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by Staff 03.30.2015 34 hours ago
 
 
dean mediterranean imports

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

Sung Korean Bistro. Salazar. Dean's Mediterranean. Goetta.

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food. Surprisingly, no one ate Indian food. 

Nick Swartsell: Continuing what's become an ongoing addiction, I had a falafel wrap at Dean's Mediterranean in Findlay Market on Sunday. It's easily the best falafel in town — super crisp on the outside and warm and fluffy inside. Plus, the wrap comes packed with all kinds of optional pickled vegetables you don't normally see, hummus and hot sauce. And they give you a side of their curried couscous, which has dried fruit, cilantro and what I think are chickpeas. All that for five bucks. The best part is, it's still pretty under the radar — most people don't know Dean's makes food (they also have pretty killer samosas, FYI). You just walk up to the counter at the front and say the secret code words (which are, conveniently, "I'd like a falafel sandwich, please") and they hook you up.

Rebecca Sylvester: I went to Sung Korean Bistro Saturday night. The food was outstanding. Korean doesn't seem to have an overpowering element like other Asian cuisines (salt in Chinese or sweetness in Thai); the flavor of the ingredients really came through. I ordered the dolsot bibimbap, which is rice, vegetables and a protein served in a 450-degree clay pot. They top it with a sunny-side-up egg and mix it at your table with a chili paste. The pot continues to cook your food the whole time you're eating it, so the rice gets crunchier as you go. So good.

I also appreciate any restaurant that gives me chopsticks first and makes me ask for a fork, not because I am at all good with chopsticks, but because it paces me from eating like Garfield.

Pama Mitchell: I had a super fun time at Salazar on Friday. We sat at the bar, which has a cool design wherein each end has a rounded seating for five — which happened to be our group's number. I was impressed by the craft cocktails, very meticulously made by two bartenders. My "Spy versus Rye" (made with rye whiskey, obviously) was delicious. Also loved the fried Brussels sprouts appetizer (yes!) and an entree of "everything"-crusted salmon. Also notable was the first sign of fiddlehead ferns in the scallops dish. Splendid!

Danny Cross: My girlfriend and I dropped my sister off at Horseshoe Casino Sunday morning — she had made it through Day 1 of a big poker tournament there and was among the final 80 or so players out of 600-something going after a six-figure first place prize. Unfortunately, she was knocked out in 67th place, just five spots away from the lower-level prize monies. She should have just skipped it and went to the Metropole at 21c with us for brunch, because that place is pretty great. I ordered the Breakfast Sandwich (pimento spread, egg, bacon) but without the pimento spread because I'm a child with a terrible palate. This led to a brief discussion about a recent Deadspin article I read detailing tips for eating at a fancy restaurant. Sounds simple, but these are things I sometimes don't know how to do. (I hate tasting wine in front of servers as if I know anything about it or would even consider sending it back.) Katie had the Quinoa Hash (sweet potatoes, avocado, sunny side eggs and cilantro creme fraiche) and thought it was terrific. We split a side of goetta because this is Cincinnati. 

Casey Arnold: My boyfriend's sister* was in town for a poker tournament, so we had a little get together for her, which involved making our own tacos and margaritas. Since she went to the next round, she didn't get to the party until after midnight when all of the taco makings were turned into late night nachos. We stayed up late catching up, which is why we didn't roll out of bed until noon on Saturday. That's when my boyfriend and I crawled our way to Hangover Easy in Clifton. It was packed as usual!

*Editor's note: Casey Arnold is in a relationship with Danny Cross' brother and they are indeed talking about the same sister and the same poker tournament.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 03.02.2015 29 days ago
Posted In: Food news, Openings, local restaurant, News, Cincinnati at 12:52 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
le-bar-a-boeuf

Jean-Robert's Le Bar a Boeuf Opens Today

After a slight delay, the French neo-bistro opens in the Edgecliff building

Jean-Robert de Cavel's latest venture, the whimsically titled Le Bar a Boeuf (literally translated to "beef bar"), opens today in East Walnut Hills' Edgecliff building (2200 Victory Parkway). The neo-French bistro will only be open for dinner to start, with lunch and brunch service following shortly after. 

“It’s taken us a little longer to open than we anticipated," says de Cavel in a recent press release. "We have a wonderful team in place and we are ready." 

The restaurant, which was originally slate to open in November, will feature a new take on classic French and American dishes. The atmosphere — a funky 70-person dining room and 20-24 person separate lounge, designed with help from HighStreet — is more casual than Table, with the intent that everybody will be able to share (at least the appetizers). A 35-person patio, with panoramic views of the Ohio River and Northern Kentucky, will open when the weather warms.

