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by Rick Pender 09.19.2014 4 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 08:05 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
the riverside _daniel c britt _l_ and gary mcgurk_r_ photo provided

Stage Door: Riverside, Reefer and Sondheim

There are several good productions onstage around town — check out CityBeat coverage of Hands on a Hardbody (a musical at ETC), The Great Gatsby (a classic American novel adapted for the stage at Cincy Shakes), Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club (a new adventure for the great detective at the Cincinnati Playhouse) and Tennessee Williams' prize-winning A Streetcar Named Desire (at the Covedale) — but if you've seen those, you have other choices for onstage entertainment. Here are three suggestions for shows a little more off the beaten path:

Local actor/director/writer Kevin Crowley has written a play called The Riverside, rooted in Cincinnati (Crowley is a member of a family that's lived locally for generations) and getting a production — he's directing it, too — at Clifton Performance Theatre, just west of the Clifton/Ludlow business district (404 Ludlow). It's set in an imaginary (or rather an imagined) bar called the Riverside, where a bunch of folks in 1989 are following the Pete Rose case about gambling that eventually got him banned from baseball. But there's a lot more happening — like protests in Tiananmen Square and the fall of the Berlin Wall. In CPT's tiny space is filled up with a lot of talent — Michael Shooner, Daniel Britt, Buz Davis, Mike Dennis, Mindy Heithaus, Reggie Willis, Mark Bowen, MaryKate Moran, Gary McGurk, Pete Wood, Cathy Springfield and Paul Morris — playing folks who hang out and argue about what's going on. I haven't caught this one yet, but everyone who has says it's worth seeing. Through Sept. 27. Tickets ($25): https://cpt.tixato/com/buy

Community theater company Showbiz Players is staging the musical Reefer Madness at the Carnegie in Covington. It opens tonight (and runs through Sept. 28). This tongue-in-cheek show was inspired by a very serious film from 1936 designed to inspire fear and loathing when clean-cut kids fall prey to marijuana. The producers "warn" that it contains adult humor, religious parody and drug use — and note that it will go "straight to your head." Should be a lot of fun for those mature enough to get the jokes ... Tickets ($19.50-$22.50): 859-957-1940

Side by Side by Sondheim was the first musical revue created using songs by the guy who wrote the music and lyrics for shows including Company, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, Gypsy and A Little Night Music. That was in 1976 in London, but the tunes are just as fresh and vibrant today as they were nearly four decades ago. Middletown Lyric Theatre is presenting this collection of 25 numbers for two weekends (tonight and tomorrow, as well as Sept. 26-27) — using seven singers and two pianists. Tickets ($15): 513-425-7140
 
 
by Rick Pender 09.12.2014 11 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 10:09 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 9-12 - sherlock holmes and the adventure of the suicide club - cincinnati playhouse - photo sandy underwood

Stage Door: Sherlock Holmes & More

Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club opened last night at the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park. It's a new adventure for the Victorian sleuth. How can that be, you might ask, if you're a Sherlock fan — this isn't a familiar title. That's because playwright Jeffrey Hatcher picked up Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's memorable detective, a master of deductive observation, and plugged him into a tale of mystery and intrigue conceived by Robert Louis Stevenson back in 1878. No spoilers here, but I will tell you that the plot of this show requires closely following a complex tale of both personal and political intrigue. Hatcher has set the story in 1914, on the brink of the first World War, and the state of international relations in Europe is woven into the tale. But there's nothing dry about this story, and Steven Hauck's performance as Sherlock is very satisfying: He brings a quirky physicality as well as a sharp wit to the character that makes him very engaging. Fans of Sherlock will not be disappointed by this show. Through Oct. 4. Tickets ($30-$85): 513-421-3888.

 

I attended the opening of The Great Gatsby at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company last week. In my review, I said, "the production gets the story and the era right," and I added that CSC's Justin McCombs "perfectly embodies" Nick Carraway, the honest narrator of this Jazz Age tale of nouveau riche Jay Gatsby and Daisy Buchanan, the one-time debutante who obsesses him. There's lots to like about this production, which captures the essence of lavish parties and the fast life of the Roaring Twenties. Cincy Shakes is committed to bringing classic literary works to the stage, and this production is a good example of how they get it done. Simon Levy's script hews close to F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1924 novel, and the company's actors bring life to the characters. Through Oct. 4. Tickets ($22-$36): 513-381-2273.

