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by Maija Zummo 01.06.2014 101 days ago
Posted In: Street Art, Get Involved, Arts community at 03:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ecosculpt

Washington Park Now Accepting 2014 Ecosculpt Submissions

Get ready to recycle artfully

Sick of just tossing your cans and bottles into the recycling bin? Good news: EcoSculpt, a three-week art installation event comprised of sculptures made of recycled and/or recyclable materials, is returning to Washington Park in celebration of Earth Day.

And EcoSculpt artists not only get to exhibit how artfully eco-friendly they are in large-scale sculptures, they also have a chance to win cash prizes. According to a press release, three judges will choose first, second and third prize winners based on concept, execution and construction. Cash prizes of $500, $250 and $150, as well as a People’s Choice prize of $100, will be awarded at the official EcoSculpt Award Ceremony on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 6:30 p.m.

Those interested in participating can visit washingtonpark.org to access an electronic application; please include a PDF or JPEG version of your sketch in your submission. The deadline to enter is 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28. Accepted applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, March 7.

View 2014 EcoSculpt submission guidelines or to submit your original eco-friendly design hereec.

 

 

 
 
by Jac Kern 10.02.2013
Posted In: Street Art, Visual Art at 11:01 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Cincinnati Street Art Featured on BuzzFeed's Community Blog

Queen City again recognized on popular list-icle site

BuzzFeed — a popular source for news bits, pop culture stories and “list-icles” such as “19 Relics From The ’90s Hologram Epidemic — has published many stories about Cincinnati this year alone. There's “15 Gorgeous Photos Of The Old Cincinnati Library,” which compiles swoon-worthy photographs of our Main Library’s past, as well as “11 Cincinnati Foods That Are Better Than Yours” and “31 Ways To Tell You’re From Cincinnati,” both of which have been shared on social media by countless locals — and mocked/criticized for being outdated and overly-generalizing (some of us actually subsist on a diet of foods that are not covered with runny chili and cheese!).

Chris Breeden, promotions director at Arnold's Bar and Grill, recently added another local list-icle to the site (on BuzzFeed’s Community page), highlighting the city’s bevy of public art created by globally recognized street artists.

Breeden's “9 World Famous Street Artists (You Never Would Have Guessed Are) Up In Cincinnati, OH” features photos of work by Shepard Fairey, Vhils, The London Police and other street artists that have adorned Cincinnati surfaces. Also on the list is French artist JR, who was recently in town for his exhibit at the Contemporary Arts Center (on view through Feb. 2, 2014).

Street art featured in the list can be seen everywhere from Arnold's downtown and Amerasia in Covington, Ky. The story details each artist’s background and home base as well as how to find each mural/painting/poster/graffiti site.

 
 
by Nolan Shea 04.16.2012
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art, Street Art at 09:04 AM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 
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Light Painting: Matt Treece's Story

“Light painting and graffiti are very similar,” says Matt Treece, 23-year-old local photographer and light painter. “I realized this when I found myself hopping through a shattered first story window on the backside of an abandoned factory on the East Side at 2:30 a.m., alone, with my backpack on, creeping around in the darkness looking for a good spot.”

Treece is searching for that “magical spot.” He doesn’t risk the charge of vandalism like graffiti artists, but he still risks a trespassing charge with every foray into the night.

Light painting is a photography technique that involves moving a camera or adding a light source while operating with a slow shutter speed. The resultant images include colorful, swirly lines and other creative effects. Like graffiti artists, “both of us trespass illegally. Both of us are night owls. Both of us have explored tunnels, creeks, bridges and abandoned buildings and have gained such a good understanding about the layout of the city,” Treece says.

Suffice it to say, Treece’s understanding of all the nooks and crannies of the city is far more in-depth than the average daylight city dweller.

Before his nightly jaunt into the darkness, Treece packs his equipment bag. At first glance, you wouldn’t think anything is out of the ordinary. Treece stuffs a Nikon D90 camera, remote shutter release, Nikon SB-600 Flash and two tripods into the main compartment of the bag. But the smaller compartments receive the stranger tools of the trade.

He reveals children’s toys, ones that light up. Treece begins to stuff light swords, mini color changing glow sticks, six different kinds of flashlights, laser pointers, finger LEDs, glow sticks and his custom nine LED light orb tool into every remaining compartment of his equipment bag.

All that’s missing is the party favors. At this point, it’s almost unclear if he’s going to a rave or going out to light paint.

Treece almost forgets the most important tool: batteries — lots of them.

Light painting hasn’t always been Treece’s passion, however. “I’ve always been interested in art, but my interest in light painting started sometime around May or June of last year,” he says. “I was browsing the Internet randomly and saw a picture of what looked like a spinning waterfall of sparks. I had seen light painting prior to this photo, but it really didn’t click that these [light painters] were using super long exposures and crazy light sources to create works of art.”

That night, Treece spent hours reading up tutorials on the website lightpaintingphotography.com and a particular online community that called itself “the light junkies.” There he learned that it was plausible to make his own contribution to the light painting community.

Not all places are created equal in the light painting community. Living in Cincinnati is both wonderful and a pain. Clifton Heights, Treece’s main stomping ground, provides him with an incredible amount of light pollution, which can be attributed to the area’s attempt to curb crime activity.

Cincinnati still provides an ample amount of opportunity to create. “[Cincinnati] has some of the most bad-ass tunnels built in the early 1900s. … Cincinnati also has a creek system, which over time had to be cemented because of industrial waste,” Treece says. “These tunnels and channels have created some of the best spaces for light painting.”