"It's not a classic bistro, like when I did Jean Ro," de Cavel told CityBeat in November. "This neo-bistro is something from the past you are familiar with but in a modern way." 

The menu features everything from escargot to calves liver and macaroni and cheese to ground steaks, with entree prices in the $11-$25 range. CityBeat dining writer Ilene Ross got a sneak-peek dinner at the restaurant this past weekend. She tried everything from the steak tartare and the lamb and beef burgers to snails in parchment and a pot de crème, saying "It. Is. Perfect." 

Le Bar a Boeuf's Chef de Cuisine is Mirko Ravlic with sous chef Travis Reidel, both from Table. Table's wine director Evan Abrams has developed the moderately priced and global wine list. The bar will also serve classic cocktails, and local, import and domestic beers. Local hospitality expert Richard Brown, who worked with de Cavel at the Maisonette and Jean-Robert at Pigall’s, serves as general manager, assisted by Leslie Brunk.  

The Edgecliff previously hosted restaurants, including The View, all of which rested on the laurels of location. De Cavel's vision is different. "I never want to promote the view; the view, for me, it's an extra," he said to CityBeat in November. "It's an extra thing. I want it to be a fun restaurant; a destination restaurant. Fun for the younger generation to the older generation."

Le Bar a Boeuf's current hours are 5:30-9:30 p.m. Tuesday-Thursday and 5:30-10:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Reservations are available for early seating times (5:30, 5:45 and 6 p.m.). For more information, call 513-751-2333 (BEEF) or follow along on Facebook and Twitter @baraboeufcincy.



 
 
by Staff 02.24.2015 35 days ago
Posted In: Cincinnati, classes at 04:42 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_jungle-jims-cooking-school-hands-on-class_photo-provided

This Week's Dining Events and Cooking Classes (2/25-3/4)

For foodies, people who like cooking, winos and everyone in between

A list of cooking classes, dining events and alcohol parties taking place this week. Warning: Cooking classes frequently sell out.

WEDNESDAY FEB. 25 
Hone Your Knife Skills — Learn to properly care for and hold a knife. 6-8 p.m. $60. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com

Taste of the World Food Tour — Take a guided foodie tour of Ohio’s oldest public market, Findlay Market. Includes stops and tastings at six merchants. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Wednesdays; 3-4:30 p.m. Saturdays. $20. Meets at Daisy Mae’s Market at Findlay Market, 1801 Race St., Over-the-Rhine, cincinnatifoodtours.com.

Wine Tasting and Food Pairing at 20 Brix — Featuring wines from California vintner Row 11. 6:30 p.m. $55-$70. 101 Main St., Milford, 20brix.com.

Sweet and Savory Young Chef’s Kitchen — The Northside Farmers Market hosts this class for kids ages 7-10. Kids learn to cook with local products, meet farmers, learn new skills and take home recipes. 4:45-6 p.m. $3. Northside Farmers Market, 4222 Hamilton Ave., Northside, northsidefm.org.

Burger and Beer Wednesdays — A burger and a pint for $10. 9:30 p.m.-midnight. Fifty West Brewing Company, 7668 Wooster Pike, Mariemont, fiftywestbrew.com.

Cincinnati E.A.T.S. at Enoteca Emilia — Cincinnati E.A.T.S. (Epicureans About Town Society) head to Enoteca Emilia for an evening of cocktails, socializing, food and mingling to benefit the Freestore Foodbank. 7:30 p.m. $45. 2038 Madison Road, O’Bryonville, cincinnati.com/cincinnatieats/index.shtml

Wine Walk on the Levee  — Take a walk around Newport on the Levee and sample red and white wines and light hors d’oeuvres. 6-10 p.m. $40; $35 advance. Newport on the Levee, Newport, Ky., newportonthelevee.com

THURSDAY FEB. 26 
One Pot Wonders — Prepare an entire meal using only one pot. You’ll make chicken pot pie soup and a pasta. 6-8 p.m. $60. The Learning Kitchen, 7659 Cox Lane, West Chester, thelearningkitchen.com.