 

Everyone I've talked to about Hands on a Hardbody at Ensemble Theatre has been enthusiastic about the show that brings to life a contest to win a Nissan pickup truck by keeping one hand on it the longest. It's a true story (it was a 1997 documentary) and these feel like real people, down on their luck but dreaming what a difference that winning could make. The music is by Trey Anastasio (of Phish) and Amanda Green, and the script was written by Pulitzer Prize winner Doug Wright. ETC has staged memorable productions of his play I Am My Own Wife and his musical, Grey Gardens. But the real attraction is an excellent cast who make you believe in these people, struggling to stay away and outlast one another under the brutal sun beating down on the Texas parking lot of a Nissan dealership. It's a fine entertainment. Through Sept. 21. Tickets ($28-$44): 513-421-3555.

 

Just opened at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts is a production of Tennessee Williams's great American play, A Streetcar Named Desire. It's about a woman who's down on her luck but unwilling to admit it. When genteel Blanche DuBois moves with her pragmatic sister and her brutal, blue-collar husband, Stanley Kowalski, is a rude awakening that goes downhill fast. Through Oct. 5. Tickets ($-$): 513-241-6550.

 

If you've become a fan of shows in the intimate Clifton Performance Theatre, you might want to check out The Riverside, a play written and directed by local theater artist Kevin Crowley. It's a story set in a Cincinnati bar in 1989 as locals follow the saga of Pete Rose's demise in baseball, the fall of the Berlin Wall and Tiananmen Square. But the bar itself is changing, too, impacting the lives of the family that owns it as well as its patrons.

Through Sept. 27. Tickets ($25): https://cpt.tixato.com/buy/.

 
 
by Rick Pender 09.05.2014 17 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 01:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door 9-5 - etc hands on a hardbody - dallas padoven as chris alvaro - photo ryan kurtz

Stage Door: 'Tis the Season for Theater

If you'd like to go to the theater every evening for the next four days, there are plenty of options for you to consider as the 2014-2015 season is getting underway on stages all over town. Here are some good choices to consider:

Hands on a Hardbody opened on Wednesday at Ensemble Theatre Cincinnati, and CityBeat reviewer Stacy Sims called it "effervescent" and "offbeat" in her review, giving it a Critic's Pick. I was there, too, and couldn't agree more about the infectious, heartfelt joy coming from the big cast of 15. The show is based on a true story (the subject of a 1997 documentary) about people in a downtrodden Texas town who enter a contest to win a Nissan pickup truck by outlasting others who vow to keep one hand on the vehicle. The cherry-red truck is as much a character as any of the contestants, the physical embodiment of their hopes and dreams — which take the form of songs by Trey Anastasio (of Phish) and Amanda Green. The script by Pulitzer Prize winner Doug Wright treats these diverse, down-on-their-luck folks with dignity, and the performers (who often perform with the truck as their dance partner) bring every one of them to life in vivid ways. This one is a must-see, a great way to kick-off ETC's theater season. Through Sept. 21. Tickets ($28-$44): 513-421-3555

The Great Gatsby kicks off Cincinnati Shakespeare Company's season tonight. You didn't know Shakespeare wrote it? Well, he didn't. This theater company focuses on the Bard, to be sure, but it frequently branches out to present stage versions of other classics, in this case an adaptation of F. Scott Fitzgerald's 1925 classic about a mysterious nouveau-riche millionaire who's obsessed with a one-time debutante. Set in the Jazz Age and inspired by lavish parties the high-flying Fitzgerald attended on the prosperous North Shore of Long Island, Gatsby is a story about the ups and downs of the American Dream. Simon Levy's script is the only one authorized by Fitzgerald's estate, and Cincy Shakes is presenting its regional premiere. (And here's a tip: on opening nights at 6 p.m., the theater offers ticket holders a complimentary catered meal, beer and wine.) Through Oct. 4. Tickets ($22-$36): 513-381-2273

Sherlock Holmes and the Adventure of the Suicide Club opens next Thursday at the Cincinnati Playhouse, but previews begin for the season opener this Saturday (through Wednesday). Tickets for these performances are discounted, and you'll be seeing a show that's pretty much ready to go. Jeffrey Hatcher's script should be lots of fun for fans of the Victorian sleuth. He's taken the character created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and dropped him into a tale conceived by another inventive writer, Robert Louis Stevenson, for a mash-up that will keep even Baker Street regulars guessing. Tickets: 513-421-3888

