some items are even selling for $1), housewares are $10 or less and everything else is discounted at 50 percent off. The store will be keeping normal hours through Jan. 18: noon-6 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday; noon-4 p.m. Sunday.

Says Garber of her customers in a blog post, "We really hope you can make it in to say goodbye. You've been so supportive and we can't thank you enough!  It's been a great ride!"

 
 
by Rachel Podnar 07.02.2014
Posted In: Life at 12:51 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From The Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the July 2 issue of CityBeat

All right guys, you know the drill. I found nine words this week to choose from, the most I’ve noticed so far. Maybe the writers are doing it on purpose?

Be sure to check out the issue (and subsequently this blog) before the Fourth of July food coma and drunken stupor sets in. That doesn't give you much time so you'd better get started ...


Autodidactic: like a self-taught person, adj.

I could have figured this out without wordreference.com if I would have just thought about it a little bit — auto, meaning self and dictact, meaning teaching. It makes sense; it’s just that people use this word even less than they learn things for themselves.


In the paper: “I just wanted to write because, autodidactic as I am, I had the sense to know that writers write,” in Kathy Y. Wilson’s “No. 104.” Can I make a joke about Kathy’s autodidactic deduction? Yes, writers write, but as opposed to what, exactly? 

 

Cogent: appealing to the mind or reason, adj.

I can’t think of a cogent reason why I like this word, but I do. FYI, it’s pronounced COjent.


In the paper: Looks like Kathy Y. Wilson pulled a double-vocab-hitter this week, “He [Danny Cross] said cogent things to me about my voice, my skill set and my value to this city” in “No. 104,” describing how our editor got her to start writing this column two years ago. I can’t really imagine Danny saying anything cogent (jokes, jokes) but whatever he said must have worked if she’s been back for 104 weeks of columns (much more impressive than my short tenure as copy editor/blogger).

 

Epocha: the beginning of a distinctive period in the history of anything, n.

Please turn to Epoch in your dictionary, because even the 1913 Webster’s Dictionary said so. Epocha is the Latin version of epoch because John Adams just had to be that formal.


In the paper: Although it appeared in Isaac Thorn’s “The Fourth of July and Me” sidebar, the credit for this one goes to John Adams. Apparently he screwed up pretty big time when he thought what we celebrate as the Fourth of July was supposed to the Second of July. “The Second Day of July 1776 will be the most memorable Epocha in the History of American,” Adams said.

 

Je ne sais quoi: French phrase, meaning a quality that cannot be described or expressed, n.

Expressions borrowed from other languages that we are supposed to understand when used in an English sentence are hard. I know what déjà vu and pièce de résistance mean, but come on, isn't this the Fourth of July issue?


In the paper: Shout out to “Beygency Officer” Jac Kern aka Arts and Culture Editor for mixing in some French with her English this week. Also for changing the masthead to say “Beygency Officer,” I’m guessing because she had the privilege of attending Beyoncé and Jay Z’s On the Run show this past weekend. I personally have never seen the ‘90s lifetime movie The Face on the Milk Carton so I can’t give you a hint as to what Jac meant when she wrote "[The new MTV series Finding Carter] could be watchable, but will surely lack that '90's lifetime movie je ne sais quoi," in her TV roundup. I did, however, try and read the eponymous book when I was in fifth grade, but I was 11 years old and I distinctly remember being uncomfortable with the teenage sexual tension between the main character and her neighbor.


I give Jac *Pick of the Week* this week because the Beygency Officer thing was so funny and I haven’t thought about The Face on the Milk Carton since 2005 and she taught us all some French.

 

Pilsner: a tall slender footed glass for beer, n.

When I read this in the paper, I thought "Wow I wonder what a pilsner is," and I was extremely disappointed when Google Images just showed what I would describe as a “beer glass but not a stein.” Maybe you all knew what a pilsner was (it is also a type of beer) and I’m just showing my age (20) or lack of class. 


In the paper: “These boys know how to have fun and get a laugh, whether it’s drinking wine out of a pilsner glass…” in Nick Grever’s “Kings of Power” about the comically named Martin Luther and the Kings band. Now that I now what a pilsner glass is, I can appreciate the quantities of wine they drink during rehearsal.

 

Bonus round: This is more grammar than vocab, but which is correct, upward or upwards? It’s always upward, regardless of what you may say in conversation. Upward as in “The car cost upward of $30,000,” according to my handy dandy 2012 Associated Press Stylebook.

