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by German Lopez 01.07.2014
Posted In: News, Environment, Climate Change at 12:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
news1_angrypowerplant_ashleykroninger

Global Warming Didn't Stop Just Because We're Cold Now

Cold weather in one city or region doesn’t disprove the global phenomenon

The recent bout of cold weather does nothing to disprove the scientifically established phenomenon of global warming, despite what conservative media might be telling some Cincinnatians.

Many Cincinnatians have taken to social media in the past few days to chime in on what the recent weather means for global warming — a debate fostered by so-called skeptics on talk radio and Fox News.

But the scientific literature is based on years and decades of trends, meaning a few days or weeks of cold weather signify little in the big picture of climate change.

In fact, Googles definition of climate is “the weather conditions prevailing in an area in general or over a long period.” The key, scientifically minded folks point out, is “long period.”

When that long period is analyzed, the trend is clear:

The trend explains why scientists almost all agree global warming is happening and most certainly spurred by human actions. In the 2013 report from the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, scientists said they are at least 95 percent certain that human actions contribute to global warming.

Beyond the scientific facts, for every anecdote out there, there is often a contradicting anecdote from another source. While Cincinnati and the Midwest may be coping with a cold winter, summer-stricken Australia is recovering from its own bout of hot weather and drought. 

The contradicting conditions don’t prove or disprove global warming, but they do show the folly of relying on anecdotal evidence.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.12.2013
Posted In: News, Climate Change, LGBT, City Council at 09:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
lgbt protections

Morning News and Stuff

Advocates pursue LGBT protections, Ohio among worst polluters, local business could move

It’s legal in most of Ohio for an employer to fire someone over his or her sexual orientation, but a new bipartisan bill being pushed by Equality Ohio could make the practice and anti-LGBT discrimination for housing illegal. Critics of the Equal Housing and Employment Act argue it could lead to a flood of lawsuits against companies, but Equality Ohio argues that just hasn’t happened in other states that passed nondiscrimination statutes. The bill’s Democratic and Republican sponsors argue that it would actually grow the economy by making Ohio more inclusive, which would make it easier to keep “the best and the brightest” employees. The bill was introduced in May and its sponsors expect it to be taken up after the General Assembly reconvenes in October.

In the United States, Ohio’s power plants pollute more than all but Texas’ power plants, making Ohio one of the nation’s leading contributors to global warming, according to a Sept. 10 report from advocacy group Environment Ohio. The report calls for all levels of government to create and enforce stronger standards and regulations to curtail pollution and encourage cleaner forms of energy. National conservative groups oppose the stricter rules; they flat-out deny human-caused global warming despite the nearly unanimous scientific consensus that it’s at least partly caused by human actions. Some companies also argue efficiency standards impose too many costs on businesses and customers.

Cincinnati officials apparently expected Pure Romance to get tax credits from Ohio. But the state ultimately refused to grant the credits, which are regularly given to firms for job creation. Now the company, along with its $100 million in annual revenues, is considering moving across the river to Covington, Ky. Ohio officials won’t clarify why Pure Romance’s request was refused, but the company suspects it’s because its product lineup includes sex toys, which could have been politically embarrassing for Gov. John Kasich’s administration.

Following the Sept. 10 mayoral primary’s historically low voter turnout, the Charter Committee, Cincinnati’s unofficial third political party, is supporting efforts to reform how the city elects its mayors. “It is absurd that taxpayers paid $400,000 for a primary yesterday that few people voted in, and that decided very little,” said Mike Goldman, convener of the Charter Committee, in a statement. Voter turnout for the Sept. 10 mayoral primary was a dismal 5.68 percent, much lower than the 15 percent that turned out for the primary held on Sept. 11, 2001 — the day of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon — and the 21 percent of voters that participated in the 2005 primary.

A City Council motion could strip council members’ support for a controversial permanent supportive housing facility in Avondale. The proposed facility, Commons at Alaska, would be a 99-unit housing facility with residency and supportive services for the homeless, particularly those with mental health issues, physical disabilities and histories of substance abuse. Several Avondale residents are concerned the facility would further deteriorate an already-blighted community. CityBeat covered the dispute in further detail here.