Serials! at Know Theatre, which has presented episodes of six Fringe-like shows at two-week intervals all summer long, culminates on Monday evening at 8 p.m. with finales of each tale. Who will win the ultimate fist fight with the Devil in Flesh Descending? How long can Luke really stay in his bedroom during The Funeral? Will we ever find out what's really happening in Mars vs. The Atom? These questions and more will be answered on Monday. Even if you've missed a few episodes, don't worry: Each 15-minute performance begins with a brief recap of the story so far. Zany and fun for anyone who's enjoyed the annual Cincinnati Fringe Festival. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669

Finally, a tip for an eye-opening theater experience next weekend: On Sunday, Sept. 14, the Cincinnati area's first-ever South Asian Theater Festival happens in an all-day event at the Anderson Theater (7850 Five Mile Rd.). Five plays are scheduled to be presented, as well as panel discussions, seven hours of programming in all. The day begins at 12:30 p.m. and is set to conclude around 8 p.m. A limited number of tickets remain ($19-$29): SATFCincy.org

 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.26.2014 28 days ago
at 11:29 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
artworks

ArtWorks' Big Pitch Winners Announced Wednesday

Watch someone win $15,000 tomorrow night

Eight finalists in ArtWorks' Big Pitch competition will each get a five-minute business-pitch session before a panel of judges and a live audience tomorrow night, starting at  6 p.m. at the American Sign Museum, 1330 Monmouth St. in Camp Washington. The judges will decide the $15,000 grand prize winner; the audience will pick a $5,000 winner. Two runners-up will receive professional services from Dinsmore & Shohl; Clark, Schaeffer, Hackett and Co.; and/or LPK. Seated tickets for this event are sold-out but standing-room tickets are still available at artworkscincinnati.org.

Check out the finalists:

The Canopy Crew, owner Django Kroner

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Canopy Crew from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.

Chocolats Latour, owner Shalini Latour

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Chocolats Latour from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Golden Hour Moving Pictures, owner C. Jacqueline Wood

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Golden Hour Moving Pictures from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Heather Britt Dance Collective, owner Heather Britt

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Heather Britt Dance Collective from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Madisono’s Gelato and Sorbet, owner Matt Madison

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Madisono's Gelato and Sorbet from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Modern Misfit Classic Genius, co-owner Cordario Collier

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Modern Misfit Classic Genius from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Noble Denim, owner Chris Sutton

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Noble Denim from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


Steam Whistle Letterpress and Design, owner Brian Stuparyk

ArtWorks Big Pitch Finalist: Steam Whistle Letterpress from ArtWorks Cincinnati on Vimeo.


 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.21.2014 33 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 09:16 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
john_waters002

FotoFocus Is Bringing John Waters to Town

Filmmaker/provocateur, humorist, art collector and all-around pop-cultural icon John Waters is coming to Cincinnati on Oct. 11 as part of the opening-week programming of the FotoFocus Biennial 2014. He will be at Memorial Hall, performing This Filthy World about his long, rewarding career. Additionally, Waters' photograph "Inga #3 (1994)" is part of a FotoFocus exhibition, Stills. The theme of FotoFocus is "Photography in Dialogue."

FotoFocus has released this (edited) list of other Memorial Hall events for its first week of programming:

Wednesday, October 8

Performance by Berlin-based filmmaker Martha Colburn, with a Cincinnati ensemble led by Tatiana Berman and the Constella Ensemble

Thursday, October 9: Photography in Dialogue

Film: Gerhard Richter Painting (2011)

Featured speakers: Gallerist Deborah Bell, New York; Gallerist Howard Greenberg, New York; Director and Chief Curator Raphaela Platow, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; Art Critic Richard B. Woodward, New York; and FotoFocus Artistic Director and Curator Kevin Moore.

Friday, October 10: Landscapes

Film: Somewhere to Disappear, with Alec Soth (2010)

Featured speakers: Curator and Art Dealer Damon Brandt, New York; Artist Elena Dorfman, Los Angeles; Artist Matthew Porter, New York; Artist David Benjamin Sherry, Los Angeles; Associate Curator Elizabeth Siegel, Art Institute of Chicago; Museum Director Alice Stites, 21c Museum Hotel; and FotoFocus Artistic Director and Curator Kevin Moore.

Keynote Speaker: Jeff L. Rosenheim, Curator in Charge, Department of Photographs, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, on photography and the Civil War.

