WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
Home - Blogs - Staff Blogs - Popular Blogs
by Hannah McCartney 07.25.2013
Posted In: Guns, Gun Violence, Police at 04:32 PM | Permalink | Comments (23)
 
 
ramundo photo

The Unexpected Death of Jeremy Ramundo

Thirty-two-year-old shot by police in Clifton was mild-mannered, acquaintances say

Who was Roger Ramundo?

First of all, those who knew him called him by his middle name, Jeremy. On Wednesday, July 24, Jeremy was shot and killed by a Cincinnati Police Officer in what the CPD is describing as a violent, “life or death struggle,” with a mentally ill, violent and heavily armed man. Those who knew Roger Jeremy Ramundo, however, remember him very differently.


Thirty-two-year-old Jeremy lived in a Clifton gaslight home with his mother, Peggy, and he liked to eat on the patio at neighborhood bar Arlin’s Bar and Grill, the same place where he lost his life in a struggle with police just blocks away from his home.

An acquaintance of the family, who asked to remain unnamed, described Ramundo as a gentle, bright and mild-mannered young man with good social skills.

Ramundo formerly worked up the street at Bruegger’s Bagels, where current CityBeat arts & culture editor Jac Kern worked with him from 2007-2008. “I always knew him to be a kind, gentle person,” she says, recalling his fondness for discussing politics and attentive listening skills.

According to Kern, Ramundo was in a car accident years before that left him with debilitating vision and hearing problems. He had also been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, both of which he’d been prescribed medications for.

But nobody, it seemed, suspected he’d be the type of person to be involved in a deadly police shootout. The Cincinnati Police Department today held a press conference on the incident, during which Cincinnati Police Interim Chief Paul Humphries described the actions of the five officers involved in the shootout as by-the-book, even heroic.

What Humphries accounts began as an argument between Ramundo his mother at their home on Thrall Avenue, a few blocks from Arlin’s, which escalated shortly after Ramundo refused to go to his doctor’s appointment, according to a 911 call made by a health care representative from the medical facility where Ramundo’s appointment was scheduled. According to the health care representative, Ramundo’s mother called her looking for help, explaining he’d become belligerent following her requests to go to his appointment. She said he had been willfully not taking his psychiatric medications, although it’s unclear for how long.

In the 911 call, the health care representative says Peggy told her Ramundo had begun threatening her, saying that if she called the cops, there would be a “bloodbath.” She saw him take off up Ludlow Avenue and said on the phone call she believed he was carrying his registered gun, a Sig Sauer .40 caliber pistol, and guessed he might be on his way to his go-to hangout spot.

Officers Jayne Snelling and William Springer followed the mother’s tip and found him sitting on the back patio at Arlin’s. 

An Arlin’s bartender named Jocelyn was working that day and recalls Ramundo coming in somewhat agitated. “He was asking about his glasses,” she says. “He seemed frustrated about losing them, and he had me call another bartender to see if they were here somewhere. After that, he asked for a glass of water, walked outside and that was that."

Jocelyn continued: “I’m in total shock. He was just a sweet kid,” she said, although she couldn’t remember seeing him in the bar for about three months prior.

In total, five CPD officers were dispatched to the scene, two of whom have had past positive experiences with Ramundo, including Officer Snelling and Officer Bryan Gabel, who later fired the shots that killed him.

The physical struggle began after peace-making efforts failed, Humphries says. Officers reported they saw Ramundo reaching toward his waistband, where he held his pistol.

Gabel was the first to make physical contact with Ramundo, trying to “control his arm,” according to Humphries. That led the other officers to become involved in a scuffle that shortly thereafter prompted Officer Kelly Jackson to deploy a five-second Taser sting to Ramundo’s back, which they say sent Ramundo to the ground.

Jackson again deployed her Taser onto Ramundo’s back, which, according to Humphries, had little to no effect after the initial five-second deploy. On a third attempt, the Taser failed to work, according to Humphries, at which point Jackson signaled another officer to deploy another Taser.

