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by Nick Swartsell 05.12.2016 16 days ago
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Council passes alternate ID resolution; Hamilton County BOE officially moving to Norwood; Planned Parenthood sues Ohio

Hey all. It’s been a busy 24 hours in Cincinnati. Here’s what’s happened. 

Cincinnati City Council yesterday passed a resolution recognizing an alternative ID card for undocumented immigrants, the homeless and others that will be sponsored by the Metropolitan Area Religious Coalition of Cincinnati and issued by Catholic Charities of Southwest Ohio. The card is intended to provide a little extra dignity for the homeless, undocumented, those returning from incarceration and others who may have trouble getting a state-issued ID. City officials say it will also help emergency personnel and other municipal bodies better serve some of the city’s most vulnerable residents.

• Council also approved $315,000 in planning funding for a proposed bridge between South Cumminsville and Central Parkway near Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Currently, an exit from I-74 serves as a gateway between the neighborhood and the college, but it’s being removed as the Ohio Department of Transportation continues its revamp of the I-75 corridor. The proposed bridge has been controversial, and some council members argued it’s unnecessary as bigger infrastructure needs like the Western Hills Viaduct loom. The viaduct, which will need replacement in the next decade, will cost hundreds of millions to fix. Mayor John Cranley, who supports the so-called Elmore Street Bridge in South Cumminsville, says the viaduct replacement is a separate matter that will hinge heavily on state funding, and that the Elmore Bridge will provide much-needed economic benefits to the neighborhoods it serves.

• Council didn’t talk about it in their meeting yesterday, but shortly afterward, city administration dropped a minor bombshell about Cincinnati’s streetcar. Per a memo from City Manager Harry Black, the city will pay $500,000 less than expected for the five streetcars it purchased from CAF USA, the company that constructed them. That’s because some of the cars were delivered late. The cars were supposed to be in the city’s hands by December last year, but the last one wasn’t delivered until earlier this month. The late deliveries didn’t cause any delays in implementation of the transit project, but a clause in the contract between CAF and the city stipulates the financial penalty for late delivery. The city will withhold the money from its payments to CAF.

• The Greater Cincinnati area’s largest construction company is moving its headquarters from Bond Hill to the West End after 
Cincinnati City Council yesterday approved a land deal with Messer Construction. The company will get land at 930 Cutter St. from the city for $2 to build its new $12.5 million headquarters, which will house more than 115 employees. Mayor John Cranley said the deal was an incentive to keep Messer here, and calls it a “huge win” for the city. Messer has said that they were attracted to the location because it’s close to redevelopment happening in downtown and Over-the-Rhine.

• Meanwhile, Hamilton County Commissioners yesterday voted to move the Hamilton County Board of Elections headquarters from Broadway Avenue in downtown Cincinnati to Norwood. Voting access advocates have decried this move, saying it will make the BOE harder to get to for many in the county and that the HQ should stay centrally located downtown. Supporters of the move, including board of elections members like Hamilton County Democratic Chairman Tim Burke, say the Norwood location will be more central for everyone in the county. Both the four-member board of elections and three-member county commission unanimously approved the move. The move won’t happen until after the 2016 election cycle.

• Here’s an interesting piece about the increasing amount Cincinnati Public Schools spends on advertising to try and compete with the area’s 50 or so charter schools. CPS spent more than $123,000 on billboard, radio and TV ads aimed at parents of children in the district. Next year, that looks to increase to $345,000. CPS loses hundreds of thousands of dollars to charters every year, though that loss has been decreasing recently. The marketing expenditures are somewhat in line with other large urban school districts in Ohio, though far less than suburban schools nearby, many of which have little to worry about in terms of competing with charters.

• Planned Parenthood of Southwest Ohio yesterday filed a federal lawsuit against the state of Ohio over recently passed legislation seeking to strip state and some federal funds from the women’s healthcare provider. Conservative lawmakers cite the fact that Planned Parenthood provides abortions as the reason for the move, though the funds being kept from the organization go to health screenings and sex education, not abortions. In its suit, Planned Parenthood claims the law, which will go into effect later this month, is an illegal attempt to penalize it for providing abortions.

• Breaking news: there’s drama in the GOP. Well, ok, you probably already knew that, but anyway. The hangover from the party’s presidential primary is still on the horizon for a lot of Republicans, and one of them could be Ohio State Treasurer Josh Mandel. As a statewide GOPer, Mandel was expected to line up behind Ohio Gov. John Kasich’s presidential bid. But instead, Mandel endorsed Rubio, tweaking Kasich’s nose several times in the process. Those snubs included predicting that Kasich would leave the race quickly and voting for Rubio in the Ohio GOP primary. Mandel has made moves to court the hardline conservatives in his party, whose support he will surely need, according to this Cleveland Plain Dealer op-ed, since the Kasich wing of the Ohio GOP now has him squarely in their crosshairs.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 04.08.2016 50 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 04:50 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
clinton

Rumble for Democratic Nomination (Mostly) a Clean Fight

Until recently, the most heated the battle for the Democratic presidential nomination got consisted of disagreements with campaign finance and fighting over the word “progressive.” For the past year, Democrats have prided themselves with debating issues and not mangling each other like the Republicans.