Saturday, October 11: Urbanscapes

Film: Bill Cunningham

Featured speakers: Architect José Garcia, Cincinnati; Curator Steven Matijcio, Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; Photography Director Ivan Shaw, Vogue, New York; Associate Curator of Photography Brian Sholis, Cincinnati Art Museum; and FotoFocus Artistic Director and Curator Kevin Moore.

Sunday, October 12: Forum

Featuring presentations and panel discussions by local participants, such as Artists Jordan Tate and Aaron Cowan.

For complete details about the FotoFocus 2014 Biennial visit here.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.18.2014 36 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art, Street Art at 09:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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ArtWorks Launches Mural Walking Tour

As Downtown and Over-the-Rhine continue to see a growth of walking tours related to the revived inner city's heritage (especially its brewing heritage) and architecture, a new one will soon be offered dedicated to its ever-growing collection of public murals.

ArtWorks, which is responsible for many of those murals (including a just-finished one at Eighth and Main streets dedicated to Cincinnati-born Pop artist Tom Wesselmann), will launch the tours in October as part of its Mural (Celebration) Month. They will continue into November, and then take a break. Beginning in 2015, they'll run April through November. Reservations will be needed for the tours, which will run 90 minutes and cost $20 for adults.

Artworks also is looking for volunteers to guide those tours. If you're interested in either, visit artworkscincinnati.org where information will be available soon. Bus tours are being discussed, too, once streetcar construction is completed.

 
 
by Rick Pender 08.15.2014 39 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:21 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
for stage door 8-15 - know theatre presents harry & the thief by sigrid gilmer id left to right sola thompson as vivian - darnell pierre benjamin as knox - photo by deogracias lerma

Stage Door: Busy August

Not too many years ago August was a very quiet month on local stages. No longer. You have plenty of good choices this weekend.

Stacy Sims reviewed Know Theatre's production of Harry & the Thief, which opened last week. She called it "a wonderfully ridiculous, history-twisting, large cast mash-up of a play," and that's just the beginning." Sigrid Gilmer's play is a riot of modern perspectives and Civil War values, a mingling of contemporary attitudes with opinions and behaviors long since set aside — but not so far off that we can't recognize them as prejudice, misogyny and racism. But Gilmer's weaves a lot of humor and satire around Harriet Tubman (a real woman who led many people out of slavery into freedom in the 1850s and 1860s). The play has been staged by guest director Holly Derr to spotlight a zany streak of humor that the playwright has generously salted across her script from start to finish. This feels a lot like a Fringe festival show, and that makes sense, since Know is the annual producer of the Cincy Fringe, and Harry & the Thief kicks off its 2014-2015 season.

As Stacy noted, "this bodes well" for the theater now being managed artistically by Andrew Hungerford. I watched a performance earlier this week with a full house resulting from Know's "Welcome Project," throwing its doors open to anyone who wants to come on several Wednesday evenings (hoping that a few of them will pay something, but requiring nothing more than showing up). I suspect many of those in attendance will be recommending this production to friends. Through Aug. 30. Tickets ($20 most of the time, although you can get rush tickets for remaining seats 10 minutes before curtain time, and free next Wednesday, Aug. 20): 513-300-5669.

Speaking of the Fringe, Know presents occasional encores from past festivals. On Sunday evening at 8 p.m. (one night only) you can catch one of the best acts I've ever enjoyed in the Cincy Fringe: David Gaines returns with 7(x1) Samurai, retelling Kurasawa's classic 1954 film in a one-man show that was a hit of the 2009 festival. It's true to the source about victimized peasants, marauding bandits and samurai warriors, astonishing to watch and one hell of a performance. Tickets ($15): 513-300-5669.

There's another astonishing, virtuoso work of theater onstage, this one south of the Ohio River at Covington's Carnegie Theatre. It's Stephen Sondheim's Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. I plan to see it on Friday evening (it opened last week), but people are already saying that Justin Glaser brings a great voice to the maniacal killer and Helen Raymond-Goers sings the role of the meat-pie-baking Mrs. Lovett with both wit and polish. This is one of the greatest musicals of the late 20th century, and all indicators are that this is a production worth seeing. Through Aug. 23. Tickets ($21-$28): 859-857-1940.

Cincinnati Shakespeare Company will double your choices this weekend. At its Race Street theater you'll find the final performances of The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), a comic rendering — or at least passing references to — all 38 of the Bard's plays, his sonnets and some amusingly presented "facts" about his life. It's a romp from start to finish, featuring three of Cincy Shakes' best actors having a hell of a good time onstage, Jeremy Dubin, Justin McCombs and Nicholas Rose. Tickets ($22-$31): 513-381-2273.