All About Chicken Lunch and Learn — Ilene Ross (CityBeat dining writer) leads this class on preparing chicken: stock, soup, roast, taquitos and chickena dn biscuits. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $40. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Tap That Thursday — Tapping new rare kegs every week. Chef Michael Shields creates specialty hot dogs to pair with the latest brew. 5 p.m. BrewRiver GastroPub at 2062 Riverside Drive, East End, brewrivergastropub.com

FRIDAY FEB. 27 
Winter Passport to Wine & Beer Tasting — Features tastings of more than 25 ales, porters and wines from around the world. 7-9:30 p.m. $29.95; $16.95 designated driver. Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Winton Woods, greatparks.org.

Cold Nights and Warm Spirits — This fundraiser for Ault Park is a whiskey tasting event, featuring more than 40 different whiskeys. 6:30-10 p.m. $30; $40 day of. Tickets include seven tastings. Ault Park, 3600 Observatory Ave., Hyde Park, aultparkac.org.

Street to Plate Pop-Up Dinner — Daveed’s hosts this pop-up dinner with eight small plates and two glasses of wine. 6:30 p.m. $65. Daveed’s, 934 Hatch St., Mount Adams, 513-683-2665.

Fundamentals of Pairing Wine and Food — This class has multiple tasting courses paired with assorted wines to evaluate how various components, flavors and textures can result in a perfect match. 6:30 p.m. $85. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu

Warped Wing Beer Dinner — Five courses prepared by the Golden Lamb chef Josh House, paired with beers from the Warped Wing Brewing Company. 7 p.m. $50. Golden Lamb, 27 S. Broadway St., Lebanon, goldenlamb.com

SATURDAY FEB. 28 
Sushi Workshop for Parents and Kids — Chef Jamie will teach you the basics of sushi. Learn how to prepare sushi rice, Ponzu and Teriyaki sauces, and complete a variety of sushi rolls. For ages 10 and older. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $95; each additional family member $40. Midwest Culinary Institute at Cincinnati State, 3520 Central Parkway, Clifton, culinary.cincinnatistate.edu.

Quick and Easy: Pizza — Learn to make pizza at home. Noon-1 p.m. $20. Cooks’Wares, 11344 Montgomery Road, Harper’s Point, cookswaresonline.com.

Vegan Pressure Cooking — Vegan cook and author of Vegan Pressure Cooking: Beans, Grains and One-Pot Meals in Minutes JL Fields introduces the world of plant-based pressure cooking. $20. Park + Vine, 1202 Main St., Over-the-Rhine, parkandvine.com.

Bier and Wine Tasting — The Donauschwaben Society hosts an American vs. European wine and beer tasting. Also featuring a stein shuffle, silent auction, barrel of spirits raffle and golf ball drop. 6-11 p.m. $35; $30 advance. Donauschwaben Haus, 4290 Dry Ridge Road, Colerain, cincydonau.com.

German Bier Dinner — At Mecklenburg Gardens with the Ziniznnati Bierband and Wiedemann Bier. 6-9 p.m. $25. 302 E. University Ave., Corryville, mecklenburgs.net.

Great Parks Dinner Series — Tonight it’s an adventure dinner with the theme “Kissing Kilimanjaro.” Dinner includes a buffet with prime rib, chicken, lasagna and assorted sides. 6:30 p.m. $29.95. Mill Race Banquet Center, 1515 W. Sharon Road, Winton Woods, greatparks.org

SUNDAY MARCH 1
Ohio Winter Food Festival — Previously known as Taste of Northern Cincinnati. A food festival featuring more than 30 restaurants. Noon-4 p.m. $20; $18 advance. Sharonville Convention Center, 11355 Chester Road, Sharonville, sharonvillechamber.com.

TUESDAY MARCH 3
National Pancake Day — All IHOPs in Greater Cincinnati are offering a free short stack of buttermilk pancakes to benefit Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals, Shriners Hospitals for Children and the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. 7 a.m.-10 p.m. ihop.com

A Plethora of Potatoes — Slice, dice, bake or fry a variety of types of potatoes. 6-8:30 p.m. $50. Jungle Jim’s, 5440 Dixie Highway, Fairfield, junglejims.com.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 4
Bier Dinner: Bockfest Kickoff — A kickoff party with Alpen Echos and Schoenling Bock. 6- 9 p.m. $25. Mecklenburg Gardens, 302 E. University Ave., Corryville, mecklenburgs.net.

Wine Dinner at Via Vite — Five courses from chef Cristian Pietoso paired with five wines from Agricola Tamburini. 7 p.m. $65. Via Vite, 520 Vine St., Downtown, viaviterestaurant.com.

Find more dining events here.

