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by Nick Swartsell 12.05.2014 55 days ago
Posted In: News at 12:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
nojustice

Local Rally Held for Man Killed by NYC Police Officer

Protests across the country decry a grand jury's decision not to indict officer

A group of more than 100 staged a peaceful rally in downtown Cincinnati on Thursday evening remembering Eric Garner, the 42-year-old man who died after New York City Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo administered a choke hold on him last July.

A New York grand jury announced yesterday it would not hand down an indictment for Pantaleo, despite video footage showing Garner offering little resistance and posing no threat to officers during the incident. The announcement has triggered protests across the country, including massive unrest in New York City, where thousands of demonstrators have taken to the streets in anger. The decision is yet another chapter in the nation's recent struggle with racially charged police killings.

The officers involved say they only used the force necessary to subdue Garner and that previous health conditions including asthma contributed to his death.

Demonstrators in Cincinnati faced freezing rain and icy temperatures during the hour-and-a-half long event, which started at Piatt Park on Vine Street before briefly shutting down the street as protesters marched to Fountain Square. There, the group, which had been chanting "black lives matter" and
Garner's last words, "I can't breathe," observed a few moments of silence for Garner and others who have died at the hands of police. Amid the swishing sound of a few ice skaters on the square's rink and Jingle Bells blasting over its PA system, many quietly laid on the ground with their hands up.

Rally attendee Christina Brown at Piatt Park for a Dec. 4 rally.
Jesse Fox

“I can’t just sit on a couch and watch TV and just watch it happen," said attendee Anna Alexander later. "I have to do something. It’s good to see that people actually care, that people are actually awake.”

Among attendees was State Senator Cecil Thomas, who spoke out against recent racially charged killings by police, including the shooting of Tamir Rice in Cleveland and John Crawford III in Beavercreek. Both were shot by police while holding toy guns.

"Folks, the fact of the matter is, this stuff has to stop,” Thomas said. “We’re not against good police officers. But when an officer does something like what I saw in the video from Cleveland, from New York, in Ferguson, none of that fits into the training I was trained on. It made no sense.”

Thomas served 27 years in the Cincinnati Police Department. He was a key mediator between the police and community during Cincinnati’s civil unrest of 2001, after black teenager Timothy Thomas was killed by white Cincinnati Police Officer Stephen Roach in Over-the-Rhine.

Thursday’s demonstrations come less than a week after a similar wave of protests happened in cities across the country, including Cincinnati, over a grand jury decision not to indict Darren Wilson, a police officer in Ferguson, Mo., who shot unarmed 18-year-old Michael Brown Aug 9. That shooting ignited civil unrest in the St. Louis suburb, as well as protests across the country.

More than 300 people came to a Nov. 24 rally and solidarity march in Cincinnati that lasted three hours and resulted in 15 arrests, some of which came after protesters briefly marched onto I-75 after it was blocked off by police. The last of those protesters was released on bond Thursday.

 
 
by Samantha Gellin 12.04.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: Commentary at 01:00 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Dec. 3 issue of CityBeat

Afternoon readers! Now that Thanksgiving is over, it's back to the normal grind, at least until Christmas. I hope everyone was able to stuff themselves with turkey and spend time with loved ones.

Let's get to Words Nobody Uses or Knows in this week's issue, which, by the way, includes a lovely piece on Ohio's historical markers.

Best word of the issue: cineastes, which appears in TT Stern-Enzi's art piece about MUBI, an innovative new film-streaming service for the "cinematic-minded."

cineastes: plural of cineaste; a film or movie enthusiast, a person involved in filmmaking (n.)

It's an obvious definition, but one I had never heard before. 

In this issue: "Since signing up, I have embarked on an old-school word of mouth campaign in support of MUBI, whispering in the ears of cineastes in my inner circle, teasing them with hints about its possibilities."

Next best word is Gramaphone, capital G, found in Stacy Sim's review of Failure: A Love Story. Ancestor to the megaphone? A phone your grandma owns?

Neither. According to Wikipedia, the Gramaphone is a phonograph, the first device for recording and replaying sound (n.)

In this issue: "There are three lovely Graces (Sophia Dewald, Megan Urz, Molly Watson) who narrate rapid-fire the events of the play, a strong Ensemble (Gabby Francis, Colin Kissel, Sarah Allen Shull and Andrew Wiemann) of clocks, birds, a dog, snake and various others, plus a smooth jazz onstage band with vocals to contribute the Gramophone soundtrack."

Mathcore was the next word that caught my eye. Sounds like a really, really unpleasant type of math course. (But I find all types of math unpleasant.) It's in Sound Advice.

Mathcore: a rhythmically complex and dissonant style of metalcore. It has its roots in bands such as Converge, Coalesce, Botch and The Dillinger Escape Plan. The term mathcore is suggested by analogy with math rock. (n.)

Looking up the definition of a music genre is a bit like jumping into a rabbit hole. Each one one is derived from or related to another genre of music that I've never heard of. (If I'm being honest, most of the music genres I've learned feel like a joke.) What is math rock? What is metalcore?

It's obvious that I'm no music expert (hell, when I started to work here I thought there was, like, 10 genres tops) but I can't be the only one who has never heard of mathcore

In this issue: "Beyond their Spinal Tappish propensity to blow up bassists, Every Time I Die has earned a solid reputation as a scorching live outfit and a stylistically diverse band that has attracted Metal fans of every conceivable sub-stripe, as well as Mathcore and Punk aficionados."

Moving on. Next on the list is commensurate, in Kathy Y. Wilson's thought-provoking piece "On Being White."

commensurate: equal in measure of size; coextensive. corresponding in extent or degree; proportionate. (adj.)

In this issue: "Four: It doesn’t take a sociologist or statistician to know that white officers just do not shoot and kill white kids at commensurate rates that they shoot black kids."

Not exactly an uplifting note to end our vocab lesson on, but if you want something to chew on for awhile, read Kathy's piece. 

Have a good weekend, readers.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.04.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 12:31 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Important New Art Film Coming to Cincinnati Art Museum

National Gallery, the latest film by the great American documentarian Frederick Wiseman, will get a free screening at Cincinnati Art Museum at 1 p.m. on Jan. 25, 2015. No tickets or advance reservations are required.

Typical of Wiseman’s inquisitively reportorial and humanistic work, this carefully and thoughtfully takes viewers inside the world of London’s National Gallery — one of the world’s finest museums. The film is three hours long.

Wiseman, who is 84, has been making films that carefully examine societal institutions — cultural, social, educational, medical and political — since his 1967 landmark Titicut Follies, about life inside the Bridgewater State Hospital for the criminally insane in Massachusetts.

His much-lauded more recent films — which did not have a showcase theatrical screening in Cincinnati — include last year’s At Berkeley and 2009’s La Danse, about the Paris Opera Ballet.

That National Gallery will be presented in a theater here — the art museum’s auditorium holds some 300 — shows the ambition of the museum’s associate photography curator, Brian Sholis, to offer more and a wider variety of films as part of his programming.

A lower-profile (compared to National Gallery) presentation last Sunday of a new documentary about digital photography, Harvey Wang’s From Darkroom to Daylight, brought a surprisingly good turnout of 55 people to the art museum’s library. 

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.04.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: News at 11:19 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
boehner copy

Morning News and Stuff

Shocker: Boehner says redistricting reform not necessary; Gannett reaches out, gets spurned; Cleveland cop who shot 12-year-old was deemed "unfit" at last police job

Hello all, hope you’re doing well this morning. I’m having a bit of trouble getting started today, maybe due to CityBeat’s Bourbon and Bacon event last night. The party at Newport’s New Riff Distillery (which is amazing, by the way) featured nearly unlimited amounts of bacon-infused items. Bacon is one of my favorite things. I’m also a big fan of whiskey, which was also available in seemingly endless quantities. I’m still recovering.