However, the battle over the April 19 New York primaries have added a new layer of tension to the campaigns. The Empire State is Clinton territory — serving as one of the state’s senators from 2001 - 2009. But the Sanders campaign has launched a full assault, gathering an army of mostly young volunteers and holding massive rallies in Clinton’s backyard — aiming for a major upset.

Clinton still leads the insurgent campaign, according to the most recent Quinnipiac poll, but nowhere near the 40 points she was leading by in the same poll conducted in June. The Democratic frontrunner’s New York support has been bleeding for months. While a loss in New York would not spell doom for the former secretary of state, it would be a massive moral loss.

The delegate gain and upset would likely propel Sanders unlike any of his other victories in this election. The Vermont senator needs 56 percent of the remaining delegates to topple Clinton. However, that does not take superdelegates into account  — which Clinton has a virtual monopoly on.

Clinton lashed out against Sanders’ qualifications for the presidency, suggesting he may not be ready for the Oval Office while echoing some of her rhetoric in the past, labeling the Vermont senator as a one-issue candidate.

“He’s been talking for more than a year about doing things that he obviously hasn't studied or understood,” Clinton said in an interview on Morning Joe. “What he has been saying about the core issue in his whole campaign doesn’t seem to be rooted in an understanding of either the law or the practical ways you get something done.”

While addressing supporters in Philadelphia, Sanders came back swinging in an unprecedented move.

“We have won seven out of eight of the recent primaries and caucuses, and she has been saying lately that I may be ‘not qualified’ to be president. Well, let me just say in response to secretary Clinton. I don’t believe she is qualified if she is through her super PAC, taking tens of millions of dollars in special-interest funds,” Sanders said.

This is the first time either Democratic candidate has suggested their challenger is “unqualified,” a phrase that caught a lot of media attention and folks questioning if Sanders is keeping true to his original promise of not being negative.

“I don’t think you are qualified if you get $15 million from Wall Street with your super PAC. I don’t think you're qualified if you voted for the disastrous war in Iraq. I don’t think you are qualified if you supported virtually every disastrous free trade agreement that have cost us millions of decent paying jobs.” Sanders added.

Clinton expressed her puzzlement over Sanders’ statement, saying, “I don’t know why he’s saying that, but I will take Bernie Sanders over Donald Trump or Ted Cruz anytime."

Ask virtually any Bernie Sanders supporter and one of the most respectful qualities they see in the Vermont senator is he has never ran a negative ad over the course of three decades in the political arena — despite losing about half-a-dozen elections over the years.

On the flipside, there’s undoubtedly a lot of frustration in the Sanders camp that the campaign largely holds back munitions it has against Clinton. For base liberals, Hillary Clinton is standing in the way of what they see as a real future for progressive politics. To a lot of his supporters, Sanders is a once-in-a-generation dream candidate, similar to the energy behind President Barack Obama when he first sought the presidency.

This has bubbled into a real desire that Sanders will finally take the gloves off and lash out against the Democratic frontrunner. However, if Sanders would attempt any knockout attack, it would be antithetical of the campaign’s values. It’s a rarity Sanders even names Hillary Clinton. In most speeches he refers to her as “my opponent” or indirectly jabs at her with his populist rhetoric.

Clinton’s campaign is likely equally frustrated. Lashing out against Sanders would risk further alienating his liberal followers, and Clinton’s mission this summer has to be uniting the party and courting Sanders supporters to combat the Republican nominee.

There’s a movement called “Bernie or Bust,” where Sanders supporters are refusing to turn out to the polls in November if he isn’t the Democratic nominee. With bulk of the electorate under 30 siding with Sanders, some of which very passionately, Clinton has had to be careful not to bruise up the Vermont senator. Also, any attack she lays out leads to the massive donations for the Sanders camp.

When Sanders said Clinton was “unqualified” at the Philadelphia rally, the crowd went wild. He finally fed that desire to throw a direct punch. It was the kind of red meat the Republican base has been spoiled with in the form of “Lyin’ Ted” and “Little Marco.” It is not unthinkable that supporters for any candidate on either side of the aisle craves some level of red meat — Democrats rarely get that service in any election.

In an election where the frontrunner for the opposing party defends the size of his genitalia on a debate stage, it is hard to imagine any realistic scenario in which either Democratic candidate goes too far.

After some blasted Sanders for his heated rhetoric, he ceased fire on the “unqualified” remarks. In a town hall Friday, Sanders said “of course” his Democratic rival is fit for the presidency. “On her worst day she would be an infinitely better president than either of the Republican candidates,” Sanders said.