Snelling attempted to do so, but mistakenly Tased another officer in the struggle, who was on top of Ramundo’s back. Gabel allegedly saw Ramundo raise his gun, when he fired his first and only shot. Officer Reginald Lane had taken the Tased officer's spot on top of Ramundo, attempting to subdue him and retrieve his gun. That's when Humphries says all five officers saw him trying to bring the gun up again, this time aimed toward the officers.

Gabel fired two shots into Ramundo’s lower left back. He died in the hospital three hours later.

Humphries says Ramundo was also carrying two magazines, mace and a folding knife.

His mother, the acquaintance says, is an outspoken advocate on mental health issues, particularly Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), on which she’s published a book. Peggy “always spoke preciously” of Jeremy, the acquaintance notes.

Bipolar disorder, when untreated, can cause those affected to experience “mood episodes,” which, in severe cases, sometimes result in impulsive, violent behavior. An estimated 2.3 million Americans suffer from bipolar disorder.

 
 
by Hannah McCartney 09.12.2013
 
 
stand-your-ground-law

City Officially Opposes Proposed "Stand Your Ground" Laws

Council vote unanimous; Dayton, Canton and Toledo expected to follow suit

A unanimous City Council vote on Wednesday to pass a resolution officially representing Cincinnati's opposition to the proposed H.B. 203, Ohio's own version of controversial "Stand Your Ground" laws, is part of a statewide advocacy effort to oppose loosening restrictions on the use of deadly force.

The vote puts Cincinnati in the middle of a national dialogue that's been ongoing since the death of unarmed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., in 2012. 

The bill, introduced by House Republicans on June 11, contains several revisions to the state's gun laws, the most controversial of which is the proposal to expand the circumstances in which a person has no duty to retreat from a threatening situation before using force in self-defense. Those in opposition to the bill worry that change will encourage vigilante justice and give gun owners a false sense of entitlement in using their firearms in otherwise non-violent situations.

The bill's language also loosens restrictions on concealed carry permits and would make it easier for individuals subject to protection orders to obtain handguns.

State Rep. Alicia Reece spoke at a Wednesday press conference at City Hall to support Cincinnati's formal opposition to the bill. Reece, also president of the Ohio Legislative Black Caucus, is part of its statewide campaign to garner enough opposition to H.B. 203 to present to Gov. John Kasich and other legislative leaders. 

She says OLBC has already collected about 5,000 petitions and hopes to obtain more than 10,000 by the time the Ohio House of Representatives resumes regular sessions on Oct. 2. 

Reece and Councilwoman Yvette Simpson, who sponsored the resolution, insist that Ohio's self-defense laws are already strong enough to protect those who face physical threats from others. In 2008, then-Gov. Ted Strickland signed Ohio's "Castle Doctrine" into law, which stripped homeowners of the duty to try to retreat in threatening situations and  gives them the "benefit of the doubt" when they injure or kill a person who enters their residence or vehicle.

"While many states around the country which have Stand Your Ground laws are looking at ways in which they can repeal those laws, or change those laws, unfortunately Ohio is moving backwards by trying to implement Stand Your Ground laws, which has become one of the most polarizing issues not only in the state of Ohio, but in the country," said Reece at Wednesday's press conference

The efficacy of stand-your-ground laws to reduce violence is widely debated; several researches insist that the laws actually cause an increase in homicides. Mark Hoekstra, an economist with Texas A&M University, published a study that found homicides increase 7 to 9 percent in states that pass stand your ground laws, compared to states that didn't pass laws over the same period. His study found no evidence the laws had an effect on deterring crime during the time period. Those statistics are difficult to gauge, however, because some homicides are legitimately considered "justifiable" while others may just be the result of the "escalation of violence in an otherwise non-violent situation," he told NPR in January.

H.B. 203 is currently waiting to be heard in front of the Policy and Legislative Oversight committee. See an analysis of the bill below:

Analysis of H.B. 203
 
 
by German Lopez 11.22.2013
Posted In: News, Stand your ground, Guns at 12:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (1)
 
 
ohio statehouse

Research: Stand-Your-Ground Laws Increase Homicides

As Ohio legislators advance law, studies cast doubt on claims of improved public safety

Supporters of a stand-your-ground law claim the measure would make the public safer by making it easier for people to defend themselves from criminals, but the research so far shows the law might weaken public safety in a few key areas and actually increase the amount of homicides.

