WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home - Blogs - Staff Blogs - Latest Blogs
Latest Blogs
 
by RICK PENDER, CityBeat staff 12.22.2014 2 hours ago
Posted In: Theater, Arts community at 09:24 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
eric ting, associate artist - photo_cincinnati playhouse in the park

Call Board: Theater News

More Directing Talent at the Playhouse. Last Wednesday the Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park announced that Obie Award-winning director Eric Ting will join the theater as an Associate Artist for the 2015-2016 season. Playhouse Artistic Director Blake Robison said, "I've known Eric for nearly 15 years, when he began his career as a student at the University of Tennessee. Since then he has created an impressive body of work as one of the country's most gifted young directors. He's in touch with a new generation of American playwrights, and he brings a fresh perspective to the classics. He's distinguished himself off-Broadway with an Obie Award. And his time at Long Wharf Theatre [in Connecticut as associate artistic director] has given him experience in an institutional theatre." Ting's 2012 Obie recognized his direction of Jackie Sibblies Drury's We Are Proud to Present a Presentation on the Herero of Namibia, Formerly South-West Africa from the German Sudwestafrika, Between the Years 1884-1915. The New Yorker called his production at Soho Rep "a thrilling opportunity to see both a serious new talent developing her voice and what an inspiring director can do to encourage it." Ting said he's honored to be named an associate artist at the Playhouse: "I've long admired Blake's work as an artistic leader and have been following the storied work of the Playhouse ever since my sister's family settled in nearby Montgomery. The associate artists program combines two of the things I hold most dear in life: art-making and community building." Ting joins three other associate artists: Timothy Douglas, Michael Evan Haney and KJ Sanchez. According to Robison, these directors "form the backbone of our directing corps and bring diverse backgrounds, experiences and viewpoints to the Playhouse."

Bowled Over. I made my first excursion to Cheviot late last week to see The Drama Workshop's production of a revue of music by Stephen Sondheim, Putting It Together. The community theater's cast of five did a commendable job with Sondheim's challenging tunes, and I was glad to get to see what TDW has done with its new home, The Glenmore Playhouse, a former bowling alley that's become a spacious performance venue thanks to the hard work of the group's many volunteers. TDW recently announced its five-show 2015-2016 season: the musical comedy I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change (Sept. 11-27); Ira Levin's murder mystery, Death Trap (Oct. 22-Nov. 8); Barbara Robinson's The Best Christmas Pageant Ever (Dec. 4-13); Paul Slade Smith's Unnecessary Farce (Feb. 26-March 13, 2016); and the world's longest-running musical, The Fantasticks (April 22-May 8, 2016). More information: www.thedramaworkshop.org.

Christmas Caroling. For the first time in 24 years, the Cincinnati Playhouse decided to have an understudy for Ebenezer Scrooge in A Christmas Carol, and it's a good thing they did: Bruce Cromer had to miss several performances after he sprained his ankle "making merry" during a rambunctious scene in the show. Another local professional, Nick Rose — a founder and a stalwart performer with Cincinnati Shakespeare Company for two decades — stepped up from a smaller role and handled a number of performances commendably. Cromer has played Scrooge for a decade (following eight years as Bob Cratchit), so it's nice to know that another fine actor might be ready to become the old curmudgeon when it's time. … Speaking of Dickens' classic story, tune in to WVXU (FM 91.7) on Christmas Eve at 7 p.m. for a recording of versatile master comedian Jonathan Winters (an Ohio native who died at age 87 in 2013) presenting his own distinctive reading of the holiday story of redemption. The pioneer of improvisational stand-up comedy, an Ohio native, was a mentor for the late Robin Williams.

Last-Minute Theater Gift? Need just one more gift to finish your Christmas shopping? The creative folks at Cincinnati Landmark Productions have put together three clever packages for dinner and a show at one of their theaters. For $75 there's the "Covedale and Coneys Bundle," offering a pair of tickets to a performance at the Covedale and a $25 gift card for Price Hill Chili. If you're willing to wait until summer is here, you can purchase an "Incline District Complete Night Out" for $100; it includes two tickets to a show at the brand new Warsaw Federal Incline Theater (due to open in June), plus a $50 gift card to either the Incline Public House or Primavista. And if you care to splurge, for $200 you can get "The Incline District Summer of Fun" tickets for all three shows during the summer of 2015 at the Incline Theater plus a $75 gift card for either the Incline Public House or Primavista. For more information or to purchase one of these packages: 513-241-6550.