 
 
by Staff 02.17.2015 42 days ago
Posted In: Brunch, Cincinnati, Indian, Leftovers, Wine, Holiday at 12:51 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
brij mohan

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

With a delay because of President's Day and Snowmageddon

Each week CityBeat staffers and dining writers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food.  

Ilene Ross: I ate out quite a bit this weekend due to the fact that my newly engaged daughter was in town for some wedding planning. On Friday we spent the day trying on wedding gowns, which left us feeling quite peckish, so we treated ourselves to afternoon tea at The BonBonerie. I find the $25 per person a bit high for the amount of food you get, but for a special occasion, you can’t beat the pomp and circumstance of tiny scones, macarons and finger sandwiches. *Note: You must make reservations for afternoon tea. 
Saturday found us in OTR looking at reception venues, so we popped into Park + Vine for their annual Customer Appreciation Day. I had the tofu and roasted vegetable sandwich with a side of macaroni and cheese. Now I know P+V is a vegan restaurant and it’s not “real” dairy cheese, but as an omnivore, I can honestly say that it’s one of my very favorite renditions of the mac and cheese. 
On Sunday night I tried new-to-me Brij Mohan Indian Sweets & Restaurant out in Sharonville with a group of friends. I had the Navratan Korma (fresh assorted vegetables and dried fruits cooked in creamy gravy), onion naan and a mango lassi (a yogurt smoothie). This place is super authentic and incredibly popular. There was a long line of people waiting to get in before they even opened for business. We were told that everything is made from scratch and in-house. Brij Mohan is wallet-friendly and super-casual, right down to the paper plates, but don’t let the dinnerware stop you from enjoying the incredible food. Said my dining companion Danny Korman (of Park+Vine), “The  paper plates I don’t get, but the food I do.” 

Kristen Franke: My Valentine and I spent Saturday morning at Findlay Market searching for wine-and-cheese-night goodies. We picked up three cheeses — St. Andre triple cream, Spanish manchego and creamy smoked gouda — and some freshly-sliced proscuitto from Gibbs Cheese, country French bread from Blue Oven, Castellare Chianti from the Market Wines and a package of dates from Madison's. Later, the dates were stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped with bacon to complete our little V-day spread.  

Maija Zummo: My friends and I had a girls night at Pontiac in Over-the-Rhine on Friday. Two of the four of us got there at 5:30 p.m. and there was no wait, which was great. However the other half of the group was late (which some portion of us always is), and they won't seat you until your whole party is there, so we sat at the bar and had some drinks until they showed up. The drinks at Pontiac are awesome. There's a whole menu of Tiki drinks, all served in tall Tiki cups. Note: If you steal a Tiki cup, they will charge you $75. I had the Bahama-Lana ($13) at the bar, which tasted like bananas and coconut and was full of rum, Domaine de Canton ginger liquor and bourbon cider. It was pretty sweet but I felt great after drinking it; vacation-style relaxed. My friend had a glass of chardonnay and the bartender was really nice and warned her about the kinda steep price ($10-$12 for a glass). She didn't mind.
In terms of food, I can't say much. I don't eat meat so I just had an assortment of sides. (Food reviewer Michael Taylor has more to say about the meat here.) Mostly I just wanted more Tiki drinks, so we ordered a bowl of Rumspringa Punch ($30). The mix of rum, ginger, champagne, pineapple and some more stuff came in a giant Tiki bowl with four straws and a flaming volcano in the middle (on fire because of the 151 puddle in there). Also fantastic. We finished it and then split another one. Turns out I love rum served in thematic cups. Also, I had to pee pretty bad because of all the Tiki drinking, and on the way to the bathroom I saw CityBeat dining writer Kristen Franke. Adorable.

Jesse Fox: I went to Tacocracy and got their vegan chorizo taco and their shroom taco (substitute avocado for cheese) and a black margarita. The shroom taco is always my go-to there and I still prefer it over the vegan chorizo, but it's awesome to see more vegan options on menus around town. The black margarita was good and not too sweet and syrupy, like some inexpensive margaritas tend to be. 
 
 
by Staff 02.02.2015 57 days ago
 
 
eats_kreugerstavern_700x615

Leftovers: What We Ate This Weekend

A lot of stuff from Walgreens, Packhouse, Krueger's Tavern, Amol and more

Each week CityBeat staffers tell you what they ate this weekend. We're not always proud — or trendy — but we definitely spend at least some money on food. 