Anyway, news time.

Usually, we think of the staunch conservatives in our state House of Representatives, bless their souls, as lovers of the smallest government possible. So it’s surprising that GOP state lawmakers have been working on a bill to pick cities’ pockets by reverting tax receipts usually going to municipalities to the state government. That bill got a little less pernicious yesterday, when a revised version passed the Ohio Senate. Mayor John Cranley touts the bill as a better deal for Cincinnati than it could have been. The proposal, which amends and allegedly simplifies Ohio’s tax rules for cities and other local governments, would cut the amount of money municipalities receive from businesses doing work in their jurisdictions. Many agree the current system is incredibly complex and makes it difficult for businesses to operate in multiple municipalities. But opponents of the original bill proposed by GOP lawmakers say the cuts to municipal tax receipts were too deep and, taken with other recent cuts to tax receipts, could hamper cities’ abilities to provide services. Cincinnati could have lost as much as $3 million a year from those cuts. The compromised bill minimizes some of those losses by keeping the municipal tax on items a company ships to places where it doesn’t have a storefront.

• A slightly fictionalized Hamilton County Christmas play in one act:

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil:
Hey guys, can I get a Harley? Maybe two Harleys? I want them for Christmas. They get better gas mileage than cars and the city taught us how to ride them.
Hamilton County Commissioner Chris Monzel: I don’t know. Ask Greg Hartmann.
Sheriff Neil: He wrote me a letter. He said I have to wait.
Hartmann: Jim, I can’t believe you’re asking for this right now. You know money is tight and we can’t afford two Harleys. We’ve gotta tighten our belts, you know. Have you thought about a nice used Suzuki? Or maybe some bicycles? Red Bike is big right now.
Sheriff Neil: But everyone else is asking for cool wheels, too.
Monzel: We’ll just have to wait and see what Santa brings. We already gave you those cars you asked for.

• Surprise, surprise: House Speaker John Boehner, who is camped out in his safely Republican district just north of Cincinnati, doesn’t want any changes to the way Ohio draws its congressional districts. He says that having one party dominate the process isn’t a problem because both parties have done so over the years and that everyone working on rule changes for redistricting should see what shakes out in Arizona. The Supreme Court is currently hearing challenges to that state’s constitutional amendment cutting the state legislature out of redistricting in favor of an independent panel, a similar arrangement to some proposals for reforming Ohio’s redistricting process. But let’s not be hasty about working to change the process that has created Ohio’s ridiculously gerrymandered districts, Boehner says.

"For 40 years the Democrat Party had the pencil in their hands, and for the last 20 years we've had the pencil," Boehner told The Enquirer yesterday. "When you've got the pencil in your hand, you're going to use it to the best of your advantage."

CityBeat contributor Ben Kaufman, who writes our "On Second Thought" column and "Curmudgeon Notes," tipped me off to this great exchange. Apparently, Enquirer parent company Gannett is reaching out to veteran journalists seeking help recruiting “leaders for the newsroom of tomorrow,” whatever that means. Gannett has been sugar-coating layoffs with this newsroom of tomorrow thing for a while and has even gone so far as to make reporters reapply for their jobs in a Hunger Games-esque battle for employment. A recruiter got a less than favorable response from three-decade veteran journalist Rick Arthur, who has been an editor at major newspapers and magazines. Arthur responds to the missive, which is, after all, not recruiting him but simply asking for help in recruiting others, with the following:

“I would never refer anyone to Gannett, an organization that has such disdain for copy editors and that treats its employees so shabbily, and whose executives, publishers and editors willfully deny that there are problems while creating — for the second time in a decade — the laughably Orwellian 'Newsroom of the Future.'

All the best, Rick”

Ouch.

• Finally, there’s continued anger around the nation over unarmed people, especially people of color, dying at the hands of police. Two brief developments: 

A grand jury in New York yesterday declined to indict Officer Daniel Pantaleo for his role in the death of Eric Garner, who Pantaleo put in a chokehold. Pantaleo died moments after the confrontation in an ambulance and can be heard on a video of the incident telling officers repeatedly he couldn’t breathe. The grand jury decision has sparked protests in New York City.

In Cleveland, there are new revelations in the death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who police shot on a playground. The officer involved in that shooting, Timothy Loehman, was asked to leave another police force in the small town of Independence, Ohio, in 2012 after being deemed unfit to serve there. Loehman reportedly had an emotional breakdown on a shooting range and was “uncommunicative and weepy” during the incident, reports on his dismissal say. The report also calls his performance with a weapon “dismal.”

 
 
by Maija Zummo 12.04.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: Coffee, Events, News at 11:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
eats_carabellocoffee_jf2

Carabello Coffee Launches Kickstarter

Philanthropic-minded coffee company is looking to expand, donate more

Carabello Coffee in Newport, Ky., is a philanthropic coffee shop and roastery owned by husband and wife Emily and Justin Carabello. As a craft coffee bar, they have all the latte art and pour-overs you'd expect, but they also do something unexpected — the business gives back by turning over a portion of their profits to third world coffee regions in Nicaragua and Kenya. 

The couple had a vision for the shop in 2009, with the idea to start a company that would source coffee equitably and sell it to the U.S., investing the profits in sustainable initiatives in third world coffee communities. The Carabellos have visited these regions in Africa and Central America, sourcing their beans from coffee farms and helping the community by doing outreach and raising money for an orphanage in Nicaragua, where some of the world’s best coffee is grown. The kickstarter campaign Carabello just launched is not only aimed at helping Carabello itself expand, but also expand the amount of good they can do. Their goal is to eventually be able to give away $100,000 a year.

With a kickstarter goal of raising $40,000 (the city of Newport will kick in $15,000 if they spend $30,000 themselves), the money will assist the shop in doing renovations to expand to include a coffee training lab (for baristas and members of the public), a community event space and a slow bar, for true coffee geeks. The slow bar will be the first in the city and showcase alternative brewing methods that don't work in a faster-paced environment. 

To learn more or to back the Carabellos, visit their kickstarter project here.
 
 
by Mike Breen 12.04.2014 56 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
facebook.com:thepasstheband

Music Tonight: The Pass, Nora Jane Struthers and More

Louisville Electro Pop artists The Pass, who’ve become popular with local audiences thanks to repeated visits to the Cincinnati area (providing highlight sets for more than a couple MidPoint Music Festivals), performs a free show tonight at Over-the-Rhine’s MOTR Pub. Local trio JetLab (which just released its self-titled debut last week) opens things up around 10 p.m.

The Pass’ show tonight is the start of a tour in support of the band’s new EP release, High Road, which follows the release of four 7-inch singles at the start of 2014 and comes out this Tuesday. “Take You Out,” a track from the new release, was debuted on the website We All Want Someone to Shout For yesterday. The site says the track "deliver(s) a world of glossy synths, love-sick vocals, and a feel-good atmosphere that you can’t shake anywhere else but the dance floor. With so many electronic groups relying heavily on computers and other effects these days, it’s great to see The Pass deliver such groovy tunes as a full live band. It truly separates them from the rest of the pack."

Check it:

• Nashville-based Americana artist Nora Jane Struthers and her band The Party Line play Newport’s Southgate House Revival tonight. Mike Oberst of local Folk faves The Tillers opens the show at 8:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. 