Happy holidays to one and all!


CityBeat's Rick Pender posts theater notices on CALL BOARD every Monday morning.
 
 
by Steven Rosen 12.02.2014 19 days ago
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 02:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
benedict

Cincinnati Art Museum's Popular Curator Benedict Leca Gets Promotion

Benedict Leca, a much-liked curator of European Art at Cincinnati Art Museum whose departure in 2012 to become chief curator at Hamilton, Ontario's, Art Gallery of Hamilton prompted protest, has moved again. It's a promotion. Perhaps his greatest accomplishment at Cincinnati was organizing Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman. Here are a few paragraphs from the press release from the Redwood Library & Athenaeum of Newport, R.I. It is especially notable for the fact the erudite Leca use the term dix-huitièmiste to describe himself in a quote — how many other museum directors would do that?

Edwin G. Fischer, M.D., President of the Board of Directors of the Redwood Library & Athenæum, announced the appointment of Benedict Leca, Ph.D., as its new Executive Director, effective January 15, 2015, following a competitive national search.

“This is tremendous news for the Redwood,” stated Dr. Fischer, “An expert in 18th-century art, history, and material culture, Benedict is uniquely qualified to move the Library into the national spotlight as a center of thought and culture. He has a wealth of experience and is extremely well-suited to lead this 268-year old cultural institution.” 

As Executive Director, Leca will articulate and advance the Redwood’s historic mission as a hybrid cultural institution with “nothing in view but the good of mankind.” Building on the Redwood’s unique position as a catalyst for dialogues about education across periods and disciplines, Leca’s work will focus on fully realizing the opportunities inherent to the athenæum model through an expanded array of public programs, forums, and exhibitions—both on-site and on-line—that will foster networks of intellectual exchange locally, regionally, and around the world. 

Prior to his current tenure at the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Ontario, as Chief Curator and Director of Curatorial Affairs (2012-14), Leca was Curator of European Painting, Sculpture and Drawings at the Cincinnati Art Museum. 

He was the first Andrew Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow in the French Paintings department at the National Gallery of Art in Washington (2003-2007), and served on the staff of the Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University (1999-2000). Mr. Leca also currently holds the position of Adjunct Assistant Professor of Art History in the School of the Arts, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. 

Mr. Leca has curated many important exhibitions: Charles-Nicolas Cochin: Draftsman of the Enlightenment (2003); Rembrandt: Three Faces of the Master (2008); Thomas Gainsborough and the Modern Woman (2010—2011); Monet in Giverny: Landscapes of Reflection (2012); The Painter Pictured: French Nineteenth-Century Paintings and Portrait Photographs (2013); the current The World is an Apple: The Still Lifes of Paul Cézanne, executed in partnership with the Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia (2014-15), and the forthcoming Illuminations: Italian Baroque Masterworks in Canadian Collections to be held at the Art Gallery of Hamilton and the Art Gallery of Alberta, Edmonton, in 2015.

(Thanks to Judith H. Dobrzynski's Real Clear Arts blog at http://www.artsjournal.com/realcleararts/ for alerting us to this story.)

 
 
by Maija Zummo 11.20.2014 31 days ago
 
 
lightgeist

Rhinegeist Lights Up Tonight with Projected Video

Lightgeist is a one-night exhibit of light and projected art at the brewery

Another historic Cincinnati building is being artfully illuminated. This year's past LumenoCity light mapping to a live orchestra on Music Hall was more popular than ever, and tonight the NEAR*BY Curatorial Collective is doing something similar at Rhinegeist.

Rhinegeist brewery is housed in the skeleton of an old Moerlein bottling plant. And starting at 7 p.m. Thursday (Nov. 20), 17 artists and collaboratives will be exhibiting projected video, sculptural and environmental installations in/on the structure's architecture. The interdisciplinary works will demonstrate how contemporary artists currently embrace the dematerialization of image and how that manifests in a non-traditional art space. The name Rhinegeist literally translates to "ghost of the Rhine," and according to the curatorial statement, "Though often intangible, light and art can likewise be said to haunt or inhabit space."

Participating artists include Brandon Abel, Jen Berter, Nicki Davis, DAAP Clay & Glazes, headed by Katie Parker and Guy Michael Davis (featuring the work of Olutoba Akomolede, Christine Barron, Amanda Bialk, Michael Broderick, Linnea Campbell, Catherine Gilliam, Theresa Krosse, Sarah Maxwell, Megan Stevens, Christine Uebel, Allison Ventura & Victoria Wykoff), Lizzy Duquette, Sam Ferris-Morris, Mark Governanti, John Hancock, Joe Ianopollo, Maidens of the Cosmic Body Running, Andy Marko, Alice Pixley Young, Play Cincy, Lindsey Sahlin, Caroline Turner, Justin West, C. Jacqueline Wood and Charlie Woodman.

