WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
September 26th, 2013 By German Lopez | News | Posted In: News, Women

“State of Women in America” Report Ranks Ohio No. 30 Overall

Report finds state lacks leadership opportunities for women

cap women report
In comparison to men, Ohio women have lower incomes, hold fewer leadership roles and disproportionately suffer from the state’s high infant mortality rate. The issues placed Ohio at No. 30 out of 50 states for women’s issues in a Sept. 25 report from the Center for American Progress (CAP) titled, “The State of Women in America.”

Out of three major categories, Ohio performed worst on leadership roles available to women, ranking No. 37 in the category with a “D” grade. CAP found only 16.7 percent of Ohio’s state-elected executive offices and 37.2 percent of managerial positions are held by women, even though women make up 52 percent of the state’s population.

The state performed slightly better in health outcomes for women and obtained a “C-” in the category. The report particularly criticized Ohio for its infant mortality rate of 7.7 deaths for every 1,000 infants — the fourth highest in the nation — and regulations and defunding measures in the recently passed state budget that make reproductive health services less accessible to women.

On economic issues, Ohio was relatively on par with the U.S.

median and ranked No. 27 with a “C” grade. For every $1 a man makes, an Ohio woman makes 77 cents, which matches the national average. But the results are even worse for minorities: Black women make 66 cents for each dollar a man makes and Hispanic women make 64 cents.

Still, with 17.7 percent of Ohio women living in poverty, the state has the No. 19 highest poverty rate for women in the country. The statistics were again worse for minorities: About 36.4 percent of black women and 32.6 percent of Hispanic women in Ohio live in poverty.

The CAP report analyzed 36 indicators for women in the categories of economic security, leadership and health. It then graded the states and ranked them based on the grades.

Vermont topped the rankings with an “A,” and Oklahoma was at the very bottom with an “F.”

CAP, which is an admittedly left-leaning organization, is touting the report to support progressive policies that could help lift women out of such disparities, including the federally funded Medicaid expansion and an increase to minimum wages.

“While women have come a long way over the past few decades, much remains to be done to ensure that all women can have a fair shot at success,” said Anna Chu, one of the report’s authors, in a statement. “Today’s report shows that in many states, it is still difficult for women and their families to get ahead, instead of just getting by.”

 
 
 
 
Close
Close
Close