On Wednesday, the Republican-controlled Ohio House passed sweeping gun legislation that would impose a stand-your-ground law in the state. The bill now requires approval from the Republican-controlled Ohio Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich to become law.

Stand-your-ground laws remove the duty to retreat before using deadly force in self-defense in places in which a person is lawfully allowed. Current Ohio law only maintains a traditional “castle doctrine,” which removes the duty to retreat only at a person’s home or vehicle.

The laws have grown particularly controversial following the killing of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman in Florida, where a stand-your-ground law exists but supposedly played a minor role in the trial that allowed Zimmerman to go free.

Regardless of what drove Zimmerman to his actions or allowed him to go free, three major studies found stand-your-ground laws might increase violence and widen racial disparities in the U.S. justice system.

A June 2012 paper from National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and Texas A&M University researchers concluded, “Results indicate (castle doctrine and stand-your-ground) laws do not deter burglary, robbery, or aggravated assault. In contrast, they lead to a statistically significant 8 percent net increase in the number of reported murders and non-negligent manslaughters.” The study looked at FBI Uniform Crime Reports from 2000 to 2010 for 21 states, including 17 states with stand-your-ground laws and four states, including Ohio, with castle doctrine laws that only apply to a person’s home and vehicle.

Another June 2012 paper from NBER stated, “Our results indicate that Stand Your Ground laws are associated with a significant increase in the number of homicides among whites, especially white males. According to our estimates, between 28 and 33 additional white males are killed each month as a result of these laws. We find no consistent evidence to suggest that these laws increase homicides among blacks.” The study looked at monthly data from U.S. Vital Statistics to gauge the effect of stand-your-ground laws on homicides and firearm injuries, with supplemental analysis of data from FBI Supplementary Homicide Reports and the Health Care Utilization Project.

A July 2013 study from the left-leaning Urban Institute found “homicides with a white perpetrator and a black victim are ten times more likely to be ruled justified than cases with a black perpetrator and a white victim, and the gap is larger in states with Stand Your Ground laws.” According to the findings, stand-your-ground states are more likely to legally justify white-on-white, white-on-black and black-on-black homicides but not black-on-white homicides. For the study, the Urban Institute used FBI Supplementary Homicide Report data for all 50 states and Washington, D.C., dated between 2005 and 2010.

When confronted with such statistics, supporters of stand-your-ground laws typically note that violent crime rates dropped in the states that adopted the laws. But, as PolitiFact Florida pointed out in response to Florida Rep. Dennis Baxley, violent crime began dropping before stand-your-ground laws were passed.

The nationwide violent crime rate dropped from 757.7 to 386.3 between 1992 and 2011, with more than half of the drop occurring between 1992 and 1999, according to FBI crime data. The June 2012 paper from NBER found more than 20 states passed traditional castle doctrine or stand-your-ground laws between 2000 and 2010, after the violent crime rate began to drop.

The research could show correlation instead of causation. Perhaps some unnamed factor in states that adopted stand-your-ground laws makes it more likely that they’ll see increases in homicides or racial disparities, even as violent crime declines. But, at the very least, it doesn’t seem supporters of stand-your-ground laws have the empirical evidence on their side.

 
 
by Danny Cross 07.27.2013
Posted In: Public Policy, President Obama, Gun Violence, Guns at 11:44 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
news_gabbygiffords_jf3

Giffords’ Anti-Gun Violence Organization Opens Ohio Chapter

Ohioans for Responsible Solutions launches chapters in Columbus and Cleveland

The gun violence prevention group founded by former Arizona Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords on July 27 announced the launch of Ohioans for Responsible Solutions, which will continue the organization’s efforts to support officials who back responsible gun legislation. 

The new chapters, in Cleveland and Columbus, are part of Americans for Responsible Solutions (ARS), which Giffords and her husband, retired Navy Captain and astronaut Mark Kelly, launched in January. 

“People in the Buckeye State know the terrible toll gun violence takes on communities,” ARS Executive Director Pia Carusone said in a statement. “We’re excited about what the 18,000-plus Ohioans for Responsible Solutions will accomplish because they represent a rich cross-section of the community: gun owners and non-gun owners alike, law enforcement officials, victims of gun violence, faith leaders, moms and voters of all political stripes from every part of the state.”