Danny Cross: A couple of my friends' girlfriends had a birthday death wish on Saturday night, taking a party of more than 15 to Krueger's Tavern. My girlfriend and I showed up late, kind of assuming everyone would be standing on the Vine Street sidewalk like a bunch of tourists. Apparently, Krueger's will seat your giant party as long as half have arrived, though, and no one was mad when the final two of us showed up like 40 minutes after the reservation time. Krueger's is owned by the same people who run Bakersfield and The Eagle OTR, and its concept is similar: loud, hip atmosphere; really good, relatively inexpensive food; and pretty great service considering how crowded and busy the place is. We split the Cuban sandwich, fries and a kale salad someone told us was going to be awesome (true). It's nice to have an OTR option aside from Taste of Belgium where you can sit down with more than four people without forcing the restaurant to rearrange the entire room. CityBeat food writer Kristen Franke had good things to say about Krueger's last week, so you should probably take her word for it. 

Jac Kern
: I’ll tell you where I did not eat: Bridalrama. Cupcakes and macaroons and cakes at every corner, and I didn't touch any of it. I was proud of my self-control until the next day when Jeff insisted on ordering Pizza Hut during the Super Bowl. And we're not talking some regular fattening pizza. No, we had to order the Triple Cheese Covered Stuffed Crust Pizza. So, needless to say, any pride I had left was gone at this point. I wanted to be disgusted by it but I reluctantly found it really tasty. 

Rebecca Sylvester: Best Friday night: ordered too much Indian food and went to sleep. Since it was obviously too cold to leave the house, my boo and I took advantage of the fact that Amol delivers and made someone else deal with the frigid 2.5-mile trek between their kitchen and my couch. The food was great, but the best part of the meal was the fact that their delivery minimum is $25, meaning it is just a dollar or two out of reach of ordering only two entrees, so we were (I was) justified in ordering A THIRD ENTREE for additional feasting. 

Mike Breen: I largely had a depressed, shut-in kind of weekend, for which I loaded up on supplies from that gourmet food haven Walgreens and barely left my apartment. The cashier told me we might get eight inches of snow over the weekend as I checked out; even though I knew that wasn’t true, I hoped my sad purchases were seen as “stocking up” for the impending Snowmageddon (or at least as treats I was taking to a Super Bowl party). I should have grabbed a bag of rock salt to make it look less pathetic.

Along with the wasabi-flavored almonds, the best thing I grabbed on my junk food spree was a pint of Ben & Jerry’s Truffle Trifecta, which I first discovered last year. It’s only available at Walgreens (which seems weird; B&J’s also has “exclusive” flavors at Target, which is somewhat understandable, but Walgreens seems to be a weird place to have to go to score ice cream). It’s Ben & Jerry’s, so of course it’s really good. And pretty simple — chocolate ice cream with marshmallow, fudge and caramel-filled truffle candy. It’s become one of my favorite Ben & Jerry’s flavors.

I was proud of myself for not devouring all of the crap food I bought. Seemed like a good purchase at the time, but I just couldn’t stomach eating the small bag of Ruffles’ Deep Ridged Bacon & Cheddar Loaded Potato Skins flavored chips I bought. But there’s always next weekend. Grammys viewing party at my place, y’all! 

Jesse FoxI wanted to get some film that I shot developed on Saturday and apparently the Walgreens in Highland Heights is the only place around here that still does that. I didn't want to drive down, go home and drive right back, so I went with my freelancer Catie so we could talk or something while we waited. The guys working said it would take two hours so we did what any respectable humans would do — we went and bought mini vodka bottles from the liquor store nearby and ate at Taco Bell. Despite ordering different things, the total of both of our meals was $6.66. The next day I woke up with strep throat, so thank you Taco Bell satan.

Maija Zummo: I finally went to Packhouse in Newport to eat some vegetarian meatballs. (My computer keeps auto-correcting that to "packhorse," which is an altogether different type of meatball.) I had been to the meatball restaurant in Corryville, Meatball Kitchen, which has a different vibe (you order at a cash register there). I had been warned that the Packhouse menu was a little bit confusing — there's a ton of choices and you fill boxes in on your menu with a marker to order — but it wasn't so bad. The waitresses help you navigate.

You pick a type of meatball — I got quinoa and veggie and the rest of my party got one of each other type of meatball on the menu: fried chicken, turkey and sage, something with sundried tomatoes and blue cheese, a normal meatball and then a lasagna meatball (lasagna shaped into a ball and fried). Then you choose a sauce (marinara, parmesan cream, some type of stew sauce, and a couple others) and how you want it served. You can get it on a sandwich, on a slider, on pasta, with Brussels sprouts etc., etc. There are like a million possible combinations. I got three quinoa meatballs on some boursin mashed potatoes with parmesan cream on top and a quinoa slider with cheese and marina sauce because, as a vegetarian, I never get to eat sliders.