 
 
by Natalie Krebs 04.04.2016 54 days ago
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Cincy Planning Commission OKs riverfront apartment complex; Metropolitan Sewer District faces more allegations of shady contracts; Trump calls on Kasich to quit presidential race

Good morning, Cincinnati! Here are your morning headlines as you gear up for the Opening Day festivities. 

 Well, it's finally here. The giant citywide party that is the kickoff to the start of baseball season. It's my first time experiencing Cincinnati's famous Opening Day celebration, but judging from the amount of Reds fans I've already seen lined up on Race Street this morning, it's going to be a big baseball party. If you're not lucky enough to get to watch the Reds play the Philadelphia Phillies at the Great American Ball Park this afternoon, there are still many festivities well worth ditching school and work for. Some ideas of what to do can be found herehere and here

 The Cincinnati Planning Commission voted Sunday to allow an Atlanta-based developer to move one step closer to building a $90 million apartment complex near the riverfront. The Novare Group plans to build a 25-story apartment building featuring 352 rental units and 3,000-square-feet of retail space. The company says it would like to begin construction this summer to have the complex finished by winter 2017. But before any groundbreaking happens, the plan still has a few more hoops to jump through: The Novare Group will need to submit final development plans to the Planning Commission as well as the City Council for approval before it gets the green light.

 Cincinnati's Metropolitan Sewer District, similar to the Cincinnati Park Board, is facing allegations of bad contracts, questionable relationships and overspending by the Enquirer. An Enquirer investigation has asserted that MSD is paying contractors way too much for their work, and MSD officials have had little oversight over major projects like the $3 billion court-ordered sewer reconstruction project. City Manager Harry Black so far has responded to the Enquirer's requests for MSD public records by tightening their spending policies, drawing up a new ethics policy, launching an audit into the department and has started personally approving all of MSD's contracts. 

 Donald Trump has called for ultimate underdog, Ohio Gov. John Kasich, to drop out of the presidential race. Trump is currently campaigning hard in Wisconsin, trying to rouse voters for the state's primary on Tuesday, and said Sunday that Kasich should just throw in the towel because it's impossible for him to secure the GOP nomination with his current delegate count. Kasich is far, far short of the necessary 1,237 delegates needed to secure the nomination. He has secured just 143 delegates, compared to Trump's count of 736 and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz's count of 463. Trump said Kasich is doing little more than taking away delegate votes that could be going to him. Kasich's campaign responded by saying that none of the remaining GOP candidates have enough delegates to secure the nomination either. One of Kasich's spokespeople told the Associated Press that Trump should consider taking his own good advice and drop out of the race before the GOP convention in Cleveland this July. 

• Last weekend, during an interview on ABC, Kasich defended the many restrictions on abortion he's signed into law as Ohio governor. His comments come in the wake of the massive pushback Trump received for telling MSNBC that women seeking abortions should be punished if abortion is outlawed. Kasich said that lawmakers must be careful about passing abortion restrictions that don't cause a constitutional conflict and called for the Supreme Court to overturn Roe v. Wade in an attempt to appeal to social conservatives. Well, pro-choice critics say Kasich actually doesn't care about "constitutional conflicts" as the 16 restrictions on abortion providers Kasich has signed into law as governor have caused half of the state's clinics to close.
 
 
by Steve Beynon 03.28.2016 61 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 11:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Why Is Kasich Still Running?

Ohio Governor John Kasich was crushed in the last round of primary contests, even losing to the ghost of Sen. Marco Rubio in Utah from early ballots casted before the Florida senator terminated his campaign. Between the recent contests in Utah and Arizona, Kasich failed to pick up any delegates.

This battle for the Republican nomination has not been kind to governors. Chris Christie, Scott Walker, Bobby Jindal and Mike Huckabee have all been casualties in a rambunctious political climate that seeks mischief and is giving the finger to the establishment by hopping on the Trump train or embracing the rebellious Texas Senator Ted Cruz.

Right now, Kasich sits with a mere 143 delegates. Trump is far in the lead with 739, followed by Cruz’s 465. It is a long shot for the Texas senator to halt Trump’s warpath to the nomination — it is mathematically impossible for Kasich. It takes 1,237 delegates to secure the GOP nomination. Even if the Ohio governor won every contest moving forward, there are not enough delegates for him to be the nominee.

Kasich’s only victory was Ohio — a contest he won by 11 points. However, Trump defeated the governor in virtually all of Ohio’s southern counties and every county that borders Pennsylvania and West Virginia. While Kasich’s victory in his home state was a moral victory, it highlighted that even with a home field advantage, he still could not get a sweeping victory like we saw with Cruz and Sen. Bernie Sanders in their states.

Other than that, he probably holds the record for most fourth-place victories. Outside of the Buckeye State, Kasich has struggled with name recognition or gathering any meaningful traction — a weakness that is entirely understandable when you have to make noise while in the same room as a man that flies around on a private jet with his name on it.