Cincinnati Public Schools is asking the state to force the Emery Center, home of the embattled Emery Theatre, to pay taxes. The property taxes could produce $130,000 a year for CPS, which the school district says it needs because local property taxes make up more of its funding than the typical urban district in Ohio. The Emery Center was originally tax exempt under a plan that used the ground floor for education purposes and a renovated Emery Theatre for community events. But neither happened; the ground floor is currently used by the Coffee Emporium, and the theater currently isn’t being renovated or used.

A judge ordered Duke Energy to destroy or return a memo that was apparently embarrassing for Cincinnati officials because the memo, which was sent by the city’s Law Department to the city manager, was supposed to remain private under attorney-client privilege. Duke wanted to use the memo in its current case against the city. The city and Duke are in court as part of an agreement between the two entities to legally settle who has to pay for moving utility lines to accommodate for the streetcar project.

The Ohio Department of Insurance hasn’t received any applications or certified individuals for Obamacare’s formal outreach effort. The “navigators,” as officials call them, are a crucial part of Obamacare because they’re supposed to promote the law’s benefits to ensure the federal government meets its health insurance enrollment goals to keep costs down. Health care advocates claim the lag is driven by federal training requirements and a state law enacted in July. The state law made it so some groups, including Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, can no longer participate in the navigator program, as CityBeat covered in further detail here.

Debe Terhar, the president of Ohio Board of Education, wants Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eye removed from the state’s Common Core education standards because the book contains a rape scene. Terhar called the book “pornographic” at a Sept. 10 Board of Education meeting. But Terhar clarified that she doesn’t want to ban the book, and she would still allow different school districts keep it in their curriculums.

State Auditor Dave Yost says Ohio’s cities and counties need to do a better job complying with public record requests. A sampling of 20 cities and counties found eight, or 40 percent, had weaknesses in compliance. The most common problem was inadequate measures to track public record requests.

The Cincinnati area’s largest mall is up for sale for $45 million. The struggling mall has gone through several names over the years: Forest Fair Village, Cincinnati Mall, Cincinnati Mills and Forest Fair Mall.

Orangutans apparently announce their travel plans a day in advance.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.11.2013
Posted In: News, Climate Change, Energy at 02:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pollution

Report: Ohio Power Plants Among Nation’s Worst Polluters

Environment Ohio calls on regulators to limit effects on global warming

In the United States, Ohio’s power plants pollute more than all but Texas’ power plants, making Ohio one of the nation’s leading contributors to global warming, according to a Sept. 10 report from Environment Ohio.

“America’s dirtiest power plants are the elephant in the room when it comes to global warming,” said Kathryn Lee, field associate for Environment Ohio, in a statement. “If we want a cleaner, safer future for our kids, we can’t afford to ignore power plants’ overwhelming contribution to global warming. For Ohio, tackling the problem means cleaning up the dirtiest power plants.”

Power plants are responsible for 41 percent of the United States’ carbon dioxide pollution, which means they contribute more to global warming than any other source in the nation, according to the report.

“Dirty power plants produce a disproportionate share of the nation’s global warming pollution — especially given the relatively small share of total electricity they produce. For example, despite producing 30 percent of all power-sector carbon dioxide emissions, the 50 dirtiest power plants only produced 16 percent of the nation’s electricity in 2011,” the report found.

The report narrows down the pollution problem to specific power plants and the disproportionate amount of greenhouse gases they emit: “The dirtiest power plant in the United States, Georgia Power’s Plant Scherer, produced more than 21 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2011 — more than the total energy-related emissions of Maine.”

The report ultimately calls on regulators to encourage alternative energy sources and curtail greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.

Specifically, the report asks the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet a timeline put forth by President Barack Obama for setting strict limits and regulations on how much future and existing power plants can pollute. It also calls on all levels of government to continue setting standards and incentives that encourage clean energy.

In 2008, Ohio passed its Clean Energy Law to require and incentivize Ohio companies to pursue energy portfolios that are cleaner, more efficient and more diverse.

Environment Ohio has consistently called on state legislators to strengthen the standards, with the latest report suggesting goals that would require even more clean, renewable energy sources than Ohio currently mandates.

But even the renewable energy standards that Environment Ohio deems too weak are likely to be diminished by a proposal from State Sen. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), following an aggressive lobbying effort from national conservative groups.

