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June 25th, 2014 By Rachel Podnar | The Morning After | Posted In: Life

From the Copy Desk

In case you need a dictionary with the June 25 issue of CityBeat

from the copy editor
Welcome to week two of the vocab blog. I got a teaser on page 7 of the issue this week so you could say things are getting pretty serious. In case you weren’t here last week, this is where I showcase the wackiest words from this week's issue of CityBeat. I’m paying close attention while I copy edit (I guess that’s what copy editing is, paying close attention) to find the most interesting words so you can add some snazz to your vocabulary.

Aegis: used in the idiom “under the aegis of,” meaning sponsored or supported by, n.

I’m sure we’ve all read this word, using context clues for the correct definition, but I wonder how often it gets thrown around in conversation. Does anyone know how to pronounce aegis? I’m thinking AGEis, aGIS. After hitting up Merriam-Webster for a robot audio pronunciation, it’s Egis. Your next challenge is finding a way to casually incorporate it in conversation, pronouncing it correctly. 

In the paper: “under LCT’s aegis” in Rick Pender’s "Curtain Call" column for the week on the League of Cincinnati Theatres Award.

Ephemera: a class of collectable items not originally intended to last more than a short time, n.

*Pick of the Week* I like this because it’s a niche word. It can only be used to describe stuff like trading cards and tickets, which is awesome. I wonder which was used first, the adjective ephemeral, which can be used to describe anything fleeting, or the more selective noun?

In the paper: “there is little fortune in ephemera like the card,” shout-out to Maria Seda-Reeder for using ephemera correctly, describing the 1940s business card of a creepy, self-appointed “dealer of love” in “Another Man’s Treasure.” Also, if I may say, I smiled at the title because I thought "No, not one man’s trash — that’s another man’s come-up." Come-up, if you don’t know, means something like “cool stuff found in a thrift store” and Macklemore's “Thrift Shop” brought it into colloquial use.


Irascible: irritable, adj.

This is one of those words where I can feel what it’s supposed to bring to the sentence just by the way it looks and is pronounced, but I couldn’t come up with a single synonym because I really have no idea and the “feel” of a word is something I just made up.

In the paper: “a portrait of irascible President Lyndon Johnson.” Rick Pender pulled a double vocab hitter in “Curtain Call,” as you know he also gave us this week’s “aegis.” Should he get “Vocab Master” of the week? Fun fact, I learned from Ben L. Kaufman’s “On Second Thought” that theater-writer Pender is a former CityBeat arts editor. Maybe you already were aware. Perhaps some of the current editors will follow Pender’s lead and include some more daring vocabulary in their issue contributions.

Incursion: hostile invasion of territory, n.

This is basically just a fancy version of “invasion,” which I’m guessing is more widely understood. I’d like to note incursion is the opposite of excursion, which we all know is an outing.

In the paper: “The Avengers repelled an alien incursion of planet Earth,” in tt stern-enzi’s cover story on summer movies. He used “incursion” because “invasion” was just too mundane.

Relegate: to send something to a lower ranking, v.

Relegate is extremely obvious from context clues and this probably isn’t a new vocab word for anyone. But as a copy editor, I had to ask ‘Why didn’t she just use “delegate” instead? Technically, delegate would work because it also means to elect something to represent something else, but Kathy Y. Wilson was trying to convey a demotion of sort, hence relegate was the precise verb for the job. Bravo.

In the paper: “pitbulls have been relegated to outcast status,” in Kathy Y. Wilson’s “Wagging the Dog.”


Rachel Podnar writes "From the Copy Desk" weekly from her desk as CityBeat's intern copy editor. Her job is to find and correct everybody else's mistakes, occasionally referencing a dictionary to check one of our more pretentious educated writers' choices of words. She rounds up and recaps the best ones here.


 
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