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August 22nd, 2013 By German Lopez | News | Posted In: News, Education, CPS

CPS Struggles in 2012-13 Report Cards

District fails in multiple categories

cps officesCincinnati Public Schools offices - Photo: Cincinnati Public Schools

Cincinnati Public Schools (CPS) got six F’s, one D and two C’s in the 2012-2013 school report card released today by the Ohio Department of Education (ODE).

The school district got an F for state test results, closing gaps related to income, race, culture and disabilities, progress among gifted students, progress among students with disabilities and both categories for graduation rates, which measure how many students graduated within four or five years.

CPS also got a D for progress among students who started out in the bottom fifth for achievement, and it got a C for progress among all student groups and how many students passed state tests.

The grades come with a big caveat: CPS is still being investigated for scrubbing data, which could be favorably skewing the school district’s results.

This is the first year ODE is using the new A-F grading system, which is more stringent than how schools were previously scored.

No school district earned straight As this year, according to StateImpact Ohio.

Because the system is new, some of the categories that schools are graded on are missing and will be added in the next few years. Specifically, the report card won’t measure overall results for the district, test scores, gap closing, K-3 literacy, progress, graduation rates and preparation for college and careers until 2015.

Under the old system, CPS dropped from “effective,” which made it the best-rated urban school district in Ohio for the 2010-2011 school year, to “continuous improvement” for 2011-2012. Those results are also under review based on data-scrubbing investigations.

CPS has recently gained national recognition in The Huffington Post and The New York Times for its community learning centers, which turn schools into hubs that can be used by locals for resources ranging from education to dental care.

In November 2012, Cincinnati voters approved a levy renewal for CPS in a 65-35 percent vote, which kept local property taxes roughly $253 higher on a $100,000 home.

The official website for the school report cards can be found here, but it’s been having technical problems for most of the day.

 
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