Seitz is a member of the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which has teamed up with the conservative Heartland Institute to dismantle state energy regulations. The two conservative groups deny global warming is driven by human actions, even though scientists reportedly said they’re 95 percent certain humans are contributing to global warming in a leaked report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Another report from Environment Ohio found Ohio’s standards, which require utility companies get 12.5 percent of their energy needs from renewable sources, have spurred clean energy projects in Cincinnati and the rest of the state. In 2011, the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden used the state incentives to install solar panels in its parking lot that will generate enough electricity to meet 20 percent of the zoo’s electricity needs and reduce pollution associated with global warming by 1,775 tons annually, according to the report.

Meanwhile, Cincinnati has taken its own actions.

“The city has been a leader in greenhouse gas reduction efforts since adopting the Green Cincinnati Plan in 2007,” said Larry Falkin, director of the Office of Environmental Quality of the City of Cincinnati, in a statement. “We have succeeded in reducing emissions by more than 8 percent through measures including energy efficiency, renewable energy and alternative fuel vehicles. What we have learned is that if you do it right, climate protection work saves more than it costs, improves public health and improves the quality of life.”

Still, some companies argue the standards impose unreasonable costs on businesses and customers. Akron-based utility company FirstEnergy previously asked for a review of Ohio’s energy efficiency standards to address the concerns, but Seitz told Gongwer that the efficiency standards will remain untouched by his legislation.

Scientists have historically called for reducing global warming to 2 degrees Celsius. That wouldn’t involve immediately eliminating all carbon pollution — such a goal is widely viewed as unrealistic — but it would likely require the United States and other developed countries to cut their carbon pollution by 80 to 95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, according to the IPCC’s 2007 report.

With its latest report, Environment Ohio is aiming to push the country in that direction.

 
 
by Danny Cross 06.19.2012
 
 
2617_68510313128_68491013128_1633404_2309653_n.nar

Morning News and Stuff

The ever-debated, never implemented property tax increase will continue to be nonexistent, as will a new police station, playgrounds, some public pools, Music Hall renovations and certain street repavings and building demolitions, according to The Enquirer. Councilwoman Laure Quinlivan will make the deciding vote against City Manager Milton Dohoney’s proposed tax increase, which would add $46 to the owner of a $100,000. Also against disproportionately taxing rich people are Councilmen Chris Seelbach, P.G. Sittenfeld, Christopher Smitherman and Charlie Winburn. Quilivan says the government isn’t the right size and that the government should make the tougher changes before asking for more revenue.

Here are two ways to report the latest news regarding potential Duke Energy rate hike connected to streetcar construction:

• From The Enquirer:  Duke customers could face streetcar tab

• From The Business Courier: “Cincinnati, Duke making progress on moving utility lines

A 15-year-old girl was killed in Over-the-Rhine around 11 p.m. last night. She was reportedly standing with a group of people, though Police haven’t released any details about the shooter.

A new poll shows support for President Obama’s shift on immigration policy.

More Asians are immigrating to the U.S. than Hispanics these days.

Adult humans are 16.5 million tons overweight, which researchers say will threaten the world’s food security and environmental resources.

Approximately half of all new AIDS cases are occurring in the South, and the region is severely short on HIV specialists.

Attorneys for the Penn State football coach who showered with a bunch of boys are starting their defense by painting him in a positive light.

Spotify will stop charging $10 per month for use on mobile devices. Free now.

Facebook acquires Face.com. Ha.

Former baseball player Roger Clemens was acquitted of perjury charges, the latest in a bunch of wasted time by the federal government investigating athletes who can afford really good lawyers.

 
 
by Danny Cross 06.06.2012
 
 
zeng

Morning News and Stuff

A local music teacher says Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy offered him a job and then rescinded the offer after asking him if he is gay. Jonathan Zeng says he went through the school's extensive interview process, was offered a position and then called back in for a discussion about religious questions in his application, during which he was asked directly if he is gay. Zeng says he asked why such information was pertinent, and an administrator said it was school policy not to employ teachers who are gay because they work with children and something about the sanctity of marriage. When contacted by local media CHCA released the following statement:

CHCA keeps confidential all matters discussed within a candidate's interview. We're looking into this matter, although the initial information we have seen contains inaccuracies. We will not be discussing individual hiring decisions or interviews.
Cincinnati's deficit isn't going to get better any time soon, according to a new report.