Struthers was born in Virginia and raised in New Jersey, getting her first taste of the musician’s life as a tween fiddler and traveling to festivals and conventions with her father (a banjoist). Struthers decided to pursue a career in teaching, but after a few years she switched her focus back to music, inspired by watching Tim O’Brien perform at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival. Her 2010 debut solo album showcased her stellar lyrical abilities and mastery of traditional Americana and Bluegrass sounds. She hit her stride with last year’s Carnival, bolstered by her full-time band, The Party Line. 


Struthers is gearing up for the release of her new album with The Party Line, Wake, which is due in February of next year. The album is said to be more eclectic and nods in a more Rock direction, inspired by her love of recent albums by Hayes Carll and Jason Isbell. 


NPR’s Ann Powers recently interviewed Struthers about the new album (read it here) and unveiled the new album track, “The Same Road.”


• According to B-105 FM’s website, tonight’s Toys for Tots benefit show at Toby Keith’s I Love this Bar and Grill is sold out (the bar’s website says there may be “limited tickets” available at the door tonight). The 8 p.m. concert features headliner Easton Corbin, plus up-and-comers Maddie & Tae and RaeLynn


Click here for show details and read Deirdre Kaye’s preview of Maddie & Tae’s performance for CityBeat here


Click here for more live music options tonight in Greater Cincinnati.


 
 
by Nick Swartsell 12.03.2014 57 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:55 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
reds

Morning News and Stuff

Hunter won't get new trial; Reds bling for sale; Republicans sink tax cuts for low-income

Hey all. Here’s the news this morning.

Former Hamilton County Juvenile Court Judge Tracie Hunter won’t get a new trial, a judge has ruled. Hamilton County Judge Norbert Nadel has denied all three of Hunter’s motions for retrial after she was convicted last month of one of eight felony counts in relation to her time as judge. Since her conviction, three jurors have recanted their guilty verdicts, however, and Hunter’s attorney has alleged procedural mistakes mean she should get a new trial. With those motions denied, Hunter will be sentenced this Friday. She plans to file an appeal on her conviction.

• Cincinnati must pay Duke Energy $15 million for moving utilities that stood in the way of the streetcar, a Hamilton County judge ruled Monday. The city already had that money in escrow as it awaited the ruling but plans to appeal Judge Carl Stich’s decision. That’s a good move, according to former city solicitor John Curp. Curp says the way Stich decided the case — by declaring the streetcar an “economic development project” — could set a hard precedent for other Ohio cities in the future. In order for Cincinnati to avoid paying Duke to move the utilities, the project would have to be something that benefits the city’s general welfare. Stich cited cases from the 1930s and the 1950s to justify his decision. Back then, public transit was run by private companies, a much different situation than today. Curp thinks the Ohio Supreme Court might have a different opinion of the streetcar and should hear the case to set a more modern precedent on transit projects.

• Do you have about $6,000 just sitting around taking up valuable space that could be used to, say, store an enormous ring? Do you need a sports-themed piece of jewelry so ostentatious no one will ever question your love for America’s favorite pastime? If so, I have a solution to both of your weird, unlikely problems. A Cincinnati Reds 1990 World Series ring has gone up for sale at a local auction house, and for a few grand you can make it yours. But be advised: It’s not Chris Sabo or Eric Davis’ ring. Heck, it’s not even Glenn Sutko’s, who saw action in one game that season. It belonged to one of the team’s part-time accountants, who I’m sure did great work counting the Reds' money. Every position is important on a winning team. Anyway, it’s big, it’s red, it has the logo on it and you should buy the ring. Or, I dunno, you could buy me a nice used car instead. Up to you.

• So it’s no secret the state’s Democratic party is hurting after last month’s disastrous statewide election. Ohio Democratic Party Chairman Chris Redfern stepped down after losing his own state representative seat to a guy accused of burglary. Now there’s a scramble to take his spot, and former Cincinnati city councilman and recent attorney general candidate David Pepper is a frontrunner. But he’s got a challenge ahead of him  in becoming the top Dem in the state: Ohio’s powerful Sen. Sherrod Brown has backed one of his opponents, former candidate for lieutenant governor Sharen Neuhardt, for the job. Pepper still sees himself as a front-runner in the contest to lead Democrats in one of the country’s most important swing states ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The new state chair will be decided by a vote within the party Dec. 16.

• Chicago City Council voted yesterday to raise the city’s minimum wage to $13 an hour over the next five years. The move was a proposal by Mayor Rahm Emanuel ahead of proposed Illinois laws that could hamstring city governments when it comes to raising minimum wages and February’s Chicago mayoral election. The boost is expected to benefit about 400,000 workers in the city. Other cities like Seattle have passed similar increases recently.

• Finally, Republicans have scuttled an extension on tax cuts for low-income and middle class workers while pushing bigger corporate tax breaks. The cuts were part of a $400 billion bipartisan tax deal lawmakers in Washington were working to put together. But President Barack Obama’s announcement last month of an executive action allowing some undocumented immigrants to stay in the country has killed the deal as Republicans pull back from the low-income tax cuts like the Earned Income Tax Credit and double down on the corporate breaks. They say undocumented immigrants will take advantage of the EITC and other credits in large numbers and therefore can’t support the cuts. Translation: Obama made us mad so we’re taking the ball that keeps millions out of poverty and going home.

 
 
by Mike Breen 12.03.2014 57 days ago
Posted In: Live Music, Local Music, Music Video at 10:42 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
soundadvice_every_time_i_die_photo_justin_reich

Music Tonight: Every Time I Die, Lera Lynn and More

Veteran metallers Every Time I Die play Bogart's in Corryville tonight. The Ghost Inside, Hundredth, Architects and Backtrack are also on the bill. Doors open at 6 p.m. and tickets are $26.27.

ETID's creative approach has earned them fans outside of just the Metal world (though they don't seem to have suffered the wrath of purists like Deafheaven or other act that dare to stray from the imaginary blueprint). Here's what Brian Baker had to say about the band's most recent album in his preview for this week's CityBeat.

Every Time I Die's latest album, From Parts Unknown, is the band's third album for Epitaph and seventh overall, and stands as a stylistic scrapbook of their best qualities — full bore Metalcore anthemics, songs both howled and sung, scathingly focused lyrics and guest appearances from Coalesce's Sean Ingram and the Gaslight Anthem's Brian Fallon. From Parts Unknown may also be the most lavishly praised album in Every Time I Die’s estimable catalog. The title of a song from the new album may provide the best description of the Every Time I Die live experience: “If there is room to move, things move.”



• Another monster of the Metal world, pioneering Bay Area Thrash crew Exodus, is also in the area tonight. The band plays Covington's Madison Theater at 6:10 p.m. Tickets are $25 and the show is open to all ages.

Emerging from the same scene that produced Thrash kings like Testament and Metallica (Kirk Hammett was an original member of Exodus), the band has been tearing shit up for the past 34 years (with a break-up, reunion and then full-time reformation sandwiched in the middle). This past October, Exodus released its 10th album (and first in four years), Blood In, Blood Out.



• If brutal Metal is not your thing, Newport's Southgate House Revival has Texas-born/Georgia-raised/Nashville-based singer/songwriter Lera Lynn tonight in the Revival Room. Locals Wilder open the show at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door.

Lynn is usually found in the Folk/Americana section of record stores, but she also sprinkles her endearing sound with a variety of other influences (Jazz, Rock, Pop, Country and beyond). Here's Lynn's soulful, rootsy take on TV on the Radio's "Wolf Like Me," for example:



Lynn's 2014 album The Avenues has been drawing favorable reviews. Here's what NPR's Meredith Ochs had to say:

Long before you figure out exactly what lyrics Lera Lynn is singing, you'll feel the melancholy and mystery in her music. Wistful melodies and the cry of a steel guitar are set to gentle, meditative rhythms. Even the song's sonic spaces suggest loneliness. With the music alone, Lynn creates a tone poem of romantic uncertainty.