 

Also, if you’re studying for a spelling bee and dying to know what words didn’t make the cut, you can click for caliphate, contrived and histrionics yourself.

 
 
by Hannah McCartney 03.01.2012
Posted In: Fun, Life at 01:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
daffodils_stjames_1366905c

Kick off Spring in Cincinnati

Before it snows, take a preemptive strike against fickle Cincinnati weather

For better or for worse, Cincinnati is infamous for its fickle weather patterns. This week's weather has been quite the anomaly — after a 70-degree day, weather forecasters are predicting snow this weekend. It's anybody's guess what next week will hold — don't listen to the groundhog — but take some time today to get in the spirit of spring. Today is expected to stay sunny and breezy, so hop to it. Here's how to get started:

•     Take a bike ride somewhere sunny and green. Try the Loveland Bike Trail, the Little Miami Scenic Trail or Lunken Airport’s trail.

•    Go to Findlay Market and get excited about all of the other farmers’ markets you can start frequenting once spring decides to stay.
•    Pick an outdoor shopping destination. Think Main and Vine streets downtown, Hyde Park Square, Mariemont Square or Rookwood Pavilion.

•    Waterproof your camping gear so you’ll be ready for an impromptu weekend excursion to Red River Gorge, Big Bone Lick State Park, East Fork State Park, John Bryan State Park or any other nearby landmarks.

•    Check out the Banks in the works on downtown Cincinnati’s riverfront. The Smale Riverfront Park has big changes in store, including a meditative labyrinth, outdoor concert venue and a tree grove; plus, the Moerlein Lager House is already open for business. Watch its growth firsthand.

•    Treat your animals. When our heating bills survive the mild winter, something else does, too: ticks and fleas. Those pesky parasites are often killed off in severe cold or frosts, but this Cincinnati winter likely spared most of them. That means dogs and cats will likely suffer from worse problems with ticks and fleas this summer and spring. Treating them early on and consistently is your best bet to spare your pet.

•    Go drinking or dining somewhere with a patio. Arthur’s in Hyde Park has an extra-intimate outdoor patio that’s great for slightly chilly spring days. Neon’s in Over-the-Rhine has a hip outdoor courtyard complete with bocce ball, a fired-up grill and a full bar.

There are lots of other ways to get acquainted with spring in Cincinnati. What are your other annual must-do Cincinnati activities when the weather warms up?

 
 
by Staff 09.11.2015
Posted In: Arts, Benefits, Comedy, Concerts, Culture, Drinking, Eats, Events, Food, Fun, Life, Music at 11:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
soundadvice_thedamned

Your Weekend To Do List (9/11-9/13)

Cincinnati Food + Wine Classic; ComiCon; MainStrasse Oktoberfest and more

FRIDAY
MUSIC: THE DAMNED
What do The Pretenders, Pink Floyd, The Clash, The Sex Pistols, Motörhead, Culture Club, T. Rex, Nick Lowe, Naz Nomad and the Nightmares, Goth Rock, The Lords of the New Church, The Sisters of Mercy, Miami Vice, The Young Ones, The Beatles and The Rolling Stones have in common? They all have a one-degree-of-separation connection to The Damned, one of Great Britain’s most renowned and durable Punk bands, touring this year on the eve of its almost inconceivable 40th anniversary. For anyone who would doubt the legitimacy of The Damned’s place in Punk history, the group’s early credentials speak for themselves. The Damned play Friday at Bogarts. More info/tickets: bogarts.com.

Harvest Home Fair
Photo: J. Klug
EVENT: HARVEST HOME FAIR
End your summer at the 156th-annual Harvest Home Fair. The fest opens Thursday with a parade, followed by various contests, including a flower show, art show and horse show, live music, a cooking demonstration by Buddy LaRosa and a Dog Walk and Mutt Mingle on Sunday. Other attractions include the 4-H petting zoo, auto show, cooking and baking exhibitions, carnival rides and games and a playground. 6-11 p.m. Thursday; 5-11 p.m. Friday; noon-11 p.m. Saturday; noon-10 p.m. Sunday. $5 adults; free children under 1; free admission Sunday until 3:30 p.m. Harvest Home Park, 3961 North Bend Road, Cheviot-Westwood, harvesthomefair.com