The one-night only exhibit kicks off at 7 p.m. and will go until 10 p.m. It's free and open to the public. Rhinegeist is located at 1910 Elm St., Over-the-Rhine. Get more information about the event or NEAR*BY and their mission to create ephemeral and interdisciplinary exhibits that bypass the art institution here.

 
 
by Steven Rosen 08.18.2014 126 days ago
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art, Street Art at 09:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
-1

ArtWorks Launches Mural Walking Tour

As Downtown and Over-the-Rhine continue to see a growth of walking tours related to the revived inner city's heritage (especially its brewing heritage) and architecture, a new one will soon be offered dedicated to its ever-growing collection of public murals.

ArtWorks, which is responsible for many of those murals (including a just-finished one at Eighth and Main streets dedicated to Cincinnati-born Pop artist Tom Wesselmann), will launch the tours in October as part of its Mural (Celebration) Month. They will continue into November, and then take a break. Beginning in 2015, they'll run April through November. Reservations will be needed for the tours, which will run 90 minutes and cost $20 for adults.

Artworks also is looking for volunteers to guide those tours. If you're interested in either, visit artworkscincinnati.org where information will be available soon. Bus tours are being discussed, too, once streetcar construction is completed.

 
 
by Jac Kern 06.18.2014
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 11:32 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
caccover_jf2

CAC Offers Extended Thursday Hours for Summer

Night Museum runs 5-9 p.m. Thursdays through Aug. 7

Fresh off its 2014-2015 season announcement, Downtown’s Contemporary Arts Center adds a new promotion to its calendar of exhibits, performances and special events.

Night Museum gives visitors a chance to check out the CAC during evening hours every Thursday. From 5-9 p.m., guests can view the latest exhibit, shop the CAC Store, enjoy a cash bar and mingle with other art appreciators. Admission is $7.50; $5.50 for seniors, students and educators; and free for children under 5 and all members. Paid visitors can park for free Thursdays in July at the Central Parking Garage (36 E. Seventh Street).

This week's Night Museum coincides with a special event from One Night One Craft, the CAC's DIY workshop series. Chef Trinidad Mac-Auliffe of Raw Intervention will demonstrate cool recipes — literally — highlighting dishes prepared without heat. Munch on raw creations, then try making some of your own fro 6-8 p.m. One Night One Craft continues Mondays through July.

The CAC is typically open until 6 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. The museum is closed on Tuesdays and offers free admission from 5-9 p.m. Mondays. Find more info here.

 
 
by Maija Zummo 01.06.2014
Posted In: Street Art, Get Involved, Arts community at 03:10 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
ecosculpt

Washington Park Now Accepting 2014 Ecosculpt Submissions

Get ready to recycle artfully

Sick of just tossing your cans and bottles into the recycling bin? Good news: EcoSculpt, a three-week art installation event comprised of sculptures made of recycled and/or recyclable materials, is returning to Washington Park in celebration of Earth Day.

And EcoSculpt artists not only get to exhibit how artfully eco-friendly they are in large-scale sculptures, they also have a chance to win cash prizes. According to a press release, three judges will choose first, second and third prize winners based on concept, execution and construction. Cash prizes of $500, $250 and $150, as well as a People’s Choice prize of $100, will be awarded at the official EcoSculpt Award Ceremony on Tuesday, April 22, 2014 at 6:30 p.m.

Those interested in participating can visit washingtonpark.org to access an electronic application; please include a PDF or JPEG version of your sketch in your submission. The deadline to enter is 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28. Accepted applicants will be notified of their status by Friday, March 7.

View 2014 EcoSculpt submission guidelines or to submit your original eco-friendly design hereec.

 

 

 
 
by Jac Kern 01.02.2014
Posted In: Arts community, Visual Art at 10:48 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
aaronbetsky_cam_jf

Aaron Betsky to Step Down as Cincinnati Art Museum Director

The Cincinnati Art Museum announced today that Aaron Betsky will be stepping down as director of the museum. Betsky, who has worked as director at CAM for seven years, will leave the position once his successor is determined.