Kasich’s strategy is digging in northeastern states like Pennsylvania, where Cruz is not expected to perform well. His campaign is not about defeating his opponents with delegates — it is about denying Trump every vote possible.

This points to both Kasich as a weak candidate and the power of Trump’s message. Kasich has never had a real message in his bid for the presidency — other than not being a jerk on stage. Instead of building his vision for the Oval Office, he hides in the corner biding his time for Trump’s self-destruction. However, that destruction never happened and is unlikely to ever occur.

Everyone is either tapping out, accepting Trump will be the nominee — and possibly our next president — or they’re holding their noses and siding with Cruz, a candidate that in any other presidential run would be seen as the fringe candidate that needs to be stopped at all costs.

It is hard to tell if Kasich actually thinks he can show up to the GOP convention with a few hundred delegates and deny Trump the nomination, or if this is a last-ditch effort to put the Ohio governor out there to take humiliating defeats while trying to soak up handfuls of delegates in hopes of putting some dents in Trump’s almost inevitable nomination.

To deny Trump’s nomination would be the GOP spitting in the faces of their voters. The democratic process picked Donald Trump, and it is hard to not take Trump seriously when he suggests there will be riots if the party robbed him of his fair victory.

Imagine if Bernie Sanders won the delegate game only to be toppled by Hillary Clinton’s superdelegates. There would certainly be some liberal-on-liberal violence in the aisles of Whole Foods.

If this is Kasich’s strategy, it should raise concerns of how much respect for the democratic process he has. If he is just crossing his fingers that Trump’s plane crashes, he should admit it instead of suggesting he is going to upset Republican voters of their candidate to lead the free world.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 03.14.2016 75 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 02:42 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Your Guide to Ohio's Presidential Primary

Ohio Primary is Tuesday, March 15

It is finally Ohio’s turn to vote for their party’s nominee. Poll hours are 6:30 am - 7:30 p.m.

The Republicans’ last stand

All hands are on deck to stop Trump’s warpath to the GOP nomination — even Marco Rubio’s campaign manager urged Ohio voters to vote for Gov. John Kasich, who is the only GOP contender that will put up a fight in the buckeye state.

Ohio is a rich prize: It’s a winner-take-all contest — meaning all 66 delegates go to the first-place winner, unlike most states that divide a portion of delegates amongst the candidates based on how many votes they received. 

Kasich is aggressively campaigning in his home state, hosting larger rallies and touring with former GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney. If Kasich loses his own state to Trump, his campaign is finished. However, Trump has a strong national lead and Kasich would still be in fourth place even if he secured Ohio. Capturing the buckeye state is seemingly a moral victory.

Trump dominated in Kentucky’s coal country with blue-collar workers, which the real-estate mogul could potentially repeat in the Cleveland and Toledo area. However, Kasich’s foothold with Ohio Republicans and home field advantage can give him an organizational edge.

The GOP race will likely be called late — with recent polls showing Kasich and Trump in a deadlock, Tuesday is going to be a tight race.

All polls show Trump has a strong lead in other Tuesday states: Florida, Illinois and North Carolina. Currently there are no major polls for Missouri. There’s a total of 424 delegates up for grabs for the GOP with Tuesday’s states combined.

Rubio and Kasich trail behind Trump with 163 and 63 delegates, respectively. Going into Tuesday, Trump sits at 460 delegates. Due to his strong lead in other Tuesday states, Trump taking Ohio likely assures his nomination.

With the most recent polls showing Kasich with a slight lead in Ohio, Trump made multiple stops in the state over the weekend. The GOP frontrunner added a last minute stop in Youngstown, Ohio Monday, canceling an event in Florida, where he has a strong lead.

Ted Cruz visited Columbus Sunday in an effort to knock Kasich down a few points in the poll. The Texas senator has been positioning himself as the only one who can take Trump down. Cruz holds second place with 369 delegates to Trump’s 460.

Democratic race tightens in the Midwest

After a crushing defeat in the South, Bernie Sanders is aiming to gain traction in Tuesday’s line of industrial states, hoping his economic message of “disastrous” trade deals resonates in areas hit hard by manufacturing losses.

Sanders has been propelled by his upset victory in Michigan, where he toppled Hillary Clinton’s nearly 30-point lead, undoubtedly prolonging the battle for the Democratic nomination.

Going into states with a larger white voter base and with a lot of donation cash in the bank, Sanders can hold his ground against Clinton until the summer.

However, the Vermont senator didn’t put a dent in Clinton’s delegate advantage after her dominance in states like Alabama and Arkansas. Clinton leads with 1,231 delegates; Sanders has 576.

Clinton has consistently led in Ohio, however, the gap has closed dramatically. In September, a Quinnipiac poll found her ahead of Sanders by 21 points. Now she leads with 5-percent, according to a new Quinnipiac poll.