If you want something a tad closer to the original, find one of CSC's free touring productions at an area park: Macbeth on Friday night (7 p.m.) at Keehner Park in West Chester and Saturday evening (7 p.m.) at Cottell Park in Mason or A Midsummer Night's Dream on Sunday evening (6 p.m.) at Washington Park. These are somewhat reduced productions (done in two hours) using just six actors: That makes them all the more exciting to watch — and to be dazzled by actors who can convincingly play multiple roles.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.14.2014 40 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art at 08:00 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
dress

Conserving a Pneumatic Dress at the Cincinnati Art Museum

Recently at Cincinnati Art Museum, Mary Baskett wore this very colorful and exciting "pneumatic dress" designed by Naoki Takizawa for Issey Miyake's 2000-2001 fall/winter collection, while textile conservator Chandra Obie discussed the very complicated but successful effort the museum has completed to restore and preserve the dress, which had started to leak air.

Baskett owns it, but it had been on display (and inflated for an extended period) at the museum's 2007 exhibition Where would you wear that? The Mary Baskett Collection. There have been discussions but no formal commitment about donating this dress to the museum. If that happens, it's doubtful it would be worn again.

Obie's discussion was sponsored by the museum's popular and rewarding Art 360 program, which gives a group a chance to learn more about specific pieces of art. The next Art 360 program is Aug. 23 at 2 p.m., when the museum's Mary Claire Angle — assistant director of school-based learning — will discuss Donald Judd's "Untititled" minimalist sculpture. Event is free; reservations required at 513-721-2787.

 
 
by Rick Pender 08.01.2014 53 days ago
Posted In: Theater at 09:35 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
shakes

Stage Door: Free Shakespeare!

The big show this weekend will be Lumenocity in Washington Park. If you were lucky enough to get a ticket, you'll be seeing some great images on Music Hall's facade with accompaniment by the Cincinnati Symphony. If you weren't so lucky, you can still enjoy the show via radio (WGUC), television, big screens (at Fountain Square and Riverbend, for free) or via live streaming at lumenocity2014.com.

If you want to check out a free show at another park, how about free performances of A Midsummer Night's Dream? Cincinnati Shakespeare kicks off its Shakespeare in the Park tour this weekend. They'll be at Seasongood Pavilion at Eden Park on Friday evening, at Harry Whiting Brown Lawn in Glendale on Saturday and the Community Park Pavilion at the Milford Historical Society in Milford on Sunday. Performances generally begin around 7 p.m. Show up earlier to get a good seat and enjoy six of Cincy Shakes actors playing a bunch of characters in a very funny comedy.

On the West Side, it's the final weekend for Footloose The Musical, presented as the 33rd annual summer show by Cincinnati Young People's Theatre at the Covedale Center for the Performing Arts. This is a program that gives teens from across Greater Cincinnati a chance to work onstage and backstage. During the past three decades more than 2,300 kids have participated. The show, based on a popular movie from 1984, is about a teenager and his mother who move from Chicago to a small farming town where dancing is frowned upon by the local preacher. But his rebellious daughter shakes things up and love wins out. It's a fine show for teens. Tickets ($12-$16): 513-241-6550.

If you're willing to make the drive to Dayton, you have the opportunity to check out workshops of new musical theater material at the Human Race Theatre Company. Molly Sweeney is about a young woman whose blindness becomes an obstacle for her new husband to overcome, even though she has a different perspective. (It's happening Friday night at 8 p.m. and Saturday at 2 p.m.) The second work is a songwriter showcase (Saturday at 8 p.m.) by a dozen creators who are working on new shows. It's being hosted by Dayton native Susan Blackwell, creator of the clever [title of show]. Advance tickets ($15): 888-228-3630 – or $20 at the door at the Loft Theatre (126 N. Main St., Dayton).
 
 
by Steven Rosen 07.30.2014 55 days ago
at 08:06 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Art Museum Announces New Director

Cameron Kitchin to take over Oct. 1

The Cincinnati Art Museum on Tuesday announced in this press release its new director, who is replacing Aaron Betsky. The latter announced his resignation late last year and left his post in May.

CINCINNATI - JULY 29, 2014 – The Board of Trustees of the Cincinnati Art Museum today unanimously voted to name Cameron Kitchin as the museum’s director. Kitchin, a nationally recognized innovator and leader in the museum field, comes to Cincinnati from the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis, Tenn., where he served as director. Kitchin will begin in his new position on Oct. 1. He will report to the museum’s Board of Trustees.

