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October 25th, 2013 By Hannah McCartney | News | Posted In: Health, Drugs, News

National Drug Take-Back Day Set for Tomorrow

Collection hopes to curb prescription drug abuse

5.25drug-prescriptionPhoto: provided

If your medicine cabinet could use a good fall cleaning, think about de-cluttering tomorrow during National Drug Take-Back day so you can properly dispose of the pills and make sure they don't get into the wrong hands. 

The local prescription take-back is sponsored by the Hamilton Country Sheriff Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration. Prescription drug abuse is a rampant public safety and health issues, and take-back programs are one of a number of public health measures communities can take to reduce prescription drug abuse in their neighborhoods.

Even flushing the pills down the toilet poses its own risks; the chemicals could make their way into our water supplies. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has found that fish have suffered serious deformities from pharmaceutical-tainted water supplies, and it could affect humans, too, although the research isn't strong enough to draw any solid conclusions yet. 

There are three locations around the city where you can bring old prescriptions (all locations are open from 10 a.m.- 2 p.m.):

  • Miami Township Community Center, 3780 Shady Lane, North Bend, OH 45052
  • Symmes Township Safety Center, 8871 Weekly Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45249
  • Anderson Center, Five Mile Road, Cincinnati, OH 45230

The National Institute on Drug Abuse estimates that 20 percent of people in the United States have used prescription drugs for reasons other than which they were prescribed.

In 2010, 7 million Americans abused a prescription drug; pain relieving medications like Vicodin and Oxycontin are the most commonly abused drugs.

Unintentional drug overdose deaths are the leading cause of injury-related deaths in Ohio. The state has experienced a 440 percent growth rate in accidental overdose deaths from 1999 to 2011.

According to DrugAbuse.gov, teenagers are especially likely to abuse medications because of their easy accessibility and a lack of awareness about the consequences of abuse.

Needles, IV bags and radioactive medicines will not be accepted.

 
 
 
 
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