Giffords’ organization says it is not anti-gun — Giffords and Kelly are both gun owners — instead arguing that the gun lobby’s influence has kept legislators from passing common-sense legislation that most Americans support. 

A Gallup poll conducted April 22-25 found 65 percent of Americans believed the U.S. Senate should have passed a measure to expand background checks for gun purchases and ban some semi-automatic weapons, which the Senate failed to pass April 17 because of procedural steps requiring 60 votes to pass. The final vote was 54 in favor and 46 against. Twenty-nine percent of Americans agreed with the Senate’s failure to pass the measure, and 6 percent had no opinion. The poll had a margin of error of +/-4 percentage points. 

In January — just a month after the shooting massacre in Newtown, Conn., that killed 20 children and six adults — Gallup found 91 percent of Americans support required background checks for all gun sales. The poll asked respondents about each of nine key proposals included in President Barack Obama’s plan to reduce gun violence. The two least-supported proposals still had majority support, but these issues turned out to be at the center of the legislation that failed to pass the Senate four months later: reinstating a ban on assault weapons (60-percent support), and limiting the sale of ammunition magazines to those with 10 rounds or less (54-percent support).

Giffords has become one of the nation’s highest-profile gun violence prevention activists since a shooting in 2011 that left her partially paralyzed. Giffords survived the assassination attempt on Jan. 8, 2011 in Tucson, Ariz., when a mentally ill man shot her in the head at a political event outside a grocery store. The man then fired on other people, killing six and wounding 12 total. 

Giffords and Kelly participated in the Northside Fourth of July parade early this month as part of Americans for Responsible Solutions’ “Rights and Responsibilities” cross-country tour promoting the organization’s goal of advocating for candidates that support responsible gun policies that protect both the public and the rights of gun owners. CityBeat covered the event here. 

“Stopping gun violence takes courage. The courage to do right, the courage of new ideas,” Giffords told the Northside crowd during a press event before the parade. “I’ve seen great courage when my life was on the line. Now is the time to come together to be responsible. Democrats, Republicans, everyone. We must do something. Fight, fight, fight.”

Americans for Responsible Solutions announced this week that its super PAC has raised $6.5 million so far this year and more than 500,000 members. At this point it has not announced any plans for a Cincinnati chapter. 

 
 
by German Lopez 07.11.2013
Posted In: News, Guns, Budget, Streetcar at 09:17 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
cover streetcar misrepresentations

Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar project misrepresented, gun control battle continues, Media Bridges closing down

Ever since the Cincinnati streetcar has been envisioned, the mass transit project has been mired in misrepresentations driven largely by opponents and politicians. CityBeat has a breakdown of the misrepresentations here, showing some of the silliest and biggest falsehoods claimed by opponents and supporters.

The national battle over gun control came to Cincinnati on July 4 when former Rep. Gabby Giffords stopped at the Northside parade to call for new restrictions on firearms. Giffords is part of a slew of national leaders calling for stronger regulations and enforcement for background checks — a policy more than nine in 10 Americans support. Still, the call seems to be politically unheard so far: Federal legislation is stalled in Congress, and Ohio legislators are working to loosen gun restrictions.

Facing city budget cuts, public access media organization Media Bridges is shutting down by the end of the year. The city picked up Media Bridges’ funding after the organization lost state funding that had been provided through an agreement with Time Warner Cable. But city officials claim the local funding was supposed to act as a one-year reprieve and nothing more — a claim Media Bridges was apparently never made aware of until it was too late. To justify the cut, the city cites public surveys that ranked budget programs in terms of importance, but a look at the citizen surveys shows the demographics were skewed against low-income people who make the most use out of programs like Media Bridges.

Check out CityBeat’s editorial content for this week’s issue:
• German Lopez: “Meet Daniela,” the hypothetical victim of Republican policies at the state and national level.
• Ben Kaufman: “‘Enquirer’ Takes Questionable Approach to Covering Meyers Ordination,” which analyzes the questionable apathy to a supposedly “illegal” ordination of a woman Catholic priest.
• Kathy Wilson: “Until It’s Time for You to Go,” a look at the life story of South African leader Nelson Mandela and the hurdles he faced as he helped end discriminatory apartheid policies.

