WHAT SHOULD I BE DOING INSTEAD OF THIS?
 
December 12th, 2011 By Kevin Osborne | News | Posted In: News, Business, Neighborhoods

Local Brewery Gets State Aid

0 Comments
     
Tags:
sam adams

The state of Ohio has approved funds to help a Cincinnati brewery expand its operations, as well as assisting two other local companies with projects.

The state will spend $663,000 to assist the Samuel Adams Brewery Co. in expanding operations on Poplar Street in the West End. The money will go toward buying the property needed for the expansion, which is located next to the existing brewery.

The expansion site has been used for industrial and commercial operations since the late 1800s and is now home to the Calmego Foundry, which produces copper, aluminum and brass products on a limited basis.

The state aid will pay for demolishing the buildings there and cleaning pollution from the site. The brewery plans to use the new property to accommodate more trucks for pick-up and delivery of its beer products.

The brewery has pledged to add 11 new jobs and retain 10 current positions. If the expansion didn't occur, the firm had considered relocating its operations to Pennsylvania.

Also, the state has approved a two-year, $34,000 contract with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center for the Ohio Department of Health’s child passenger safety program in southwest Ohio. The program, known as “Ohio Buckles Buckeyes,” provides child safety seats and booster seats to eligible low-income families. The program's goal is to increase the availability of child safety seats for families who couldn't otherwise afford them and to ensure their correct installation and proper use.

Since it was created five years ago, the program has distributed more than 17,000 seats.

Additionally, state money was approved for improvements to the heating and air conditioning system at Summit Behavioral Healthcare in Roselawn. The nearly $400,000 project will reduce energy consumption by providing high-efficiency burners for the steam boilers and other improvements. The state expects the work to pay for itself through lower energy costs in about two years.

 
comments powered by Disqus
 
Close
Close
Close