From the press release:

"The museum now has the programming and staff in place, and the financial stability that will allow me to openly pursue my next position," noted Mr. Betsky. "I feel that I have accomplished the goals that I and the Board had envisioned when I first arrived and would like to explore opportunities that may include or combine my academic interests and institutional experience."

The CAM Board of Trustees is assembling a search committee to find a successor. Betsky will assist in this decision.

"Aaron has effectively led the Cincinnati Art Museum through one of the most challenging periods in our history and did so while adding new facilities, growing our program, attracting record audiences, and raising money both for capital projects and our endowment," said Dave Dougherty, Chairman of the Board of Trustees. "He brought a vision, energy and acumen that will continue to serve the museum into the future."

Go here to read CityBeat's recent interview with Betsky, wherein the the director discusses changes and challenges at CAM.

 
 
by Jac Kern 11.13.2013
Posted In: Visual Art, Arts community at 09:46 AM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
1002638_10151948882978965_599207823_n

UPDATE: Cork 'N Bottle Removes London Police Mural

Decision made one day after BLDG's Mike Amann passed away

UPDATE: Cork ‘N Bottle has reached out to BLDG and the public to apologize for the removal of The London Police mural made possible by BLDG and Mike Amann, who passed away Sunday.

Cork ‘N Bottle’s Tim Hue met with BLDG owners to apologize for the unfortunate timing of the mural removal. The company says it will donate $1,000 to the American Cancer Society in Mike Amann’s name and work to bring The London Police back to Covington to create a new mural. Both the gallery and Cork ‘N Bottle shared the news on social media.

From BLDG’s Facebook page:

“Excellent update on the Cork-N-Bottle and The London Police - Official mural situation:
We just had an excellent meeting with Tim Hue from Cork N Bottle issuing a formal apology along with a gracious $1,000 donation to the American Cancer Society on behalf of Mike Amann.
We fully accept this apology along with Tim's eagerness to correct the situation. We will be working with Tim and Cork N Bottle on replacing the mural in a timely fashion.
Also, we would like to state that the unfortunate timing of the event was in no way intended to be malicious or insensitive in any way.
Thank you Cork N Bottle for doing the right thing for the City of Covington and our community.”

Cork ‘N Bottle also reached out to fans on their page:

“We understand and sincerely regret the hurt that the removal of the art mural has caused our community. We acted out of a concern of a Maker’s Mark copyright violation – which we feared might affect our relationship with a key supplier. We certainly had no intention of offending The London Police - Official, BLDG or the community who had come to appreciate and enjoy the mural. We have been a part of this community for 50 years and as always, wish to work in the best interest for our community's development and growth. We regret the loss of this piece of art, and thank you for your comments and your enthusiasm for Covington. We too share your passion for our neighborhood and love being a part of this community. In furtherance of our sincere apologies, Cork 'N Bottle has made a donation in the name and memory of Michael T. Amann to The American Cancer Society. We invite others to join us.”

ORIGINAL POST: 10 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 12

The London Police mural on the side of Covington’s Cork ‘N Bottle has been removed by the liquor store.

British street artists TLP came to Greater Cincinnati this August as part of a collaboration with Covington’s BLDG. The London Police created one large mural and several smaller graffiti works across Covington during their two-week stay. Cork ‘N Bottle owners, according to BLDG, agreed to keep one of the works on the side of their building for at least one year. The mural was removed Monday.

From BLDG’s Facebook Page:

Huge loss in Covington today. Cork 'N Bottle decided to paint over their The London Police - Official mural today. Let us state that the agreement of the mural being painted on the building was that the painting would be up for at least a year after completion. From this point forward, we will surely only shop at The Party Source for all our spirits!”

This decision comes just a day after BLDG owner Mike Amann passed away Sunday after a battle with stage four neuroendocrine cancer.

Friends of Amann and fans of the artwork reached out to Cork ‘N Bottle on Facebook for an explanation. The liquor store posted the following statement this morning.

The London Police mural was removed from our building at 501 Crescent Ave. yesterday. The reasons for this are that the contract to have it painted was unauthorized and the image was an infringement on the Maker’s Mark trademarked bottle image. Please look for new art coming this spring as a new mural is being properly contracted.”

This blog will be updated when more information becomes available.