“On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Cincinnati Art Museum, I am excited to announce the appointment of Cameron Kitchin as our new director,” said Marty Ragland, president of the Board of Trustees and co-leader of the search committee. “From Day 1, our members and patrons, as well as members of our search committee, board and staff, agreed that, in addition to being an accomplished museum leader, our new director must have a passion for art, be a strategic thinker and embrace our city with the goal of bringing people to the enjoyment of art. We found these qualities and many more in Cameron.”

Kitchin will oversee the entire institution, including collections, staff, facilities, exhibitions, research resources, education and outreach programs, external relations, fundraising and administrative activities. As an arts and cultural leader, Kitchin will initiate, maintain and develop new partnerships and collaborations in Cincinnati, the state and the region to enhance and support the Cincinnati Art Museum’s mission to bring people and art together in ways that transform everyday lives and the community.

Kitchin’s appointment comes at the end of a nearly seven-month search by the committee led by Ragland and board chairman Dave Dougherty. The Board of Trustees also hired professional search firm, Russell Reynolds Associates, to help guide the process. Kitchin won the unanimous vote of the search committee prior to going to the board vote.
"I am greatly honored to be appointed to serve as director of the Cincinnati Art Museum,” Kitchin shared. “I look forward to joining with the Cincinnati community to grow the museum's role in the life of our new city. I have long admired the Art Museum’s exhibitions, programs, collections and transformative educational initiatives. I am excited now to lead a team of talented professionals and supporters, with our dedicated trustees, to expand the impact and to broaden the reach of the museum to serve all Cincinnatians."

Kitchin led the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, one of the South’s leading art museums, for six years. He oversaw the growth of the museum as a community-based institution, leveraging the museum’s significant collections and history to forge new partnerships with a wide network of cultural institutions, educational entities, universities and social service agencies. Under his leadership, the Brooks engaged in rigorous new educational initiatives, pursued exciting original scholarship and successfully achieved broad appeal in exhibitions and programs. Kitchin led the museum through two comprehensive strategic plans, a capital plan and a groundbreaking program in early childhood education in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution. Other significant new achievements included art therapy, Alzheimer’s services, teen art programs and overhauls of critical museum systems, collections databases and security infrastructure. Kitchin’s innovations and effectiveness in reaching new audiences across the entire community, building bridges through public service and leading a diverse and talented professional museum team drew the attention of the Cincinnati Art Museum’s search committee. In addition, Kitchin’s use of technology as a tool for exploring art and his creative public programming impressed the museum’s board.

Prior to joining the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art, Kitchin served as executive director of the Virginia Museum of Contemporary Art, the statewide contemporary art museum in Virginia. During his six years there, he led the museum through a comprehensive institutional revitalization, increased visitation and achieved a balanced budget every year. He also mounted numerous acclaimed exhibitions of national and international note while simultaneously opening the doors to new audiences through creative programming. His successful completion of a major capital campaign and commitment to social discourse at the museum raised the museum to new heights during his tenure.

Previously, Kitchin managed Economics Research Associates’ national consulting practice for museums and cultural attractions for three years in Washington, D.C., and led the economics component of Washington’s Museums and Memorials Master Plan, as well as studies for the Newseum and National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, D.C. In previous engagements, he directed the American Alliance of Museums’ strategic planning process, headed AAM’s national political campaign in support of museums and led a complex digital copyright initiative for museums.

Kitchin is an active member of the Association of Art Museum Directors and has served on numerous task forces, including one on AAMD’s national standards on deaccessioning and broadened and diversified the membership of the association as an appointee to the AAMD membership committee. He received a bachelor’s degree in fine arts from Harvard University in 1993 and an MBA with a concentration in not-for-profit and museum management from the Mason Graduate School of Business, William & Mary in 1999. Kitchin was also selected from among top international museum professionals to participate as a residential program fellow in the Getty Leadership Institute’s Museum Leadership Institute, the most rigorous and longest-established academic program for interdisciplinary museum leadership, in 2008. He is also an AAM accreditation peer reviewer, an IMLS national grant panelist and an active leader in numerous professional associations and societies.

Kitchin will relocate to Cincinnati this fall. He will be joined by his wife Katie - a national public policy expert in homelessness and child and family wellbeing - and his three young children, ages 10, 7 and 3.

 
 

 

 

 
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