With Ohio having similar demographics and trade issues as Michigan, it is possible Sanders can upset the political landscape again in the buckeye state. However, with some major schools such as The Ohio State University on spring break, it is possible that the college crowd largely being out on vacation can cripple Sanders.

About 30 Clinton supporters turned out to Sunday’s CNN Democratic Town Hall event at Ohio State, holding signs on campus in support of the former secretary of state. There was no turnout of Sanders supporters. Given he wins the younger vote with huge margins, spring break might be troubling for Sanders in Ohio and other states.

A look at the candidates:

Republicans

Donald Trump: The GOP frontrunner is seemingly unstoppable with channeling the country’s anger against Washington.

John Kasich: Ohio’s governor has struggled to stand out in this race. He hopes capturing his home state can give him an advantage in the GOP convention. 

Ted Cruz: The Texas senator has secured his spot in second place and is quickly catching up to Trump.

Marco Rubio: He was the Republican establishment’s pick and was the guy most thought would lead the party. However, with so few delegates under his belt and the likelihood that he will lose his home state of Florida, Rubio’s campaign is on life support.

Democrats

Hillary Clinton: She has been the consistent frontrunner, gathering superdelegates

and has her husband and Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown campaign with her in Ohio.

Bernie Sanders: The Vermont senator will likely start performing better now that the election is going into whiter states. His ground game is strong with supporters marching through downtown Cincinnati a few weeks ago. Sanders appears to have virtually unlimited funding from supporters.

How do I figure out if I’m registered and where to vote?

You can go to the Hamilton County Board of Election site. You will be able to see if if you are registered and locate your polling station.


The primaries are elections in which the parties pick their strongest candidate to run for president. In Ohio, Election Day is Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Go here for more information on primaries.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 03.10.2016 79 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 03:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Primary Cheat Sheet: John Kasich

John Kasich (Republican)

Fun Fact:

Donald Trump is not the only person in the race with a background in TV. Ohio Gov. John Kasich used to host Fox News show Heartland with John Kasich. It was a similar format to The O’Reilly Factor, a show Kasich often served as a substitute host. Heartland with Kasich aired from 2001-2007.  

What’s up with the campaign?

Kasich has failed to secure any states or a lead in the polls. The Ohio governor treated his second-place finish in New Hampshire as a moral victory. He also placed second in Massachusetts and Vermont.

Trump has successfully pulled Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio into the mud with him — all three slinging insults at each other.

“A guy with the worst spray tan in America is attacking me for putting on makeup. Donald Trump likes to sue people — he should sue whoever did that to his face,” Sen. Rubio said at a Georgia rally.

In the first 10 minutes of the eleventh Republican debate, Trump defended the size of his genitalia, saying, “there’s no problem.” The real estate tycoon went on to refer to Sen. Rubio as “Little Marco” for most of the debate.

Kasich has successfully kept his head above water, making it to all the primetime debates. With the GOP Civil War erupting and the Trump train being virtually unstoppable, Kasich appears to be playing the long game, biding his time for the New England states and Ohio.

His best-case scenario is to emerge from the rubble, after months hiding in the corner, at a brokered GOP convention after Cruz and Rubio are bloodied up from their year-long war against Trump.

Voters might like: 

      Never wrestle with a pig, because you get dirty and the pig likes it. That has been Kasich’s strategy from day one. He has stayed away from personal attacks and has not directly engaged any candidate. Kasich has secured his position as “the adult” on the stage.

      In February, Kasich signed a bill defunding Planned Parenthood. The bill doesn’t explicitly mention Planned Parenthood, instead redirects $1.3 million of government money away from organizations that performs or promotes elective abortions and into other health organizations. This affects Ohio’s 28 Planned Parenthood locations — three clinics provide abortions.

      Kasich has governed a swing state, meaning he can talk to both sides of the aisle. He expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act, expanding health coverage for 275,000 Ohioans.

...but watch out for

      Gov. Kasich might suffer from name recognition as the primaries move forward. Without a clear victory and by not engaging in the GOP slugfest, Kasich risks not getting his message out. Google analytics support this concern, saying Kasich is the least searched presidential candidate.

      Kasich’s acceptance of a Medicaid expansion is a double-edge sword. His support of subsidized health care and support of immigration reform could make him look like a liberal to rightwing voters.

      By staying in the race so long with little hope of actually capturing the nomination, Kasich has gotten on the bad side of some of the Republican establishment due to hogging some delegates over more likely winners like Ted Cruz.

Biggest policy proposal:

Kasich’s tax plan would cut the top income tax rate from 39.6 percent to 28 percent. The tax cuts aren’t as deep as GOP front runner Donald Trump, nor are they a flat tax like Sen. Ted Cruz’s — and they still maintain a level of progressive tax. The Kasich tax plan calls for reducing the tax brackets from seven to three — but does not specify tax rates for the lower two.