Kevin McDonald
Photo: Leif Norma
COMEDY: OTR IMPROV FESTIVAL
Calling all comedy fans: OTRimprov, a local sketch group dedicated to creating a strong improv community in Cincinnati, will host its second Improv Festival Cincinnati at the Know Theatre to fête the group’s fifth anniversary. The four-day fest will feature improv acts from around the country in addition to workshops in storytelling, sketch writing and more. Emmy-nominated comedian Kevin McDonald of Kids in the Hall (see also: That 70s Show, Arrested Development) is headlining. Thursday-Sunday. $15-$35 single day/evening; $75 all-access pass; $65 weekend pass. Know Theatre, 1120 Jackson St., Over-the-Rhine, ifcincy.com

MainStrasse Oktoberfest
Photo: Matthew Andrews
EVENT: MAINSTRASSE OKTOBERFEST
Oktoberfest season in Cincinnati rolls on with MainStrasse’s Oktoberfest celebration this weekend. The festivities kick off Friday evening with a ceremonial keg tapping at Goose Girl Fountain with the German American Citizens League and affiliated sister organizations, followed by live German music, German food and other family-friendly entertainment. 5-11:30 p.m. Friday; noon-11:30 p.m. Saturday; noon-9 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. MainStrasse Village, Covington, Ky., mainstrasse.org.

Cincy Beerfest
EVENT: CINCY BEERFEST
From the people who bring you the Cincy Winter Beerfest at the Convention Center comes Cincy Beerfest, an outdoor brew fest on Fountain Square. It’s a craft beer block party with live music, more than 250 craft beers (local and national) and food trucks. Friday and Saturday. $15-$45; $10 DD. Fountain Square, Fifth and Vine streets, Downtown, cincybeerfest.com.

EVENT: MALTS IN AULT
Head to Ault Park for a beer festival featuring craft beers from across the nation, including MadTree, Dogfish Head, Revolution and more. 6:30-10:30 p.m. $25; includes 20 tastings. Ault Park, Observatory Ave., Hyde Park, aultparkac.org

EVENT: CLITON COUNTY CORN FESTIVAL
Celebrate Clinton County’s agricultural heritage with a three-day festival of corn. The fest features antique farm machinery, parade games, a quilt show, live music, all types of food made from corn and the Corn Olympics. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday. $4-$7. Clinton County Fairgrounds, 958 W. Main St., Wilmington, clintoncountyohio.com.

The Food Wine Classic descends on Washington Park for a weekend of dining, drinking and learning.
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCINNATI FOOD + WINE CLASSIC
If Food Network and Top Chef got married and had a baby, it would be this event. Celebrate the Midwest culinary scene with grand tastings, demos, seminars, competitions, after-parties, and more. Friday-Sunday. Washington Park, 1230 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodandwineclassic.com.

SATURDAY
Cincy ComiCon
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCY COMICON
Let your nerd flag fly, Cincinnati. Cincy ComiCon is back once again to ensure comic books get their fair representation in the Queen City. Created somewhat as a response to the Cincinnati Comic Expo, whose tendency is to feature more film and TV stars than comic book creators, Cincy ComiCon is all about the writers and illustrators who bring costumed characters to life on the page. Created by Kendall Swafford of the Cheviot comic book shop Up Up & Away! and Walking Dead co-creator Tony Moore — a well-established illustrator beloved by the industry — Cincy ComiCon will feature Rick Remender (Tokyo Ghost), Mark Schultz (Xenozoic Tales) and many other panelists, booths and special guests. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday; 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday. $20-$50. Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. Rivercenter Blvd., Covington, Ky., cincycomicon.com.

'The Secret Garden'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: THE SECRET GARDEN
Blake Robison is the guy who makes the artistic decisions at the Playhouse in the Park, and he’s committed to shows that appeal across generations. He says The Secret Garden is one of his favorite musicals. “So many stories with child protagonists are cutesy and saccharine. Not so in The Secret Garden,” he says. Mary Lennox, 10, is a selfish, spoiled orphan in Victorian England put in the care of an unhappy uncle in a remote British manor. In the midst of unhappiness and loneliness, a secret garden becomes a place of healing for several characters. It’s a powerful show, full of deep, complex emotions and great music. Through Oct. 3. $30-$85. Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, 962 Mt. Adams Circle, Mount Adams, 513-421-3888, cincyplay.com

EVENT: HOFBRAUHAUS OKTOBERFEST
Head to the Hofbräuhaus for a stein-holding competition, keg and pretzel toss, circus acts, face painting and bier, bier, bier. Saturday and Sunday. Free. 200 E. Third St., Newport, Ky., hofbrauhausnewport.com.

