WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
May 4th, 2009 By | News | Posted In: Community, Public Policy, CPS

Strive Success

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Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery and one Cincinnati group has one million reasons to be flattered. Strive is “a unique education partnership spanning all sectors of Greater Cincinnati society… working to help each child in our urban core succeed from birth through some form of college into a meaningful career” and their approach is being replicated across the United States.

In a recent announcement the group broke the news.

“Living Cities, a collaborative of 21 of the world’s largest foundations and financial institutions, recently announced a near $1 million investment into solving one of the most complicated challenges facing our country today – making the shift from a 19th century factory education model to a 21st century system of learning,” the announcement said. “Over the next year, Strive… will be working collaboratively with four selected universities to create and strengthen cradle through career education partnerships in their respective cities that ensure every child can be successful.”

After an “extensive proposal review process,” four locations were selected to build local partnerships to use data driven educational changes necessary to meet the needs of current and future students. The four are:

California State University, East Bay (Hayward, CA)

Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis (Indianapolis, IN)

University of Houston (Houston, TX)

Virginia Commonwealth University, (Richmond, VA)

“Each site will receive $100,000 to fund operational support and technical assistance to drive successful implementation in the selected sites,” the announcement said. “The sites will join Strive to form the Education Partnership Implementation Network (EPIN) that will strengthen themselves through sharing best practices and be a valuable resource to future partnerships in other cities.”

To learn more about Strive, see Striving to Improve Children's Lives, May 14, 2008



 
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