The Reds drafted high school pitcher Nick Travieso in the first round of the MLB draft on Monday. Here's a rundown of their other picks Monday and Tuesday.

Senate Republicans yesterday blocked a Democratic bill calling for equal pay in the workplace, and the Dems are going to stick it in their faces during this year's campaigns. From the AP:

As expected, the pay equity bill failed along party lines, 52-47, short of the required 60-vote threshold. But for majority Democrats, passage wasn't the only point. The debate itself was aimed at putting Republicans on the defensive on yet another women's issue, this one overtly economic after a government report showing slower-than-expected job growth.

"It is incredibly disappointing that in this make-or-break moment for the middle class, Senate Republicans put partisan politics ahead of American women and their families," Obama said in a statement after the vote.

"Even Mitt Romney has refused to publicly oppose this legislation," added Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. "He should show some leadership."

The Washington Post wonders whether Mitt Romney can use Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's template for surviving a recall election to try to win the presidency. It involves “big money, powerful organization and enormous enthusiasm among his base.” Exit polls in the state suggest Obama is ahead, however.

China wants foreign embassies to stop releasing reports and Tweeting about its poor air quality.

Gonorrhea growing resistant to antibiotics? Rut roh.

Dinosaurs apparently weighed less than scientists previously thought. Adjust paper-mache Brontosaurus as necessary.

Facebook is considering letting kids younger than 13 use the site.

The Boston Celtics took a 3-2 series lead over the Miami Heat on Tuesday and could send Bron Bron and Co. back home on Thursday.

 
 
by Kevin Osborne 02.02.2012
 
 
handel

Morning News and Stuff

The big news breaking the Internets is that Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the nation’s leading breast cancer charity, is pulling its grants from Planned Parenthood affiliates. The charity gave about $680,000 last year and $580,000 in 2010, which is mostly used to provide free breast exams for low-income women.

Read More

 
 
by Danny Cross 11.03.2011
 
 
nets-iceage

Morning News and Stuff

Cincinnati has the third-highest rate of childhood poverty in the country, and The Enquirer's Mark Curnutte tells the story of an East Price Hill family and school system struggling to keep up.

Hamilton County for the fourth straight year dipped into its rainy day fund instead of instituting major cuts or raising taxes.

National non-profit teacher training program Teach For America has offered to work in Cincinnati Public Schools, possibly as early as next year. CPS has yet to commit to the partnership, noting that there are laid-off veteran teachers in the region.

Read More

 
 
by 08.11.2011
 
 

Green Group Plans Council Forum

A forum is planned to question Cincinnati City Council candidates on issues involving “green” building techniques, making the city more sustainable and other environmental topics.

The event, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 6 p.m. Oct. 12 in the rear stage area at the Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. Before the forum begins, a networking session with candidates will be held at 5 p.m.

Read More

 
 
by Danny Cross 05.31.2011
 
 
-

Attention Cycling Enthusiasts

Queen City Bike today sent out an email asking for help in convincing St. Bernard Service Director Phil Stegman why including a climbing lane on Mitchell Avenue between Vine Street and Reading Road is important to the area's cycling infrastructure. According to QCB, St. Bernard's engineers prefer to keep 10 feet of space for parking rather than use 8 feet for parking and include the bike lane. The city of Cincinnati, which owns half the road, needs St. Bernard to sign off on the infrastructure improvement, according to QCB.

Read More

 
 
by 04.19.2011
Posted In: Climate Change at 01:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
-

Art for the Sky with Picking Up America

Sawyer Point's Earth Day celebration and educational events were all but closed on Saturday, as wind and rain caused the cancellation of most activities.

Despite the inclimate weather, members of Pick Up America took part in an Art of the Sky exhibit during which members of the public were invited to stand in a silhouette of Cincinnati skyline. Rep. Denise Driehaus (D-31st District) was on hand to participate.