If you’re headed to Fountain Square today, expect to see some images of bloodied fetuses and fetal limbs. An anti-abortion group is showing a video with the gruesome visuals as part of a protest against what it sees as “the greatest human rights injustice of our time.” The group defends its tactics by citing its First Amendment rights. The U.S. Supreme Court has so far refused to rule one way or the other on the issue, but, barring some restrictions for airwave broadcasts, the court typically protects all kinds of political speech as long as it’s not pornographic.

The Cincinnati Police Department is changing how it responds to calls to focus on what it sees as the most important issues, such as impacting violent crime, youth intervention efforts, long-term problem solving projects, traffic safety and neighborhood quality-of-life issues. The biggest change will come with how the department reacts to minor traffic accidents: It will still respond, but it may not file a report.

The so-far-unnamed Greater Cincinnati coalition working to reduce the local infant mortality rate set a goal yesterday: zero. It’s a dramatic vision for a region that, at 13.6, has an infant mortality rate more than twice the national average of six, as CityBeat covered here.

Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld announced in a statement yesterday that he will be gathering local leaders and health officials to encourage the state to expand Medicaid. The expansion, which CityBeat covered in further detail here, would save Ohio money and insure half a million Ohioans in the next decade, according to an analysis by the Health Policy Institute of Ohio.

Fish oils may increase the risk of prostate cancer, according to a new study.

A measure that would disallow employers from discriminating against gay and lesbian individuals made it through a U.S. Senate committee yesterday.

Cadillac’s Super Cruise could have the features to making self-driving cars viable.

A device trains blind people to see by listening.

 
 
by German Lopez 07.22.2013
Posted In: News, LGBT, Guns, Courts at 09:27 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
peter beck

Morning News and Stuff

Local Republican indicted, gay couple sues state, Ohio PAC buying Zimmerman a gun

The speaker of the Ohio House is asking a local state representative to resign after he was indicted on 16 counts of fraud. State Rep. Peter Beck, a Mason Republican, already faces a maximum of 43 years in prison if he’s convicted on all the counts, but Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine says the ongoing investigation might produce more charges. The charges are a result of Beck’s alleged actions involving an Ohio software company called Christopher Technologies, which investors claim bilked them out of $200,000.

Claiming discrimination, a newlywed same-sex couple is suing the state of Ohio for failing to recognize their marriage. Jim Obergefell and John Arthur were married in Maryland, but the couple lives in Cincinnati, Ohio, where same-sex marriage is banned by the state constitution. The couple’s attorney claims the state should be forced to recognize the marriage because of Fourteenth Amendment protections extended to gay couples by the Supreme Court’s recent ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Arthur was diagnosed in 2011 with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurological disease that causes muscles to rapidly deteriorate, and he’s currently bedridden as a result. Given Arthur’s health, the couple will argue for an expedited ruling at a hearing at 1:30 p.m. today in front of U.S. District Court Judge Timothy Black.

The Buckeye Firearms Association is raising money to buy a gun for George Zimmerman, who was acquitted of second-degree murder in the murder trial of black 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman’s gun is currently being held by the U.S. Department of Justice as it investigates further charges.

Councilman P.G. Sittenfeld and 100 members of the Children’s Defense Fund will meet at Washington Park at 1 p.m. today to rally against gun violence in Cincinnati. The group plans to march to City Hall, where they will listen to students suggestions for making the city a safer place to visit and reside.

A state representative introduced a bill that would allow some public university students to forgo traditional tuition and instead pay for their college education through a percent of their income for 24 years after they graduate.

An Ohio health aide is being sent to prison for Medicaid fraud.

Ohio gas prices are down this week.

In a desperate bid to save the endangered Sumatran rhino, the Cincinnati Zoo is attempting to breed a brother and sister.

If you think the recent heat has been bad, Popular Science has a humbling list of the 10 worst places to live in the universe.

 
 
by German Lopez 01.24.2014
Posted In: News, Guns, Gun Violence, Education at 03:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (3)
 
 
ohio statehouse

School Employees Could Soon Carry Concealed Guns

Research indicates the Republican-backed proposal might fail to improve school safety

The Republican-controlled Ohio House on Wednesday approved a bill that would allow school boards to designate some school employees to carry concealed firearms and prohibit school boards from releasing the names of those employees.