War:

At a stop in Michigan in August, Kasich made it clear he is not supportive of nation building. “I don't think it ought to be a priority of the United States to get everybody on the globe to operate exactly the way we do. I mean there are people that we look at and they may do things that we don't like, but we have similar goals. We don't need to spend our resources trying to get them to become like us,” Kasich said.

However, in a February interview with CNN, Kasich said boots on the ground will be required to defeat the Islamic State.

"Mark my words ... at some point it will require boots on the ground from the world to be able to deal with this problem," Kasich told CNN’s Gloria Borger.

Kasich has never been clear on whether or not he intends to deploy conventional troops to combat ISIS in his presidency — nor has he specified which country boots on the ground would be required in.


The primaries are elections in which the parties pick their strongest candidate to run for president. In Ohio, Election Day is Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Go here for more information on primaries.
 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.29.2016 89 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 11:28 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Primary Cheat Sheet: Ted Cruz

Ted Cruz (Republican)

Fun Fact:

Whether you agree with Ted Cruz’s policy or not, this Texas senator is highly educated — graduating from two Ivy league schools. Cruz graduated cum laude from Princeton University with a B.A. in Public Policy, we went on to graduate magna cum laude from Harvard Law School with a Juris Doctor degree.

Before setting foot in the political arena, Cruz was an adjunct law professor at the University of Texas from 2004 to 2009, teaching U.S. Supreme Court litigation.

What’s up with the campaign?

Cruz has held his head above water, consistently placed as a top-tier candidate in the GOP field. The Texas senator won his first election in 2012, being in Washington just long enough to have some knowledge in policy, but not long enough to be considered an “establishment” candidate by any reasonable margins.

However, in a political field that’s hungry for someone that isn’t politics as usual, Cruz has struggled to make himself stand out compared to Trump — who is about as outside the beltway as you get. In a Trump-less election, Cruz would have likely been seen as the fringe candidate doing a hostile takeover of the GOP.

His ultra-conservative ideology and political resume put him somewhere between Rubio and Trump. With more than $19 million on-hand and a super PAC, Cruz is running a powerful campaign — but it has been hard for him to stand out or propose any attractive proposals other than he isn’t Trump.

Cruz may have won Iowa, but he looks weak moving forward. The path to the White House is narrow for the Texas senator.

Voters might like:

      Cruz is the most conservative candidate. Period. He has earned a 100 percent score from the Heritage Action Scorecard and the American Conservative Union. Glenn Beck also said Cruz is “more conservative than Reagan.”

      There’s no fear from Cruz in fighting the establishment and standing up for his principles. He consistently advocates abolishing the IRS and the Department of Education. We also cannot forget his 21-hour filibuster against Obamacare. During that same filibuster he gave a phenomenal reading of Green Eggs and Ham.

       He speaks to the evangelical crowd — which is a huge voter base in the GOP primary. Cruz has captured the heart of a lot of religious Americans, speaking as a man that lives Christian values.

...but watch out for

      Many view Cruz as more “dangerous” than Trump. This anti-Washington crusader has made a career out of dismantling the government, thus hasn’t made a lot of friends in Congress. He led the government into a shutdown in 2013. Trump has proven he can get independents and Democrats to vote for him, Cruz seemingly only has support from the far-right.

      Cruz is a loud and proud climate change denier, once saying it’s “not science, it’s a religion.”  It is difficult to measure whether that is pandering or the Texas senator is being a honest skeptic of science. But when virtually all scientists and governments take climate change seriously and the pentagon considers it a “security threat,” it’s difficult to take skepticism seriously when some of Cruz’s largest donations come from oil companies.

      Cruz really hates government — of course that is a staple for conservatism these days, but he takes the Ronald Reagan rhetoric of “government is the problem” to the max. Cruz is not talking about the Islamic State when he says, “we are facing what I consider to be the epic battle of our generation” — he is talking about Obamacare. Cruz has a true hatred of the federal government, which makes it hard to understand why he wants the highest position in the federal government.

Biggest policy proposal:

Like a lot of conservatives running for the Oval Office, Cruz has proposed a flat tax — yet his is probably the most dramatic of all.

Cruz would replace the income tax with a 10-percent flat tax, abolish corporate tax and all payroll, estate and gift taxes. Some analytics such as the Tax Policy Center find that plan would cost the U.S. about $1 trillion per year for the next decade and lower the GDP 3.6 percent.

War

Cruz hasn’t been entirely clear on whether or not he would use conventional ground troops in Iraq or Syria to fight the Islamic State. However, it sounds like boots on ground is an option.

"The mission should be defeating ISIS before they succeed in carrying out more horrific acts of terror, before they succeed in murdering Americans. If need be, we should go that step," Cruz said in an interview on This Week with anchor George Stephanopoulos

Cruz has made it clear that the priority should be arming those already fighting ISIS on the ground such as the Kurdish fighters in Iraq.