Read More

 
 

 

 

Latest Blogs
 
by German Lopez 01.07.2014
Posted In: News, Environment, Climate Change at 12:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (2)
 
 
news1_angrypowerplant_ashleykroninger

Global Warming Didn't Stop Just Because We're Cold Now

Cold weather in one city or region doesn’t disprove the global phenomenon

The recent bout of cold weather does nothing to disprove the scientifically established phenomenon of global warming, despite what conservative media might be telling some Cincinnatians.

Many Cincinnatians have taken to social media in the past few days to chime in on what the recent weather means for global warming — a debate fostered by so-called skeptics on talk radio and Fox News.

But the scientific literature is based on years and decades of trends, meaning a few days or weeks of cold weather signify little in the big picture of climate change.

In fact, Googles definition of climate is “the weather conditions prevailing in an area in general or over a long period.” The key, scientifically minded folks point out, is “long period.”

When that long period is analyzed, the trend is clear:

The trend explains why scientists almost all agree global warming is happening and most certainly spurred by human actions. In the 2013 report from the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, scientists said they are at least 95 percent certain that human actions contribute to global warming.

Beyond the scientific facts, for every anecdote out there, there is often a contradicting anecdote from another source. While Cincinnati and the Midwest may be coping with a cold winter, summer-stricken Australia is recovering from its own bout of hot weather and drought. 

The contradicting conditions don’t prove or disprove global warming, but they do show the folly of relying on anecdotal evidence.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.12.2013
Posted In: News, Climate Change, LGBT, City Council at 09:41 AM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
lgbt protections

Morning News and Stuff

Advocates pursue LGBT protections, Ohio among worst polluters, local business could move

It’s legal in most of Ohio for an employer to fire someone over his or her sexual orientation, but a new bipartisan bill being pushed by Equality Ohio could make the practice and anti-LGBT discrimination for housing illegal. Critics of the Equal Housing and Employment Act argue it could lead to a flood of lawsuits against companies, but Equality Ohio argues that just hasn’t happened in other states that passed nondiscrimination statutes. The bill’s Democratic and Republican sponsors argue that it would actually grow the economy by making Ohio more inclusive, which would make it easier to keep “the best and the brightest” employees. The bill was introduced in May and its sponsors expect it to be taken up after the General Assembly reconvenes in October.

In the United States, Ohio’s power plants pollute more than all but Texas’ power plants, making Ohio one of the nation’s leading contributors to global warming, according to a Sept. 10 report from advocacy group Environment Ohio. The report calls for all levels of government to create and enforce stronger standards and regulations to curtail pollution and encourage cleaner forms of energy. National conservative groups oppose the stricter rules; they flat-out deny human-caused global warming despite the nearly unanimous scientific consensus that it’s at least partly caused by human actions. Some companies also argue efficiency standards impose too many costs on businesses and customers.

Cincinnati officials apparently expected Pure Romance to get tax credits from Ohio. But the state ultimately refused to grant the credits, which are regularly given to firms for job creation. Now the company, along with its $100 million in annual revenues, is considering moving across the river to Covington, Ky. Ohio officials won’t clarify why Pure Romance’s request was refused, but the company suspects it’s because its product lineup includes sex toys, which could have been politically embarrassing for Gov. John Kasich’s administration.

Following the Sept. 10 mayoral primary’s historically low voter turnout, the Charter Committee, Cincinnati’s unofficial third political party, is supporting efforts to reform how the city elects its mayors. “It is absurd that taxpayers paid $400,000 for a primary yesterday that few people voted in, and that decided very little,” said Mike Goldman, convener of the Charter Committee, in a statement. Voter turnout for the Sept. 10 mayoral primary was a dismal 5.68 percent, much lower than the 15 percent that turned out for the primary held on Sept. 11, 2001 — the day of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon — and the 21 percent of voters that participated in the 2005 primary.

A City Council motion could strip council members’ support for a controversial permanent supportive housing facility in Avondale. The proposed facility, Commons at Alaska, would be a 99-unit housing facility with residency and supportive services for the homeless, particularly those with mental health issues, physical disabilities and histories of substance abuse. Several Avondale residents are concerned the facility would further deteriorate an already-blighted community. CityBeat covered the dispute in further detail here.