As part of the designation, school employees would have to participate in “active shooter training” established by the state attorney general. School boards and employees could also consult with local law enforcement to establish stronger standards and training.

If a gun-toting teacher injures or kills someone, the rules exempt the school board and employees from liability “unless the injury, death or loss resulted from the employee’s reckless or wanton conduct.”

The bill would also allow off-duty officers to carry firearms in schools.

There are some restrictions: A school board could not force an employee to carry a gun, and gun-carrying rights could not be part of a collective bargaining agreement.

While a Republican majority supports the rules to increase safety in schools, some research indicates the plan could backfire.

A review from the Harvard Injury Control Research Center found states and countries with more guns tend to have more homicides. Specifically, men and women in places with more firearms are exposed to a larger risk of gun-related homicide.

University of Pennsylvania researchers found similar results in a 2009 study.

“On average, guns did not protect those who possessed them from being shot in an assault,” the study concluded. “Although successful defensive gun uses occur each year, the probability of success may be low for civilian gun users in urban areas. Such users should reconsider their possession of guns or, at least, understand that regular possession necessitates careful safety countermeasures.”

A 2009 ABC News special found even trained gun-wielders fail to properly react in the event of a shooting. In multiple simulations that placed trained and armed students in a classroom, none of the participants succeeded in stopping an unexpected shooter from landing fake rounds that would have been deadly in a real shooting.

Local state representatives split along party lines on the bill. Democrats Denise Driehaus, Connie Pillich and Alicia Reece voted against it, while Republicans Peter Stautberg and Louis Blessing voted for it.

The bill now needs to move through the Republican-controlled Ohio Senate and Republican Gov. John Kasich to become law.

 
 
by German Lopez 07.29.2013
Posted In: News, Streetcar, Business, Guns at 09:26 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
streetcar

Morning News and Stuff

Streetcar gets executive, businesses call for inclusion, gun control group opens Ohio chapter

John Deatrick is taking over as project executive of the Cincinnati streetcar project, moving on from his previous work as project manager of The Banks. Deatrick’s hiring announcement happened in April, but it was delayed while City Council fixed the project’s budget gap. Deatrick and his team previously won an award for their work at The Banks, and he says he will bring the same scrutiny and success to the streetcar project. A new project manager for The Banks is set to be hired in August. Since the streetcar project’s inception, it has been mired in misrepresentations and political controversy, which CityBeat covered in further detail here.

Local business leaders are calling on the city government to change its contracting policies to target minority- and women-owned businesses. Advocates argue the city’s inclusion rates have greatly dropped since Cincinnati did away with its inclusion program in the 1990s, but the city administration points out the rates are likely understated because women- and minority-owned businesses are no longer required to report themselves as minorities or women. The business leaders say the figures are too low regardless, which could have big implications since minority-owned businesses are more likely to hire minorities, who have twice the unemployment rate as white residents. As a result of court rulings, Cincinnati needs to first conduct a disparity study before it makes any changes that specifically target minorities or women.

Gabrielle Giffords’s anti-gun violence organization is opening an Ohio chapter to promote legislation that intends to protect both the public and the rights of gun owners. Giffords, a former U.S. representative who survived an assassination attempt, has been touring around the country — at one point coming to Cincinnati — to speak out against gun violence. Gun control legislation failed in the U.S. Senate in April after it fell short of getting 60 votes to overcome procedural hurdles, even though polling shows a clear majority of Americans favor such legislation.

Local government funding may be further reduced as a result of recent tax cuts because the Local Government Fund traditionally gets a percent of state tax revenue. Specifically, critics are concerned less state tax revenue will slow down “natural growth” in funding to cities and counties. Last week, an analysis from Policy Matters Ohio found the recently passed two-year state budget already reduces local government funding, following even steeper reductions in the previous budget. The cuts since Gov. John Kasich took office have cost Cincinnati more than $22 million.

A traffic camera ban would cost Ohio cities and counties millions of dollars in revenue.

Ohio gas prices are starting down this week.