Click here for more live music options in Greater Cincinnati tonight.

 
 
by Charlie Harmon 12.02.2014 57 days ago
at 03:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Pedal Wagon Offers Winter Tours

Pedal around the city for pre-game drinks, progressive dinners and more

If you’ve ever been driving around the interlocking streets of the city and seen a group of hysterical people slowly pedaling a giant wagon, then you’ve been exposed to the wonderful world of the Pedal Wagon. This 15-person rolling party — powered by the pedals beneath each rider’s seat — takes groups on historic tours, pub crawls and more while also offering specials on drinks at participating bars. Here are some special tours Pedal Wagon is offering during the winter season:

Polar Bear Express

Pedal Wagon presents a wonder that would have the likes of Clark Griswold lighting up in uncontainable excitement. This seasonally decorated Wagon takes riders — who are encouraged to don their favorite holiday costumes like Santa, the Grinch or the Abominable Snowman — on a two-hour pub crawl to four of Cincinnati’s most eclectic bars, where they will enjoy seasonal drink specials.

Progressive Dinner

With all the incredible culinary treasures of old and new sprinkled throughout the Queen City, who wouldn’t want to have fun balancing the calories between meals with a Pedal Wagon adventure? This three-hour tour takes riders to Kaze for an appetizer and drink, then Arnold’s for an entree and drink, and Taste of Belgium for dessert and a final drink.

Pedal to the Jungle

With football season upon us yet again and the cold creeping down from the north, standing around a parking lot with a beer sounds just plain chilly. For a more interactive adventure that might also keep you warm, Pedal Wagon offers a two-hour pub crawl that takes fans to some of the city’s best sports bars — Rhinehaus, O’Malley’s in the Alley and Jefferson Social — and drops them off just a half hour before kickoff.

Hair of the Dog

Celebrate the fact that it is indeed 5 o’clock somewhere with a barhopping pedal tour. This two-hour crawl takes riders to four great spots to grab a beer and warm their ears, stopping at HalfCut, Knockback Nat's, Lackman and Rhinehaus.

Go here for more info and to book your ride.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.02.2014 57 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 02:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
benedict

Cincinnati Art Museum's Popular Curator Benedict Leca Gets Promotion

Benedict Leca, a much-liked curator of European Art at Cincinnati Art Museum whose departure in 2012 to become chief curator at Hamilton, Ontario's, Art Gallery of Hamilton prompted protest, has moved again. It's a promotion. Perhaps his greatest accomplishment at Cincinnati was organizing Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman. Here are a few paragraphs from the press release from the Redwood Library & Athenaeum of Newport, R.I. It is especially notable for the fact the erudite Leca use the term dix-huitièmiste to describe himself in a quote — how many other museum directors would do that?

Edwin G. Fischer, M.D., President of the Board of Directors of the Redwood Library & Athenæum, announced the appointment of Benedict Leca, Ph.D., as its new Executive Director, effective January 15, 2015, following a competitive national search.

“This is tremendous news for the Redwood,” stated Dr. Fischer, “An expert in 18th-century art, history, and material culture, Benedict is uniquely qualified to move the Library into the national spotlight as a center of thought and culture. He has a wealth of experience and is extremely well-suited to lead this 268-year old cultural institution.” 

As Executive Director, Leca will articulate and advance the Redwood’s historic mission as a hybrid cultural institution with “nothing in view but the good of mankind.” Building on the Redwood’s unique position as a catalyst for dialogues about education across periods and disciplines, Leca’s work will focus on fully realizing the opportunities inherent to the athenæum model through an expanded array of public programs, forums, and exhibitions—both on-site and on-line—that will foster networks of intellectual exchange locally, regionally, and around the world. 

Prior to his current tenure at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Ontario, as Chief Curator and Director of Curatorial Affairs (2012-14), Leca was Curator of European Painting, Sculpture and Drawings at the Cincinnati Art Museum. 

He was the first Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the French Paintings department at the National Gallery of Art in Washington (2003-2007), and served on the staff of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University (1999-2000). Mr. Leca also currently holds the position of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History in the School of the Arts, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Mr. Leca has curated many important exhibitions: Charles-Nicolas Cochin: Draftsman of the Enlightenment (2003); Rembrandt: Three Faces of the Master (2008); Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman (2010—2011); Monet in Giverny: Landscapes of Reflection (2012); The Painter Pictured: French Nineteenth-Century Paintings and Portrait Photographs (2013); the current The World is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne, executed in partnership with the Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia (2014-15), and the forthcoming Illuminations: Italian Baroque Masterworks in Canadian Collections to be held at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, in 2015.

(Thanks to Judith H. Dobrzynski's Real Clear Arts blog at http://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/ for alerting us to this story.)

 
 

 

 

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by Nick Swartsell 01.29.2015 111 minutes ago
Posted In: News at 12:01 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
sherrod brown

Why Not Sherrod Brown for Prez?

Staunch progressive seems a logical choice for Dem nominee but says he's not interested

If you’re a spectator of Democratic Party politics right about now, you’ve probably watched the 2016 presidential election sweepstakes unfolding with interest. Dems probably won’t get close to the huge stable of potential nominees the Republican Party is currently wrangling with, and Hillary Clinton seems to have the nomination locked up. But there are other viable candidates. Vice President Joe Biden is also, uh, bidin’ his time (sorry). And then there’s progressive firebrand Elizabeth Warren. She says she’s not running, but she’s got a vocal fan base who have continued to push her name into the conversation in a big way.

One question you may have asked yourself at this point: If Warren, why not Sen. Sherrod Brown? Or maybe, if you’re like some of the prominent progressive political operatives in this Washington Post story, that possibility hasn’t entered your mind. But as that story asks, why not?

Ohio’s senior senator has the deep progressive bonafides of Warren plus a heap more experience, an easy-going way about him and a high profile in the nation’s highest deliberative body. Plus, if we haven’t already said this (we have), Ohio’s so hot right now. Our other senator, Rob Portman, had been considered a potential candidate for the Republican nomination before he dropped out in December. Fellow GOPer Gov. John Kasich’s name has been floated a lot as well, though he’s been coy about his intentions. And there’s a good possibility all three political conventions will be converging on our vital swing state in 2016. A presidential candidate from Ohio could wrap the state up for either party.

So why not Brown? Is it the perception that Democrats are ready to elect the first female president after Barack Obama's history-making election? Is it Brown’s own reluctance, or outright refusal, actually, to play along? Is it the fact that he sounds like the Dark Knight when he talks? (The Post says Tom Waits. I consider either an asset.) Brown says he's focused on doing the job he has now, but they all say that, right?

“I don’t think you can do your job well in the Senate if you’re looking over your shoulder wanting to be president,” Brown tells the Post. Earlier in the article, he says, “I know you don’t believe this, but I don’t really think about it all that much.”

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 01.29.2015 2 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:59 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
weed

Morning News and Stuff

Developer's plans for northern OTR expand; Ohio congressman flips, now supports women's right to choose; why we love cars so dang much

Morning all. Here’s what’s happening around town today.

Ohio Gov. John Kasich and Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear would like to see the looming effort to replace the Brent Spence Bridge, currently estimated to cost $2.6 billion, trimmed by $300 million, they said yesterday in a news conference. That will be a tall order, Kentucky transportation officials say, but something they’ll work on. Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Secretary Mike Hancock says it’s hard to find immediate and obvious reductions to the project.