Cincinnati Public Schools is asking the state to force the Emery Center, home of the embattled Emery Theatre, to pay taxes. The property taxes could produce $130,000 a year for CPS, which the school district says it needs because local property taxes make up more of its funding than the typical urban district in Ohio. The Emery Center was originally tax exempt under a plan that used the ground floor for education purposes and a renovated Emery Theatre for community events. But neither happened; the ground floor is currently used by the Coffee Emporium, and the theater currently isn’t being renovated or used.

A judge ordered Duke Energy to destroy or return a memo that was apparently embarrassing for Cincinnati officials because the memo, which was sent by the city’s Law Department to the city manager, was supposed to remain private under attorney-client privilege. Duke wanted to use the memo in its current case against the city. The city and Duke are in court as part of an agreement between the two entities to legally settle who has to pay for moving utility lines to accommodate for the streetcar project.

The Ohio Department of Insurance hasn’t received any applications or certified individuals for Obamacare’s formal outreach effort. The “navigators,” as officials call them, are a crucial part of Obamacare because they’re supposed to promote the law’s benefits to ensure the federal government meets its health insurance enrollment goals to keep costs down. Health care advocates claim the lag is driven by federal training requirements and a state law enacted in July. The state law made it so some groups, including Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, can no longer participate in the navigator program, as CityBeat covered in further detail here.

Debe Terhar, the president of Ohio Board of Education, wants Toni Morrison’s novel The Bluest Eye removed from the state’s Common Core education standards because the book contains a rape scene. Terhar called the book “pornographic” at a Sept. 10 Board of Education meeting. But Terhar clarified that she doesn’t want to ban the book, and she would still allow different school districts keep it in their curriculums.

State Auditor Dave Yost says Ohio’s cities and counties need to do a better job complying with public record requests. A sampling of 20 cities and counties found eight, or 40 percent, had weaknesses in compliance. The most common problem was inadequate measures to track public record requests.

The Cincinnati area’s largest mall is up for sale for $45 million. The struggling mall has gone through several names over the years: Forest Fair Village, Cincinnati Mall, Cincinnati Mills and Forest Fair Mall.

Orangutans apparently announce their travel plans a day in advance.

 
 
by German Lopez 09.11.2013
Posted In: News, Climate Change, Energy at 02:15 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
pollution

Report: Ohio Power Plants Among Nation’s Worst Polluters

Environment Ohio calls on regulators to limit effects on global warming

In the United States, Ohio’s power plants pollute more than all but Texas’ power plants, making Ohio one of the nation’s leading contributors to global warming, according to a Sept. 10 report from Environment Ohio.

“America’s dirtiest power plants are the elephant in the room when it comes to global warming,” said Kathryn Lee, field associate for Environment Ohio, in a statement. “If we want a cleaner, safer future for our kids, we can’t afford to ignore power plants’ overwhelming contribution to global warming. For Ohio, tackling the problem means cleaning up the dirtiest power plants.”

Power plants are responsible for 41 percent of the United States’ carbon dioxide pollution, which means they contribute more to global warming than any other source in the nation, according to the report.

“Dirty power plants produce a disproportionate share of the nation’s global warming pollution — especially given the relatively small share of total electricity they produce. For example, despite producing 30 percent of all power-sector carbon dioxide emissions, the 50 dirtiest power plants only produced 16 percent of the nation’s electricity in 2011,” the report found.

The report narrows down the pollution problem to specific power plants and the disproportionate amount of greenhouse gases they emit: “The dirtiest power plant in the United States, Georgia Power’s Plant Scherer, produced more than 21 million metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2011 — more than the total energy-related emissions of Maine.”

The report ultimately calls on regulators to encourage alternative energy sources and curtail greenhouse gases that contribute to global warming.

Specifically, the report asks the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet a timeline put forth by President Barack Obama for setting strict limits and regulations on how much future and existing power plants can pollute. It also calls on all levels of government to continue setting standards and incentives that encourage clean energy.

In 2008, Ohio passed its Clean Energy Law to require and incentivize Ohio companies to pursue energy portfolios that are cleaner, more efficient and more diverse.

Environment Ohio has consistently called on state legislators to strengthen the standards, with the latest report suggesting goals that would require even more clean, renewable energy sources than Ohio currently mandates.