The Galloping Pig
Photo: The Bowtie Foundation
EVENT: THE GALLOPING PIG
If you’re feeling generous and a bit British, then look no further to satisfy your anglophilic desires. The 2015 Galloping Pig looks to raise funds through the BowTie Foundation toward the education of underprivileged youth as patrons gather to watch the Cincinnati Polo Club square off in an exhibition match. But there’s more than just the polo match: Attendees will pet horses, meet the polo players, hit some balls, drink, eat and dance to live music. Summer dresses and bowties are recommended apparel. 11:30 p.m.-5 p.m. Saturday. $20; $125 VIP. Wilshire Farm, 6065 Goshen Road, Goshen, thegallopingpig.com.

Cincinnati Hispanic Fest
Photo: Provided
EVENT: CINCINNATI HISPANIC FEST
The Cincinnati Hispanic Fest highlights the food, music, dance, sports, art and culture of local Hispanic communities. The main stage features more than 15 musical acts over the course of the two-day event, along with cultural dancing performances, a Festival Queen competition, live mass and a free showing of the film Cesar Chavez on Saturday and Sunday. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. $1 walk in; $8 per car. Hamilton County Fairgrounds 7820 Vine St., Carthage, cincinnatihispanicfest.org.

Seabird
Photo: Provided
EVENT: LONGSTONE STREET FESTIVAL
Take to the streets for Milford’s annual Longstone Street Festival. Get your fill of live music, food, games and arts and crafts at this 12-hour, family-friendly event. A live music stage will host nine bands throughout the day, including Folk, Funk, Soul, Bluegrass, Americana and Alt Rockers, including headliners Seabird. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday. Free. 200 Main St., Milford, longstonestreetfestival.com

EVENT: TASTE OF INDIA
This festival includes Indian food, shopping, games, pony rides, fireworks from Rozzi’s and a Naach Sitare Indian dancing competition. Noon-8 p.m. Free admission. The Hindu Temple of Greater Cincinnati, 4920 Klatte Road, Summerside, tasteofindiacincinnati.com.

EVENT: ART AND WINE FESTIVAL
The 17th-annual Art & Wine Festival features the work of more than 60 area artists, live music, a grape-stomping competition, food, draft beer and wine from Vinoklet. Noon-11 p.m. Saturday; 1-8 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Vinoklet Winery, 11069 Colerain Ave., Colerain, vinokletwines.com.

EVENT: FLIPPIN CANCER FLIP CUP TOURNAMENT
Braxton is supporting Bridgette Hightower in her mission to wipe out blood cancer with a flip-cup tournament. Event includes a costume contest, Strong’s Brick Oven Pizzeria, split-the-pot, door prizes and more. Proceeds benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. Check-in starts at 2 p.m. $125 for teams of $5; $1 pints of Sparky; $6 pizzas. 27 W. Seventh St., Covington, Ky., 859-261-5600. 

EVENT: CINCINNATI JAZZ & BBQ FESTIVAL
MadTree beer, music from Mike Wade & the Mighty Groovers, Ron D’s BBQ, Just Q’in, games for kids, an art mart and more. 3-8 p.m. Free admission. Madison and Whetsel, Madisonville, facebook.com/cincyjazzandbbqfest.

EVENT: APPLE HARVEST WINE DIVINE
Woodstone Creek celebrates the season with wine, mead and craft spirits, plus tastings of apple and brandy wine. Includes five samples. 2-7 p.m. $12. Woodstone Creek Winery & Distillery, 4712 Vine St., Saint Bernard, 513-569-0300.

SUNDAY
Los Lobos
Photo: David Alan Kogut
MUSIC: LOS LOBOS
Los Lobos began making music back when Richard Nixon was still in office. For the historically illiterate, that’s more than 40 years, during which the Los Angeles crew has put forth its distinctive sounds — from slanted Tex-Mex and Folk to straight-up Country and Rock — via more than a dozen studio albums and a variety of EPs, live records and side projects. The band is still probably best known in the mainstream for its take on Ritchie Valens’ “La Bamba,” from the 1988 biopic of the same name. Which is unfortunate, because it’s the least interesting thing Los Lobos has done. Los Lobos plays Sunday at Taft Theatre. More info/tickets: tafttheatre.org.

Luna Gale
Photo: Ryan Kurtz
ONSTAGE: LUNA GALE
This year marks Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati’s 30th anniversary. It was launched in 1986 to support local professional artists, driven by strong faith in the transformative power of the arts to create sustainable communities. Its founders, David A. White III and Jeff Seibert, pulled together a corps of local actors and aspiring theater professionals and assembled two seasons that were presented at Memorial Hall. Luna Gale tells the story of a social worker who meets two teenage drug addicts accused of neglecting their baby. Luna Gale continues through Sept. 27 at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati. More info/tickets: ensemblecincinnati.org.