Part of the problem with cost-trimming is that the current bridge accommodates 160,000 cars a day, much more traffic than it was originally intended to carry. The solution engineers have in mind would mean building a bigger, wider bridge next to the Brent Spence. It would also mean highway-widening and interchange updates along an eight-mile stretch on both the Ohio and Kentucky sides of the bridge. Those highway changes account for 60 percent of the project’s costs. Officials say they will look at tightening the scope of the project and also finding ways to do what needs to be done for less money.

One lynchpin of the governors’ plan is that it will be partially funded by tolling, a controversial solution. Vocal opponents of tolls in Northern Kentucky, including many elected officials, have vowed to fight against tolling on the bridge, saying it will put a burden on businesses and workers. They say the project is unnecessarily large and that both states should approach the federal government in an attempt to get funding for a smaller, more modest project to replace the bridge.

• A local developer's vision for the area around Findlay Market in Over-the-Rhine has expanded. Model Group, which has already bought up a number of buildings in the area with plans to renovate them into office and commercial space, is making moves to purchase several more neighboring buildings on Race and West Elder streets. Model recently bought 101 W. Elder, 1812 Race St. and is in the final stages of purchasing 1818 Race St., all apartment buildings with first-floor retail space. It is also looking to purchase 1808 and 1810 Race St. soon. It is unclear if these buildings are currently occupied or represent affordable housing in the neighborhood. The expansion brings the developer’s first phase of development from $14 million to $19 million. The expansion creates a big increase in residential space — 35 units instead of 14 in the original first phase of the project, as well as 50,000 square feet of retail space instead of 40,000.

• An Ohio congressman and former pro-life advocate says he has changed his mind about abortion. Rep. Tim Ryan was one of just a few Democrats in the House who had opposed abortion, in part due to his Catholic faith. Over his 14-year career, Ryan has been an outspoken opponent of abortion but says his views have changed over time, writing in
an op-ed in the Akron Beacon Journal: “I have come to believe that we must trust women and families — not politicians — to make the best decision for their lives." Another factor in his change of heart may be that he’s eyeing Republican Rob Portman’s Senate seat in 2016.

• As we talked about a few days ago, it seems increasingly likely that Ohio voters will get to weigh in on a ballot initiative legalizing marijuana in November. But if you ask Attorney General Mike DeWine, that’s just dumb. DeWine called legalization “a stupid idea.” DeWine said something esoteric about the law being a teacher before basically telling folks at a Rotary Club meeting in Newark Tuesday that legalizing weed will have everyone and their mom smoking the stuff all the time because the law says they should, creating chaos in the streets, stunning increases in demand for Bonnaroo tickets and long lines for snack products (OK, he didn’t go that far, but you could tell he was thinking it).

Beyond that, DeWine did have some pretty fair points to make about a leading proposal by ResponsibleOhio, which has presented one of the ballot initiatives. That initiative would allow anyone over 21 who passes a background check to buy weed, but would limit the number of growers in Ohio to 10 and create a seven-member Marijuana Control Commission to oversee production and sale of the crop. Who chooses growers and the commission is unclear. Sound like a monopoly? Yeah. DeWine thinks so too, and actually made a pretty cogent point about that.

"Even if you think selling marijuana is a great idea, I don't know why anyone would think just giving a few people who are going to put the money up to pass it on the ballot is a good idea to let them have that monopoly," DeWine said.

So can we just legalize weed and have it all operate like every other large monopolistic business in the country instead of a state-anointed monopolistic business, like, say, our casinos? Stay tuned…

• As a bike commuter and die-hard pedestrian, this UrbanCincy opinion piece on how car-centric and bike/pedestrian/eyeball/everything-else unfriendly many Cincinnati-area Kroger stores are really resonates. With either updates, new stores needed or on the slate in Walnut Hills, Over-the-Rhine, Avondale and Corryville, it’s a good time to think about how our grocery stores should operate and who they’re designed to serve. This is an especially salient point in light of the problems many Cincinnatians have living in food deserts. UrbanCincy editor Randy Simes makes a great point in the piece about how other cities, namely Lexington, have gotten more urban-friendly, modern designs that serve motorists, cyclists and pedestrians equally well. Why not here?

• Finally, as we think about billion-dollar bridges and oceans of grocery store parking lots, I leave you with this: the Washington Post’s WonkBlog a couple days ago had a really interesting piece on the roots of America’s "love affair" with the automobile. Spoiler alert: It’s all been a big marketing campaign, the author says. Worth a read for the history of America’s car culture, highway system and shout out to Cincinnati’s pre-I-75 West End.

 
 
by Samantha Gellin 01.29.2015 4 hours ago
Posted In: Commentary at 09:31 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
from the copy editor

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the Jan. 28 issue of CityBeat

Good morning readers! After a break last week, I'm back at it. I know you've all been waiting anxiously for your next vocabulary lesson. (And by that I mean not at all.)

This week, Kathy Wilson's editorial on the infamous letter the mayor of Norwood penned to Norwood's police department is full of Words Nobody Uses or Knows. Well, just four, but that's a lot for one article. I'll start with my favorite: bon mot.  In French, bon mot literally translates to good word. (Woo! All my years of French classes finally paid off!) 

In the states, though, bon mot is defined as an apt, clever, or witty remark (n.)

In this issue: "In a letter dated Dec. 22 that has now come to light, Norwood Mayor Thomas F. Williams penned a bon mot to the Norwood Police Department slamming black civil rights leaders and do-nothing politicians, warning officers — like a roll call from a long-ago episode of Hill Street Blues — to 'be careful out there,' ending that he, for one, will always have their backs."

Next best word in Kathy's piece is flummoxed, which is  pronounced flum-eks. (I kept thinking it was pronounced flu-mox.)

flummox: to confuse or perplex someone (trans. verb)

In this issue: "People are talking about you in these streets and they’re mainly flummoxed by your letter and how it and you can go unnoticed."

The third word in Kathy's editorial that caught my eye is kowtowing.

kowtow: to be submissive or subservient to someone, or to kneel and touch the ground with your forehead as an act of worship (trans. verb)

In this issue: "Clearly, Mayor Williams can say Ferguson, Long Island and Cleveland. Further, he must be watching endless pundits on, probably, Fox News espouse how this country has been run off the rails by gutless politicians kowtowing to bullying black thugs running and rioting in the streets."

And, finally, the last word in Kathy's piece (but not in our lesson) is meted.  I have a feeling this isn't an unusual or pretentious word at all, but I've never heard of it.

meted:
to allot; distribute; apportion: usually with out (trans. verb)

In this issue: "
The KKK was also formed as a fraternity of like-minded, fed-up brethren who sidestepped the law and meted out their own form of justice, all while stitching their rebel flags with the threads of “us versus them.”

The other pretentious word in this week's issue, polymath, was found in Anne Arenstein's piece on Opera Fusion.  It sounds very much like an algebra word (anybody remember polynomials? *shudder*) but it means a person of great and diversified learning (n.) Poly is Greek is for multiple or more than one. Makes sense!

That's all I've got, readers, enjoy the weekend!

 
 
by John Hamilton 01.28.2015 21 hours ago
at 04:25 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the_dark_crystal_film_poster

Forgotten Classics: The Dark Crystal

Reviewing lesser-known films that stand the test of time

“Another world, another time, in the age of wonder…”

It’s with that mystical and somewhat haunting quote that the audience is set up for something truly special.