But even the renewable energy standards that Environment Ohio deems too weak are likely to be diminished by a proposal from State Sen. Bill Seitz (R-Cincinnati), following an aggressive lobbying effort from national conservative groups.

Seitz is a member of the conservative American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC), which has teamed up with the conservative Heartland Institute to dismantle state energy regulations. The two conservative groups deny global warming is driven by human actions, even though scientists reportedly said they’re 95 percent certain humans are contributing to global warming in a leaked report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Another report from Environment Ohio found Ohio’s standards, which require utility companies get 12.5 percent of their energy needs from renewable sources, have spurred clean energy projects in Cincinnati and the rest of the state. In 2011, the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden used the state incentives to install solar panels in its parking lot that will generate enough electricity to meet 20 percent of the zoo’s electricity needs and reduce pollution associated with global warming by 1,775 tons annually, according to the report.

Meanwhile, Cincinnati has taken its own actions.

“The city has been a leader in greenhouse gas reduction efforts since adopting the Green Cincinnati Plan in 2007,” said Larry Falkin, director of the Office of Environmental Quality of the City of Cincinnati, in a statement. “We have succeeded in reducing emissions by more than 8 percent through measures including energy efficiency, renewable energy and alternative fuel vehicles. What we have learned is that if you do it right, climate protection work saves more than it costs, improves public health and improves the quality of life.”

Still, some companies argue the standards impose unreasonable costs on businesses and customers. Akron-based utility company FirstEnergy previously asked for a review of Ohio’s energy efficiency standards to address the concerns, but Seitz told Gongwer that the efficiency standards will remain untouched by his legislation.

Scientists have historically called for reducing global warming to 2 degrees Celsius. That wouldn’t involve immediately eliminating all carbon pollution — such a goal is widely viewed as unrealistic — but it would likely require the United States and other developed countries to cut their carbon pollution by 80 to 95 percent below 1990 levels by 2050, according to the IPCC’s 2007 report.

With its latest report, Environment Ohio is aiming to push the country in that direction.

 
 
by Danny Cross 06.19.2012
 
 
2617_68510313128_68491013128_1633404_2309653_n.nar

Morning News and Stuff

The ever-debated, never implemented property tax increase will continue to be nonexistent, as will a new police station, playgrounds, some public pools, Music Hall renovations and certain street repavings and building demolitions, according to The Enquirer. Councilwoman Laure Quinlivan will make the deciding vote against City Manager Milton Dohoney’s proposed tax increase, which would add $46 to the owner of a $100,000. Also against disproportionately taxing rich people are Councilmen Chris Seelbach, P.G. Sittenfeld, Christopher Smitherman and Charlie Winburn. Quilivan says the government isn’t the right size and that the government should make the tougher changes before asking for more revenue.

Here are two ways to report the latest news regarding potential Duke Energy rate hike connected to streetcar construction:

• From The Enquirer:  Duke customers could face streetcar tab

• From The Business Courier: “Cincinnati, Duke making progress on moving utility lines

A 15-year-old girl was killed in Over-the-Rhine around 11 p.m. last night. She was reportedly standing with a group of people, though Police haven’t released any details about the shooter.

A new poll shows support for President Obama’s shift on immigration policy.

More Asians are immigrating to the U.S. than Hispanics these days.

Adult humans are 16.5 million tons overweight, which researchers say will threaten the world’s food security and environmental resources.

Approximately half of all new AIDS cases are occurring in the South, and the region is severely short on HIV specialists.

Attorneys for the Penn State football coach who showered with a bunch of boys are starting their defense by painting him in a positive light.

Spotify will stop charging $10 per month for use on mobile devices. Free now.

Facebook acquires Face.com. Ha.

Former baseball player Roger Clemens was acquitted of perjury charges, the latest in a bunch of wasted time by the federal government investigating athletes who can afford really good lawyers.

 
 
by Danny Cross 06.06.2012
 
 
zeng

Morning News and Stuff

A local music teacher says Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy offered him a job and then rescinded the offer after asking him if he is gay. Jonathan Zeng says he went through the school's extensive interview process, was offered a position and then called back in for a discussion about religious questions in his application, during which he was asked directly if he is gay. Zeng says he asked why such information was pertinent, and an administrator said it was school policy not to employ teachers who are gay because they work with children and something about the sanctity of marriage. When contacted by local media CHCA released the following statement:

CHCA keeps confidential all matters discussed within a candidate's interview. We're looking into this matter, although the initial information we have seen contains inaccuracies. We will not be discussing individual hiring decisions or interviews.
Cincinnati's deficit isn't going to get better any time soon, according to a new report.

