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The Many Moods of MidPoint

MidPoint Music Festival was a rollercoaster of emotions and sounds

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 29, 2010
We had joy, we had fun. We had some frustration and anger, too. Such has been the way of the MidPoint Music Festival since its origins in 2002. But, in the end, MPMF’s 2010 edition proved to be the most successful yet, drawing thousands of music lovers to downtown, Over-the-Rhine and Newport over the course of three days.  

New Heights of Cincinnati Music

Clifton Heights Music Festival keeps its focus local and community-oriented

0 Comments · Monday, September 27, 2010
You might recognize him next to a shot of Jack Daniels, a Newcastle and a few friends in any bar around Clifton Heights, but when not out with friends Rome Ntukogu is busy planning the Clifton Heights Music Festival (this Friday and Saturday) and keeping it focused on his passion: furthering unity in a community through music and art.   

Tom Tom Club: Heads Above, Groove Below

Pioneering rhythm section goes back out on road in anticipation of 30th anniversary

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 22, 2010
It's not been easy to see Tom Tom Club play live. The pioneering, avant-percussive Dance Rock band, formed in 1981 by Talking Heads bassist Tina Weymouth and drummer Chris Frantz (her husband), has taken a back seat in recent years to family life. The group is doing just 10 dates on the East and West coasts this tour, including a headlining gig Saturday night at the MidPoint Music Festival.  

Van Dyke Parks: Shifting Out of Park(s)

Iconic singer/songwriter/producer makes a rare performance appearance at MidPoint

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 22, 2010
Van Dyke Parks is not a household name. His recorded catalog, revered by a cultish number of fans, has sold sparsely yet his influence is inescapably broad. Parks' work as a producer/arranger and the amazing artists he's worked with over the past four decades has cemented his iconic status — perhaps most famously The Beach Boys. Parks is making a rare appearance as an artist at the MidPoint Music Festival, traveling with Clare and the Reasons, who serve as his opening act and backing band.  

Caribou: Where the Dear and Caribou Play

Dan Snaith takes his one-man band out of the '60s and into the Dance club

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 22, 2010
On his first two full-length releases and a handful of CD singles and live recordings, Dan Snaith had established himself as a rather well-informed and astute purveyor of Psychedelic Pop as he transformed it into his own unique brand of one-man-laptop bravado. But when it came time to begin work on new material to follow up 2008's 'Andorra,' the only certainty was that Snaith didn't want to re-create that same sound.  

Surfer Blood: Caught in a Wave

Despite a quick rise, Florida indie rockers strive for longevity

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 22, 2010
In existence for just over a year, Surfer Blood seems to have arrived on the scene fully formed. The West Palm Beach, Fla., quartet's debut full-length, 'Astro Coast,' is an uncommonly cohesive set of songs informed (but never bound) by 25 years of Indie Rock touchstones and founder/frontdude John Paul Pitts' own unique vision. They play MidPoint on Friday.  

Springsteen and His Boss Hogs

The Boss' music continues to inspire new generations of rockers, from Gaslight Anthem to The Hold Steady

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 15, 2010
Bruce Springsteen hasn't played in Cincinnati since 2008, but various iterations of him promise to keep the local concert and record scene busy this fall. There are at least three major acts coming to town that — in the style and substance of their material — have been pronouncedly influenced by The Boss: Gaslight Anthem, playing Bogart's Sept. 22; The Hold Steady, playing the Southgate House Oct. 2; and John Mellencamp, performing at Music Hall Nov. 1.   

Cool Sounds of the Renaissance

Annalisa Pappano's Catacoustic Consort animates the sounds of another era

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 15, 2010
At first glance, the Catacoustic Consort might appear disconnected from the modern world. But the music isn't an attempt at time travel so much as it is a method of exploring the sounds, emotions and people of another era — the chamber musicians of the 16th-18th centuries. See for yourself Sept. 18 at Walnut Hills Christian Church.   

The Wolverton Brothers Got Guts

The defiantly unique, 'pretty out there' Wolverton Brothers have endured for a quarter century

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 15, 2010
Standing outside the practice space used by Cincinnati's legendary mainstays of underground Rock, The Wolverton Brothers, I reminded them it was their 25th year in brotherhood. "The Wolverton Brothers is a sonically all over the place, pretty 'out there' kind of music," Tim Schwallie says. "We're kind of getting rediscovered."  

Of Montreal's Sci-Fi Dance Party

New album delivers in a big way, taking band to Funkytown

0 Comments · Tuesday, September 14, 2010
With rampant stories regarding predatory men of the cloth, it's easy to read darker meanings into of Montreal's new album, 'False Priest.' It clearly represents of Montreal's next evolutionary step, long after beginning a gloriously lo-fi, giddily complex Pop band. He's now fronting an eclectic Soul revue, says Kevin Barnes.  

The Triumphant Andre Williams

After decades of struggle, R&B artist Andre Williams finds his way back into music’s good graces

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 8, 2010
Andre Williams, also known as Mr. Rhythm, made several salacious R&B records for independent labels, produced Ike Turner, did live shows with Little Willie John and managed Soul singer Edwin Starr. He was slipped into drugs, alcohol and homelessness in the 1980s. But now at age 73, he is releasing a new album.  

Donald Fagen's Revue Redo

Steely Dan frontman hits the road with pals for the Dukes of September Rhythm Revue

1 Comment · Friday, September 3, 2010
As a student of musical history, Steely Dan's Donald Fagen knows that during the Great Depression musical revues were a popular form of live entertainment. So does that mean the 'Dukes of September Rhythm Revue,' coming to PNC Pavilion Sept. 10 and featuring Fagen, Boz Scaggs and Michael McDonald, was launched in response to the ongoing Great Recession? "No, but it occurs to me that sometimes these things happen on an unconscious level," Fagen says.  

She Blinded Me With Scientists

Brooklyn trio looks to increase its American audience

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 1, 2010
Dichotomy looms so large for We Are Scientists that it's almost a provisional member. They're a California band that's lived in New York for nearly a decade. The members are inveterate smartasses in interviews and between songs on stage, although their finely honed sense of humor rarely comes through in the music in any obvious way (like, say, They Might Be Giants).  

Fall Arts Preview: Classical Music

Jarvi bids CSO farewell, plus tons of chamber music

0 Comments · Wednesday, September 1, 2010
Orchestras all over the world are still playing music from the 16th century; if The Beatles are being cited as an influence in 2310, that will be a good indication of Rock's timelessness. In the meantime, there's plenty of centuries-old (and newer) music coming this fall, starting with the world-renowned Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, in its final season under Maestro Paavo Jarvi.  

Jeff Daniels: Strum & Strummer

A-list actor uses musical talents to raise funds for his small-town theater

0 Comments · Monday, August 23, 2010
An elephant will be in the room Thursday when Jeff Daniels, the singer, songwriter and guitarist, performs at the Southgate House. That elephant is the simultaneous presence of Jeff Daniels, the acclaimed actor in such movies as Terms of Endearment, The Squid and the Whale, The Purple Rose of Cairo and Dumb & Dumber. Daniels, the musician, doesn’t try to pretend that his “other” career doesn’t exist. He performs Thursday at the Southgate House.