In the 1980s Jim Henson, maestro behind the creation of the lovable and hilarious Muppets, decided to expand his creative mind and came out with two non-Muppet movies. In 1986 there was the cult classic Labyrinth, which featured the man who fell to earth himself, David Bowie. But there was one film he made earlier, in 1982, that many seem to overlook — Henson’s fantasy epic The Dark Crystal.

Along with fellow Muppeteer Frank Oz and illustrator Brian Froud, Henson managed to create the enchanted and wonder-filled world with terrific looking creatures, an interesting mythology and a movie with a cast made up entirely of elaborate animatronic puppets. That should sell you on the movie instantly.

The story is rather basic: Jen, one of the last remaining members of the race called Gelflings, must embark on a quest to heal the titular Dark Crystal. The crystal in question is missing one chard and Jen must find it and go to the dark castle where it is held. On his journey he meets another Gelfling named Kira and a cranky, eccentric yet wise, old hermit named Aughra (voiced by the late Billie Whitelaw). In the castle Jen must confront not only his fear and self-doubt but the inhabitants of the castle as well — the cruel buzzard-looking Skeksis and their giant beetle bodyguards called the Garthaim.

The movie very obviously has the common theme of good vs. evil. When the film begins, the narrator points out that when the Crystal cracked two new races appeared, the aforementioned Skeksis and their gentle, almost dragon-looking Mystics. As the film progresses it hints at that it wasn’t just a coincidence that these groups just happened to appear when the Crystal cracked. The movie is saying that we all have to battle and come to terms with our inner demons, whether it’s rage, greed or even something like self-doubt. Of course, like any fantasy story, there is a ton of expanded universe stuff that gives more details to this story. While every story should stand on its own, acknowledging these details explained in this universe may help the story a tad and it does add a good extra flavor to this awesome buffet of a movie.

When Jen finally gets the Crystal chard, his caretakers, the Mystics, find out about his discovery (through some spiritual connection, I’m sure) and they start their long journey to the castle. Now their trek almost rival that of Lord of the Rings, but it could very easily represent what it takes to confront your evil or the part of yourself you don’t want to confront. You may be willing to face it and come to terms with it, but who knows how long it’ll take, or if it’ll be successful at all?

This film also features probably one of my favorite movie characters of all time, Aughra the astronomer. She helps Jen find the missing chard and gives him some knowledge about why this journey is important. The reason she’s amazing to me is because she’s just so unique looking and her characteristics are not what you usually imagine when you think of the wise old mentor characters. She’s just splendid, and Billie Whitelaw’s voice fits perfectly.

This is a film that has an entire puppet cast, no humans in sight. That’s what makes the film so incredible. Jim Henson and his entire production pretty much started their Creature Shop just for this film alone. Every creature has an amazing amount of detail put into it. The craftsmanship is displayed in the clothing for the characters, in their faces, their sounds and even in the background. This is a movie where almost every scene has something to offer. Henson stated in the “Making of” special of this film that the first thing he thought of was the creatures and the world they were inhabiting. I think that displays what kind of creative mastermind Jim Henson was and a good reason why his non-Muppet related work should be appreciated.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 01.28.2015 26 hours ago
Posted In: News at 11:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brent spence bridge

Morning News and Stuff

Greater Cincinnati employment rates up; group confronts Mayor Williams at Norwood Council meeting; Kochs plan big political spending spree

Hello Cincy. There’s a lot happening today, so let’s get it going.

Later today, Mayor John Cranley and the Economic Inclusion Advisory Council he appointed last year will present the results of a study on ways to make the city more inclusive for businesses owned by minorities and women. The EIAC has been tasked with finding ways to get more minority-owned businesses included in city contracts, and the board came up with 37 suggestions, including ordinances that make diversity a priority in the city when it comes to contracts it awards. Cincinnati, which awards a very small number of contracts to minority and women-owned businesses, has already tried twice to find ways to boost that number, but Cranley is confident the EIAC’s recommendations will make the city a “mecca” for minority-owned businesses.

• Here’s some (qualified) good news for Greater Cincinnati: Unemployment in the region has fallen to 4.1 percent, the lowest it’s been since 2001. Though the region lost 2,000 jobs in December, numbers are up overall from this time last year, as we’ve added more than 21,000 jobs in the last 12 months. The Greater Cincinnati area’s unemployment rate at that time was 6.1 percent. Cincinnati’s fairing better than Ohio and the nation on the jobs front. Ohio’s unemployment rate is 4.8 percent, and the country’s as a whole is 5.4 percent. All those numbers have been trending downward. But there’s a caveat to all that good news: Wages have remained stagnant. More folks may have jobs, but folks aren’t necessarily making more or enough money at those jobs.

• Are we getting closer to a replacement for the Brent Spence Bridge? Ohio Gov. John Kasich, a Republican, and Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear are expected to announce a plan for the bridge at a news conference in Covington later today. Here’s what they’re expected to put on the table: a 50/50 split on costs between the two states, tolls that cost as close to $1 as possible with a discount for frequent commuters and ideas to make the $2.6 billion project more affordable. Kentucky owns the bridge and gets final say in the plans. A bill seeking a public-private partnership for the replacement project will more than likely be introduced in the Kentucky state legislature this session, though what happens after that is unclear. Kasich and Beshear have been working together on rehabbing the bridge, a vital link in one of the nation’s busiest shipping routes, since 2011. But Beshear will leave office after this year due to term limits. Meanwhile, Northern Kentucky officials and lobbying groups are pushing against tolls on the bridge, fighting it out with other, pro-toll business groups.

• The proposed Wasson Way bike trail through the city’s east side could stretch all the way into Avondale, supporters of the project say. The trail, which has been one of Mayor Cranley’s top priorities, is slated to go from Bass Island Park near Mariemont into Cincinnati along an unused rail line mostly owned by Norfolk Southern. Original plans had the trail stopping at Xavier, but a new 1-mile extension would carry cyclists all the way into uptown, near big employers like the city’s hospitals and University of Cincinnati. There is still a long road ahead for the trail, including securing right of way on land the trail passes through and an argument about whether to leave room for a future light rail line. Costs for the project range from $7 million to $32 million depending on that and other considerations.

• A group angry over Norwood Mayor Thomas Williams’ letter decrying “race-baiting black leaders” spoke at a Norwood City Council meeting yesterday evening asking for an apology. At least 14 people spoke out against the mayor’s letter, which he posted on social media last month in solidarity with the city’s police department. Among those who packed council chambers were Norwood residents, members of Black Lives Matter Cincinnati, a group we talk about more in this story, and activist and Greater Cincinnati National Action Network President Bishop Bobby Hilton.

"It was stabbed right in the heart ,” Hilton said at the meeting, referring to the letter. “I humbly ask if you would please retract that statement and we'll stand with you in supporting your law enforcement."

• A coalition of teachers, parents and progressive organizations in Ohio has banded together to ask the state board of education not to renew the charters of 11 charter schools in the state run by Concept Schools, Inc., including the troubled Horizon Academy in Dayton. That school is being investigated after former teachers there reported attendance inflation, sexual harassment, racism and other issues last year. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is also investigating several schools in Ohio run by the Chicago-based Concept after reports of misuse of federal money and other violations. Concept denies any wrong doing.