The Reds drafted high school pitcher Nick Travieso in the first round of the MLB draft on Monday. Here's a rundown of their other picks Monday and Tuesday.

Senate Republicans yesterday blocked a Democratic bill calling for equal pay in the workplace, and the Dems are going to stick it in their faces during this year's campaigns. From the AP:

As expected, the pay equity bill failed along party lines, 52-47, short of the required 60-vote threshold. But for majority Democrats, passage wasn't the only point. The debate itself was aimed at putting Republicans on the defensive on yet another women's issue, this one overtly economic after a government report showing slower-than-expected job growth.

"It is incredibly disappointing that in this make-or-break moment for the middle class, Senate Republicans put partisan politics ahead of American women and their families," Obama said in a statement after the vote.

"Even Mitt Romney has refused to publicly oppose this legislation," added Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. "He should show some leadership."

The Washington Post wonders whether Mitt Romney can use Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's template for surviving a recall election to try to win the presidency. It involves “big money, powerful organization and enormous enthusiasm among his base.” Exit polls in the state suggest Obama is ahead, however.

China wants foreign embassies to stop releasing reports and Tweeting about its poor air quality.

Gonorrhea growing resistant to antibiotics? Rut roh.

Dinosaurs apparently weighed less than scientists previously thought. Adjust paper-mache Brontosaurus as necessary.

Facebook is considering letting kids younger than 13 use the site.

The Boston Celtics took a 3-2 series lead over the Miami Heat on Tuesday and could send Bron Bron and Co. back home on Thursday.

 
 
by Kevin Osborne 02.02.2012
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

The big news breaking the Internets is that Susan G. Komen for the Cure, the nation’s leading breast cancer charity, is pulling its grants from Planned Parenthood affiliates. The charity gave about $680,000 last year and $580,000 in 2010, which is mostly used to provide free breast exams for low-income women.

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by Danny Cross 11.03.2011
 
 
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Morning News and Stuff

Cincinnati has the third-highest rate of childhood poverty in the country, and The Enquirer's Mark Curnutte tells the story of an East Price Hill family and school system struggling to keep up.

Hamilton County for the fourth straight year dipped into its rainy day fund instead of instituting major cuts or raising taxes.

National non-profit teacher training program Teach For America has offered to work in Cincinnati Public Schools, possibly as early as next year. CPS has yet to commit to the partnership, noting that there are laid-off veteran teachers in the region.

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by 08.11.2011
 
 

Green Group Plans Council Forum

A forum is planned to question Cincinnati City Council candidates on issues involving “green” building techniques, making the city more sustainable and other environmental topics.

The event, which is free and open to the public, is scheduled for 6 p.m. Oct. 12 in the rear stage area at the Northside Tavern, 4163 Hamilton Ave. Before the forum begins, a networking session with candidates will be held at 5 p.m.

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by Danny Cross 05.31.2011
 
 
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Attention Cycling Enthusiasts

Queen City Bike today sent out an email asking for help in convincing St. Bernard Service Director Phil Stegman why including a climbing lane on Mitchell Avenue between Vine Street and Reading Road is important to the area's cycling infrastructure. According to QCB, St. Bernard's engineers prefer to keep 10 feet of space for parking rather than use 8 feet for parking and include the bike lane. The city of Cincinnati, which owns half the road, needs St. Bernard to sign off on the infrastructure improvement, according to QCB.

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by 04.19.2011
Posted In: Climate Change at 01:49 PM | Permalink | Comments (0)
 
 
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Art for the Sky with Picking Up America

Sawyer Point's Earth Day celebration and educational events were all but closed on Saturday, as wind and rain caused the cancellation of most activities.

Despite the inclimate weather, members of Pick Up America took part in an Art of the Sky exhibit during which members of the public were invited to stand in a silhouette of Cincinnati skyline. Rep. Denise Driehaus (D-31st District) was on hand to participate.

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