Portion sizes were big and the quinoa meatballs tasted like little arancini; they were little fried tasty nuggets. I loved them a lot more than I expected because I hate quinoa. The rest of my party, however, didn't love their meatballs. There was some confusion as to which was which, like they couldn't tell the difference between the turkey and sage an the sundried tomato one. But I was happy, which is the most important part. They also have bottles of wine for $19, and the service staff is paid a fair wage so you don't tip, which is a cool novelty. I'd go back for more sliders and cheap wine, and my one friend wants to go back to tackle their eating contest, where you need to eat like 25 of the same meatballs in an hour or something. 

Samantha GellinI had brunch at BrewRiver Gastropub. It's a New Orleans-style place. The food was delicious but the prices ... not. The entrees were all in the $12 to $16 dollar range, so I opted for two "sides": two sunny-side up eggs and a small bowl cheese grits. The eggs were delicious; the grits, while tasty, weren't life-changing. My husband got poutine and eggs, and the beef short-rib gravy was really rich and delicious. It had strips of really tender meat in it. For anyone who doesn't have to watch their cholesterol, it's a solid choice. The server was a bit pushy and anxious to get our party of eight out the door by the afternoon closing time, though. I'm not sure I'd go back, partly because of the prices and partly because I'm over brunch dates. Maybe I'm just getting too old to be drinking three mimosas at noon.
 
 
by Richard Lovell 11.20.2014 131 days ago
Posted In: Beer, Cincinnati, Alcohol, Food news at 02:09 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
todo_moerleinlagerhousebeerfestival

Seasonal Winter Releases from Local Breweries

Because everyone is over pumpkin

Tis the season for winter microbrews, and with MadTree, Rhinegeist, Christian Moerlein and plenty of others putting out unique and distinctive beers this winter, Cincinnatians have plenty of options to choose from.

Your favorite craft brewers have been hard at work combining the flavorful aspects of winter into their latest creations; ones that will surely keep you warm through the rest of the year — or at least drunk. You’ve probably worn thin of the ubiquitous Pumpkin Ales and the dull Winter Lagers, so here’s a list of the latest and upcoming craft beers. You should be able to get everything at the respective brewery's taprooms, but call ahead for availability and other serving locations.  

  • Long Way Home: A companion to Blank Slate’s “Fork In The Road” and “The Lesser Path,” this IPA is brewed with chocolate malt and aged on cocoa nibs. It has five different varieties of hops and a 10.4% ABV. 

  • Christkindl Winter Warmer: Unwrap this large-malt bodied ale with the essence of chocolate sweetness, and a balanced hop finish that creates a subtle spice flavor. On draft at the Moerlein Lager House. 6.95% ABV.

  • Coffee Please: Made with local coffee from Madeira's coffee please, this dark stout has a 7/1% ABV. Creamy and made with cold brew.
  • Home Sweet Home: An American brown ale with all the makings for a sweet potato pie, including cinnamon, sage, molasses and pecans. Who needs dessert when you have this. 7.1% ABV.

  • Chickow! Coconut and Chickow! Cinnamon Roll: These two beers will be released on Black Friday, with a limit of four bottle of each beer per customer.
  • White Death: A winter warmer ale with cinnamon, fermented in Kentucky bourbon barrels. 

  • Thundersnow: This sweet and bread beer has an 8.5% ABV, with hints of ginger, nutmeg, vanilla and cinnamon. It's rare, so drink up while you can (or download the recipe at madtreebrewing.com). Look for it at Arnold's, Igby's, Boca, the Moerlein Larger House, Metropole and more; MadTree has a handy zip code locator on their site. 
  • Pilgrim: This is a super limited beer, with hops, malted barley, cranberries, walnuts and vanilla beans. With 5% ABV. 

  • Winter Ale: An ale with scents of spruce and ginger, and flavors of orange-spiced bread. 8% ABV. 

  • Dad: A hoppy red ale you can take home for the holidays; it will be served in cans for the first time this year. This ale balances crisp hops with juicy malt, and notes of citrus and cherry life savor. 6% ABV. 
  • Panther: Malty with notes of milk chocolate, carob and light molasses. 5.8% ABV. 