• Hey, this is a fun tidbit. The Koch brothers, those modern American captains of industry who make billions of dollars a year, mostly in the energy sector, are planning on spending big cash in the 2016 election. That in and of itself isn’t news — the Kochs have been dumping obscene amounts of cash into local, state and federal elections for years, aided recently by the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. But just how obscene the amount of cash could be in 2016 is noteworthy. The brothers’ political organization has set a goal of spending more than $889 million in the next presidential election cycle. That’s a lot. A whole lot. To illustrate how much, that amount is more than the $657 million the Republican National Committee and congressional campaign committees spent in 2012. Democrats spent even more, but not as much as the Kochs are planning to spend in 2016. Dumping that much cash into the election would more or less match the sky-high projected expenditures by Democrats and Republicans for the next presidential election. So basically, at least when it comes to political spending, we have a third party we didn’t vote for made up entirely of the Koch brothers and their rich donor cronies.  Awesome.

 
 
by Nick Swartsell 01.27.2015 51 hours ago
Posted In: News at 10:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
wwe-cranley

Morning News and Stuff

Someone has been shooting at Great American Tower; Cranley goes to Washington; a weird way to remember your ex on Valentine's Day

Hey all, let’s talk news.

This is a weird one. Someone or multiple someones fired shots at the Great American Tower downtown four times in the last week. The shooters have taken their potshots after business hours, when few people are in the building. There have been no injuries, though windows have been shattered. Police are a bit mystified by the shooting and are looking for a perpetrator. For now, employees will still be allowed in the building, though new security measures might be put in place by the building’s managers. While I’m not a huge fan of the tiara-ed building myself, there have to be better ways to register your distaste for a piece of architecture.

• Madisonville will receive $100 million in residential and commercial development in the coming year, which city officials say will provide a big economic boost to the East Side neighborhood. Mayor John Cranley touted the development yesterday at a Hamilton County Transportation Improvement District meeting. That board gave the go-ahead for an extension of Duck Creek Road past where it currently ends at Red Bank Road as part of the development. And there’s the rub: That part of the deal doesn’t sit well with members of the Madisonville Community Council, who are worried about possible traffic congestion caused by extending Duck Creek Road. The extension will cut close to John P. Parker Elementary School, and the council worries that it could limit the school’s enrollment. The council is looking for an explanation of why the road needs to be extended and some kind of compensation, perhaps in the form of scholarships that will help entice students to come to the school. RBM, a development group owned by nearby company Medpace, is planning the project. The company is working on details of the proposed development now.

• This weekend, the University of Cincinnati will host an 11-member task force appointed by President Barack Obama to investigate and hold conversations on policing in the 21st century. UC will host two of the task force's seven listening sessions Jan. 30 and 31. Other sessions have been held in Washington D.C., and two others will happen next month in Phoenix. The task force was created by a December executive order signed by Obama in the wake of controversy surrounding police use of force around the country.

• Mayor Cranley headed to Washington, D.C. last week to chat with federal officials about a number of issues, including Cincinnati’s bike trails, his Hand Up anti-poverty initiative and money to fix the crumbling Western Hills Viaduct. Cranley met with Department of Housing and Urban Development head Julian Castro, a fellow Democrat and the former mayor of San Antonio. He also met with officials at the Federal Highway Administration and joined up with other mayors from around the country to prod Congress to, well, do its job and actually pass some legislation this time around, specifically legislation that will help cities with development and infrastructure projects.

• Controversy over Norwood Mayor Thomas Williams’ letter decrying “racebaiting black leaders” continues. Activist group Black Lives Matter Cincinnati, which published a letter addressed to the mayor asking for an apology, has said it will be attending tonight’s Norwood City Council meeting, which is at 7:30 p.m., to ask for a response in person. Mayor Thomas has indicated to media that he is sticking by his letter, which was written to express support for the Norwood Police Department as questions around police use of force continue to be a big topic across the country.

• Promoters working to bring the 2016 Democratic National Convention to Columbus are feeling pretty good these days. Recently, Democrats announced they intend to hold the convention the week of July 25, which Columbus has indicated is its ideal time frame. Convention-goers will need to be housed in Ohio State University dorms, which fill up with students again in August. Democratic National Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz was in the city Sunday and yesterday on a tour to consider the city’s logistical ability to handle the huge event. Should Dems tap Columbus over contenders Philadelphia and Brooklyn, N.Y., Ohio will host three major political conventions in the next presidential election year, with the Republican National Convention in Cleveland and the NAACP convention here in Cincinnati in 2016.

• Finally, this national story is gross. And creepy. And kind of brilliant. The San Francisco Zoo is offering the chance to sponsor a Madagascar hissing cockroach or a big ole’ hairy scorpion in honor of your ex this Valentine’s Day.

"These invertebrates are aggressive, active and alarmingly nocturnal. Much like your low-life ex, they are usually found in and around low-elevation valleys where they dig elaborate burrows or 'caves,' " reads promotional material for the scorpion adoption. "Also just like you-know-who, when a suitable victim wanders by, the scorpion grabs the doomed creature with its pinchers and stings the prey ... Charming."

Whoa. Bitter much? For $50, you can adopt the scorpion for your ex, to whom the zoo will send a stuffed scorpion stinger and a certificate. A similar deal for the cockroach costs $25. Nothing says “I’m over you” like dropping $50 to say, “I’m over you.”

 
 
by Steven Rosen 01.26.2015 3 days ago
Posted In: Architecture, Visual Art at 12:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ac_bp_aaronbetsky_provided

Aaron Betsky Lands New Job

Former CAM director named new dean of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Aaron Betsky, who stepped down from his post as Cincinnati Art Museum director last year, has a new job: Dean of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. 

The school, which offers M.Arch degrees, offers graduate students educational training at Taliesin in Spring Grove, Wisc., and Taliesin West in Arizona. It is an evolution of the Taliesin Fellowship program created by Wright in 1932. Betsky, in addition to his curatorial and leadership experience at art and architecture museums, was trained as an architect at Yale University.

In a press release, Maura Grogan, chair of the Frank Lloyd Wright School's Board of Governors, said, "We sought a Director who, like Wright, relishes invention, challenge, and discovery; someone who is excited to chart architecture's next frontier; a person who in a time of conformity understands the beauty of idiosyncrasy; a leader who is ready to speak enthusiastically and persuasively to a profession in need of direction. It is clear to us that Aaron is that person."

Betsky succeeds Victor Sidy, dean since 2005, who is stepping down to return to his architectural practice. 

Betsky will lead a fundraising campaign to help the school become an autonomous independent subsidiary of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, as required by the Higher Learning Commission for it to continue its accreditation.

"I look forward to continuing the tradition of experimental architecture (Wright) did so much to define by helping new generations to discover how they can use design to make our world better," Betsky said in the release.
 
 
by Nick Swartsell 01.26.2015 3 days ago
Posted In: News at 10:40 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
anniversary_cartoon_ccv

Morning News and Stuff

CCV in a tizzy about sex again; Cincinnati Public Library opens Maker Space; will Ohio legalize weed?

Let’s just get right to it this morning.

It’s clear we as a society have lost our way. We’re so focused on the little things — pervasive poverty, military conflicts around the globe, our government’s inability to accomplish much of anything, etc. — that we’ve let a major atrocity slip right past us. But at least one local group has their priorities straight, and they’re not going to let someone get away with putting on a billboard three phonetic symbols representing the natural act of human procreation. That’s right, Citizens for Community Values is at it again as founder Phil Burress rails against a billboard on I-71 that reads “end boring sex” erected (oops, sorry) to advertise Jimmy Flynt Sexy Gifts, a new store in Sharonville owned by the brother of notorious porn mogul Larry Flynt. The store is only a couple miles from CCV’s headquarters, which is a pretty funny move. Jimmy Flynt says that’s because there’s big bucks in selling sexy stuff to suburban folks with some extra cash. Burress is outraged, however, that children riding with their parents on the interstate might see the word “sex.” Though really, you’d think CCV would be on board with a sentence that starts with the word “end” and ends with the word “sex.”