Cincinnati Landmark Productions’ 'A Chorus Line'
Photo: Mikki Schaffner
ONSTAGE: A CHORUS LINE
The dancers who back up Broadway productions are called “gypsies.” They lead anonymous lives, but they’re passionate, dedicated performers. They got their star turn in A Chorus Line, a 1975 show about a group of performers competing for spots in the company of a new production. The show was based on composites of real people, but it features some of Broadway’s greatest musical theater numbers. With songs by Marvin Hamlisch — especially “One Singular Sensation” — the show danced off with nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize. It ran on Broadway for more than two decades. It’s a great choice to open Covedale’s 2015-2016 season. Through Sept. 27. $21-$24. Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glendale Ave., Covedale, 513-241-6550, cincinnatilandmarkproductions.com

EVENT: OLD WEST FEST
If you have a pair of cowboy boots laying around that you’ve been meaning to break out, you’re in luck — Old West Fest is back for its eighth year, featuring an authentic recreated Old West Dodge-City-style town, with gold panning, covered-wagon rides, kids activities, live entertainment (including trick riding and a saloon show) and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Through Oct. 18. $12 adults; $6 ages 6-12; free under 12. 1449 Greenbush Cobb Road, Williamsburg, oldwestfestival.com.

Ohio Renaissance Festival
Photo: Will Thorpe Photography
EVENT: OHIO RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL
The Ohio Renaissance Festival is back and bringing fall weekends filled with costumes, turkey legs, mulled mead, jousting, games, glass-blowing demonstrations, choirs, crafts and tarot readings inside a 30-acre, recreated 16th-century village. This weekend is opening weekend, so tickets for adults are buy-one-get-one, and kids under 12 get in free. Be sure to check the website for themed weekends (like Time Travelers Weekend Sept. 12; where’s your fez?) and different deals. Nerds of all kinds welcome — just remember that any medieval weapons you might bring need to be tied in a sheath at all times. 10:30 a.m.- 6 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays (and Labor Day). Through Oct. 25. $21.95 adult; $9.95 child; $119.95 season pass. 10542 E. State Route 73, Waynesville, renfestival.com

ART: UNKNOWN ELEMENTS
In art, as in life, context is key. An image that would otherwise be treated with contempt — or worse, blithe indifference — can be illuminated with only a few facts. Likewise, stripped of its context, a piece of art can become something else entirely as the viewer imagines a contextual framework for the art. This is the premise of a new photography exhibition at the Cincinnati Art Museum, Unknown Elements, which features 26 photos from the museum’s collection “about which some details are unknown.” Displayed in Gallery 212, the photographs range in date from the mid-19th century to the present day and are accompanied by written works from local writers — poems, short stories and other responses paired to selected images to serve as a “prompt” for viewers’ own reflections. Unknown Elements is on display at the Cincinnati Art Museum through Nov. 8. More info: cincinnatiartmuseum.org.









 
 
by Jac Kern 08.03.2011
 
 

ICYMI: Chippendales Edition

I like to think I'm always up on the gossip, but some newsworthy items slip under my radar, like 98 Degrees' Jeff Timmons (my childhood fave - sorry, Nick) being a Chippendales performer! Chippendales at The Rio in Las Vegas features the Cincinnati boy as their hunky headliner all summer long, extending his stay (eyebrow wiggle) several times.

So, if you like combining the most homoerotic performance ever to be marketed to middle-aged women with prepubescent boy band fantasies, and who the hell doesn't, get your ticket soon! Jeff will only be flexing his "Hardest Thing" (sorry) through Labor Day.

                                               Or just watch this painfully awkward video of him posing for pictures!

Speaking of former child stars-turned-desperate, orange juiceheads, Baywatch alum and current Celebrity Rehab-er Jeremy Jackson has also made a bow tie-and-cuffs appearance. Some reports say he's addicted to fitness and would make excellent eye candy, so I'm guessing they haven't seen his stint on the VH1 show. Dude's addicted to German cattle steroids and cancer patient meds.


And if he's worried chemicals in bottled water will turn him gay, he clearly needs to give his Chippendales contract a second read.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 11.05.2008
Posted In: Life at 01:45 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 

Barack Obama's American Rhapsody

And oldie but goodie from some PROJECTMILL members:

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