The primaries are elections in which the parties pick their strongest candidate to run for president. In Ohio, Election Day is Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Go here for more information on primaries. CityBeat will be profiling each of the candidates every week until the primaries in March.


 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.10.2016 108 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 03:16 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Clinton's New Hampshire Defeat Highlights Campaign Issues with Women

Bernie Sanders clobbered Hillary Clinton in his neighboring state of New Hampshire last night, and the early dominant performance could send shockwaves through Clinton’s operations.

Once seen as an afterthought in the Democratic primary, Sanders took the Granite State in an impressive 60-percent victory over the former secretary of state’s 38.3 percent.

"Nine months ago, if you told somebody that we would win the New Hampshire primary, they would not have believed you," the Sanders campaign wrote to supporters. With 11 percent of the votes counted, Clinton conceded defeat early in the evening.

“I know what it’s like to be knocked down — and I’ve learned from long experience that it’s not whether you get knocked down that matters. It’s about whether you get back up,” Clinton’s campaign said.

Shortly before Clinton conceded defeat, Sanders’ supporters gathered for a victory speech. Cheers erupted, “Bernie! Bernie! Bernie!” and chants of “We don’t need no Super PAC” were blared when TV cameras went live as the 74-year-old took the stage with his wife.

"The people of New Hampshire have sent a profound message to the political establishment, the economic establishment and, by the way, to the media establishment," Sanders said in his victory speech.

"What the people here have said is that given the enormous crises facing our country, it is just too late for the same-old, same-old establishment politics and establishment economics — the people want real change."

Sanders’ senior strategist Tad Devine said in an MSNBC interview that they believe this was the biggest margin of victory in a contested Democratic primary in history.

Going through the election results, there is virtually nothing for Clinton to claim as a morale victory. Her margin of losing was too great with most voters.

New Hampshire exit polls show 85 percent of women under 30 voted for Sanders. He won 53 percent of the women’s vote overall.

Clinton fell short with every age group except those 65 and older among both genders.

"We are a better organized campaign,” Devine said. We have more people on the ground. And as of today I believe we have more resources, campaign to campaign, to expand. We are demonstrating that resource superiority by going on television all across this country, and it is our ability to organize people — which I think we showed in Iowa, and showed again tonight in New Hampshire.”

One of Clinton’s talking points has been her historic candidacy — the prospect of the first female president has been a major selling point.

However, the gender-politics element of the fight for the Democratic nomination has gotten ugly over the past few days with the recent comment by former secretary of state Madeleine Albright saying, “There’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help each other.”

One Friday’s episode of HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher, feminist icon Gloria Steinem suggested that Clinton’s lack of support with young women is because they’re meeting boys at Sanders rallies.

“When you’re young, you’re thinking, ‘Where are the boys?’ The boys are with Bernie,” Steinem said.

These comments were largely seen as dismissive and sexist, suggesting young women are not politically savvy enough to make their own choices. This rhetoric of shaming women — or any American — into voting for a specific candidate is ugly.

It is a safe bet that these troubling comments did not come from a campaign script, however, this brand of entitlement is exactly what is hurting Clinton with young voters.

We can easily sum up why Bernie Sanders wants to be president — his stump speech is simple: The top one-tenth of the one percent control too much wealth; we have gross injustice in campaign finance, and that it is a moral outrage that Americans might have to go into severe debt for healthcare and education.

Why is Clinton running for president? I’m not entirely sure, and I do not think there is that simple elevator pitch she can give to a voter.

I do not doubt Clinton’s ability to hold the Oval Office. However, I cannot easily identify what her key issues are and where her passions lie.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.09.2016 109 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 01:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Clinton and Sanders to Spar in Flint

CNN is set to host the sixth Democratic debate of the cycle. The Democratic National Committee scheduled the March 6 debate in Flint, Mich.

The Flint debate came after presidential hopefuls Sen. Bernie Sanders’ and Hillary Clinton’s campaigns agreed to additional debates which were motivated by a virtual tie in the Iowa caucuses.

Clinton’s campaign challenged Sanders to an unsanctioned debate on MSNBC at the University of New Hampshire, following their photo-finish race in the Hawkeye State. The DNC officialized the debate, propelling the first time the former secretary of state and the Vermont senator went one-on-one.

Flint’s debate is one of two more debates the Clinton campaign agreed to in exchange for the University of New Hampshire debate.

In the midst of Flint’s water crisis, the town has been at the top of both of the Democratic candidates’ talking points — highlighting what is at stake in this election and what the Democratic party can offer in terms of economic power and regulation.

Sanders went as far to call for Michigan Governor Rick Snyder’s resignation.

“And I think the governor has got to take the responsibility and say, ‘You know what, my administration was absolutely negligent and a result of that negligence, many children may suffer for the rest of their lives and the right thing to do is to resign,” Sanders said in an interview with The Detroit News.