Home-schooled and private-school students have a right to play on public school teams because of a provision in the recently passed state budget.

When Columbus’ parking meters were upgraded to accept credit cards, revenue jumped by 13.2 percent. Cincinnati’s meters will be upgraded as part of the parking privatization plan.

Ohio air bases are undergoing review this week as part of Congress’ attempts to gauge whether the nation’s Air Force is prepared for current and future missions and homeland defense.

Slow news day, Enquirer?

Florida researchers found “fat shaming” actually perpetuates obesity.

It would probably take 300 to 500 piranhas five minutes to strip the flesh off a 180-pound human.

 
 
by German Lopez 11.21.2013
Posted In: News, Guns, Governor, Privatization at 09:58 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
eric kearney

Morning News and Stuff

Local senator to run for lt. governor, audit clears JobsOhio, House OKs "stand your ground"

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald selected State Sen. Eric Kearney of Cincinnati as his running mate for his bid against Gov. John Kasich in 2014. Although Kasich is widely perceived as a favorite as the incumbent, recent polling found the race is tied. (The poll was commissioned by Ohio Democrats, but the firm behind it was deemed the most accurate national pollster of 2012.)

Republican State Auditor Dave Yost’s long-awaited audit of JobsOhio found no substantial conflicts of interests at the privatized development firm established by Gov. Kasich and Republican legislators to replace the public Ohio Department of Development. But the audit found 113 items totaling nearly $69,000 in inadequately documented expenditures financed through the state’s leased liquor profits and insufficient safeguards to identify potential conflicts of interest. In a statement, John Patrick Carney, the Democratic candidate for state auditor running against Yost in 2014, claimed the audit was a whitewashed attempt that fails to give taxpayers a full accounting of JobsOhio” and touted it as evidence the state auditor’s office needs change. CityBeat previously wrote about criticisms towards JobsOhio in further detail here. (Updated at 10:45 a.m.: Rewrote paragraph to add Carney’s comments.)

The Ohio House yesterday approved sweeping gun legislation that would impose “stand your ground” rules in the state and automatically recognize concealed-carry licenses from other states. “Stand your ground” rules remove a duty to retreat before using deadly force in self-defense when a person is in areas in which he’s lawfully allowed; current Ohio law only removes the duty to retreat when a person is in his home or vehicle. The bill is particularly controversial following Trayvon Martin’s death to George Zimmerman in Florida, where a “stand your ground” law exists but supposedly played a minor role in the trial that let Zimmerman go free. The bill now requires approval from the Ohio Senate and Gov. Kasich to become law.

Commentary: “False Equivalency Confuses Streetcar Debate.”

The American Civil Liberties Union of Ohio says it opposes new early voting limits that would shorten the in-person early voting period from 35 to 29 days and remove a “golden week” that allows Ohioans to simultaneously register and vote in person. The Ohio Association of Election Officials claims the limits are necessary to establish uniform voting days across all counties without placing too much of a burden on smaller counties. But Democrats claim the limits aim to suppress voters. The Ohio Senate yesterday cleared the new early voting limits, which now require approval from the Ohio House and Gov. Kasich to become law.

If property and business owners along the planned streetcar line sue over the cancellation of the $133 million project, legal experts say they have a very slim chance of winning. The threat of litigation is one of the potential back-up options discussed by streetcar supporters if Mayor-elect John Cranley and the incoming City Council agree to cancel the project, as CityBeat covered in further detail here.

Hamilton County commissioners agreed to increase the tax return local property owners will get as part of the deal funding Paul Brown Stadium and Great American Ball Park. The deal boosts the rebate to $13 million in 2014, up from $10 million in 2013 but still below the $20.5 million promised to property owners after voters approved a sales tax hike to fund the stadiums. Commissioners estimate property owners will receive nearly $46 for each $100,000 of property value from the boosted rebate, up from $35 this year, but Hamilton County Auditor Dusty Rhodes told CityBeat that the exact number is unclear until the tax commissioner approves new tax rates.