  • Winter Ale: This spiced winter ale is thick and creamy, with hints of caramel, toffee and cinnamon. Serve in a snifter. 8.2% ABV.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 11.20.2014 131 days ago
Posted In: Alcohol, Beer, Cincinnati, Events, Food news, Openings at 10:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
barrio

Barrio Tequileria in Northside to Reopen

More tacos!

The relatively short-lived Barrio Tequileria in Northside is re-opening next weekend, under new management and ownership. 

Starting with a grand re-opening Friday and Saturday evening (6 p.m. Nov. 28 and 29) the weekend after Thanksgiving, new owners Thomas Placke and 3TC entertainment say the restaurant will still serve Tex-Mex-style food, with updated offerings including smoked wings, house-cured smoked bacon and Texas-style smoked beef brisket chili. They'll also be serving up imported tequilas and specialty cocktails, like the Helltown Hooch, Pineapple Mint Margarita and Mango Habanero Margarita, plus non-alcoholic libations for kids (and non-drinking adults) like strawberry cucumber lemonade. 

An added bonus? The huge outdoor patio will double as a dog-friendly bar with a fire pit and a s'mores menu in winter, then games when the weather gets warmer.

A recent press release also says, "In commitment to the neighborhood, Barrio will continue with fan favorites such as open mic Jazz on Tuesdays, trivia night on Wednesdays and karaoke thursdays. Barrio will also offer live music nights and delve into the local Northside character by showcasing local artists and talent."

The restaurant will also seek out a variety of nonprofits to donate portions of proceeds to.  

Barrio is located at 3937 Spring Grove Ave., Northside. Follow along with updates on Facebook.
 
 
by Paloma Ianes 11.13.2014 138 days ago
Posted In: Alcohol, Cincinnati, Food news, News, Openings at 02:30 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
myrtles punch house

Molly Wellmann's Myrtle's Punch House Opening Nov. 28

East Walnut Hills' revitalization continues with the new addition

Forget your Kool-Aid and your Sprite and whatever else goes into your office party’s punch bowl, for soon dignity will be restored to punch. Molly Wellmann’s newest creation, Myrtle’s Punch House, will specialize in handcrafted punch and a wide array of wines and craft beers. (The Wellmann Brand also owns Japp’s, Neons Unplugged and Old Kentucky Bourbon Bar.)  

Myrtle’s is located in the historic DeSales Corner of East Walnut Hills, and surprisingly punch itself is also heavy with history. It’s been around since the 1600s and is believed to have been first concocted by British sailors working with the East India Company. With months on deck, beer became flat and stale, and so an alternative was created. Punch originally comes from the Sanskrit word “panch” meaning five, referencing the five ingredients in the original classic punch: lemon, alcohol, sugar, spices and water or tea. Of course, like the rest of the world, punch has evolved, but despite the ingredients, the flavor template has remained the same. 

The opening event on Friday, Nov. 28, will begin at 7 p.m. with ribbon-cutting ceremony with Councilwoman Yvette Simpson, followed by a red carpet entrance, live music and food from Fireside Pizza. 

2735 Woodburn Ave., East Walnut Hills. More information on Facebook.
 
 
by Maija Zummo 11.04.2014
Posted In: Cincinnati, Food news, News, Recipes at 10:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
findlay-cookbook-cover

Cook Your Way Through Findlay Market

Findlay Market Cookbook goes on sale Nov. 6

Findlay Market and foodies go hand in hand (as do people who enjoy cost-effective wine tastings at noon on a Sunday followed by some Velvet Smoke BBQ). Now, you can experience Findlay Market in your own home…sort of. 

The new Findlay Market Cookbook ($24.95) goes on sale on Thursday, Nov. 6, and it's full of recipes from market merchants, farmers, food artisans and favorite local celebrity chefs, including Jose Salazar, Julie Francis, Jean-Robert de Cavel and more. With more than 100 recipes — featuring profiles and photos — the cookbook not only helps you recreate some of your favorite market eats, it also celebrates history, local food and community in the way only Findlay Market can. 

Pre-order is available here. Books can be picked up at the Market Center in the main market house or at select vendors. A portion of proceeds benefits the Findlay Market Fund.
 
 
by Kristen Franke 10.17.2014
Posted In: Alcohol, Beer, Cincinnati, Events, Food news, Food art at 05:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
jose-salazar-plates-food-at-iron-fork

The Palace's Chef Joe West Wins CityBeat's Iron Fork

While attendees ate and drank at Moerlein's brewery space

Wednesday, Oct. 15, kicked off CityBeat’s maiden voyage for Iron Fork Cincinnati, a Iron Chef-esque cooking competition complete with famous chefs from around the city, closed-circuit television and, of course, plenty of food and drink to keep the attendees happy and buzzed.