Sanders further blasted the governor's response to the water crisis during the University of New Hampshire debate, saying, “A man who acts that irresponsibly should not stay in power.” The Vermont senator added that this is the first time he has ever called for the resignation of another politician.

Flint was a stop on Clinton’s campaign trail Sunday as she urged Congress to pass a $200 million effort to fix the ailing city’s water infrastructure.

"This has to be a national priority," Clinton said at the House of Prayer Missionary Baptist Church. "What happened in Flint is immoral. The children of Flint are just as precious as the children of any part of America."

Clinton praised Flint Mayor Karen Weaver as "someone who is working every way she knows how to provide the help and support that all the people of Flint deserve to have." The Flint Water Crisis started in April 2014 after the city changed its water source from Lake Huron to the Flint River — the new water source is contaminated with lead, prompting President Obama to declare a state of emergency.

The Flint River’s corrosion is caused by aged pipes that leach lead into the water supply. The EPA estimates thousands of residents are at risk of lead poisoning, and has recommended testing 12,000 children. The water is also possible responsible for an outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease, killing 10 people.

The Michigan Army National Guard was deployed to Flint to assist in the crisis and President Obama has allocated $80 million in government aid.

 
 
by Steve Beynon 02.08.2016 110 days ago
Posted In: 2016 election at 12:40 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Primary Cheat Sheet: Hillary Clinton

Hillary Clinton (Democratic)

Fun Fact:

Then-Senator Hillary Clinton had a vodka-drinking contest against Sen. John McCain (R-AZ.) when the two were touring Estonia in 2004, possibly the most legendary drinking story in modern politics.

“We agreed to withdraw, in honorable fashion, having, I think, reached the limits that either of us should have had,” the Democratic frontrunner said in a campaign video. There are unconfirmed reports of Clinton besting Sen. McCain with four shots of vodka, however the former first lady called the game a tie. 

What’s up with the campaign?

Until her virtual tie in the Iowa caucus, Clinton’s campaign has been virtually in cruise control. While the former secretary of state may have had to move to the left a bit on some issues with the surprise threat of Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), her rhetoric has mostly stayed in the center.

Aside from New Hampshire, Clinton has stayed on top of the polls, raised more money than any other candidate on either side of the aisle and seemingly has the backing of the entire establishment.

Voters might like:

      Clinton has one of the thickest resumes of any presidential candidate in history. Being a first lady is not usually a political job, but she was the first wife of a president to create an office in the West Wing. She led the way for subsidized health care in the ’90s with the Health Security Act, informally called “Hillarycare.”

      She went on to serve as senator of New York from 2001-2009. After losing her bid for the presidency to Barack Obama, she was appointed to secretary of state — giving her a huge advantage on foreign policy over Sanders.

      Some consider Clinton’s centrist policies as a weakness. However, her consistently not falling into liberalism will likely be the key to winning the general election if she earns the Democratic nomination. Clinton is not calling for free college education, a high minimum wage or universal healthcare — considering how far to the right Congress is at this point might lead to her being a successful president in the early years of her first term.

...but what out for

      Clinton spent more than a decade opposing gay rights. The former secretary of state did not support gay marriage until 2013. “I take umbrage at anyone who might suggest that those of us who worry about amending the Constitution are less committed to the sanctity of marriage, or to the fundamental bedrock principle that it exists between a man and a woman,” Clinton said in 2004.

      Most Americans are weary of getting into another war, and the Iraq War is largely considered one of the biggest foreign policy blunders in American history. Clinton was a part of the 58 percent of senate Democrats who voted in favor of the Iraq Resolution, which authorized President George W. Bush’s invasion.

      On both sides of the aisle, career politicians and the establishment have become toxic. You would be hard-pressed to find anyone in the country that is more establishment or embodies political privilege more than Clinton. The $600,000 she received in speaking fees from Goldman Sachs and millions in corporate donations have raised a lot of eyebrows in this new political climate that is increasingly skeptical of big-money interests.

Biggest policy proposal:

The United States is one of the only developed nations in the world that does not have guaranteed paid family leave. A lot of career jobs offer paid time off, however it is not guaranteed by law — this mostly affects those in low-income jobs. Clinton says she aims to guarantee up to 12 weeks of paid family leave with two-thirds of wages. The campaign claims this will also be accomplished without a mandate on the employer or an increase in payroll tax.

War:

Clinton does not support conventional ground troops conducting combat operations in Iraq or Syria. However, she is in favor of continuing Obama’s air campaign and using Special Operations forces.


The primaries are elections in which the parties pick their strongest candidate to run for president. In Ohio, Election Day is Tuesday, March 15, 2016. Go here for more information on primaries. CityBeat will be profiling each of the candidates every week until the primaries in March.
 
 

 

 

 
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