 
 
by Rick Pender 11.08.2013
Posted In: Arts community, Theater, Visual Art at 11:22 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door blog 11-8 - drew pulver as tevye human race - photo scott j. kimmins

Stage Door: Choices Galore

I had occasion to be in downtown Dayton on business earlier this week and thought I'd stay for the evening to catch the Human Race Theatre Company's production of Fiddler on the Roof at the Loft Theatre. It's not a space you'd immediately think of for this often large-scale show, but director Kevin Moore has put of lot of action and choreography (by Chris Crowthers) on the stage, centering on Drew Pulver as the philosophical Jewish milkman, Tevye. He's the show's charismatic core, but he's surrounded by a strong cast who really embody their roles. Wandering on and off the stage, a four-musician band, including George Abud as the expressive fiddler, ably accompanies the cast, several of whom play multiple roles. The intimacy of the Loft amplifies the heartfelt nature of the show, and the actors pour heart and soul into the joyous storytelling. This production runs through Nov. 30, so you have time to plan a trip to Dayton yourself. If you're a fan of musicals, you won't be disappointed. Tickets: 937-228-3630

If you're looking for a good musical closer to home, I can certainly recommend the Cincinnati Playhouse production of Cabaret, which gets my Critic's Pick in the current issue (see review here). Director Marcia Milgrom Dodge has taken it back to 1929 with costumes and choreography very true to the period in a seedy, sexy Berlin nightclub. The Playhouse doesn't often do musicals, but this one is done right. Tickets: 513-421-3888

Know Theatre is staging another work by Mike Bartlett. Last spring it was Cock; this time it's Bull (review here). It's a story of two people bullying a third as they compete for jobs. A nasty tale, not for the faint-hearted, but some fine writing and acting. You'll feel ashamed of yourself for enjoying it, I suspect. Tickets: 513-300-5669

A fine production of John Steinbeck's Depression era tale of migrant workers and a guy who just doesn't fit in, Of Mice and Men (review here), finishes its run this weekend at Cincinnati Shakespeare. Jeremy Dubin's performance as cranky George and Jim Hopkins as simpleminded Lenny are examples of the kind of fine acting that's a regular commodity at Cincy Shakes. Tickets: 513-381-2273

Finally, if you're in the mood for a hilarious farce, your destination should be the Carnegie in Covington. CCM Drama has transported some of its actors from the UC Campus to Covington, Ky., for a production of a deliriously funny tale of one man in Paris juggling three fiancees, Boeing Boeing. They're all flight attendants, but advances in aviation screw up his neat schedule to keep them discreet from one another. Comedy ensues. Tickets: 859-957-1940

 
 
by Rick Pender 06.21.2013
Posted In: Arts community, COMMUNITY, Theater, Visual Art at 09:13 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
stage door image for human races avenue q - katie pees & andrew ian adams - photo scott j. kimmins

Stage Door: The Droll Days of Summer

Most of our local theaters are cooling their jets for the summer months, but you still have two more weekends to catch the hilarious, three-actor Sherlock Holmes spoof of Hound of the Baskervilles at Cincinnati Shakespeare Company. This one is definitely fine-tuned, featuring a trio of Cincy Shakes best actors — Jeremy Dubin, Nick Rose and Brent Vimtrup — directed by Michael Evan Haney from the Cincinnati Playhouse. It's a revival of a hit from last summer, so they have the comic timing of quick costume changes and fast-paced tomfoolery down pat. I understand that this weekend is almost sold out, but don't let that keep you from trying. Final performance is June 30. I hope you've deduced that you need to get for it this time around, even if you saw it before. (If you did, you know how funny it is.) It's elementary! Tickets: 513-381-2273, x1

The Showboat Majestic is a venue that floats along every summer with solid entertainment. Right now you can come on board for a classic piece of comedy by Neil Simon, The Odd Couple. It's a hit from 1965 in a production featuring a couple of great local actors: Joshua Steele as the prissy Felix and Mike Hall as the messy Oscar. They're a pair who know their way around a funny script, so it's a fine show for a summer's laugh. Tickets: 513-241-6550

Maybe you thought Sesame Street was funny when you were a kid. How'd you like to see some raunchy puppet behavior? Avenue Q is onstage in Dayton at the Human Race Theatre. The 2004 Tony Award-winning musical offers laugh-out-loud musical mayhem. But leave the kids at home: This one is aimed at those who are twentysomething and up, offering answers to a simple question: What happens to the kids who were raised on Sesame Street when they grow up? You'll find the answers — in songs like "It Sucks to Be Me" and "The Internet Is for Porn" — at the Loft Theatre, 126 North Main St. in downtown Dayton. Tickets: 937-228-3630

 
 

 

 

 
Close
Close
Close