The event, which raised money for local nonprofit Gabriel’s Place and its Junior Culinary Institute, took place at the Christian Moerlein brewery in Over-the-Rhine. The restaurants represented (Jimmy G's, Django Western Taco, LaLa's Blissful Bites, Invito Chef, El Rancho Grande, Huit BBQ, Redondo Taqueria, Axis Alley on the Levee, Seasons 52, Silver Ladle, Elephant Walk Injera & Curry House, Washington Platform, Swad, O'Malley's in the Alley, Mazzaro's Place, The Pub, Boswell Alley and Moerlein Lager Houseeach provided a small sample of their favorite items for attendees to nibble on, from mini-steak sandwiches to shot glass-sized pecan pie. Some of the vendors were parked in the more polished taproom, while the majority of the booths and the competition itself appeared in the “basement chic” room next door. Attendees wandered from booth to booth, balancing small plates and frothy cups of Moerlein beer as they waited for the main event to begin. Everyone looked slightly confused at first, but it didn’t take long for everyone to catch on and figure out where to go — the Four Roses bourbon cider probably helped.

Iron Fork’s version of Kitchen Stadium was a small-ish cooking space set up at one end of the very large room. It was fully stocked with brightly colored produce from SYSCO, plenty of spices, gas burners and shiny stainless steel cookware from Cooks'Wares. Scattered across the room were large TVs (not in HD, our spoiled selves lamented) for those who may not be able to find a spot in the small area in front of the kitchen to watch the action. The three judges were perched to the left of the kitchen, presumably starving.

Frances Kroner of Sleepy Bee, Jose Salazar of Salazar and Joe West of The Palace at The Cincinnatian were the three chefs chosen to appear for the event. Each of them had one hour to create a dish using the elusive secret ingredient: figs. (Most of the crowd had left before the secret was revealed; it had to remain a secret to make the competition fair for everyone.) Each chef also had a Junior Culinary Institute student from Gabriel’s Place on their team; all three of the students, it must be said, were incredibly impressive in their professionalism and skill. 

The hour-long cooking time per chef allowed attendees to continue to wander and stuff their faces with local treats. The amount of sweet options seemed high (possibly because it was hard to locate the free water to cleanse your palate). The beer line never seemed to shorten, which was fine. If anything, it allowed for more socializing with the other food enthusiasts. Watching the cooking itself was only really entertaining near the end of the hour-long time limit — Jose Salazar straight up ran to the judges’ table with his dishes at the end, and that’s just good TV. 

Once each chef’s segment was complete and the three judges were served, a fourth dish was auctioned off to a lucky audience member. (Frances Kroner’s dish went for a whopping $150.) 

"All the chefs did a great job and we had a lot of fun sharing our thoughts and our food with the crowd," says judge and CityBeat food writer Anne Mitchell. "Frannie Kroner's lamb chop entree was wonderful, and (Ilene Ross, CityBeat food writer and judge) had a great idea — she added one of her lamb chops to the auction for Gabriel's Place." 

"I ate all three of mine and gnawed the bones clean, so that shows you where my heart resides," she continues, laughing. "Jose's appetizer, lamb tartare, was amazing. Ilene licked her plate. It was the kind of dish that separates ordinary food from art." 

The audience did not hear from the judges until the end, when they named The Palace’s Joe West as the winner for his appetizer and entree dishes. 

"Joe West's appetizer and entree blew us away," says Mitchell. "The scallop crudo was another work of art, and it was the perfect starter for Joe's main dish. I wish I could be 100 percent sure of the description but things got a little crazy at the end and we really didn't hear what Joe said, but I think it was halibut in veloute sauce with bacon crumbles for a garnish, flash-fried potato 'chips' from tiny fingerling potatoes and the figs." 

"Figs were the 'secret ingredient' that all the chefs had to incorporate into their dishes," she continues. "It would have been fun to see them utilized a little more essentially in the dishes instead of used as a (yummy) garnish, but that seems a little like splitting hairs."

Overall, the event’s first run was a success. Did I want to snag one of Kroner’s scallops or a bite of Salazar's lamb tartare right off the judges’ table? Sure. But I didn’t, and it still turned out to be a nice little Wednesday night. 


 
 

 

 

 
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