College campuses generally struggle with too-frequent cases of sexual assault, but one lawsuit from an alleged victim is targeting Miami University for supposed negligence and a breach of the student code of conduct. The female student claims she was raped by former Miami University student Antonio Charles, but she says that multiple red flags could have prevented the alleged incident. Charles was eventually expelled from Miami University for “sexual misconduct” in response to the incident involving the plaintiff, but that was after he was investigated for multiple other accusations related to sexual misconduct. Miami University Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Rebecca Getson defends some of the university administration’s actions regarding sexual assault cases as a strict adherence to protocol and blames some of the public perception on the administration’s lack of awareness about the atmosphere.

Cincinnati’s economy will grow more slowly than the nation’s economy next year, according to Cincinnati USA Partnership for Economic Development’s panel of five regional economists.

Al Neyer plans to build a $22 million luxury apartment tower in downtown Cincinnati.

Cancer research done on mice might get screwed up by standard laboratory temperatures.

Follow CityBeat on Twitter:
• Main: @CityBeatCincy
• News: @CityBeat_News
• Music: @CityBeatMusic

• German Lopez: @germanrlopez

 
 
by German Lopez 01.06.2014
Posted In: News, Police, Guns at 12:28 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
jeffrey blackwell

Police Explain Local Increase in Homicides

Gang-related activity driving increase in violence, according to police

Heads of the Cincinnati Police Department testified in front of City Council’s Law and Public Safety Committee Monday to address the local increase in homicides.

The city’s homicide rate hit 25 per 100,000 residents in 2013, compared to the U.S. rate of 4.7 per 100,000 in 2012, following a spike in homicides in Over-the-Rhine, downtown and the west side of Cincinnati, according to police statistics.

“The concern has been the sheer number of homicides we experienced in 2013 and the number of juvenile victims we had this year,” said Assistant Chief Dave Bailey.

Councilman Christopher Smitherman also highlighted the high levels of black-on-black crime, which Chief Jeffrey Blackwell agreed are unacceptable across the country.

“My fear is that my son, who’s African-American … is going to be killed by another African-American,” Smitherman said. “That’s what those stats are saying.”

The key driver of the increases, according to police, is gang-related activity, particularly activity involving the Mexican drug cartel that controls the heroin trade.

“If our theory is correct, most of these homicides involve narcotic sales, respect and retaliation,” Bailey said.

Chief Blackwell explained the increase in homicides appears to be particularly related to disruptions in criminal organizations and their territories.

“Criminal territories have been disrupted, and we’ve seen an increase in turf wars and neighborhood situations between young people,” he said. “Most of the homicides are personal crimes between two known victims. Very rarely are they random in nature.”

Councilman Kevin Flynn asked what council could do to help remedy the situation.

“We are significantly short of police officers, so we desperately need a recruit class,” Blackwell responded. “We need to improve our technology platform here in the police department.”

Blackwell cautioned that there’s not a direct correlation between more police officers and less homicides, but he said another recruit class could help the city meet basic needs.

Flynn claimed council is very willing to meet those needs, given the importance of public safety to the city’s prosperity.

“If we’re not safe and we don’t have the perception that we’re a safe city, none of the rest of the great things we do as a city are going to help,” he said.

How council meets those needs while dealing with fiscal concerns remains to be seen, considering Mayor John Cranley and a majority of council members ran on the promise of structurally balancing the city’s operating budget for the first time in more than a decade.

City officials have vowed to avoid raising taxes and cutting basic services, which makes the task of balancing the budget all the more difficult. Advancing promises of more spending for the police department further complicates the issue, even if it’s politically advantageous in a city seriously concerned about public safety.

Cincinnati Police will hold several town hall meetings in the next week to hear concerns from citizens. The meetings will span across all local districts:
• District 2: Jan. 7, Medpace, Inc., 5375 Medpace Way.

• District 3:
Jan. 8, Elder HS Schaeper Center, 3900 Vincent.
• District 1 and Central Business District:
Jan. 9, River of Life Church, 2000 Central Parkway.
• District 5:
Jan. 13, Little Flower Church, 5560 Kirby Ave..
• District 4:
Jan. 14, Church of the Resurrection, 1619 California Ave.

Correction: The local homicide rate for 2013 was 25 per 100,000 residents, contrary to the 15.5 per 100,000 rate cited by police officials to City Council.

 
 

 

 

 
Close
Close
Close