• Activists in Norwood have started a Change.org petition asking Mayor Thomas Williams to engage in a community forum around his racially charged comments on a Norwood Police Facebook page. The letter, signed simply “Norwood Citizens,” starts out by praising the department’s police officers and their work in the community, but condemns Williams’ statement made via social media in December. Those statements addressed to Norwood police pledged support for the department while decrying “race baiting black leaders and cowardly elected officials” over the ongoing protests around police shootings of unarmed black citizens. The online petition is the latest wrinkle in the drama around Williams’ statements, which led to calls for boycotts against Norwood and a response from black activists in the Greater Cincinnati area asking for an apology. Williams has subsequently told media that he stands by his statement.

• This is really cool: Today is the grand opening of the Cincinnati and Hamilton County Public Library’s Maker Space, which will be open to patrons of the library. The space includes technology like vinyl printers and cutting machines to make vinyl signs, laser cutting machines, 3D printers, sewing machines, audiovisual equipment including DSLR cameras, a soundproof recording booth with microphones and monitors, so-called “digital creation stations” with suites of creative software and a ton of other great things to help fledgling creatives with their projects, including something called an “ostrich egg bot.” Sounds very cool. All equipment will be free for patrons to use, but there will be a charge for materials like vinyl or resins for the 3D printers.

• Cincinnati’s Port Authority is looking to kick-start a local neighborhood by purchasing and renovating 40 single family homes in Evanston. The neighborhood borders Xavier University, contains Walnut Hills High School and is the home of King Records’ historic studio. But like many urban neighborhoods near the city’s core, it has fallen on hard times in the past few decades and has been ravaged by disinvestment, high rates of poverty and dwindling prospects for jobs. The port authority hopes it can work similar changes to those that have transformed Over-the-Rhine, which has seen a marked increase in development over the last five years.

"This is the 3CDC model on a miniature scale," Kroger Vice President Lynn Marmer, who chairs the port's board of directors, told the Business Courier. 3CDC is responsible for much of the change happening in OTR. The port hopes to sell the homes at market rate to entice families to move to Evanston.

• So, is legal pot coming to Ohio? Voters may be able to decide in November. The group ResponsibleOhio, one of two looking to put an initiative on the ballot this year, released some details of its plan this week, though the exact legal language of the proposed bill is fuzzy. The group suggests that growers around the state would cultivate the sticky-icky and send it to one of five labs in Ohio for potency and safety testing. Those labs would then distribute it to medicinal marijuana clinics and retailers. Should voters approve the plan, Ohio would be the first state to go from an outright ban on marijuana to full legality.

• Many conservative lawmakers in Ohio love the idea of the state paying for students to attend private schools, but it seems Ohio residents are more lukewarm to the idea. Ohio offers more than 60,000 vouchers to students so they can use funds set aside for public school to attend the private school of their choice. However, only one third of those vouchers were used last year, according to data from the State Board of Education reported by the Enquirer Saturday. Despite this, there seems to be little movement to reconsider the state’s school choice system, which is a darling of conservatives like Gov. John Kasich.

• Finally, on the national level, there’s this story, which is crazy. A junior at Yale University says he was leaving a library on campus when a police officer pulled a gun on him unprovoked because he allegedly matched the description of a burglary suspect. The twist in the story is that the student’s father is Charles Blow, a New York Times columnist who has written extensively about the deaths of Mike Brown and Trayvon Martin and more generally about racial inequities in America’s justice system. Talk about getting the wrong person. Yale officials say they’re investigating the incident. The younger Blow says he remains shaken by the encounter, while his columnist father has penned a furious piece about the confrontation. 

 
 
by Mike Breen 01.26.2015 3 days ago
Posted In: CEAs, Local Music at 12:11 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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2015 Cincinnati Entertainment Awards: The Winners

It was another great celebration of the Greater Cincinnati music scene Sunday night at Covington’s Madison Theater, as CityBeat presented the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards for the 18th straight year. The eclecticism of our local music scene was on display via excellent performances by nominees Mad Anthony, The Cliftones, Young Heirlooms, Zebras in Public, The Whiskey Shambles, Buggs Tha Rocka, Dark Colour and Injecting Strangers. (Pick up a CityBeat Wednesday for more on the show itself and stay tuned for photos from the event) 

Wussy emerged the big winner of the night, taking home the Album of the Year, Artist of the Year and Best Music Video CEAs, a nice capper to a breakthrough year that saw the band sell out shows across the country, score rave reviews from several high profile music press outlets and make its network TV debut on CBS This Morning


Below is the full list of 2015 Cincinnati Entertainment Award winners:

World Music/Reggae: The Cliftones

Jazz: Blue Wisp Big Band

Singer/Songwriter: Molly Sullivan

Country: 90 Proof Twang

Punk/Pop Punk: The Dopamines

Indie/Alternative: The Yugos

Rock: Buffalo Killers

Electronic: Dream Tiger

Blues: The Whiskey Shambles

Bluegrass: Rumple Mountain Boys

Folk/Americana: The Tillers

Metal/Hard Rock: Electric Citizen 

R&B/Funk/Soul: Under New Order

Hip Hop: Buggs Tha Rocka

Best Live Act: The Almighty Get Down

Best Music Video: Wussy’sNorth Sea Girls” (directed by Rich Tarbell)

New Artist of the Year: Honeyspiders

Album of the Year: Wussy’s Attica!

Artist of the Year: Wussy


 
 
by Steven Rosen 01.23.2015 6 days ago
at 01:04 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
julian morgenstern, huc president

Clifton's Hebrew Union College Celebrates 140 Years

The Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion presents lectures Sunday and Monday

Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion is using a two-day event this weekend to kick off the 140th anniversary celebration of the founding of HUC in Clifton. On Sunday at 4 p.m., it will observe the role of one of the school's past presidents, Julian Morgenstern, in rescuing 11 college professors and five rabbinical students from Nazi-occupied Europe and the Holocaust. Many of the professors were dismissed from their European faculty jobs by the Nazis because they taught Jewish studies. Despite financial struggles, HUC-JIR hired them, nearly doubling its faculty.

One of the speakers Sunday will be Susannah Heschel, a professor of Jewish Studies at Dartmouth College and the daughter of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, one of the rescued scholars. The event is being held on the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland as well as to observe International Holocaust Remembrance Day. The program, which will be free and open to the public, begins in Scheuer Chapel on the campus at 3101 Clifton Ave. People who want to attend can RSVP by calling 513-487-3098 or going to http://huc.edu/rsvp/IHRD.

On Monday at 4 p.m., there will be a panel discussion on Respectful Discourse on College Campuses to focus on the increasing amount of hate speech on college campuses. Three college presidents will discuss how to promote safe and respectful spaces for political discourse — Santa Ono of the University of Cincinnati, Eli Capilouto of the University of Kentucky and Rabbi Aaron Panken of HUC-JIR. Professor Heschel will moderate the panel.

A second part of the program, which will start at 5:30 p.m., will feature three members of the clergy also talking about the subject — Rabbi Irwin Wise of Adath Israel, a Conservative synagogue in Amberley Village; Rev. Bruce Shipman; and Rev. Eugene Contadino, S.M., of St. Francis de Sales, a Catholic parish in Cincinnati.

The Monday program will be held in Mayerson Hall on the HUC-JIR Clifton campus. People who want to attend can RSVP by calling 513-487-3098 or going to http://huc.edu/rsvp/IHRD.

 
 
 
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